Dancing Astronaut’s Top 100 Songs of the Decade

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Dancing Astronaut’s Top 100 Songs of the DecadeTracks Of The Decade

Words: Bella Bagshaw, Rachel Narozniak, Chris Stack, Jessica Mao, and Farrell Sweeney

From “Clarity” to “Bangarang,” the past ten years have borne witness to no shortage of colorful electronic releases that, cumulatively, have contributed to the genre’s expansion from niche to mainstream. A golden decade in dance, 2010 to 2020 saw electronic music hit a commercial climax in 2012.

As dance music worked its way across radio airwaves, most commonly through the recently popularized dance-pop hybrid format, and as the stock of electronically oriented festivals expanded, one thing became increasingly clear: dance music is for everyone. In a retrospective review of the releases that defined the span of time between 2010 and 2020, Dancing Astronaut proudly presents our top 100 tracks of the decade.

1 Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites – Skrillex

“Yes, OH MY GOD!” The premier single from Skrillex’s first Grammy Award-winning album for Best Dance/Electronica Album in 2011. Also grabbing a Grammy for Best Dance Recording, the track catapulted dubstep into the American dance scene.

2 Stay – Zedd

“Stay” arrived as evidence of the symbiotic quality of Zedd’s refined approach to both electronic and pop stylings. In partnering with then rising pop starlet, Alessia Cara, on the record Zedd affirmed what his followers had long known: the dance-pop hybrid is one of his strongest sonic suits—and he’s still here to play.

3 Body – Loud Luxury

The release that catapulted Loud Luxury into the musical mainstream, “Body” is an evergreen electronic anthem that exemplified the duo’s acute ear for effervescent productions.

4 Jackie Chan – Tiesto and Dzeko

Tiësto and Dzeko‘s collaboration with Post Malone and Preme, “Jackie Chan” proved itself to be a particularly pervasive summer anthem, as the star-studded hit single worked its way through playlists and radio queues alike. The cut, which scored a platinum certification, was as much a credit to Tiësto’s ear for electronic tunes that resonate — and have consistently resonated — with listeners as it is a watershed moment in Dzeko’s progressing career as a solo producer.

5 After Life – Tchami feat. Stacy Barthe

The undisputed father of future house, Tchami wielded this dancefloor weapon to open the floodgates, helping a whole new generation of four-by-four lovers discover the “hard” sector of house.

6 The Veldt – deadmau5

Inspired by a fan’s tweet and a Ray Bradbury tale of the same name “The Veldt” is deadmau5 at his progressive peak. The halcyon track paints a visceral lyrical and production portrait, scaling mythical proportions in electronic lovers’ hearts. It’s an untethered demonstration of deadmau5’s unique ability to create music that’s both gentle and galvanizing all at once.

7 Instant Crush – Daft Punk feat. Julian Casablancas

Introspection is one hell of a drug. Daft Punk knows this well, seen through their somber synth-pop moments. The androids borrow The Strokes lead singer Julian Casablancas’ palatably plaintive vocoded voice for a glorious game of sad robot.

8 Promises – NERO (Skrillex & Nero remix)

Appearing on NERO’s official debut album, the trio’s “Promises” remix helped catalyze the decade’s emotional dubstep craze. It even snagged Skrillex the 2013 Grammy for Best Remixed Recording.

9 Faded – ZHU

Remixed by everyone from ODESZA to Lido, “Faded” was a collective late-night mood for more or less the latter half of the decade. No one could deny ZHU’s beckoning vocal advances and up-to-no-good production prowess.

10 Internet Friends – Knife Party

“You blocked me on Facebook / And now you’re going to die.” At the height of Knife Party’s rage or die reign over the first half of the ’10s, came “Internet Friends.” It’s a cheeky, relentless emblem of the group’s electro house savored sonic flavor. Aside from making an appearance in live sets far and wide, it even made it onto The Walking Dead.

11 One Kiss – Calvin Harris

One kiss is all it takes? Over 900 million Spotify streams later, it seems listeners wanted more than that from the heavenly Dua Lipa-Calvin Harris tag team.

12 Raise Your Weapon – deadmau5

Written with Skrillex at his side, deadmau5 puts on a full-frontal display of his aural dexterity. Greta Svabo Bech helps wed progressive and dubstep in this hallowed union.

13 The Island -, Pt. 1 (Dawn) – Pendulum

Between its ample radio play and both Skrillex and The Godfather of EDM, Tiesto’s decisions to offer the track official remixes, “The Island” garnered the good graces it deserves. The flagship progressive paragon not only helped Pendulum flex their genre agility, but catapulted a teenage Madeon’s career, after the young Frenchman won Pendulum’s remix contest for the track.

14 Afterhours – TroyBoi feat. Diplo & Nina Sky

A pairing aligned in trap paradise, Diplo and TroyBoi, with the help of Nina Sky, bring sultry, up-to-no-good worldliness to “Afterhours.” The track pulsed with production ad libs evocative of their champion caliber of nuance across festival frontlines following its release in 2015.

15 Titanium – David Guetta feat. Sia

Close to a billion streams later, Sia’s steely vocals ring with the same prophetic cadence, as does Guetta’s slow-burning pluck. “Titanium” is one of the few preeminent paragons of dance pop in the US.

16 Express Yourself – Diplo feat. Nicky Da B

If we had to pinpoint a piece of music that catalyzed Diplo’s “random-white-dude-be-everywhere” reign over dance music and—who are we kidding—the industry at large, “Express Yourself” was that moment. It’s bombastic, deathly danceable, Afro-leaning style stood as a pristinely telling precursor for the near-decade of nonsense to brew from the Diplo camp. RIP Nicky Da B.

