Silk Music Delivers Masterful Remix Album For Acclaimed Duo, The Midnight

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Since the August 2017 release of “The Midnight Remixed,” one of the most acclaimed releases in Silk Music history, Tim McEwan and Tyler Lyle, better known as The Midnight, have released a #1 Billboard Dance album (“Kids”) and toured much of North America, Europe, and Australia. It is safe to say that the magical discography

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The Midnight paint with vibrant sonic colors as they prepare their new LP, tour the world [Interview]

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The Midnight paint with vibrant sonic colors as they prepare their new LP, tour the world [Interview]Cover

Tim McEwan and Tyler Lyle are exhausted—the good kind of exhausted that comes from performing in countless venues around the world.

The Midnight paint with vibrant sonic colors as they prepare their new LP, tour the world [Interview]Edit 5 2
Photos by Zachary White/Dancing Astronaut

“We haven’t slept in six months,” Lyle says. “It’s all one
big blur.”

The duo, known to the music world as The Midnight, have been touring almost nonstop since the release of Kids, their third LP released last September. They’ve spent most of 2019 on the road, kicking off in Norway in February and hardly slowing down since then. On a stop in St. Louis in the midst of this heavy tour schedule, DA caught up with The Midnight to hear about their journey across the globe and the promise of new music on the horizon.

McEwan and Lyle jointly form one of the most celebrated acts in the modern synthwave scene, but they don’t like to put their music in a genre-confined box. They simply enjoy making music together and delivering the end result to their fan base and beyond.

There is a Japanese term: Mono no aware. It means basically, the sad beauty of seeing time pass – the aching awareness of impermanence. These are the days that we will return to one day in the future only in memories.

McEwan and Lyle first got together in 2012 when they were paired up in a studio session. They didn’t know each other prior. McEwan, who’s from Copenhagen, comes from a production and studio background, and Lyle grew up in Georgia and has a songwriting background. While their backgrounds were largely different, something happened the first day they got in the studio together: They wrote their first song as The Midnight, “WeMoveForward.”

“[Lyle] wrote the verses pretty quickly, but finding out
what the song was was a longer
process,” McEwan recalls. “We didn’t know we were going to make a band called
The Midnight. It was all about finding and figuring out where to point the
ship.”

Both artists agreed that the tricky thing about meeting someone you could do anything with is that it’s both freeing and overwhelming. They spent their first EP figuring out what The Midnight sounded like, and from there, it was a natural progression.

“It’s a palette of colors we’ve been working with,” Lyle notes. “We’re still going to use those palettes over time, but we’re going to grow.”

The Midnight paint with vibrant sonic colors as they prepare their new LP, tour the world [Interview]Edit 2 2
Photos by Zachary White/Dancing Astronaut

Mono no aware fuels The Midnight’s music—whether it’s in the form of the dramatic “WeMoveForward” or the final Kids track, “Kids (Reprise),” from last September. They’ve grown tremendously as a band since those early days and are constantly seeking to evolve their sonic palette. Many fans were initially thrown off by the absence of saxophone riffs in the Kids album, but McEwan and Lyle insist that the recent album had a different story to tell than its predecessors. Kids is—as its title plainly reveals—about what it’s like being a kid.

“Sultry sax doesn’t go hand in hand with being 10 years old and riding around on bikes,” McEwan explains. “The people that connected [to Kids] connected in a very deep way. They really got it. There’s a pain and a sadness inherent in nostalgia that I think [Lyle] was really good at tapping into.”

Lyle expounds, noting that they’re “trying to broaden and deepen the palette” with their new material.

“We’re writing songs in different corners of the room,” he says. “Hopefully with the next record, we’ll bring a little more sunlight out.”

Where Kids was
about growing up, McEwan and Lyle see their next album as a natural progression
in life into the teenage phase. McEwan says they’ll look to capture “the angst
and the turmoil of being a teenager, the highs and lows, the hormones going
crazy” in their next body of work. The way their writing process is going, they
see this series as “maybe a trilogy,” telling an overarching story.

For those who can’t wait for their next dosage of The Midnight’s new material, the duo’s second remix EP landed on Silk Music on Sept. 27, featuring reinterpretations of tracks like “Arcade Dreams” from Timecop1983 and “Shadows” from Uppermost.

