Tyler, the Creator gets jazzy on two new latest singles

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Tyler, the Creator gets jazzy on two new latest singlesTyler The Creator Asap Rocky

Let’s face it, Tyler, the Creator is suaver than most of us will ever be.

Every day, the rapper reveals small subtleties about himself that set him apart from the pack, like how just this weekend he re-opened the Los Angeles Golf Wang store, all designed by Tyler himself, how he likes driving fast cars, or how his two latest tracks are spaced-out jazz gems.

Just this week, Tyler released a new song called “PUFF,” an instrumental driving cut that reimagines Tyler’s Cherry Bomb track “Blow My Load.” “PUFF” is one of the lightest reworks Tyler’s shared with fans to date — at least it was until Tyler followed up on the track just two hours later with his most mellow song yet.

“BUCKET” is just the latest loosie from the artist, and follows a long string of tracks that include “435,” “GELATO,” “PEACH FUZZ,” “QUARTZ,” and a few remixes.



Photo credit: Matthieu Venot

Tyler, the Creator serves up another spicy new freestyle, this time rapping over Drake & Lil Baby’s ‘Yes Indeed’

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Tyler, the Creator serves up another spicy new freestyle, this time rapping over Drake & Lil Baby’s ‘Yes Indeed’Tyler The Creator

Tyler, The Creator isn’t showing any signs of stopping the consistent stream of remixes he’s been dropping this summer.

He’s just shared “BRONCO,” which is his own smooth new take on Drake and Lil Baby’s Harder Than Ever single “Yes Indeed.” Tyler raps a mile minute on “BRONCO,” managing to fit in references to Ludacris, Busta Rhymes, Stevie Wonder and his cars in just 57 seconds.

“BRONCO” comes after Tyler’s recently shared remixes of songs from Prophet, Jacquees, and his own take on “Kids See Ghosts.”

Tyler, the Creator flexes his freestyle skills on new track, ‘Gelato’

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Tyler, the Creator flexes his freestyle skills on new track, ‘Gelato’GettyImages 946443032 1529953631

Tyler, The Creator’s non-stop.

The rapper and singer continues to release loosies and freestyles one after the other since he premiered his last album, Flower Boy, mid-last year. Now, following his more recent take on Ye’s “Kids See Ghosts” Tyler’s dropped “Gelato.”

The latest track’s a new freestyle that uses Cash Money Records’ singer-songwriter Jacquees’ “No Validation” from the artist’s recent 4275 album. “Gelato” sees Tyler in his usual form — rapping and making quippy comments over a smooth beat about his affinity for fast cars, romance without borders,  Timothée Chalamet — this time in reference to Call Me By Your Name — and even That’s So Raven.

Photo Credit: Kevin Winter for Coachella Getty Images

Tyler, the Creator freestyles over Kanye and Kid Cudi’s ‘Kids See Ghosts’ on new ‘CRUST IN THEIR EYES’

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Tyler, the Creator‘s on a roll, having been sharing outtakes for the better part of the last year from his Flower Boy recording sesh, and sprees that have followed since, left and right, pretty much since his critically acclaimed album dropped. His latest is in coincidence with a month of G.O.O.D Music Fridays, as he’s shared a new version of Kanye West and Kid Cudi‘s recent Kids See Ghost album title track, dubbing the new version “CRUST IN THEIR EYES.”

Tyler took to Twitter to share how the track from his friend and colleague, Ye, came to be before sharing, revealing he made it in just one hour:

With the same passionate and self-aware MO that listeners have come to associate with the rapper over the last few years, the former Odd Future proponent comes through as characteristically clever and collected on his “CRUST IN THEIR EYES,” remix, doing his peers’ work considerable justice — with less than an hour of his creative attention.

 

We can’t stop listen to Tyler, the Creator’s hot new one-take track, ‘435’

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Tyler, the Creator is keen on surprises. He’s dropped off a steady stream of one-offs since his deeply personal Flower Boy LP last year, and now, “because why not,” he’s followed a string of tweets with another new one-off track and in-studio video.

“435” samples Saint Etienne’s “4:35 In The Morning” and was recorded while Tyler was on tour in Philadelphia. Albeit brief, clocking in under two minutes, it’s another indication of just how versatile the former Odd Future rapper really is. He’s since claimed that’s it not “an indication of how future things will sound.”

