Watch The Chainsmokers perform ‘World War Joy’ cuts live from New York City

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Watch The Chainsmokers perform ‘World War Joy’ cuts live from New York CityGames 6 Galen Oakes

The Chainsmokers continued to flaunt their status as certified crowd pleasers from the TODAY plaza, where the duo convened with some of their recent collaborators to perform for the Today Citi Summer Concert Series. Ty Dolla $ign and bülow joined Drew Taggart to deliver a live rendition of their recent single, “Do You Mean.” The Chainsmokers also linked with Bebe Rexha. The versatile songstress stopped by to vocalize The Chainsmokers’ latest World War Joy offering, “Call You Mine.”

While The Chainsmokers’ set was primarily presently leaning in its focalization of the producers’ newer material, the duo nevertheless issued a nod to a celebrated catalog classic, “Paris.” Today’s 2019 programming touts a number of blockbuster artists, including Aloe Blacc, Lizzo, and OneRepublic, among others, all of whom are slated to perform later this summer. Watch The Chainsmokers’ Today set, here.

Photo credit: Galen Oakes

Miley Cyrus Can’t Stop Getting In Her Own Way

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Miley CyrusCan you believe it’s been less than 10 years since Miley Cyrus released “Party In The U.S.A.”? The song, which reached #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and became her bridge from the Disney Channel to a grownup mainstream audience, feels like it has existed for several lifetimes. It was in fact released in August … More »

The Chainsmokers Receive an 80’s Infused Remix from Trueblue

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Hey dance music fans! Hope you are enjoying the wind-down from your mid-day week! We just wanted to share with a nice little remix that up and coming producer Trueblue has just released. Trueblue took The Chainsmokers recent record, The One, and really showed us what you can do to make a remix special. Trueblue

The post The Chainsmokers Receive an 80’s Infused Remix from Trueblue appeared first on EDM Sauce.

What You’ve Been Waiting for “In Between” Spring and Summer

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The exciting, electronic duo, LZRD returns with another track. Titled “In Between,” the track begins with a very pop vibe to it. Atmospheric noise fills the ears of listeners at the start. A strong vocal is accompanied by sweet melodies and claps. More drums come in before the bridge. The interlude features a guitar lead,

The post What You’ve Been Waiting for “In Between” Spring and Summer appeared first on EDM Sauce.

The Chainsmokers reunite with Bebe Rexha for ‘Call You Mine’ from upcoming sophomore LP

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The Chainsmokers reunite with Bebe Rexha for ‘Call You Mine’ from upcoming sophomore LPDqtwPGPQAADMhK

The Chainsmokers and Bebe Rexha are a pairing that haven’t shared a title together in nearly a half-decade, although both acts’ status have greatly shifted since their last collaboration. The EDM duo initially began their ascend to superstardom with frequent remixes, offering their vision on a handful of music’s most notable releases at the time. One of those profile-building remixes was The Chainsmokers’ illustrious spin on Rexha’s “Drinking About You” and nearly six million streams later, it has remained a fan-favorite in the duo’s lengthy catalog. Fast forward five years to 2019 and the trio is officially reuniting for a proper collaboration as the fourth single from The Chainsmokers’ upcoming sophomore LP ‘World War Joy‘ with “Call You Mine.”

The new single serves as another compelling sucess as The Chainsmokers maintain top form during the front half of 2019, following up on their recent Ty Dolla $ign and bülow-assisted single, “Do You Mean.” Now, “Call You Mine” automatically draws likeness to The Chainsmokers’ inescapable smash hit with Hasley, “Closer” as Bebe Rexha’s indelible lyrics are consolidated alongside the duo’s intricately-designed future bass instrumental. Over time, Rexha has become an inspirational figure to The Chainsmokers, with the duo expressing,

“Just want to leave a note that Bebe Rexha was one of the first artist we ever met. We were both basically nobodies at the time but always were there for one another offering advice and supporting and now here we are 6 years later with a massive song together! We love you Bebe!”

The music video for “Call You Mine” may be the most enticing element of the release as Drew Taggart and Alex Pall have their lives abruptly taken at the hands of Bebe Rexha.