17 I Know The Truth – Pretty Lights

“I Know The Truth” is nothing short of an instrumental love letter to dubstep. Expertly placed, just ahead of its genre’s wall-to-wall embrace mid decade, the track displays Derek Vincent Smith’s unparalleled sample savvy, in this case O.V. Wright’s “A Fool Can’t See The Light.”

18 Tell Me – RL Grime & What So Not

A trap affront for the ages. “Tell Me” combines RL Grimes’ over-the-top orchestral energy and What So Not’s ethereal, trend-setting melodic flair.

19 I Can’t Stop – Flux Pavilion

Producers literally couldn’t (and still can’t) stop playing this larger-than-life track out. The proverbial dubstep onslaught became a quintessential live set closer soon after its release.

20 Marijuana – Chrome Sparks

“Marijuana” not only helped spark synth wizard Chrome Sparks’ career, but topped the ubiquitous “chill-out beats” playlists near and far.

21 Civilization – Justice

Picked up for multi-national ads with Adidas, “Civilization” is Justice at their best, full of funk, femme, and downright fun.

22 Say My Name – ODESZA feat. Zyra

An exemplar of ODESZA’s fluttery, technicolor sweetness, “Say My Name” helped pave the way for the ’10s’ chromatic chill-out niche.

23 Turn Down For What – DJ Snake

Soon to become a ubiquitous catchphrase and altogether ethos of the mid-decade, “Turn Down For What” is one of the most voraciously used movie score, TV commercial, and remix sources in the history of dance music.

24 Spaceman – Hardwell

Big room house most certainly had its day in the sun this decade. “Spaceman” is hands-down the sound’s token epochal track.

25 Harlem Shake – Baauer

One of those songs of which the legacy precedes exegesis of the song itself. The “Harlem Shake” isn’t a track; it’s a phenomenon.

26 Tidal Wave – Subfocus & Alpines

The decade’s proverbial melodic drum ‘n’ bass offering. Nearly a full ten years later, “Tidal Wave” still washes over like a welcomed rush of endorphins.

27 Gecko (Overdrive) – Oliver Heldens & Becky Hill

A watershed waypoint in the “future” house foray this past decade. A precocious young Oliver Heldens proves the clarity and ultra-modern precision of his vision with this one.

28 Rude Boy – Zeds Dead feat. Omar LinX

A bass line has never crunched harder than Zeds Dead’s “Rude Boy,” with lyrical hellfire to boot on behalf of serial ZD collaborator, Omar LinX. Islandy and merciless all at once, 2010’s “Rude Boy” splashed onto the decade’s dubstep scene sending heads rolling.

29 Innerbloom – RÜFÜS DU SOL

Idealistic, implacably danceable, a song for lovers to its core, to “Innerbloom” we surrendered. We’re all for cheesy saccharine-sweet house tracks, but this just isn’t one of them. Melt into the chromatic complexities of “Innerbloom”‘s swimming corridors of color.

30 Roses – The Chainsmokers feat. ROZES

An effervescent dance pop presentation like no other this decade, “Roses” was instrumental in taking The Chainsmokers from niche to nationally recognized.

31 Midnight Hour – Boys Noize & Skrillex

No, not a Dog Blood number. But “Midnight Hour” bangs with the same flare and dexterous finger on the pulse of the modern electronic heartbeat. A notable cobblestone on the duo’s prolific partnership path.

32 Pop Culture – Madeon

What would this list be without dance music’s token mashup? An overnight YouTube sensation “Pop Culture” shot Madeon into the stratosphere.

33 It Ain’t Me – Kygo feat. Selena Gomez

Kygo’s one-size-fits-all appeal is supremely evident in the sweeping success of the Selena Gomez-assisted “It Ain’t Me.” This track saw cross-continental top-five chartings from Australia, to Canada, to Belgium. The tropical house/dance-pop phenom continues to prove why he’s sought out with nearly unprecedented fervency from all-star vocalists.

34 Cheerleader – OMI (Felix Jaehn remix)

On the precipice of the tropical house explosion “Cheerleader” was a wholesome, silver-tongued spoonful of dance music for the unenlightened. Infectious and saccharine as a sweet tooth, Felix Jaehn gave “Cheerleader” the feel-good flip we could all get behind.

35 More Than You Know – Axwell Λ Ingrosso

Fans crawled and clawed for this one after tasting it at Coachella in 2015, waiting another two years for an official release. “More Than You Know” are the Swedish boys at their best, pure festival euphoria bottled in a song.

36 Viol – Gesaffelstein

Nasty, writhing, deliciously unsettling, it must be Gesaffelstein. “Viol” is a slow-crawling, torrential techno endeavor that will send the unprepared spiraling into the darkest corners of the electronic continuum, if they’re not careful.

37 Closer – The Chainsmokers

A driving force of the dance-pop hybrid’s pop cultural pervasion, “Closer” exerted a white knuckle grip on the charts, spending one year in the US Top 40 and 61 weeks in Billboard’s Top 10.

38 Where Are Ü Now – Jack Ü

Defined by its inescapability, “Where Are Ü Now” secured triple platinum status in addition to Grammy Awards and AMAs for both Skrillex and Diplo, while simultaneously ushering Justin Bieber back into the sonic spotlight.

39 Turn Up The Speakers – Afrojack and Martin Garrix

On “Turn Up The Speakers,” Afrojack and Martin Garrix collaboratively revive the heart pumping, adrenaline spiking glory of electronic festival sets, to take attendees and the genre alike back to its buzzing roots. To say that the 2014 cut has aged well would be an understatement; “Turn Up The Speakers” remains a prominent inclusion of electronic circuit sets.

