NMF Roundup: San Holo reveals new single, JOYRYDE returns with ‘IM GONE,’ Vincent releases debut EP + more

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NMF Roundup: San Holo reveals new single, JOYRYDE returns with ‘IM GONE,’ Vincent releases debut EP + moreSan Holo Freddy Mercury Stance Goldrush Rukes

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Feed Me has at last revealed the full extent of his High Street Creeps LP, which kicks off with otherworldly “Perfect Blue.” JOYRYDE returns after “AGEN WIDA” with his first tune of 2019, “IM GONE,” and San Holo picks up his guitar in his new single, “Lead Me Back.” Afrojack and Chasner have unveiled their energy-filled remix of David Guetta, Bebe Rexha and J Balvin‘s “Say My Name,” and Party Favor and graves transport listeners to a festival main stage on “Reach For Me.” Vincent‘s debut EP officially hits the airwaves today, featuring heartfelt tracks like “Can’t Help Myself” with Pauline Herr. Manila Killa returns with his seven-track 1993 EP on Moving Castle, and The Knocks celebrate the end of the week on their new “block party mix” of Blu DeTiger‘s “In My Head.” It’s been almost a year, but RAM Records king Andy C has resurfaced to bring the world “Till Dawn,” a drum & bass number that’s simultaneously funky and intense. Vicetone‘s four-track Elements EP has arrived on Monstercat, featuring songs like “Home.” David Guetta dons his Jack Back moniker for a new Toolroom Records release with Cevin Fisher, “2000 Freaks Come Out,” and Louis Futon reveals his full 14-track LP, Way Back When. In an interesting turn of events, NGHTMRE, Shaquille O’Neal, and Lil Jon share a byline on their new single, “BANG,” and Diplo flexes on a new body of work, Europa, on Mad Decent.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Rukes

Saturday Night Session 008: Vicetone talks about their custom built studio home and how their love for technology has impacted their creative output

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Saturday Night Session 008: Vicetone talks about their custom built studio home and how their love for technology has impacted their creative outputRutger Prins Vicetone

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Dutch duo Vicetone is known for their quintessential feel good sound that has been inducing nothing short of euphoria over the past seven years. Friends turned music producers Ruben den Boer and Victor Pool quickly started gaining momentum in 2012 after signing to Monstercat, and later joining as support for Nicky Romero‘s Nothing Toulouse: North American Tour. Their career ascension fortuitously coincided with the peak of the progressive house era, and from there, Vicetone has become a poster-child for the genre.

Despite their lengthy career, Den Boer and Pool have mainly stuck to releasing singles and remixes as opposed to full length albums. They are set to release their second EP this spring, titled Elements, and it is the follow up from their previous EP release in 2016, Aurora. Elements will be the first creation to come out of their brand new studio compound in Nashville that is described as, ‘a home custom-built to maximize their creative output with a state-of-the-art space housing two separate studios.”

The duo spoke about their creative process, and how having two separate studio spaces has greatly heightened their efficiency and output, saying, “we have two studios on separate floors that are connected with a very fast server. We can sync up all our projects, samples, and presets. The great thing is that we’re a short walk from each other, so we work together in the same studio a lot, but still have the opportunity to work on different tracks at the same time.” They continue, “When a track has been completely arranged, and we have all the sounds picked out as well, we usually start the mixdown process, which is often easier done solo as it’s more technical than creative. The fact that we can work together in a studio and 10 seconds later work in two studios separately speeds up our workflow a lot.” Their state of the art studio spaces have also been able to fulfill another hobby of the friends, which is translating their love of technology into custom built PCs created specifically to maximize their production abilities with Ableton.

Vicetone explains, “We love all things technology. We love video games as well – we have all modern consoles and a sweet gaming rig as well. Fun fact: we hand-build all our computers, including our studio computers, which are completely overkill, but it allows us to run the biggest projects in Ableton without lag.” Fans will now get to hear the creative output of their brand new studio set up with Elements. The first release from the EP was “Something Strange” featuring Haley Reinhart, and Vicetone’s Saturday Night Session includes brand new release, “Fences.” The track is a subtle melody that features guitar as the leading instrumental element that provides the perfect sonic juxtaposition with the bouncy drop.

 

 

When speaking to what their Saturday Night Session mix will get listeners’ ready for, the duo exclaims, “If you want to go out, our mix will get you energized. If you want to stay in and watch Netflix documentaries about the cosmos, this mix will get you in the right mood.” The versatile mix is certainly fitting for any night the listener wishes to have, and it’s the perfect sneak peak into what is to come from EP, Elements.