“I always love hearing a different take on our songs and my tracks and what elements are used and how they’re using [Lyle’s] voice,” McEwan says. “It’s so freeing to hear. I’m really excited about these songs being dressed up differently for people.”

For now, though, The Midnight are on a brief tour break after trekking across the States for much of the summer and early autumn. In late October, the duo take off again across the pond to play shows in Germany, the UK, France, and many more, wrapping up one of their heaviest tour years to date in the later days of 2019.

As a singer, Lyle thrives off the energy he gets from
crowds, noting that his favorite part of his job is the moments when he can
feel the connection in the room.

“I spent 10 years as a folk singer in much smaller rooms,” he remembers. “It felt like a heart-to-heart connection, but this feels like a spiritual energy with a whole room. There’s an energy there that’s hard to simulate any other way.”

The Midnight paint with vibrant sonic colors as they prepare their new LP, tour the world [Interview]Edit 9 2
Photos by Zachary White/Dancing Astronaut

McEwan lives on the other end of the spectrum, calling
himself a “studio guy.”

“My real high comes when I’m working on a track and I crack the code,” he says. “You have the promise of something great, but you haven’t had to do the laborious work of executing it yet. You’re riding the high of all the possibilities, and you know where to take it.”

Combined, these two personalities and skill sets are unstoppable. With their music, The Midnight has touched countless lives with their ability to reach and comfort their fans—fans who “need to be told they’re OK, they’re loved and that and they’re not alone,” Lyle says. “We’re trying to build up the mythology, singing about monsters and vampires… But at the end of the day, the connection seems to happen when we just sort of recognize that human struggle is universal, and we’re all in it. Music is this magical thing that helps us feel a little less alone.”

McEwan agrees, saying that all of us “are the same when it comes down to it.”

“It sounds like such a cliché, but music is a way to unite people,” he says. “It’s the feeling of knowing that you’re meeting all these kindred spirits. You’re writing a song, and three years down the line you’re playing somewhere in Germany or St. Louis and someone comes up to you and says ‘you got me through a hard period of my life.’ That’s something that’s bigger than us.”

The Midnight paint with vibrant sonic colors as they prepare their new LP, tour the world [Interview]Edit 14 2
Photos by Zachary White/Dancing Astronaut

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 110

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 110Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here


I’ve loved Maduk and Dennis Pedersen‘s “Miles Apart” since its release last spring and was intrigued to see that Fox Stevenson had done a remix of the tune for Liquicity‘s Reflections Part 3. In true Fox Stevenson fashion, the producer has flipped the tune into a more energetic iteration, complete with his own harmonies underneath Ella Noël’s. It’s flawless.

Tobtok‘s name seems to be popping up everywhere, and his funky vintage style of house music keeps drawing me in. His latest is a collaboration with Adam Griffin and vocalist Hayley May. With a bold, anthemic melody and steady grooving beat, “The Stand Off (I Want You)” is irresistible. The Swedish producer knows how to craft tunes for the dance floor, and this is ready for just that.

Last month brought the arrival of a new Dimension song, “If You Want To”—an aggressive drum ‘n’ bass number with a dramatic, foreboding tone. Here in the following month, the British producer has reworked his own song into an electro interpretation, fueled by the sultry spoken vocals. This one has a more laid-back feel, but its underlying orchestral elements give the tune a bit of an eerie feel.

At long last, the second remix EP for The Midnight has arrived via Silk Music. It’s been more than two years since the release of the first one, but it appears lush remixes featured on this new collection have been worth the way. This take on the Nocturnal song is breathtaking, as Kobana builds a rich sonic landscape with his progressive house-inspired version of the song.

Essenger‘s new single, “Tether,” combines a wide range of styles effortlessly. It opens with a wistful guitar melody, leading into a nostalgia-fueled verse from the producer, who does his own vocals. “Tether” drips with emotion from start to finish and seems to encourage the listener to look inward and absorb the very soul of the song in a raw and real way.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 106

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 106Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here


A new set of remixes of The Midnight draws near. The Midnight Remixed 02 arrives on Silk Music on Sept. 27, previewed by this exceptional rework of “Shadows” by Uppermost. The French producer bathes the duo’s original in light, bringing it out of the, erm, shadows, to give it a blissful new tone.