Featured image: Rukes

NMF Roundup: Madeon returns, Dog Blood release four-track EP + more

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NMF Roundup: Madeon returns, Dog Blood release four-track EP + moreMadeon Photo Cred Rukes

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

At long last, Madeon makes a triumphant return with his first original in years, “All My Friends.” Dog Blood, too, impress with a new four-track EP, Turn Off the Lights. Slander, Said the Sky, and JT Roach concoct brilliant “Potions” in their new release, and Nicky Romero takes on Kygo and Rita Ora’s “Carry On” in a new remix. The Bloody Beetroots and Dr. Fresch prove to be a formidable combo as they deliver their new collaboration, “Fkn Face,” and Yotto puts his own spin on RÜFÜS DU SOL’s iconic “Underwater.” Rinzen brings a touch of magic to Lane 8’s “Visions,” and Deorro eases fans into summer with “Obvious.” Maceo Plex delivers a lengthy, soothing single, “When the Lights Are Out,” and Petit Biscuit and JP Cooper join forces for “We Were Young.” Will Clarke puts a shimmering spin on Phantoms’ “Designs for You,” and Arty brings the “Sunshine” to his newest release. The Chainsmokers and Bebe Rexha dip between pop and dance music on “Call You Mine,” and Sofi Tukker link with Colombian duo Bomba Estéreo for a tropical number, “Playa Grande.” The latest Chase & Status LP has finally arrived, bringing with it songs like “Shut Up,” and Figure teams up with Hi I’m Ghost for “Intergalactic.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Rukes

Saturday Night Session 021: Elephante opens up about being a vocalist on more music moving forward and gives fans a look into a day in his life

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Saturday Night Session 021: Elephante opens up about being a vocalist on more music moving forward and gives fans a look into a day in his lifeElephante

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Every artist has a unique story when it comes to their foray into music. Some come into notoriety carrying out their lifelong dream of becoming an artist and others stumble into the career accidentally. Tim Wu, who is more popularly known as DJ and music producer Elephante, found himself sitting alone in a music studio at 25 through neither of these paths. He admits that, would he have been able to go back and tell his 16-year-old self that he would end up becoming a DJ and music producer, he wouldn’t have believed it.

Wu grew up an avid John Mayer fan, which ultimately inspired him to play in bands and write songs that he would perform on the acoustic guitar at local showcases in his hometown of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Music has always been an incredibly big part of his life, but Tennis ultimately landed him at Harvard University where he played and locked in a career in consulting after graduation. When he wasn’t at his consulting job, Wu discovered electronic music production, and he became hooked. The more he produced music, the more miserable he became at his job to the point where he quit. He was so concerned about his parent’s reaction that he spent over a year lying to them about the decision to became a full time musician.

He reminisces on telling his parents he had stopped working as a consultant to pursue music, stating, “I think they were mostly confused, and obviously worried. Like what do you mean you’re gonna be a DJ? Can you get healthcare doing that? But at the end of the day, I think they knew how unhappy I was and that it was something I had to do, and were mostly just hoping I didn’t get hooked on heroin or something. I mean, can you imagine moving to a different country, working your ass off your whole life to give your kids a better life, and then having said kid tell you they were quitting their job to be a DJ? I would have murdered me. Now though they are super stoked – I brought them on stage for a couple shows and fans were asking for pictures with them and stuff, so I think they get a kick out of it. My mom still reminds me every time we talk not to do heroin though.”

The rest is history with Wu’s production career, although those who are familiar with the producer’s music would hardly be surprised to learn that Wu’s artistry grew out of his love of songwriting as a teenager. In a world where commercial crossover releases dominate the charts, Wu has found a way to bring vocals front and center in his releases without producing a stream of three note drops that leave the vocals and vocals alone to differentiate one track from the next. His body of work spans for folky “Come Back For You” featuring Matluck to beautiful “Catching On” featuring Nevve.

Wu recently released his own cover of “Shooting Stars,” which is the second release he has put out with his own vocals. Wu speaks about the decision to utilize his own vocals on his music, noting, “I was a singer-songwriter before I started producing music, so I’ve been singing for forever. But it was really important that my voice was the right one for the song, and I wasn’t just singing it for vanity’s sake. If someone else could sing it better, I’d have them do it instead.”

Those who have seen Wu perform live will recognize his rendition of the track, which has been cut in and out of his live performances since he made the cover in 2014. Now that he has begun to release music with his own vocals, Wu has developed a stream of covers that he will be putting out over the next few months.