 

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To each of you- what is the favorite song you have ever released of all time?
Ruben: It’s really hard to say. It’s almost like picking your favorite kid as a parent. If I had to choose, I’d say “Nevada.” It was a complicated track for us to mix right, but a very rewarding and fun experience. I still love playing it out to this day and get a fuzzy feeling.
Victor: Our “Sparks” remix was the first song of ours to ever be played on the radio. That was a huge moment for us in our career, and I still remember it very fondly – it’s a special track for us for that reason.

I read that you have a state of the art space in Nashville that you produced your new EP
Elements in, and within this space, you each have your own studio. Can you tell us a little more about your creative process- and how you work together?
We have two studios on separate floors that are connected with a very fast server. We can sync up all our projects, samples, and presets. The great thing is that we’re a short walk from each other, so we work together in the same studio a lot, but still have the opportunity to work on different tracks at the same time. When a track has been completely arranged, and we have all the sounds picked out as well, we usually start the mixdown process, which is often easier done solo as it’s more technical than creative. The fact that we can work together in a studio and 10 seconds later work in two studios separately speeds up our workflow a lot.

The last EP you released was Aurora in 2016. What can fans expect from the new EP Elements? How has your music evolved?
We still love how the Aurora EP turned out, but we both feel that this EP is stronger and catchier compared to Aurora. It’s hard to put into words how we have evolved – this is something our listeners should comment on – but we feel our sound is improving every year. The goal of Elements was to showcase multiple facets of the Vicetone sound, while still keeping the melodic and energetic core the same. There should be a track for just about every type of Vicetone fan out there on this project. We’re really excited to hear the feedback on the different songs on there.

When you both started producing together, did you ever imagine you would have ended up here?
We always dreamt of this lifestyle and dreamt of doing music full-time, but it always felt like a pipe dream. Slowly realizing that this was actually happening for us was extremely exciting. We really feel this is what we’re meant to be doing, so we’re lucky to have this job.

What is your favorite club and favorite festival respectively to play at?
Very hard to choose. We’d say New City Gas is our favorite music venue as far as indoors goes. It is an amazing venue, and it has even more amazing crowds. Montreal is really special for us! As for festivals, it’s hard to pick a favorite. They’re all great and unique in their different
ways. We loved playing Ultra, Tomorrowland, Escapade, Electric Love, Amsterdam Music Festival, the list goes on!

Given you have made a career out of creating music for raves… do you ever actually go to clubs/raves yourselves anymore? When is the last time you went to enjoy the music as a spectator and not a performer?
We got to experience going out to raves during our early years. We used to stay at raves until the early hours of the morning, till 6am, and take a train ride back home for 2 hours. These days we get a lot more enjoyment out of playing our own livesets. Nothing really beats that feeling for us. So we don’t go to raves in the same way as we used to, but we were very big on raves before we started creating our own music.

What are your hobbies outside of music?
We love all things technology. We love video games as well – we have all modern consoles and a sweet gaming rig as well. Fun fact: we hand-build all our computers, including our studio computers, which are completely overkill, but it allows us to run the biggest projects in Ableton without lag. And recently we’ve brushed up our cooking skills as well – it’s a nice break from being in the studio all day.

Worst thing about this career? Best thing?
Best thing is doing what you love the most and getting paid for it. Our work is our hobby – it doesn’t get any better than that. Our least favorite thing is probably not seeing our family and friends as often as we’d like.

What kind of a Saturday night is this mix getting our listeners’ ready for?

Whatever they want. If you want to go out, our mix will get you energized. If you want to stay in and watch Netflix documentaries about the cosmos, this mix will get you in the right mood.

NMF Roundup: Skrillex and Hikaru Utada take on Kingdom Hearts III, Zeds Dead and Delta Heavy team up, Gorgon City unveil ‘Lick Shot’ + more

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NMF Roundup: Skrillex and Hikaru Utada take on Kingdom Hearts III, Zeds Dead and Delta Heavy team up, Gorgon City unveil ‘Lick Shot’ + moreSkrille Superjam Bonarroo Live