Grum‘s latest Anjunabeats venture is a rework of Luminary‘s “Amsterdam.” The four-minute introspective piece is saturated with emotive trance goodness, composed of dreamlike synths, accented melodies, and drifting vocals. It’s dramatic and infectious.

We’re just a week shy of Moon Boots‘ new album, Bimini Road, and the producer continues to drop hints of what fans can expect from his second studio album. Moon Boots taps vocalist Nic Hanson for “Clear,” crafting a clean-cut, soulful atmosphere, with a dance floor-ready beat.

Dabin and Essenger‘s original “Home” tugged at listeners’ heartstrings all around the world upon its initial release. Now, with Dabin’s Wild Youth (The Remixes) compilation making its debut, fans can experience songs like “Home” in a new light, thanks to talented producers like Mazare, who adds a whole new layer to the emotive core of the tune.

On Aug. 30, Danny Howard relaunched his Nothing Else Matters imprint and celebrated with the release of a new song: “If You Were” with Eli & Fur. This six-minute house heater is the perfect combination of sultry vocals and irresistible beats.

NMF Roundup: NGHTMRE and ZHU link for new single, JOYRYDE reveals ‘MADDEN’ + more

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NMF Roundup: NGHTMRE and ZHU link for new single, JOYRYDE reveals ‘MADDEN’ + moreNGHTMRE Tessa Paisan Ritz Ybor 2017 39 Of 50

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

NGHTMRE and ZHU have linked with Kidd Keem to deliver the delectable “Man’s First Inhibition,” and Seven Lions, MitiS, and RBBTS join forces on “Break The Silence.” JOYRYDE has revealed the third single from his forthcoming LP, “MADDEN,” and Adventure Club, Said the Sky, and Caly Bevier flex their skills on “Already Know.” Duke & Jones try their hand at remixing Party Favor and graves’ “Reach For Me,” and Gareth Emery continues his Laserface takeover with “Laserface 01 (Aperture).” Fox Stevenson announces his debut album with the release of “Hold Steady,” and David Guetta and MORTEN take on a remix of Avicii’s “Heaven.” Also in today’s remix game is Ross From Friends, who puts his own spin on Flume and London Grammar’s “Let You Know.” Mura Masa and Clairo thrill with their release of “I Don’t Think I Can Do This Again,” and Ilan Bluestone reworks Cosmic Gate and Emma Hewitt’s “Be Your Sound.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Tessa Paisan

NMF Roundup: Diplo and Tove Lo team up, i_o reveals fiery ‘Death By Techno’ EP + more

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NMF Roundup: Diplo and Tove Lo team up, i_o reveals fiery ‘Death By Techno’ EP + moreDiplo Tim MosenfelderGetty Images

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Diplo continues to flood the music world with new tunes of all genres—the latest of which is a sultry house collaboration with Tove Lo. A-Trak, too, has been releasing a slew of new tunes, including a groovy remix of Axwell‘s “Nobody Else.” Fans of the deepest depths of bass will rejoice at the release of i_o‘s Death by Techno EP on mau5trap, and Ephwurd and Shapes join forces on “Desires.” Flava D puts her own scintillating spin on Anna Lunoe‘s “303,” and TOKiMONSTA casts a soothing spell on “Dream Chorus.” Nitti Gritti and Gammer release their highly anticipated “Underdogs,” a day after the tune premiered on Dancing Astronaut, and The Him tap Maria Hazell for melodic masterpiece “Found Me.” The Midnight bring the early ’90s back with “America Online,” and Wolfgang Gartner kicks up the intensity on “28 Grams.” Sick Individuals‘ new tune, “We Got It,” leads perfectly into the weekend, and Sullivan King and Kai Wachi take no prisoners on the formidable “Between the Lines.” Dimension returns with another drum ‘n’ bass masterpiece in “Devotion,” and STANDERWICK combines elements of rock and trance in “Never Gonna Step Down.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Tim Mosenfelder