Recently, in a cover story with Complex ahead of his new album, A$AP Rocky claimed that Tyler has already been working on the follow-up to Flower Boy, explaining, “Tyler’s new shit is crazy. I’m not even lying, honestly, sonically he challenged himself in a different way,” he says. “It’s not even like Flower Boy. His next album is a new wave.”

Tyler, the Creator, Kali Uchis, Bootsy Collins, & BadBadNotGood join forces on smooth new track

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Colombian-born R&B singer-songwriter Kali Uchis has tapped Tyler, the Creator, funk maestro Bootsy Collins, and eclectic jazz outfit BadBadNotGood for her diversified new song, “After the Storm.”

Uchis is preparing to release her debut album this spring via Interscope/Virgin Records, of which this track will be a part of. “After the Storm” is not the first time Uchis and Tyler have worked together on a track, but its funky-melodrama is significantly more prominent than past collaborations “Aunt Wang Syrup Theme Song” or “PERFECT.” “If you need a hero / Just look in the mirror,” Kali sings, while Bootsy ad-libs for affective touch.

“We can find solace in the fact that we have to go through the bad stuff to truly get to the good,” Uchis said of “After the Storm” in a press statement. “Just because you’re losing at the moment doesn’t mean you’ve lost yet. The storm may be scary now but it’s how your flowers bloom later, and paradise is just beyond the rainbow.”

 

 

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How Houston’s Day For Night festival served as a sound intersection of curatorial excellence

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How Day For Night festival achieved curatorial excellence

Houston, Texas’ Day For Night festival has established itself as an unconventional, hyper-sensory utopia. Bolstering an exemplary menu of avant-garde talent, the festival satiates thousands all while blurring the boundaries of performance and offering the utmost in aural phenomena in its industrial warehouse setting.

Day For Night prided itself on its snapshot booking in its third year, by and for the experimentally-inclined. Enlisting artists like Nina Kraviz, Kaytranada, Justice, Jlin, Jamie xx, Mount Kimbie, Solange, REZZNine Inch NailsTyler, the Creator, and Thom Yorke, among others, the gathering has situated itself as an unorthodox standout from an at times mundane, and largely counterfeit American festival circuit.

Words by Grace Fleisher Featured image courtesy of Theo Civitello

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In its immersively emblematic nature, Day For Night’s third edition was a polyamorous union of music, culture, and digital art. It was a multifarious destination, and offered its attendees a mode of escapism while simultaneously defying how they explored their own, as well as others’ relationships with art and reality.

Those who attended were immersed in an epicenter of capitalism’s desolation, i.e the former Barbara Jordan Post Office, only to enter a sprawling industrial wonderland; complete with capacious lasers, fog machines, and immersive visual art open to infinite interpretations. Despite its growing pains, Day For Night was an unparalleled destination in the American festival circuit, protruding the landscape with its singularity in 2017, as it likely will in years to come, too.

Photo Credit: Katrina Barber

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Embracement of Reflection: Houston & Beyond

It would be naive to ignore how Houston’s rampantly evolving cultural and developmental environment shaped Day For Night. A look at almost any sect of the city points to hyper-gentrification and a lack of zoning restrictions that are rendering a city of cultural depth increasingly unrecognizable. Festivals have the potential to be the 21st-century’s greatest linking apparatus, and Day For Night embraced multiple methods of coupling reflection in an immensely immersive fashion. Summits delved into socio-political discourse by way of Laurie Anderson, Chelsea Manning, Pussy Riot’s Nadya Tolokonnikova, and more. The gathering challenged its attendees toward an attainment of outward-awareness.

Photo Credit: Charles Reagan Hackleman

 

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Woven into the very seams of artistic discourse at Day For Night was a thread on how the world’s 24-hour loops and radical advances in technology and communication are seamlessly moving faster than behavioral evolution, rendering many helpless in the interim. In a hyper-connected sect of the world, it’s ironically never been easier for one to feel helpless. Day For Night ruminated on how these very advancements can work to foster connections and discoveries in the world which will propel us further as a collective entity.

Photo Credit: Chad Wadsworth

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Post HTX Served As A Model Venue

“The way one sees things, and the expectations one brings to a performance, or any art form, really, is completely determined by the venue,” articulated David Byrne of the seminal group, The Talking Heads.