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Skrillex and Hikaru Utada kick off some of the most prominent of NMF releases with the heavenly “Face My Fears” from Kingdom Hearts III. Also leading the charge are Zeds Dead and Delta Heavy with a powerful drum & bass collaboration, “Life You Up.” Sofi Tukker and ZHU have delivered the sultry “Mi Rumba,” and Gorgon City bring the heat with a feisty new original, “Lick Shot.” Sam Feldt and Kate Ryan dive into their feelings in “Gold,” and Slushii dreams of warmer days with the tropical “Never Let You Go.” 13 summons a storm on the formidable “Uppercut,” and Above & Beyond are “Flying By Candlelight” in their new collab with Marty Longstaff. Lost Kings continue their slew of releases with “FU4E,” and Xan Griffin delivers his first release since his September Self-Discovery album. Peking Duk sprinkle some sweetness in their new original with Jack River, “Sugar,” and Richard Durand puts his intense spin on Armin van Buuren‘s “Wild Wild Son.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Saturday Night Session 006: Morgan Page takes listeners on a sonic journey through 2018 and talks remaining true to his roots with his weekly radio show

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Saturday Night Session 006: Morgan Page takes listeners on a sonic journey through 2018 and talks remaining true to his roots with his weekly radio showMorgan Page

Mainstay Morgan Page kicked his career off with Grammy nominated “The Longest Road,” and he hasn’t looked back since. He has become known for euphoria inducing tracks with polarizing vocals, and this sets his music apart from formulaic commercial crossover tracks. He has managed to achieve this while retaining the ability to create singles that work for radio play and live performance alike.

2018 has been a big year for the producer, both personally and professionally. Page had a new addition to his family, daughter Bea. He also switched over to Armada Music exclusively, where he released a three track EP, Born to Fly. It is also the ten year anniversary of “The Longest Road,” so to celebrate, artists ranging from Vicetone to Steff Da Campo put their on spin on the original to celebrate.

In addition to his original releases, Page has been producing his own radio show for years, In The Air, which was named after his 2012 13-track album. He is on his 446th episode of the radio show series, and he spoke exclusively with Dancing Astronaut on what the series means to him, and how it has evolved over the years. Page says, “I can hardly believe it’s already been over 8 years of doing a mixshow. It started as a podcast only, and morphed into a weekly Sirius XM slot and globally syndicated show. Radio has always been in my blood, so it’s an honor to keep doing the show, and presenting my favorite music every week.”

Episode 446 takes the listener through some of the biggest hits coming out of 2018 with everything from FISHER‘s “Losing It” to Axwell and Ingrosso‘s “Dreamer.” The one unifying theme of the mix is that it is the perfect track to get a Saturday Night going thanks to its upbeat energy and the infectious collection of releases.

 

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]

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Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Press Shot 2 Morgan Page

Being a touring DJ for over ten years is like being a professional football player at the age of 40. Most people can’t sustain the career for more than a few years, so for those who hit the 10, 15, and 20-year marks, they are often revered as the anomalies of the industry. The DJs and producers who have successfully it through the commercialization of the field are few in number, though Morgan Page is certainly among that class, building a decorated career on the key ingredient that dozens of others have failed to master — consistency. His journey has seen fair ups and downs, but since his breakthrough release “The Longest Road,” in 2008, the Vermont-native EDM mainstay has managed to remain relevant amid electronic music’s rapid global boom. He continues to release a steady output, and as a result, manages a brimming itinerary of shows at some of the top venues and festivals around the world year over year. Morgan Page recently sat down with Dancing Astronaut to look back on the last decade of non-stop touring action.

A Grammy-nominated producer, Page is the first to admit his career has not been free of strains. Page says he recognizes he is where he is today because he has not been afraid to reach for that he most desires. In fact, he attributes his Grammy nomination to his own self-cultivated initiative, explaining,

“I got [myself] my Grammy nomination. I submitted it myself; the label did not submit it. You have to take things into your own hands.”

While a Grammy nomination is no small feat, it is his personal life that has brought what he considers “his greatest collaboration yet,” to fruition. Not a song or sold-out tour, but his now-four-month-old daughter, Bea. Page spent years persevering his way to the innermost holdings of the industry, and countless more working to steady that spotlight — to stay relevant. However, Page says having a daughter has reconfigured his entire outlook.

Page says all the toiling and tumult behind him are most gratifying in that they have laid out immeasurable opportunity for his daughter. While he has resolved not to be a “stage dad,” he is optimistic that raising her in a musical environment will prove worthwhile.

“I’m going to do a lot to encourage her to do music. She can do whatever she wants, but I am going to encourage her not to settle for a realistic job. I’m definitely going to raise her my style. I just think it’s a very unique situation to have a kid in these times. There is this great studio right downstairs. Why not use it?”

Unsurprisingly, Page says his memories of walking his daughter down to his private studio are among his fondest to date, rivaled only by the experience of introducing her to his own music. In addition to growing up with state-of-the-art equipment just a stone’s throw from her bedroom, Bea will also have access to her father: a model of resolve and improbable success, as well as a wealth of industry knowledge.