Lunar Lunes: Just A Gent flips RL Grime and graves, The Knocks put their spin on Houses’ ‘Fast Talk’ + more

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Lunar Lunes: Just A Gent flips RL Grime and graves, The Knocks put their spin on Houses’ ‘Fast Talk’ + moreJust A Gent

Each week, New Music Friday sweeps through with torrential force, showering streaming platforms with immeasurable amounts of new tunes. Just like Dancing Astronaut rounds up 25 of the biggest songs of the week for the Hot 25 Spotify playlist each New Music Friday, Lunar Lunes serves as a landing pad for SoundCloud users who want a whole new dose of tunes to kick off the work week.

Just A Gent steps up to the remixing plate once again with a fierce reworking of RL Grime and graves‘ “Arcus,” as do The Knocks with their remix of Houses’ “Fast Talk.” Dillon Francis crafts his most contagious song yet with “Catchy Song,” featuring That Girl Lay Lay and T-Pain, and techno duo Gettoblaster bring “Get Dat” to Dirtybird. Paris Blohm taps Romysa for a gorgeous new single, “Warriors.” Flite flexes his drum & bass muscles on a feisty remix of Skrillex and Habstrakt‘s iconic “Chicken Soup,” and Kwon puts a laid-back spin on Hotel Garuda‘s “One Reason.” Adrian Lux unveils an extended cut of “Meditation,” and Kramder goes all in on a “raw sauce mix” of Splinta’s “Shock Therapy.” GANZ takes on Kovacs’ “My Love” in a new remix, and Barely Alive turn up the volume on a ferocious dubstep original, “Wack.”

The selection is updated every Lunes (Monday).

Premiere: The Midnight shine on synthwave remix of SYML’s ‘Clean Eyes’

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Premiere: The Midnight shine on synthwave remix of SYML’s ‘Clean Eyes’The Midnight Photo Credit Timothy Chan

After releasing their nostalgia-fueled Kids LP in September, LA-based synthwave duo The Midnight continue their tour de force into 2019 with new material: a remix for SYML.

SYML’s “Clean Eyes” initially came out the same week as Kids. Its upbeat, catchy vibe caught the ears of listeners across the country, leading the track into the top 30 on Billboard‘s alternative charts. Upon its release, SYML told Nettwerk Music Group that “Clean Eyes” was a “fun challenge” to create because of “the contrast between the intimate lyrics and anthemic choruses.”

Here, months later, The Midnight’s Tim McEwan and Tyler Lyle have leaned into the song’s intimate lyrics to craft something that’s wistful and introspective. Their retro take on the track uses ’80s-inspired synths and dreamy melodies to create a completely different mood. The dramatic synth stabs and filtered harmonies shape a new way to digest SYML’s vocals, and the final product is a beautifully slow-burning synthwave production that fits perfectly with SYML’s wistful lyrics.

“I’ve been a fan of [McEwan] for a minute,” SYML told DA. “I absolutely love what he did with the song. It’s one thing to slap some synths and beats on something and call it a remix. What The Midnight brings is another level.”

The Midnight’s “Clean Eyes” remix beautifully encompasses the concepts the duo build their music around: the sad beauty of seeing time pass and the aching awareness of impermanence.

Photo credit: Timothy Chan

Soak up some synthwave nostalgia in The Midnight’s new album, ‘Kids’

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Soak up some synthwave nostalgia in The Midnight’s new album, ‘Kids’The Midnight Kids

Soak up some synthwave nostalgia in The Midnight’s new album, ‘Kids’The MidnightLong gone are the carefree days of our youth. The breezy, blissful moments of our childhood have faded away into adulthood, and The Midnight take time to reflect on those times gone by in their new album. Though vocalist Tyler Lyle insists that “we are not a sentimental age,” the duo’s latest venture may suggest otherwise.

The nine-track Kids contrasts its somewhat darker predecessor: 2017’s Nocturnal, which was primed for late-night drives with its dramatic saxophone riffs and shadowy, intense undertones. Kids, which was released on Sept. 21, has an entirely different feel to it.