Wu gives fans insight into his decision to utilize his own vocals, which is a decision more producers have seemingly been making over the past few years thanks to artists like Calvin Harris and The Chainsmokers singing on their own original releases. He states, “Especially after The Chainsmokers had so much success with Drew singing – there were a bunch of DJs who were like ‘oh I can sing too,’ and some really can, and others were like… should you though? And I wanted to make sure I wasn’t just doing it for the sake of it. Producing the songs I sing feels somewhat different, just because I know I always can go back and change the line.”

2019 will be a big year for Wu, who notes he has multiple projects in the pipeline. For now, he is still inducing euphoria through his live sets and original releases, including a high energy and genre-bending Saturday Night Session that takes listeners through a dynamic journey. When asked what kind of a Saturday night the mix is going to get listener’s ready for, Wu states, ” The best Saturday night of their life!!! You were planning on taking it easy, but instead you listen and are inspired to go out and you meet the love of your life and go get pizza with them and on a whim buy Powerball tickets and you win a billion dollars. That kind of Saturday night.”

_____________________________________________________________________________

Where do you draw inspiration from when you sit down to produce music? Can you give us some insight into your creative process?
Honestly, sounds and melodies and lyrics kinda just pop into my head at random times, sometimes in the shower, when I’m about to fall asleep in a hotel, when I’m listening to music or reading or whatever. I have no idea where exactly it comes from though. I’ve learned to write down or record a voice memo any time one of these little moments strikes, so by the time I’m sitting down in the studio I have a bunch of ideas that I’m excited to work on. Once I’m there, it’s all about just really diving in an exploring that idea – I’m always asking myself what comes next? What would be cool with this? I try to work away from the computer as much as possible – playing piano, jamming on guitar, writing/drawing in notebooks, whatever. And I just try to keep finding that next little cool moment, that next little sound, and then on the good days I come to 8 hours later and something exists that didn’t before. On the bad days the voices in my head are silent, and it’s like well, guess I’ll try again tomorrow.

“Glass Mansion” was your first time singing on one of your songs, and rumor has it you’ll be doing this more often moving forward. Were you nervous at all to jump into also being a vocalist? Does producing a track with your own vocals feel different than producing a track with someone else singing on it?
I was, but for different reasons than you’d expect. I was a singer-songwriter before I started producing music, so I’ve been singing for forever. But it was really important that my voice was the right one for the song, and I wasn’t just singing it for vanity’s sake. If someone else could sing it better, I’d have them do it instead. So it took a long time for me to write a song that I knew I absolutely had to sing, and really feel confident in that, and “Glass Mansion” was the first time I was like, ‘I have to do this.’ Especially after The Chainsmokers had so much success with Drew singing – there were a bunch of DJs who were like ‘oh I can sing too,’ and some really can, and others were like… should you though? And I wanted to make sure I wasn’t just doing it for the sake of it. Producing the songs I sing feels somewhat different, just because I know I always can go back and change the line, or change the phrasing or whatever, which can actually be kind of a negative. But over the years I’ve gotten better at understanding what works and really building the song around the vocals, whether it’s me or someone else, and not just slapping a beat over an acapella.

Do you have any guilty pleasures?
Yes, eating almond butter out of the tub. I’m doing that right now actually.

When you aren’t touring, what does a normal day in your life look like?
Ideally I’ll play some pickup basketball in the morning, then eat and hit the studio. I fucking love the studio. It’s what I’d want to do even if I wasn’t making a living doing it. You know how when you’re a kid you have things that you had to finish your homework before you can do, and that’s the thing that gets you through the day? That’s making music for me. It’s so much fun I’m still kinda baffled that I get paid to do it. 

You have a really interesting story- you went to Harvard, got a consulting job, and then quit to pursue music full time. You didn’t tell your parents that you quit for a while though. How did they react when you first told them, and how do they feel about your career as a musician now that you’ve become so successful?
I think they were mostly confused, and obviously worried. Like what do you mean you’re gonna be a DJ? Can you get healthcare doing that? But at the end of the day, I think they knew how unhappy I was and that it was something I had to do, and were mostly just hoping I didn’t get hooked on heroin or something. I mean, can you imagine moving to a different country, working your ass off your whole life to give your kids a better life, and then having said kid tell you they were quitting their job to be a DJ? I would have murdered me. Now though they are super stoked – I brought them on stage for a couple shows and fans were asking for pictures with them and stuff, so I think they get a kick out of it. My mom still reminds me every time we talk not to do heroin though.