Page speaks about his path to becoming an artist in a revelatory lens, bringing a formerly untapped dimension to his career retrospection. It’s both hope and hindsight that had yet to surface when Dancing Astronaut sat down with him a year ago. At that time Page did not know he would soon become a father. His reflections now posit his own efforts to secure success beside hypothetical musings of his daughter’s chances at a similar undertaking.

“It’s such an unlikely career, but I want to make sure it is possible. I never expected to make a living. I was never the resident DJ, and I was never given those opportunities. No one was like, ‘hey do you want to play in Avalon in Boston and see how it goes?’ No one gave me the time of day,” reflects the “Against the World” producer.

As an artist who has amassed a fiercely loyal following over the last decade, signed to an international label, that has managed to deliver a continuous output of music, Page is among an elite breed of industry players who have learned to navigate the circuitous industry staircase. He is not reluctant in the least to speak on the near impossible feat of attempting to make a living in this space without help from the record labels and management companies. Page asserted that of all the dizzying idiosyncrasies at work in the music business, the most complicated mechanisms at work here are humans. “I think human dynamics are harder than anything,” admits Page — an interesting acknowledgement from a career entertainer.

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Morgan Page Live

Human dynamics are the most challenging part of collaborations, Page shares. Two well-known artists co-producing music isn’t always (or even frequently) born out of a happenstance encounter or coming to an agreement upon one party’s first inquiry; there are often other forces at work. Creating the music itself together, he says, can be the easiest part of the entire process. Management usually has their own ideas about how collaborations will come to life.

“If artists actually worked with one another it would be so much more simple. [With] management, it’s all a block because they are like, well my artist is worth ‘x,’ and then it’s a counter of what the other manager is saying their artist is worth. I think the hard part about collaborating is usually who stands in the way when two artists genuinely want to work together because the management will get into an over-protective ego war.”

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Morgan Page Strut

The dance music industry may flaunt a lustrous exterior, but the behind the scenes, interactions are not always so resplendent. According to Page, artists often find themselves at a standstill while their teams go to war about what point font he or she is on a lineup. When it comes to a collaboration itself, the collaborators don’t even always get to sit in a studio and work together. Co-productions are also susceptible to dizzying artist schedules and personal preference.

“My collaboration with Swanky Tunes was fine, for example, because there was only one person I was dealing with. But it’s difficult. Everyone is touring. You don’t hear back for a month, and if you don’t hear back, either someone doesn’t like [the music] or they are busy,” recalls Page.

Page’s recent song with Swanky Tunes is a diversion from Page’s typically melodic style, and showcases how working with new producers can push an artist’s personal boundaries. The collaboration is an example of the shift of his personal interests when it comes to what satiates him sonically. He has been focusing on outreach with fellow producers, mentoring younger artists, and even returning to remixes, which Page admits he distanced himself from for a while.

“Some of the remixes are so off the mark, and from good producers too. The dynamic has changed a lot now where I think people don’t want to do remixes because stuff gets denied or things are done on speck. People will hire emerging names, and many are like, well unless it’s Rihanna and I’m getting $10 grand, people are so finicky. I’m like, it doesn’t matter, and I will go find an emerging name while I’m playing my radio show.

Not only is Page taking on remixes of his own again, like his reboot of Elephante’s “Come Back for You” featuring Matluck, but he will be releasing a remix package for “The Longest Road” in honor of the iconic track’s tenth anniversary. The first The Longest Road EP features three remixes: a brand new take from Steff Da Campo, the 2012 bootleg remix from Vicetone now receiving its debut official release, and the song’s most famous edition, deadmau5‘ unforgettable 2008 remix.

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Screen Shot 2018 11 14 At 6.29.35 PM

While Page’s life remains in a constant state of flux both personally and professionally, he was immediately able to peg the catalytic record that catapulted him out of unnamed monotony, the fittingly named, “The Longest Road.” He stands firm that his daughter is by and large his greatest collaborative effort, but ascribes “The Longest Road” a close second. Like the electronic arena he knows and loves, Page’s priorities shift. His interests broaden. Yet, Page remains an unpredictable and immovable force in this inconstant arena.

Photo Credit: Morgan Page Instagram

Celebrate 10 Years Of Traveling Down ‘The Longest Road’

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It’s been 10 years since Morgan Page released one of his most memorable tracks, “The Longest Road”. Whether it’s the original or one of the many remixes; the stunning sounds of Lissie and catchy lyrics were what really made this track shine. In a recent Instagram post, Morgan Page described how the lyrics for the

The post Celebrate 10 Years Of Traveling Down ‘The Longest Road’ appeared first on EDM Sauce.