40 One (Your Name) – Swedish House Mafia feat. Pharrell Williams

Axwell, Ingrosso, and Angello made their auspicious debut under moniker Swedish House Mafia in 2010 with single “One.” Their entrance into the electronic music scene with “One” was a force that would set the tone for the group’s career. “One,” also written by Pharrell Williams, was one of the music industry heavyweights’ first forrays into electronic music writing and co-production. “One” is a track that has become a pillar of Swedish House Mafia’s discography and is still performed to this day thanks to the timelessness of the upbeat production elements. The single won Best Electro/Tech House Track and Best Progressive Track at the International Dance Music Awards in 2011. 

41 Get Lucky – Daft Punk ft. Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers

Daft Punk basically brought back disco with this single. Enlisting an all-out all-star collaborative team behind the release, Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers, “Get Lucky,” half a billion streams later, did just that.

42 Levels – Avicii 

If there’s one song that arguably kickstarted the commercialization and mainstream crossover of electronic music, it is “Levels” by Avicii. The larger-than-life progressive tune single-handedly took over every festival mainstage, radio station, becoming the backdrop to movie scenes, sports networks and more.

43 Animals – Martin Garrix 

“Animals” was the first global hit produced by the then 17-year-old prodigious producer, Martin Garrix. “Animals” is definitive thanks to the fact that it took over mainstages across worldwide, and vamped Garrix’s career on a global level. No mainstage set was complete without dropping this track at the height of its success.

44 We Found Love – Calvin Harris feat. Rihanna

Calvin Harris led the way for major pop music collaborations with electronic music artists when he enlisted Rihanna for “We Found Love.” Despite having only released electronic leaning music, Calvin Harris was an opening act on the pop queen’s Loud Tour, and this crossover helped to cement the fact that electronic music and pop music not only could coexist, but that electronic music could truly appeal to the mainstream. “We Found Love” was the first of many collaborations between Harris and Rihanna, including “Where Have You Been” in addition to “This Is What You Came For.” Calvin Harris can also credit his lone Grammy award to “We Found Love,” which won the Best Short Form Music Video category during the 2012 Grammy Awards.

45 Losing It – Fisher

Fisher reignited a global addiction to a song with his release “Losing It,” which also arguably put the producer on the map for the long haul. Chris Lake co-produced the single, as if that isn’t insurance enough for a hit. But “Losing It” is also impactful because it helped to reignite the electronic music community’s love of house music. Gimmicky, sure, but intoxicatingly fun.

46 Lean On – DJ Snake and Major Lazer

DJ Snake and Major Lazer brought Carribean sounds to the forefront of dance music after releasing “Lean On,” which went on to become a worldwide phenomenon. The single inspired many other artists to tap into Carribean and reggae influences for feel-good summer releases. The track even became one of the top 10 most streamed videos on YouTube after it amassed two billion views on the platform in 2017. 

47 Shelter – Madeon and Porter Robinson

Porter Robinson and Madeon teamed up in 2016 to produce “Shelter,” and the collaborative effort was truly a noteworthy one. Their distinctive qualities combined to yield a french electro and Japanese-inspired single that was quite different from the vanguard of the time. “Shelter” has withstood the test of time as a fan-favorite of both its creators.

48 Don’t You Worry Child – Swedish House Mafia

One of Swedish House Mafia’s most alluring ballads and well-known works is “Don’t You Worry Child.” It came out at a pivotal point during Swedish House Mafia’s ascension into progressive house royalty. The single cemented them as truly influential for the genre, and it remains one of their most streamed works to date. 

49 Latch – Disclosure feat. Sam Smith

Both Disclosure and Sam Smith reign as leading artists of their respective genres, but each of their ascensions was aided by “Latch.” The fluid exposition of Smith’s vocal chops and Disclosure’s production landed on Disclosure’s debut album, Settle, released in 2013.

50 This Is What It Feels Like – Armin van Buuren

Trance titan Armin van Buuren pioneered the underground subgenre, achieving notoriety for his trance anthems, but van Buuren’s breakthrough into more mainstream dance music was aided by this aching number.

51 Feel So Close – Calvin Harris

The second single released from Calvin Harris’ gilded third studio album, 2012’s 18 Months, “Feel So Close” saw Harris transcend his disc-jockey talents to lend his vocals to this leading cut. The success of Harris’ extension, from producer to vocalist, was evidenced in the track’s alluring catchiness, and ultimately, its inescapability. 

52 Runaway (U & I) – Galantis

“Runaway (U & I)” laid the sonic groundwork for Galantis’ penetration of the electronic genre, and pending the single’s release, the production pair swiftly attracted and held the public’s attention as they went on to further define the style. Streamers got a first glimpse of Galantis’ dance aesthetic on “Runaway (U & I),” and in the time since, Galantis have animatedly labored to sharpen it.

53 Sweet Memories – Kaskade & CID

The rushing, mid-tempo bliss of Kaskade’s “Sweet Memories” is nearly unparalleled in its ability to please all in the crowd at the afters. The energetic number eases streamers from the weekend adrenaline spike to the gossamer glide back down to repose with a muted brilliance that only Kaskade could effect.

54 Language – Porter Robinson

The seminal Porter track “Language” marked a pivotal point in not only the producer’s evolution as an artist, but also the dance scene’s welcoming of melodically-inspired electro house— Peaking at #1 on the UK Indie charts and #7 on the US Billboard Dance Airplay charts, “Language” cemented Porter as a household name and served as a precursor for his creative direction in Worlds.

