Kali Uchis Announces Album, Plays Fallon With Tyler, The Creator

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Colombian-American singer Kali Uchis just officially announced her debut album, Isolation, and last night, she went on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon to perform the Tyler, The Creator/Bootsy Collins collab “After The Storm.” Although Collins wasn’t there, she was assisted onstage by Tyler and the Roots, singing and dancing in front of a … More »

Hip-Hop Is Evolving, And So Is Tyler, The Creator

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Tyler Gregory Okonma won the red carpet at this year’s Grammys — where his fifth and most recent studio album Flower Boy was nominated for Best Rap Album — donning a mixture of high fashion (a Louis Vuitton scarf) and his own fashion (custom Chuck Taylor High-Tops, a collaboration between … More »

The 5 Best Videos Of The Week

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I haven’t had a lot of time in my life for the new N.E.R.D. album, but I’ve got plenty for their videos and, even more, their recent TV performances. Without access to their boldfaced-name guest stars, N.E.R.D. have instead turned those performances into celebrations of dance, ceding their stages and TV slots to people who … More »

Kali Uchis – “After The Storm” (Feat. Tyler, The Creator & Bootsy Collins) Video

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Kali Uchis has shared a new video for “After The Storm,” the track she recently shared that features Tyler, The Creator and Bootsy Collins. It’s an immaculately directed clip by Nadia Lee Cohen that starts with Kali Uchis making a shopping list over breakfast that includes finding a lover and follows her to the … More »

Tyler, the Creator, Kali Uchis, Bootsy Collins, & BadBadNotGood join forces on smooth new track

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Colombian-born R&B singer-songwriter Kali Uchis has tapped Tyler, the Creator, funk maestro Bootsy Collins, and eclectic jazz outfit BadBadNotGood for her diversified new song, “After the Storm.”

Uchis is preparing to release her debut album this spring via Interscope/Virgin Records, of which this track will be a part of. “After the Storm” is not the first time Uchis and Tyler have worked together on a track, but its funky-melodrama is significantly more prominent than past collaborations “Aunt Wang Syrup Theme Song” or “PERFECT.” “If you need a hero / Just look in the mirror,” Kali sings, while Bootsy ad-libs for affective touch.

“We can find solace in the fact that we have to go through the bad stuff to truly get to the good,” Uchis said of “After the Storm” in a press statement. “Just because you’re losing at the moment doesn’t mean you’ve lost yet. The storm may be scary now but it’s how your flowers bloom later, and paradise is just beyond the rainbow.”



Read More:

Tyler, the Creator says he’s ‘making a pop album’

Check out Tyler, The Creator’s first ever NPR Tiny Desk concert

Tyler, the Creator blossoms on neatest introspective work ‘Flower Boy’


How Houston’s Day For Night festival served as a sound intersection of curatorial excellence

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How Day For Night festival achieved curatorial excellence

Houston, Texas’ Day For Night festival has established itself as an unconventional, hyper-sensory utopia. Bolstering an exemplary menu of avant-garde talent, the festival satiates thousands all while blurring the boundaries of performance and offering the utmost in aural phenomena in its industrial warehouse setting.

Day For Night prided itself on its snapshot booking in its third year, by and for the experimentally-inclined. Enlisting artists like Nina Kraviz, Kaytranada, Justice, Jlin, Jamie xx, Mount Kimbie, Solange, REZZNine Inch NailsTyler, the Creator, and Thom Yorke, among others, the gathering has situated itself as an unorthodox standout from an at times mundane, and largely counterfeit American festival circuit.

Words by Grace Fleisher Featured image courtesy of Theo Civitello


In its immersively emblematic nature, Day For Night’s third edition was a polyamorous union of music, culture, and digital art. It was a multifarious destination, and offered its attendees a mode of escapism while simultaneously defying how they explored their own, as well as others’ relationships with art and reality.

Those who attended were immersed in an epicenter of capitalism’s desolation, i.e the former Barbara Jordan Post Office, only to enter a sprawling industrial wonderland; complete with capacious lasers, fog machines, and immersive visual art open to infinite interpretations. Despite its growing pains, Day For Night was an unparalleled destination in the American festival circuit, protruding the landscape with its singularity in 2017, as it likely will in years to come, too.