Celebrate 10 Years Of Traveling Down ‘The Longest Road’

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It’s been 10 years since Morgan Page released one of his most memorable tracks, “The Longest Road”. Whether it’s the original or one of the many remixes; the stunning sounds of Lissie and catchy lyrics were what really made this track shine. In a recent Instagram post, Morgan Page described how the lyrics for the

The post Celebrate 10 Years Of Traveling Down ‘The Longest Road’ appeared first on EDM Sauce.

Lunar Lunes: Hermitude brings blissful beats, Protostar and Muzzy captivate in new collab, DROELOE and Sem ‘face the sea’ together + more

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Lunar Lunes: Hermitude brings blissful beats, Protostar and Muzzy captivate in new collab, DROELOE and Sem ‘face the sea’ together + moreLunar Lunes E1540831560592

Each week, New Music Friday sweeps through with torrential force, showering streaming platforms with immeasurable amounts of new tunes. Just like Dancing Astronaut rounds up 25 of the biggest songs of the week for the Hot 25 Spotify playlist each New Music Friday, Lunar Lunes will be a landing pad for SoundCloud users who want a whole new dose of tunes to kick off the work week.

This week’s selection of tunes includes new releases from Nora En Pure to TroyBoi to Morgan Page. Kicking off, Aussie duo Hermitude return for a blissful collaboration with Bibi Bourelly. Nora En Pure launches her Polynesia EP with a gorgeous song of the same name, and fellow beats queen WHIPPED CREAM goes from zero to 60 in “Bad For Me.” In “Facing the Sea,” DROELOE and Sem find themselves and “[acknowledge] that it’s going to be hard and that you’re going to struggle and that you should face those problems head-on.” Protostar and Muzzy hold nothing back on their new Monstercat drum & bass heater, “MELTDOWN.” Darude taps JVMIE for “Timeless,” a powerful trance number on Gareth Emery‘s Garuda.

The selection will be updated every Lunes (Monday).

Vicetone Drop Magical New Single In Tribute To Avicii

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Having previously racked up huge success with singles like ‘Nevada’ (40 million Spotify streams) and ‘Astronomia’ (36 million Spotify streams), Dutch duo Vicetone is back, this time unveiling the sweet and sumptuous melodies of ‘South Beach.’ Soaked in their signature progressive house sound, packed with rich chord patterns, and vibrant hooks, ‘South Beach’ is as

The post Vicetone Drop Magical New Single In Tribute To Avicii appeared first on EDM Sauce.

New Music Friday featuring Marshmello, The Chainsmokers remixes and more

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Music festival

The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.


Marshmello got back to his EDM roots in a brand new single with serene vocals from Leah Culver.

Indie duo Salt Cathedral test poppier waters with their tropical-infused single “No Love.”

Luca Schreiner offered a welcome twist on hip-hop auteur TYLERxCORDY’s viral track “Cheap Situation.”

Patrick Baker serves lush instrumentation and chill vibes on his latest EP, Dusk, courtesy of Armada


KSHMR gets funky on this bass-heavy disco noir number via his side project, The MVI.

Vicetone take it way back on their newest release, a high energy EDM track with Cozi Zuehlsdorff.

It’s hard to pick out the best re-spin from The Chainsmoker‘s newest remix package for their pop-punk crossover single “You Owe Me.”

Borgeous taps into classic electro melodies on his infectious new release — his first as a Casablanca Records signee.

Bingo Players and Goshfather team up for a high energy collab on new single “Everybody.”

Dannic‘s latest via Spinnin’ will have dance floors heating through festival season with its minimal structure and infectious drop.

Graves gets moody on a textured, future-bass inspired new release, a collab with bitbird cohort Duskus.

Klingande‘s collaboration with vocalist Krishane channels late tropical EDM vibes with a pitched up vocal and blissed out tribal-influenced instrumentation.

Hot Chip put their virtuosic twist on Troye Sivan‘s “My My My!” with this nuanced and funky house flip.

Sahar Z & Vic F provide a lush, ethereal progressive contribution to Anjunadeep’s fifth Explorations edition.

Swedish veteran Zoo Brazil makes his LNOE debut, closing out his EP with an entrancing, yet gritty “Socialism.”

Rebelski channels nostalgia and gentle meditation with this sentimental piece from his new ADID EP.

TWO LANES target the brain’s feel-good center with a euphoric future bass cut packed with jubilant guitar riffs and a satisfying drop.