This phenomenon of a concert space shaping context, and in turn, enjoyment, is explored in Byrne’s book How Music Works. Surely, the way in which performances are perceived en masse is in relation to the space they’re experienced in. At times this is an obvious element. Take the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, for example. Burning Man’s sustenance relies on the desert space it resides in, and while this may be an extreme example, space is becoming a deeply entwined element in the worldwide festival circuit. The relationship between attendees and venues is why scenes blossom, and it’s why destination festivals are becoming increasingly popular.

Photo Credit: Sara Marjorie Strick

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Day For Night’s decision to place a hyper-sensorial paradise across four stages in a dimly lit, abandoned post office was a masterful one. Ironically, the nucleus of the performance venue were the veins of the warehouse, many of which contained captivating art installations. Unlit hallways that separated the “blue” stage from the intimately circular “yellow” stage, for example, beckoned an art form in themselves. For in these empty spaces, attendees prepared to ascend into visual or aural titillation. Whether it be disco balls adorned from a ceiling in netting, illuminating an entire room, moving mechanical cranes paired to ominous music, or synced screens around a ground level stage, the once-vacant warehouse was flooded with an innate intertwinement of senses.

Photo Credit: Theo Civitello

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Exemplary Curatorial Intent

A festival’s success begins in its curatorial intent. Founded in 2015 by the Free Press Houston and the New York-based creative agency Work-Order, Day for Night established itself as a visually immersive music and art festival from the very beginning. By embedding an exploration of the elements of light, space, and sound in its mission, Day For Night has transformed the festival landscape by combining new media art with envelope-pushing musicians. It may still be a young festival, but its surely created a unique experience. Day For Night’s careful selection of artistry and curatorial intent spoke to several sects of music, tech, and art lovers. Planning such a feat does not come without intent or without a deeply embedded audience understanding, though.

Photo Credit: Katrina Barber

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Appealing to the experimentally-inclined, for example, Day For Night brought forth Nina Kraviz, who’s on the heels of a momentous 2017, and largely regarded as a queen of techno. The festival also booked her трип (or Trip) labelmate Bjarki. Jlin, who’s set ironically rivaled her longtime purveyor Aphex Twin‘s 2016 DFN appearance, was also a standout experimental act. Her album, Black Origami, was an exemplary experimental record of the past year. Additionally, artists like Forest Swords, Jenny Hval, Shlomo, and Roni Size, all capitalized on the use of live sets as a medium for either outward, emotive release or social commentary.

Photo Credit: Julian Bajsel

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Day For Night also booked standout artists like the esteemed Nine Inch Nails, who’ve been touring their immensely accessible EP Add Violence. Solange stunned in her Houston homecoming, merging art and popular culture with an affirming image of black pride and femininity.  Cardi B gave the 12-minute performance of the year, encapsulating a tumultuous 2017 with her ominous hit “Bodak Yellow.”  Tyler, The Creator gave a fervent performance which was brimming with tracks off his introspective new work Flower Boy. Pussy Riot, Pretty Lights, Justice, and REZZ — with her exceptional Mass Manipulation tour visuals — all expectedly stunned.

Day For Night displayed a keen understanding of the experimentally inclined, but also served as an apt pop culture gathering.In bringing together artists who continue to challenge the status quo, the festival’s curational intent was two-fold — displayed initially by the festival, and then, by each and every artist that performed.

Photo Credit: Ismael Quintanilla

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Embedding a Festival Framework for the Future

As more and more festivals continue to emerge on the American festival circuit, immersive affairs such as Day For Night will continue to be a saving grace. It’s one thing to have an exemplary understanding of an audience, but as festival-goers grow into an increasingly digitized world, a means of facilitating connection through art and performance will be needed more than ever. Day For Night blurred the lines between its attendees and artists, it’s an environment where everyone was on an even playing field, as an observer, student of performance, and the outside world itself.

Photo Credit: Sara Marjorie Strick

Top 30 Albums of 2017

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Gathering our favorite albums of the year is always such a challenge. 2017 was a year where our society may have taken a few steps backwards – exclusionary politics threatened personal freedoms and made some of us feel unwelcome within our own homes. It was 2017’s music – a combination of bright newcomers and longtime favorites – that kept us going forward. Moses Sumney made his eclectic debut with Aromanticism, a genre-defying collection of strummed guitars, twisting synth lines and buzzing harmonies. St. Vincent reworked her labyrinthine tendencies into chrome-clad future pop and Julien Baker exposed the darkest shadows of her psyche to give us all appreciation for every beam of light. Meanwhile, Kendrick Lamar and Bjork invited us into their unique and awe-inspiring worlds. 