Photo Credit: Katrina Barber


Embracement of Reflection: Houston & Beyond

It would be naive to ignore how Houston’s rampantly evolving cultural and developmental environment shaped Day For Night. A look at almost any sect of the city points to hyper-gentrification and a lack of zoning restrictions that are rendering a city of cultural depth increasingly unrecognizable. Festivals have the potential to be the 21st-century’s greatest linking apparatus, and Day For Night embraced multiple methods of coupling reflection in an immensely immersive fashion. Summits delved into socio-political discourse by way of Laurie Anderson, Chelsea Manning, Pussy Riot’s Nadya Tolokonnikova, and more. The gathering challenged its attendees toward an attainment of outward-awareness.

Photo Credit: Charles Reagan Hackleman



Woven into the very seams of artistic discourse at Day For Night was a thread on how the world’s 24-hour loops and radical advances in technology and communication are seamlessly moving faster than behavioral evolution, rendering many helpless in the interim. In a hyper-connected sect of the world, it’s ironically never been easier for one to feel helpless. Day For Night ruminated on how these very advancements can work to foster connections and discoveries in the world which will propel us further as a collective entity.

Photo Credit: Chad Wadsworth


Post HTX Served As A Model Venue

“The way one sees things, and the expectations one brings to a performance, or any art form, really, is completely determined by the venue,” articulated David Byrne of the seminal group, The Talking Heads.

This phenomenon of a concert space shaping context, and in turn, enjoyment, is explored in Byrne’s book How Music Works. Surely, the way in which performances are perceived en masse is in relation to the space they’re experienced in. At times this is an obvious element. Take the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, for example. Burning Man’s sustenance relies on the desert space it resides in, and while this may be an extreme example, space is becoming a deeply entwined element in the worldwide festival circuit. The relationship between attendees and venues is why scenes blossom, and it’s why destination festivals are becoming increasingly popular.

Photo Credit: Sara Marjorie Strick


Day For Night’s decision to place a hyper-sensorial paradise across four stages in a dimly lit, abandoned post office was a masterful one. Ironically, the nucleus of the performance venue were the veins of the warehouse, many of which contained captivating art installations. Unlit hallways that separated the “blue” stage from the intimately circular “yellow” stage, for example, beckoned an art form in themselves. For in these empty spaces, attendees prepared to ascend into visual or aural titillation. Whether it be disco balls adorned from a ceiling in netting, illuminating an entire room, moving mechanical cranes paired to ominous music, or synced screens around a ground level stage, the once-vacant warehouse was flooded with an innate intertwinement of senses.

Photo Credit: Theo Civitello


Exemplary Curatorial Intent

A festival’s success begins in its curatorial intent. Founded in 2015 by the Free Press Houston and the New York-based creative agency Work-Order, Day for Night established itself as a visually immersive music and art festival from the very beginning. By embedding an exploration of the elements of light, space, and sound in its mission, Day For Night has transformed the festival landscape by combining new media art with envelope-pushing musicians. It may still be a young festival, but its surely created a unique experience. Day For Night’s careful selection of artistry and curatorial intent spoke to several sects of music, tech, and art lovers. Planning such a feat does not come without intent or without a deeply embedded audience understanding, though.

Photo Credit: Katrina Barber


Appealing to the experimentally-inclined, for example, Day For Night brought forth Nina Kraviz, who’s on the heels of a momentous 2017, and largely regarded as a queen of techno. The festival also booked her трип (or Trip) labelmate Bjarki. Jlin, who’s set ironically rivaled her longtime purveyor Aphex Twin‘s 2016 DFN appearance, was also a standout experimental act. Her album, Black Origami, was an exemplary experimental record of the past year. Additionally, artists like Forest Swords, Jenny Hval, Shlomo, and Roni Size, all capitalized on the use of live sets as a medium for either outward, emotive release or social commentary.

Photo Credit: Julian Bajsel


Day For Night also booked standout artists like the esteemed Nine Inch Nails, who’ve been touring their immensely accessible EP Add Violence. Solange stunned in her Houston homecoming, merging art and popular culture with an affirming image of black pride and femininity.  Cardi B gave the 12-minute performance of the year, encapsulating a tumultuous 2017 with her ominous hit “Bodak Yellow.”  Tyler, The Creator gave a fervent performance which was brimming with tracks off his introspective new work Flower Boy. Pussy Riot, Pretty Lights, Justice, and REZZ — with her exceptional Mass Manipulation tour visuals — all expectedly stunned.