55 Clarity – Zedd feat. Foxes

To this day, “Clarity” stands irrevocably as a Zedd masterpiece that has held its own amongst the exponential growth of the dance scene. Smashing the charts, the Triple-platinum record was Zedd’s first Grammy and broke through to mainstream airplay—introducing the producer’s pop-influenced electro house and marking another wave of dance music domination.

56 Opus – Eric Prydz

The final offering from Eric Prydz’s debut artist album Opus, titular track “Opus” and its deliberate 9-minute intricacies have perhaps seen itself as one of the most grandiose and gratuitous unfoldings of progressive house in the sense of both a standalone track and its context as the capstone of a concept album. Melding cerebral textures and masterful layers, “Opus”‘s climactic progression is an ode to the Swedish producer’s legendary craft and continues to be a pillar of his EPIC sets.

57 You & Me – Disclosure (Flume remix)

The iconic Flume remix of Disclosure’s “You & Me” shot the Aussie producer’s pioneering future bass sound into the hallmark of fame and opened the gateway for the subgenre’s subsequent popularization. Enveloped by euphoric strings and brimming oscillations, the remix’s momentous drop has been celebrated time and time again.

58 Gold – Adventure Club Feat. Yuna

The second meeting of Adventure Club and vocalist Yuna brought about the Canadian dubstep duo’s iconic Calling All Heroes track, “Gold”. Arriving in the midst of the golden era of melodic dubstep, “Gold” exemplified Adventure Club’s command of emotive dance music and female vocals in its prime.

59 Calling (Lose My Mind) – Sebastian Ingrosso & Alesso

Undeniably one of the most popular EDM tracks of all time, “Calling (Lose My Mind)” joins the forces of powerhouse Sebastian Ingrosso and Alesso with OneRepublic’s Ryan Tedder in the culmination of euphoric-inducing progressive house. With songwriting support from Matthew Koma, the chart-topping track, its instantly recognizable top line and sing-along characteristics have established the collaboration as a timeless festival anthem.

60 It’s Strange – Louis the Child Feat. K.Flay

Upon the release of their K.Flay track, “It’s Strange”, it wouldn’t take long before then-newcomers Louis the Child broke onto the electronic scene. While the age of future bass had dawned, the Chicago outfit innovated on the popular sub-genre—constructing subaqueous-like synths over K.Flay’s spoken rap fusion to deliver a tastefully eccentric concoction of future bass, pop and trap.

61 Room for Happiness – Kaskade Feat. Skylar Grey

Hailing from Kaskade’s iconic 2011 album Fire & Ice, “Room for Happiness” lives among several other companion singles including “Eyes”, “Turn It Down”, and “Lick It”, as a nuanced showcase of Kaskade’s discography. The track saw the superstar coalesce with pop singer Skylar Grey on a melancholically hopeful track with house progressions equal parts gut-wrenching and suited for the dance floor.

62 Sweet Nothing – Calvin Harris Feat. Florence Welch

Topping the UK and Ireland charts and nominated for a Grammy, “Sweet Nothing” made up of one of nine top ten singles from Calvin Harris’ 18 Months and marked his first UK No.1 from the album. A distinct departure from his previous stylings, “Sweet Nothing” simultaneously rocketed Harris as an electro house aficionado with a penchant for radio appeal and showcased Florence Welch dynamism—its firing synths, club-driven BPM, and embrace of Welch’s powerful vocals as the foundation for a smash hit.

63 Bunnydance – Oliver Heldens

Ushering in his groove-tinged house productions, Oliver Heldens and his delivery of “Bunnydance” put footwork first, beat-wise and quite literally, on stage. Both quirky and channeling mass appeal, “Bunnydance” built the Heldens brand in his dance antics during sets and established him as a future house frontrunner.

64 HyperParadise – Hermitude (Flume remix)

Yet another ode to Flume’s range as a producer, his remix of Hermitude’s “HyperParadise” resides as his self-titled debut album’s embodiment of the Grammy-winning act’s investigation into trip hop-influenced future bass. Infused with heavy vocal chops and funkadelic rhythms, the 2012 remix timelessly depicts Flume’s inclination as an experimental innovator then, and now.

65 5 HoursDeorro

Perhaps Deorro’s most preeminent track, “5 Hours” crushed the charts, receiving two gold certifications, and received widespread success across the industry with appearances in several dance compilations during 2014. An electrifying hook encased by a four-on-the-floor structure, “5 Hours” breathes as an addictive track on all occasions, from the dance floor to late night drives.

66 Tremor Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Martin Garrix

Good or bad, the argument for “Tremor” as one of the most iconic dance tracks of the last decade is difficult to refute. Its 2014 release brought about the commercialization of the next generation’s big room house and resonated with festival crowds worldwide—crowned as one of the quintessential anthems among staples like “Seven Nation Army” and “Kernkraft 400”. Characterized by archetypal drops and crowd-pleasing energy, “Tremor” paved for success for main stage sound, undeniably influencing the future direction of both EDM and festival appeal.

67 Ten Feet Tall – Afrojack

Afrojack’s cross-genre hit “Ten Feet Tall” became an international sensation upon its release in 2014. With inspiriting chord progressions and rousing vocals from Wrabel, “Ten Feet Tall” and its emotional dance-pop connected with listeners through the track’s uplifting foundations.