And though this pursuit was a challenge, looking back on this year’s music has been quite therapeutic for us. The Wild Honey Pie has come together to list the albums that allowed us to escape to places where each one of us felt welcome and understood. There’s no theme to this year’s list, but our top albums do have one thing in common: in their own special way, each of these artists broke down boundaries to remind us that we are all more similar than we might think.

We’d like to invite you into some of these places, where we hope you’ll feel welcome, too. These are our favorite albums of 2017.

Playlist

30. (Sandy) Alex G – Rocket

29. Tyler, The Creator – Flower Boy

28. Jessie Ware – Glasshouse

27. Priests – Nothing Feels Natural

26. Jay Som – Everybody Works

25. Ryan Adams – Prisoner

24. Perfume Genius – No Shape

23. Slowdive – Slowdive

22. King Krule – The OOZ

21. Sylvan Esso – What Now

20. LCD Soundsystem – American Dream

19. Julie Byrne – Not Even Happiness

18. Vagabon – Infinite Worlds

17. Vince Staples – Big Fish Theory

16. Henry Jamison – The Wilds

 

15. Fleet Foxes – Crack-Up

14. HAIM – Something To Tell You

13. alt-J – Relaxer

12. SZA – Ctrl

11. Cigarettes After Sex – Cigarettes After Sex


10. Mount Eerie – A Crow Looked at Me


Phil Elverum of Mount Eerie recently lost his wife, fellow musician and comic-book artist Geneviève Castrée, to a heartbreaking battle with cancer. This concept album is dedicated to her, and does not shy away from painful details of their story. A Crow Looked at Me is not just about the way sickness and death infiltrate life, but it is an exploration of what it means to carry on. Elverum says, “there is an echo of Geneviève that still rings, a reminder of the love and infinity beneath all of this obliteration.” This album so beautifully captures that echo.

9. Overcoats – YOUNG

Young is a folk-pop testament to friendship, built from the tightly wound voices of Hana and JJ, and fortified in their dancy and electronic production. This album is about what happens when an unhealthy relationship slowly eats away at who you are. Hana and JJ show us that in friendship and harmony, we can find ourselves again and help to build each other back up. Watching these two grow has been an honor for us, whether they were performing in front of a campfire at our very own Welcome Campers or embracing each other on stage in front of a sold-out audience at Bowery Ballroom.

8. Kendrick Lamar – DAMN.

Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN. is a statement piece — an effort that not only showcases the rapper’s immense talent for spitting rhymes that tackle complex social issues, but one that also sets aside Lamar from his contemporaries as a brave voice never lacking honesty in its approach. DAMN. is as bombastic as lead single “HUMBLE.”, as tightly coiled and cutting in meaning as standout track “DNA.” and as expansive as its collaborations with Rihanna, Zacari and U2 might suggest. DAMN. is a much-needed, explosive force, as conspicuous and unabashed as the caps lock and requisite punctuation of its title.   

7. Julien Baker – Turn Out the Lights

This album by Julien Baker is a special one. Baker so candidly shares stories of addiction and what it means to be truly consumed in darkness. However, as she brings us into this place, she infuses it with beauty and grace, delivering so many chilling moments of release. She does not sugar-coat the repeated moments of pain and disappointment, but she does find hope within them, belting out her words so powerfully as if they themselves contain the source of the light (and maybe they do). This album has meant so much to us and I’m sure it has to so many others as well. 

6. St. Vincent – MASSEDUCTION

Prefaced by the gently ridged heartbreak and teetering chords of “New York,” St. Vincent’s fifth studio album served as a concentrated break into pop music. Masseduction is a rollercoaster filled with twists and turns that allow Annie Clark to extend her repertoire — slipping into the role of abandoned lover, disco queen, enabler – all without sacrificing her love for rougher edges. Behind the iron-clad pop hooks lies an album full of complex emotional and social machinery, where Clark can convincingly rouse adrenaline-driven love, or evaporate the shadow of a lover between the swelling of a string orchestra and her own breath.  