Day For Night displayed a keen understanding of the experimentally inclined, but also served as an apt pop culture gathering.In bringing together artists who continue to challenge the status quo, the festival’s curational intent was two-fold — displayed initially by the festival, and then, by each and every artist that performed.

Photo Credit: Ismael Quintanilla


Embedding a Festival Framework for the Future

As more and more festivals continue to emerge on the American festival circuit, immersive affairs such as Day For Night will continue to be a saving grace. It’s one thing to have an exemplary understanding of an audience, but as festival-goers grow into an increasingly digitized world, a means of facilitating connection through art and performance will be needed more than ever. Day For Night blurred the lines between its attendees and artists, it’s an environment where everyone was on an even playing field, as an observer, student of performance, and the outside world itself.

Photo Credit: Sara Marjorie Strick

Like Everything Else, Music Videos Turned Millennial Pink In 2017

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Apparently, pop culture can now assign an entire generation their own color. “Millennial Pink” has supposedly been on the rise for the past few years, but 2017 is when it became inescapable. Everywhere I looked this year, the subdued-yet-quirky shade was lurking. BAM, there it is in a weirdly sexual Postmates ad on … More »

Tyler, The Creator takes his recent emotional outpourings on the road, creates North American tour with Vince Staples

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Tyler, The Creator’s latest album Flower Boy (or Scum Fuck Flower Boy) has been deemed by numerous critical outlets (including this one) as a watershed in the maturation of the 26-year old rapper, who’s otherwise received tons of arguably justified flack for lyrics that flirt (at the very least) with the line demarcating creative expression and outright homophobia and misogyny. The album’s production and musical cohesiveness have been objectively improved from his prior work, and Flower Boy is packed with introspection and a fragility previously unimaginable. Thank you for finally letting us in, Tyler! Thank you!

Hmm. Maybe he’ll soon be able to say the same to the countries that not-so-quietly saw it fit to prevent his entry?

Well…until that time comes (or doesn’t), fans local to the United States will be able to enjoy (or decry) an upcoming winter tour that’s set to begin at the end of January 2018. Support notably comes from Vince Staples and Taco throughout the tour, which naturally skews toward the major cities.

You know the drill: peep some memory-jogging clips in order to solidify and/or reevaluate your recent stance on the guy, then see if you can picture yourself in attendance at one of the dates below.

Tyler, The Creator, Vince Staples, & Taco:

01.26.18 – Vancouver, BC – PNE Forum
01.27.18 – Portland, OR – Memorial Coliseum
01.29.18 – San Francisco, CA – The Armory
01.31.18 – Sacramento, CA – Memorial Auditorium
02.02.18 – San Diego, CA – Valley View Casino Center
02.03.18 – Tempe, AZ – Marquee Theatre
02.06.18 – Denver, CO – 1stBank Center
02.07.18 – Kansas City, MO – Arvest Bank Theatre
02.08.18 – Dallas, TX – Bomb Factory
02.10.18 – Atlanta, GA – World Congress Center
02.12.18 – Miami, FL – James L. Knight Center
02.13.18 – Orlando, FL – Orlando Amphitheatre
02.15.18 – Philly, PA – Liacouras Center
02.17.18 – Toronto, ON – Ricoh Coliseum
02.18.18 – Montreal, QC – MTELUS
02.20.18 – Pittsburgh, PA – Stage AE
02.21.18 – Rochester, NY – Main Street Armory
02.23.18 – New York, NY – The Theater at MSG
02.25.18 – Washington D.C. – The Anthem
02.27.18 – Detroit, MI – Masonic Temple Theatre
03.01.18 – Madison, WI – Alliant Energy Center
03.02.18 – Chicago, IL – Aragon Ballroom
03.04.18 – Milwaukee, WI – Eagles Ballroom

24K Starboys: Thoughts Upon Seeing The Weeknd & Bruno Mars On Consecutive Nights

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The year was 2011. Winter was on the verge of melting away, but the sounds emanating from the north were still plenty frigid. From out of the newly ascendant Toronto scene that gave us Drake came a dark and mysterious figure calling himself the Weeknd. We’d later learn this person was Abel Tesfaye, a child … More »

Your (Completely Speculative) Guide To Taylor Swift’s (Possibly Imminent) New Album

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Taylor Swift has been a little too quiet lately. Some might call that a blessing; this is, after all, a woman who can saturate your entire news feed without trying very hard, and one who is also known for trying extremely hard, a polarizing figure who’s been known to wear out her welcome even among … More »