68 Acrylics – TNGHT (RL Grime Edit)

When two bass superforces collide, RL Grime’s “Acrylics” Edit happens. Revamping the heavy duty TNGHT single, RL Grime’s edit ups the ante on the original gargantuan destructive soundscape—doubling the chaotic trap expression and championing an evil acidity exclusive to the bass legend’s realm.

69 Firestone – Kygo Feat. Conrad Sewell

The seminal Kygo track “Firestone” established the Norwegian producer as the tropical house’s lead innovator while simultaneously breaching international territory with No. 1 positions in several countries. In line with his major key stylings, “Firestone” distinguished itself from its dance counterparts of big room and festival-oriented peers with its heartfelt vocals and soft aesthetics.

70 Sexual Healing – Marvin Gaye (Kygo remix)

Preceding his attention-garnering Ed Sheeran’s “I See Fire” remix and subsequent breakthrough with “Firestone”, Kygo’s 2013 “Sexual Healing” remix stole the spotlight with its infectious, sensual undertones and served as the platform for his continued execution of tranquil dance beats.

71 Fantasy Alina Baraz & Galimatias

If sound were a remedy, “Fantasy” would be the cure. The then-20 year old Alina Baraz joined with electronic producer Galimatias in delivering a fantastically-sensual track reminiscent of the directions of ambient electronic music blooming in SoundCloud spaces. Its dreamy fusion of lush sonics set the precedent for more downtempo, synth-kissed acts to perforate the scene.

72 Lights – Ellie Goulding (Bassnectar Remix)

Bassnectar rarely crosses over into the pop realm; however, the underground bass king made an exception for Ellie Goulding, and the result was resounding radio success. 

73 All is Fair in Love and Brostep – Skrillex

The Recess track “All Is Fair in Love and Brostep” garnered attention not just for its impeccable dubstep sound design, but also for its uncanny resemblance to Zomboy’s “Terror Squad” — ultimately, bringing about a speculative war regarding who-copied-who that ended with “love and brostep” in which Zomboy revealed “Terror Squad” was unwittingly inspired by Skrillex’s This Much Power DJ Tool.

74 Boneless – Steve Aoki

2013 “Boneless” amassed widespread success across Europe and the broader dance scene as a club banger—adding to Steve Aoki’s portfolio of party smashers and forecasting Chris Lake’s rise as one of the house music’s most coveted. Boasting a minimalist electro structure easy enough to mix into any dance set or simple enough to layer hip-hop verses over, “Boneless” and its signature beat have continued to be recognized over the last decade.

75 Need Your Heart – Adventure Club Feat. Kai

Adventure Club’s “Need Your Heart” enlisted Kai for a forceful display of melodic dubstep that showed the duo’s intuitive craft for balancing heavy wobbles with euphoric vocals. Complete with a tasteful build-up and scintillating bass, “Need Your Heart” sits comfortably in Adventure Club’s arsenal of potent, yet artful dubstep tracks.

76 Everyday – Rusko (Netsky remix)

One of the most sweeping drum ‘n’ bass/drumstep tracks to ever touch down in the states, Netsky’s “Everyday” remix is a fearless explosion of ad libs and production nuance evocative of Netsky’s production caliber.

77 Spectrum – Zedd

In the span of an artist’s career, there are few songs that subsist as the apex of their artistry. Alongside its sister single “Clarity”, “Spectrum” endures as one of ZEDD’s legendary productions. The Matthew Koma collaboration topped three charts including Billboard’s US Dance Club Songs and enforced Clarity as a holistic body of work in itself. Fine-tuned with complexities of layers and emotional lyricism, “Spectrum” speaks to ZEDD’s capabilities as not just an electronic artist, but an artist built from traditional musical foundations.

78 FadedAlan Walker

Clocking in 2.6 billion views on Youtube and over 1 billion Spotify streams, “Faded” saw massive worldwide success upon its release and charmed both dance and non-dance fans with its instrumental beauty and brand of anonymity.

79 Gold Dust – DJ Fresh (Flux Pavilion remix)

Dubstep came from the UK, and Flux Pavillion was known to influence the likes of Skrillex with his remix of DJ Fresh’s “Gold Dust” and the likes. 

80 Alive – Krewella

When the group was a trio with producer Kris “Rain Man” Trindl behind the beats, “Alive” charting at 32 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The song was Krewella’s first and only top 40 hit on Billboard.

81 Cinema – Benny Benassi (Skrillex remix)

The hard hitting remix was a seminal weapon in Skrillex’s liver performance arsenal for years, and won a Grammy for Best Remixes Recording, Non-Classical. 

82 Bird Machine – DJ Snake and Alesia

At the precipice of EDM Trap, “Bird Machine,” was simultaneously silly and hyphy, and a festival pleaser as one of the first officially released tracks from the mega-superstar, DJ Snake.  

83 I Could Be The One – Avicii & Nicky Romero

The first Avicii producer collaboration that really took off with its unforgettable melody.  Released after “Levels,” the track fast-tracked Avicii’s upward propulsion to stardom.  

84 Bass Head – Bassnectar

Bassnectar fans are some of the most, maybe THE most, devoted fans in the history of dance music. This is their theme song.  

85 I Can See It In Your Face – Pretty Lights

Pretty lights continued his upward, live-performance trajectory towards the turn of the decade, and “I Can See It In Your Face” was a mainstay in the electro-funk magnates sets. 

86 Light – San Holo

“Light” is San Holo’s certified gold, future bass offering that bolstered the experimental melody writer to new heights.

87 Thief – Ookay

2016’s sing-a-long anthem was brought to us by the lovable and jovial, Ookay, with his sax-lead, future bass crossover, “Theif.”