What is one thing your fans don’t know about you?
I’m allergic to bees? And dogs and cats and horses and pretty much anything with fur. Which sucks cuz I love dogs. Can’t have it all.

What kind of a Saturday night is your Saturday Night Session mix going to get listeners ready for?
Best Saturday night of their life!!! You were planning on taking it easy, but instead you listen and are inspired to go out and you meet the love of your life and go get pizza with them and on a whim buy Powerball tickets and you win a billion dollars. That kind of Saturday night.

Midnight Kids dance back to better times with ‘Those Were The Days’

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Midnight Kids dance back to better times with ‘Those Were The Days’Webp.net Resizeimage

It’s hard to believe that LA-based duo, Midnight Kids have only released three original tracks of their own given the amount of support they have garnered from top-tier artists like The Chainsmokers, Alesso, Don Diablo, and more. Midnight Kids is comprised of Kyle Girard and Dylan Lee, whose latest original, titled “Those Were The Days,” is a worthy addition to their already infectious catalog.

The vocals initially lure the listener in, and then guide them through melodic ebbs and flows of soothing electronic synths juxtaposed by smooth, ambient background hums. Jared Lee serves as the lead vocalist on the track, and despite moments of energetic upticks, the listener is left in a state of calm upon the track’s close.

The duo issued a release about the nostalgia-driven song, stating, “‘Those Were The Days’ was a record that came together quicker than anything we’ve done before… It was something that felt extremely reminiscent of the youth we’ve both experienced. From the late night drives, to first kisses, and the moments we’ve shared with loved ones, this record hits home for us and we knew we had to make it come to life.”

“Those Were The Days” is out now via RCA Records.

Photo Credit: Sam Gay

The Time Has Come To Discuss Yungblud

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YungbludThe name “youngblood” has a rich history in pop music. First there were the Youngbloods, the critically acclaimed folk-rockers best known for their 1967 hit “Get Together.” Decades later along came the YoungBloodZ, the Atlanta rap duo best known for their 2003 smash “Damn!” alongside Lil Jon. Many others emerged along the way including Sydney … More »

The Chainsmokers show off their pop sensibilities on new single, ‘Do You Mean’

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The Chainsmokers show off their pop sensibilities on new single, ‘Do You Mean’51926010 2270053173027060 2260313881974931456 O

The Chainsmokers embark on a lyrical search for sincerity in their new single, “Do You Mean.” Ty Dolla $ign and pop vocalist, bülow, hop on the track to help The Chainsmokers articulate the question that sits at the lyrical core of the song: “do you mean what you say?” The Chainsmokers’ resident singer, Drew Taggart once again lends his vocals to the production, rendering “Do You Mean” a collaborative affair when it comes to verses sung.

“Do You Mean” is the third single to hail from The Chainsmokers’ forthcoming album, World War Joy. The American DJ duo preceded “Do You Mean” with the 5 Seconds of Summer-assisted “Who Do You Love,” and more recently, “Kills You Slowly.” “Do You Mean” continues The Chainsmokers’ pensive, questioning, and generally confessional lyrical course, suggesting World War Joy to be an album deeply interested in introspection and interiority, as far as lyrics are concerned.

“Do You Mean” harnesses The Chainsmokers’ pop sensibilities: warm pop chords and an inviting, looping vocal hook outfit the single with some of the pop genre’s classic sonic accessories. The style of Ty Dolla $ign’s contribution further solidifies “Do You Mean” as a ponderous pop production. While Ty Dolla $ign seems always to move with dexterity between R&B and hip-hop productions, the artist’s distinctive crooning on “Do You Mean” bears none of the energetic verse spitting that frequently peppers his more hip-hop leaning numbers, like “Clout.”

In “Do You Mean,” listeners gain the tempered rasp of Ty Dolla $ign’s singing voice, in a pop context. The Chainsmokers tread the pop territory that has now long been familiar to them for quite some time now, and judging from the sound of “Do You Mean,” The Chainsmokers are not only acquainted with this sonic terrain–they navigate it with finesse.

Photo Credit: The Chainsmokers/Facebook