Set in 1985, the LP is ushered in by “Youth,” a shimmery track layered with audio snippets of broadcasters and children talking about the rise of computers and video games and what the technology could mean for the future of the world as it was known at the time. The album’s next track, “Wave,” starts much the same way, but it morphs into something much more recognizable as The Midnight’s style. Lyle’s vocals make their album debut on this track, insisting that “we are not a sentimental age,” and cites not wanting parents’ china and hooking up with strangers, never to be seen again. The album’s namesake track is broken into two parts: a prelude that follows “Wave” and a reprise that wraps up the collection. The prelude takes a somber tone, as Lyle sings wistfully about the arcade closing and monsters in the spare bedroom.

“Kids are sad, the sky is blue
There are monsters in the spare bedroom”

Its forlorn theme carries into the introduction of the previously released “Lost Boy,” a clear album standout. The duo teased the track’s July release by pairing it with clips of emotive scenes from Stranger Things, as the filtered vocals serenade, “I was a lost boy when I met you.” A soaring guitar melody accentuates the song’s themes flawlessly, leading out into into a brief interlude.

“‘Cause in the dark there are no strangers at all”

Cereal hits the bowl as a kid flips through the television channels in “Saturday Mornings,” finding commercials for The Tranformers, Blockbuster video, Atari Games, and more. The interlude gracefully delivers the listener from a carefree weekend morning to the empowering, adventure-filled “Explorers.” The Midnight pay homage to the explorers of the ’80s, giving a hat tip to the “spark-igniters,” the “Lost Ark Raiders,” the “lion-tamers.”

“Let it be said, and let it be known
He who is free is never alone”

Its hopeful undertones merge into the equally hope-filled “America 2.” Lyle’s vocals tell the tale of going to look for “America 2,” backed by the duo’s signature guitar melodies and retro synths. When it was released in August, the artwork for “America 2” depicted an ’80s-era mall, with a sign reading “permanently closed.” The neighboring arcade, however, was still lit up in its hazy neon glow, leading The Midnight to one of the LP’s final songs, “Arcade Dreams.” The instrumental track twinkles with a plucky melody and a dreamy atmosphere.

“We grow up and move away
The seasons pass, but the monsters stay”

To close out their latest endeavor, Lyle and Tim McEwan have tapped the West LA Children’s Choir to truly bring the kids to Kids. They bring back the theme from the prelude in a six-minute rendition that spans from an introspective guitar segment to the simple and sweet vocals children’s choir, summing up the LP’s overall contemplative and nostalgia-filled aura.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 55

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 55Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.


Talented Monstercat standout Richard Caddock has reimagined himself as an artist with the debut of a new moniker, Keepsake. His first release, “This Time Around” featuring Slyleaf, is a lighthearted, bouncing track that’s highlighted by a merry melody and spirited vocals from himself and Slyleaf. Its carefree atmosphere is reminiscent of old-school Owl City tracks and marks his first release on the label since 2016.


Continuing on the multi-week of loving and promoting the forthcoming Destinations, Vol. 1 EP, Vorso delivers “Crisis.” This intense, four-minute ball of energy is marks the fourth release on the five-track EP. It’s a drum & bass slice of heaven, smashing and exceeding expectations with its forceful, bass-heavy tendencies.


In mid-August, Faux Tales tapped vocalist Ingrid Lukas for an alluring cinematic experience he calls “Rise Now.” Lukas’ voice captivates immediately, drawing the listener in with her wistful singing. Faux Tales backs up her vocals with astoundingly stellar production, crafting a mesmerizing soundscape of dramatic interludes and delicate piano melodies.


Friction‘s “Running” featuring Raphaella may have come out last October, but I’ll confess: I didn’t discover it until the release of the UK drum & bass maestro’s debut album on Sept. 7. All of Connections is beautifully constructed, highlighted by entrancing standouts like this one. Connections has been four years in the making, and it’s well worth the wait.


In an interesting turn of events leading up to their album release, The Midnight have unveiled an instrumental track called “Arcade Dreams.” Kids‘ other releases so far have been vocal-centric, but “Arcade Dreams” doesn’t need vocals to stand out. It’s beautiful as it is. Twinkling synths rise and fall in a dreamy pattern, invoking waves of nostalgia that wash over the listener from start to finish.