88 EdgeREZZ

After Skrillex’s dubstep ran its course, a new kind of bass music began to emerge in the low-end populous. REZZ surfaced from the mau5trap depths with the piercingly scintillating “Edge,” launching her to headline for the new era of bass heads.  

89 Eyes – Kaskade Feat. Mindy Gledhill

Kaskade’s first Grammy nomination came by way of Fire & Ice, for best Dance/Electronic Album in 2013. “Eyes” was the lead single off the project and a closing song for that epoc of the melodic house guru.

90 Higher Ground – TNGHT

As hip-hop crossed over to EDM for the electronic trap wave, Lunice and Hudson Mowhawk’s “Higher Ground” was at the forefront, helping the duo earn stellar production credits with Kanye West and the like. 

91 Never Be Like You – Flume Feat. Kai

Off Flume’s first Grammy winning Skin album, “Never Be Like You,” was the premire song off the project and received a Grammy nod for Best Dance Recording. To this day, it’s Flume’s most streamed song on Spotify.

92 Bangarang – Skrillex

Skrillex won back-to-back Grammy awards for Best Dance Recording and Best Dance/Electronica Album in 2011 and 2012. The latter was from his Bangarang project with the title track winning the prestigious award.

93 Fade Into Darkness – Avicii

The infectious piano melody encapsulated the melodic house wunderkids’ early ability, as the hit predecessor to his world renowned “Levels.” “Fade Into Darkness” served as a momentum that catapulted Avicii to the top of the industry greats.

94 Wake Me Up – Avicii

Avicii’s ‘Wake Me Up’ featuring  Aloe Blacc has been named as the highest charting dance track of the decade as a seminal closing or opening song for Tim’s 2013 tour supporting his True album that crossed country music into the electronic music realm for an epic and emotional melody escapade. The track is Avicii’s most streamed song on Spotify, reaching close to 1 billion streams all-time. 

95 Summertime Sadness – Lana Del Rey (Cedric Gervais Remix)

An oxymoronic summer anthem flipped one of Lana Del Rey’s number six Billboard topper for a 2014 Grammy Award winner for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical.

96 Original DonMajor Lazer

The dancehall trio partnered with The Partysquad for a festival staple in their 2012 and beyond sets. Notable remixes from Flosstradamus made it to Major Lazer’s essential list on Spotify in 2018.

97 Techno – Destructo

Gary Richards (Destructo) took Eminem’s infamous Moby diss from “Without Me” (“Nobody listens to techno!”) and set the record straight.

98 I Want U – Alison Wonderland

The effervescent Alison Wonderland at her best. “I Want U” is the bouncy, frolicsome trap that had us hooked from that first time we watched her crawl up on the decks.

99 Bodies – Drowning Pool (Drezo remix)

Drezo has a penchant for frequenting the smoky and seemingly uninhabitable corners of the dance music continuum. His “Bodies” remix soon became a soul-sucking insertion in hundreds of artists’ sets across the globe, from festival front gates to covert club floors.

100 OKAY – Shiba San

If anyone can make tech-house digestible for the uninitiated, it’s Dirtybird dynamo Shiba San. “OKAY”‘s genius is in its sensational simplicity. The four-on-the-floor guru has been stripping crowds of all will power and sensibility with this one since its 2014 release.

Celebrate 15 years of Tomorrowland with full ‘Our Story’ orchestral performance [Watch]

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Celebrate 15 years of Tomorrowland with full ‘Our Story’ orchestral performance [Watch]Tomorrowland Our Story Photo Credit Tomorrowland

Since 2005, Tomorrowland has been blazing a path for electronic music fans all over the world. This past October, the iconic festival celebrated its 15th anniversary year with a special performance at ADE.

The Amsterdam event, called Our Story, featured a lineup that included Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Afrojack, Armin van Buuren, Tiësto, Steve Aoki, The Bloody Beetroots, GOOSE, Netsky, and M.I.K.E. These chart-topping names were joined by members of the Metropole Orchestra, who added a whole new dimension to tracks like van Buuren’s “This Is What It Feels Like” and countless others over the course of the two-and-a-half-hour performance.

Tomorrowland recently announced that it had extended its contract in the town of Boom, Belgium through 2034. Tickets for Tomorrowland’s 2020 iteration go on sale in early 2020. Learn more here.

Photo credit: Tomorrowland

Tiësto drops guitar-led pop soother, ‘BLUE,’ featuring Stevie Appleton

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Tiësto drops guitar-led pop soother, ‘BLUE,’ featuring Stevie AppletonTiesto Ed Sheeran

The Grammy-winning, platinum-certified, Dutch DJ who needs no formal introduction, Tiësto, recently dropped off his new offering, “BLUE” featuring Stevie Appleton, through Republic / Casablanca Records. It’s a pop-leaning soother with folksy vocals and calming melodies notably redolent of Milky Chance’s “Stolen Dance.”

“BLUE” marks a deviation from the superstar producer’s preeminent big room house practices. He’s been showing his versatility within the pop realm lately with successful releases like “Ritual” featuring Jonas Blue and Rita Ora and “God Is A Dancer” with Mabel. And that’s not to mention last year’s hit single, “Jackie Chan,” with Post Malone, Dzeko, and Preme, which recently passed the 1 billion stream mark.

Tiësto passed along a quote in a recent release: “I wanted to end the year with a track that is a different vibe for me – the exploration of different sounds and styles is what keeps things fresh and energizing for me as an artist.”