5. Lorde – Melodrama

If any moment captures the tender heartbreak behind Melodrama best, it’s the exact midpoint of the album, where, in the midst of the outro to the first part of “Hard Feelings/Loveless,” the song kicks back into one last verse. “Three years loved you every single day, it made me weak…Now I’ll fake it every single day ‘till I don’t need fantasy, ‘til I feel you leave,” Lorde sings, as memories of the rush of first love well up involuntarily. Melodrama is about accepting these pieces as they come back to you, even when doing so is so difficult. The album serves as a beautifully constructed, often pained reminder that even after momentous loss, you are still whole.

4. Bjork – Utopia

It’s no surprise that Bjork made this list, as her innovation has essentially changed music forever. But what does “utopia” sound like for Bjork? This is an album of love songs, a romantic journal containing flutes, choirs and birds that elevate us beyond the reality that we know. She sings of paradise after healing, giving and receiving love unabashedly. She feels lighter here, which is reflected in the airy instrumentals. Bjork sings, “loss of love, we all have suffered / how we make up for it defines who we, who we are” a realization that seems to be the centerpiece of Utopia.

3. Phoebe Bridgers – Stranger In The Alps

Phoebe Bridgers is one of our favorite new artists of the year. Every song on this album feels like a late-night conversation with a trusted friend. Bridgers drops us directly into her world, tackling feelings of unexplainable sadness, friendship and death. Bridgers has a true gift for finding the right words and remaining brutally honest, transforming the mundane into the alluring, making a “stack of mail and a tall can” sound so profound. This album contains echoes of intimacy and morbidity, reminiscent of her emo/folk predecessors Elliot Smith and tourmate/collaborator Conor Oberst. Ultimately, this is an album that we have found so soothing, so inescapably truthful and so reflective of the times. 

2. Moses Sumney – Aromanticism

This debut LP from Moses Sumney stretches wide across space and time. Sumney transcends genre in Aromanticism, weaving together ambient synths, acoustic guitars and soulful melodies. The songs on this album take on many different forms – some just a few sentences spoken above a horn section and some with no lyrics at all, just winding melodies cradled in Sumney’s silky voice. Contrary to many of the albums on this list, this one is not about love but rather the lack thereof. Sumney writes in pure poetry about the relationship to the body and its role in romance and identity. He turns the body to liquid and wings to plastic, disassembling it until it becomes clear that we cannot be defined by our bodies, nor can we be defined by our relationships or our past. Aromanticism may be showing us that we are not meant to be defined at all, but rather, we are just meant to be.

1. Big Thief – Capacity

We chose Capacity as our number 1 album of the year because it is the one we’ve had on repeat since it came out, and it has personally meant the most to us this year. Big Thief continues to amaze us, whether it is the tactful and imagistic storytelling of Adrianne Lenker or the pure magic they create on stage, this band is truly hypnotizing, and Capacity is an excellent portrait of their strengths. I remember the first time I heard the lyrics “there are no enemies / we’re make-believing everything” from the title track. Capacity is a storybook containing several of these wisdom-filled moments. This record is imaginative, emotional and timeless, and we hold it very close to our hearts here at The Wild Honey Pie.

Check out Tyler, The Creator’s first ever NPR Tiny Desk concert

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2017 was arguably Tyler, the Creator’s biggest year yet. The OFWGKTA founder released his fourth studio album Flower Boy back in July to widespread critical acclaim. It saw Tyler hit lyrical stride at the peak of his career through a journey of introspective, self defining tracks.

Tyler, the Creator’s debut Tiny Desk performance was the first time NPR has held a nighttime performance, at the special request of Tyler’s team to light the room themselves.

Tyler and his bandmates perform bathed in a saturation of rich, self lit colors, “What’s your name?” Tyler asks a woman in the crowd. “Nana” she replies. Tyler then motions to his backing choir to sing along, “Nana in this motherfucker” they sing. It’s quite silly, but Tyler and his backing group sing with an impassioned fervor.

The group plays “Boredom,” “See you Again,” and “Glitter” across the twenty minute concert, all songs from Flower Boy. Tyler’s bandmates balance his nonchalant frontman presence with their earnest vocal hymns. Even when he’s joking, Tyler, the Creator seems to hit a soft spot in his audience.

 

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