Photo Credit: @tiesto/Instagram

NMF Roundup: Four Tet remixes ‘Midnight Hour,’ Dillon Francis flips Maroon 5 + more

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NMF Roundup: Four Tet remixes ‘Midnight Hour,’ Dillon Francis flips Maroon 5 + moreFour Tet Photo Credit DAN WILTON

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Dan Wilton

NMF Roundup: RÜFÜS DU SOL remix Foals, deadmau5 unleashes another single, ‘FALL’ + more

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NMF Roundup: RÜFÜS DU SOL remix Foals, deadmau5 unleashes another single, ‘FALL’ + moreRUFUS PressShot LeFawnhawk 1

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: LeFawnhawk

Major Lazer release season one of self-titled animated show

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Major Lazer release season one of self-titled animated showMajor Lazer Animated

All 11 episodes of Major Lazer’s new animated show are now available to view in full on YouTube. The episodes come in around 10 minutes a piece and feature loads of original tracks, as well as a few Major Lazer classics.

The show follows the adventures of the Major Lazer himself as he and a new cast of characters deal with the ramifications of laced weed, clubbing in Ibiza, and much more. Several star guest actors appear throughout the first season, including Andy Samberg, Kumail Nanjiani, JK Simmons, Riff Raff, Ezra Koenig, Charli XCX, and Tiësto

Of course, the group is notably missing former Major Lazer member Jillionaire, who left the group over the summer to be replaced by Ape Drums. Since the switch, Major Lazer have gone on to release a steady stream of singles and were recently announced as a headliner at Ultra 2020.

Kastra, Modern Machines, and Bianca Linta debut club primed collaboration, ‘Issues’

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Kastra, Modern Machines, and Bianca Linta debut club primed collaboration, ‘Issues’MM

Modern Machines, Kastra, and Bianca Linta are a collaborative triple threat on what is indubitably poised to be the next crowd championed club favorite, “Issues.” A glittering new gem of Tiësto’s Musical Freedom/AFTR:HRS imprint, “Issues” holds a danceable allure. From the fluidity of its midtempo pace to its captivating beat, it’s clear that “Issues” is Modern Machines and Kastra’s appeal to the crowds clustered on the dimly lit dance floor.

The irresistible appeal of the single’s arrangement is further amplified by Linta’s vocal, which functions as the sonic cherry atop the effervescent affair. Her pop-centric hook, coupled with the house inflected chords of “Issues,” cause the cut to channel the pop/house crossover sound that has flirted with mainstream potential in recent months. A magnetic showing sure to exert a hold on modern dance circles, “Issues” spotlights Modern Machines, Kastra, and Bianca Linta as artists to watch—if streamers weren’t already doing so.

Photo credit: Sammy Dean

EDC Mexico reveals 2020 lineup featuring Diplo, Tiësto, Knife Party, Madeon, and more

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EDC Mexico reveals 2020 lineup featuring Diplo, Tiësto, Knife Party, Madeon, and moreScreen Shot 2018 11 21 At 9.53.42 AM

Less than a day before EDC Orlando 2019, Insomniac has revealed the full lineup for EDC Mexico 2020. Returning for a seventh iteration, EDC Mexico will take place at its home venue Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez from Feb. 28-March 1 as a three-day event this time around. In concurrence with its other Insomniac variations, EDC Mexico’s lineup packs a punch in offering an extensive selection of acts across all genres—featuring a spectrum from mainstream artists to rising talent and everything in between.

Diplo, Tiësto, Armin van Buuren, Zedd, and David Guetta are among a few of many DJs gracing the festival’s bookings, as well as comeback artists like Knife Party and Madeon. Other beloved artists including Carl Cox, Vini Vici, Giuseppe Ottaviani, Walker & Royce, and Wax Motif are also slated to perform.

Tickets for EDC Mexico 2020 are on sale here. General admission three-day passes begin at $1,950 MXN. The Comfort Pass, PLUS • Enhanced Experience Pass, and SkyDeck package are also available to purchase.

Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]

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Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]ADE Laura Siliquini

Words by: Josh Stewart & Bella Bagshaw

For a festival older than many of its attendees (including a co-author of this review), Amsterdam Dance Event hasn’t lost an ounce of prerogative in the electronic music space across its 24-year tenure. Much like its increasingly international soil, ADE is voraciously traveled to by electronic infatuates across the globe. This year the industry-oriented endeavor garnered attendees from 146 countries—the most internationally visited installment to date.

But what makes ADE so painfully cool, is not only its chromatic agenda—spanning panels, parties, makeshift productions, and larger-than-life arena stops—but its locational litany. From train stations, to museums, to the warehouse spots, all of Amsterdam is ADE’s playground.

And it feels like the whole city is participating, too. Right outside the Schipol Airport, your humble narrator is greeted by a proverbial ADE cube humming above an information/check-in hut, ready for business at 8 am sharp. Once I secure my media pass, a 40-something cab driver promptly rattles off his week’s after-dark itinerary, with the enthusiasm of a tourist and the precision of a seasoned attendee.

ADE is unique in that it implores you to acquaint yourself with Amsterdam. It’s an unfettered celebration among the city’s quotidian. And that’s undoubtedly why the very best of the dance music business (Garrix, Tiesto, Guetta, Knight, Hawtin, Brejcha, you name it) return year after year. Here are some spots that made ADE sing this year.

Rijksmuseum

Rijksmuseum, Dancing Astronaut‘s quintessential stop on the ADE agenda. The storied subterranean dwelling of the historic Dutch landmark make for a sublime dance music backdrop—invoking elegance and clandestine cadence all at once. Raw Rave sanctioned Boys Noize Thursday night for a long dance (the kinetic vernacular in Europe is actually swaying) in the dark, as Maceo Plex and Underworld had so notably done just a few years prior.

The hallowed columns cast great, oblong shadows through the crowd, while fog dances in time with Boys Noize‘s beguiling analog techno. It’s an altogether post-apocalyptic display; as if all the wide-eyed pedestrians who normally flood the area by day are gone for good and there’s nothing left to do but soak up the smoke and party (if you can maneuver to the bar, that is). The air buzzed with sweet and sweaty malice, beneath a collection of Rembrandts resting soundly upstairs, no less! The historic holdings are a smoldering embodiment of ADE’s ability to make Amsterdam’s cornerstone conventions come alive.

Paradiso

Of all the Amsterdam club locales, Paradiso is likely the most atmospherically adjacent to a US spot ADE has to offer. Though, its architectural grandeur is singularly European. The assuredly haunted ex-church, with its resplendent stained glass windows and intricately etched balcony arrangement, seems destined for a back-to-back DJ set from priest vestment-donning Tchami and his perpetually pernicious aural associate, Malaa. A far cry from the litany of icons Paradiso once welcomed—The Rolling Stones, Prince, Patti Smith, The Cure, Nirvana (just to name a few)—the duo’s Dutch rendition of No Redemption was, nonetheless, entertaining as hell.

The hard-house maestros topped giant LED cubes which lit up in sync with painstakingly on-brand visuals when the respective DJ took his turn. For Tchami, a storming jungle scene evocative of his recent melodic house sensation, “Rainforest.” For Malaa, the expected illicit and explicit imagery: lines of white powder, skin-clad, ski-masked women, and otherwise. PSA: Moshing to dance music is apparently not just an American phenomenon.

Above section by: Bella Bagshaw

Armada Office

Days before the release of his 7th studio albumArmin van Buuren opened the doors to Armada’s office, sitting on the city’s outskirts for a cranked-up ADE-themed recording of A State Of Trance. Attendees were welcome to wander the corridors of the iconic trance label’s home base, with over two dozen guest sets spinning between “The Club” and the infamous recording studio where Armin streams his weekly shows. The who’s who of trance ticket gave fans a chance to see tastemaker after tastemaker, mainstay after mainstay, bringing the likes of Richard DurandMarkus SchulzFerry CorstenSander van Doorn, and even BT, for eight hours of intimate trance bliss.   

NDSM Wharf

DGTL brought four nights of ADE-insanity to NDSM Wharf, a former shipyard with grounds big enough to house 10 soccer fields. As massive of a venue as it was, another few soccer fields probably could’ve housed the droves of ravers who kept the waterfront warehouse’s sprawling mainstage saturated. A headlining lineup of Richie HawtinRÜFÜS DU SOLBonoboOrbital, and Ben Klock back to back with Marcel Dettmann proved too tempting a ticket for thousands of ADEers. There’s no doubt that the music is the focal point of a week like ADE, but it’s hard not to see the event for the grand portrait of dance music that is when showing up to NDSM. Between the ferry from Central Station, that showcases much of the city’s forward-thinking architecture, to the street art that blankets the hip, developing wharf, and fresh fruit the warehouse served until wee hours of the morning, a trip to NDSM shines a light on many of the enchanting idiosyncrasies that make ADE so distinctly Amsterdam.

Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]TIMBUITING NDSM Ade
Photo: Tim Buiting/NDSM

Lil’ Central Station

ADE fever even spread to Amsterdam’s very own Central Station (think Grand Central), which was effectively party-fied by Audio Obscura for the whirlwind weekend. Tucked just a few stories below the rails that funnel people in and out of Amsterdam by the thousands was Lil’ Central, a cozy nightclub space with DJs that encouraged a bit of loco and a lot of motion. From Motor City Drum Ensemble‘s swerve-inducing Thursday night set to Tchami‘s afterparty the following evening, express tickets to a good time were wholesale at Lil’ Central. Every city has nightclubs, most even have particularly cool ones, but how many municipalities are willing to turn their central transport hub into an all-night rave?

I can only think of one.

Above section by: Josh Stewart

Photo Credit: Laura Siliquini

Hard Rock’s DAER concept expands to south Florida, debuting with Tiësto, The Chainsmokers, Dillon Francis

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Hard Rock’s DAER concept expands to south Florida, debuting with Tiësto, The Chainsmokers, Dillon FrancisGames 6 Galen Oakes

Hard Rock’s emerging DAER concept is less than two years old and the team behind Atlantic City’s newest club is already prepping a major expansion. DAER’s new dayclub/nightclub hybrid concept anchors the new Guitar Hotel at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood. Championed by the Hard Rock brand’s deep musical legacy, DAER has been drawing in top-tier talent since it opened in June 2018. Now, for the grand opening of their latest property, the club is going all out with Tiësto, Dillon Francis, and as if the lineup wasn’t stacked enough, they’ve added some additional star power with The Chainsmokers

The Halloween-themed grand opening weekend includes a performance from DJ Five and a costume contest on October 31, followed by Francis and Tiesto on November 1 and 2. The Chainsmokers round the grand opening festivities out on Sunday, November 3, officially introducing south Florida to its newest marquee dance club. DAER has already staked its claim on the national club circuit with major bookings including Drake, Tiësto, Alesso, Travis Scott, Above & Beyond, and more in Atlantic City. Former Hakkasan figures have brought their know-how to Atlantic City, starting the entertainment hotspot’s long awaited resurgence. Now, the team is planting their flag in south Florida and they’ve got a stellar lineup to set things off.