Welcome To Superstardom, Camila Cabello

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Camila Cabello stuck the landing so emphatically that it’s easy to forget she leapt in the first place. This time last year the 20-year-old Cuban-Mexican singer from Miami was fresh out of Fifth Harmony, her generation’s most popular girl group, assembled by Simon Cowell from an array of teenage strangers on the short-lived American edition … More »

Watch Paramore Cover SZA’s “20 Something”

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Paramore have come along way from their emo/pop-punk roots; just look at their cover choices. As The FADER points out, the band has taken to playing a piece of “20 Something,” the minimal acoustic song from Ctrl, the great recent album from Paramore’s fellow beloved pop phenom SZA. In concert, … More »

♫ Listen: Kendrick Lamar & SZA – “All The Stars”

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Kendrick Lamar and SZA release Black Panther track ‘All The Stars’

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TDE siblings Kendrick Lamar and SZA are two of hip hop’s most globally acclaimed figures. The former’s discography is widely recognized as the most critically sound body of work in hip hop’s vast history — not undue to the chart topping release of DAMN. back in April — and the latter’s critical masterpiece, Ctrl, solidified her as one of the genre’s most inventive rising artists.

Marvel Studios’ film Black Panther comes out in theaters February 16th, 2018, Kendrick Lamar set to write, produce and curate the soundtrack for the Ryan Coogler-directed film. “Marvel Studios’ Black Panther is amazing, from its cast to its director. The magnitude of this film showcases a great marriage of art and culture” reads a press release from Lamar, “I’m truly honored to contribute my knowledge of producing sound and writing music alongside Ryan and Marvel’s vision.”

The collaborative single “All The Stars” marks the first released track from the film’s soundtrack and sees Lamar and SZA fuse an invigorating pop chorus along with two standout solo verses. The track is sure to enrapture fans and provide a bit of viral hype leading up to the films release next month.

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At long last, Skrillex has delivered his Kendrick Lamar-endorsed ‘Humble’ remix [Download]

Rihanna & SZA – Consideration (Will Clarke remix)

 

Kendrick Lamar & SZA – “All The Stars”

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TDE labelmates Kendrick Lamar and SZA both had huge years in 2017, with Kendrick cementing his spot atop the rap hierarchy and SZA becoming the first new honest-to-god R&B star we’ve seen in a while. And both of them released two of the best albums of the year. So it’s very cool to see them … More »

Rihanna & SZA – Consideration (Will Clarke remix)

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Will Clarke tackles Rihanna and SZA’s collab, “Consideration,” in his latest imaginative reproduction, tricking out the track in a musical “glitter” that, in accordance with Rihanna’s lyrics, “makes it gold.”

A producer of booty shakin’ beats, Clarke crafts a remix that functions as much as an attitude-infused flip of the original as it does an invitation to writhe to the song’s dark house glow on the dance floor. Airy synths ascend and fall as Clark splices the original, foregoing the majority of the song’s lyrical work to loop Rihanna’s second verse, “Let me cover your sh*t in glitter I could make it gold.”

When played to a live audience, Clarke’s take won’t fail to provoke an anticipation surrounding the song’s build, and a comparable satisfaction taken in its descent, Clarke orienting the remix’s fluttering build and drop around the lyric. Clarke puts forth a remake that is sure to shimmer among the various songs in his set lists.

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How Musicians Turned To Their Mothers During A Destabilizing Year

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One of the most disarming moments in a sea of disarming moments on Frank Ocean’s 2016 album Blonde comes four tracks in, after the haze of “Pink + White” clears and a keyboard interlude trots in. Over the keyboard, a woman’s voice, scratched by phone compression, warns at length about the dangers of using alcohol … More »

SZA – “The Weekend” Video

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SZA’s remarkable debut album Ctrl made it close to the top of our 50 Best Albums Of 2017 list, and she’s closing out the year with a new video. “The Weekend” is a sultry slow-burner that appears toward the end of the LP, and SZA’s visual treatment for the song is a lonely … More »

TDE Announces Christmas Concert & Toy Drive With Rihanna, E-40

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TDE — the label and crew behind Kendrick Lamar, SZA, and Schoolboy Q — is one of of the all-time great winning streaks in music, and maybe all their good karma has something to do with it. Every year, right around Christmas, the label throws a massive concert and toy drive in a disadvantaged area … More »

Top 30 Albums of 2017

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Gathering our favorite albums of the year is always such a challenge. 2017 was a year where our society may have taken a few steps backwards – exclusionary politics threatened personal freedoms and made some of us feel unwelcome within our own homes. It was 2017’s music – a combination of bright newcomers and longtime favorites – that kept us going forward. Moses Sumney made his eclectic debut with Aromanticism, a genre-defying collection of strummed guitars, twisting synth lines and buzzing harmonies. St. Vincent reworked her labyrinthine tendencies into chrome-clad future pop and Julien Baker exposed the darkest shadows of her psyche to give us all appreciation for every beam of light. Meanwhile, Kendrick Lamar and Bjork invited us into their unique and awe-inspiring worlds. 

And though this pursuit was a challenge, looking back on this year’s music has been quite therapeutic for us. The Wild Honey Pie has come together to list the albums that allowed us to escape to places where each one of us felt welcome and understood. There’s no theme to this year’s list, but our top albums do have one thing in common: in their own special way, each of these artists broke down boundaries to remind us that we are all more similar than we might think.

We’d like to invite you into some of these places, where we hope you’ll feel welcome, too. These are our favorite albums of 2017.

Playlist

30. (Sandy) Alex G – Rocket

29. Tyler, The Creator – Flower Boy

28. Jessie Ware – Glasshouse

27. Priests – Nothing Feels Natural

26. Jay Som – Everybody Works

25. Ryan Adams – Prisoner

24. Perfume Genius – No Shape

23. Slowdive – Slowdive

22. King Krule – The OOZ

21. Sylvan Esso – What Now

20. LCD Soundsystem – American Dream

19. Julie Byrne – Not Even Happiness

18. Vagabon – Infinite Worlds

17. Vince Staples – Big Fish Theory

16. Henry Jamison – The Wilds

 

15. Fleet Foxes – Crack-Up

14. HAIM – Something To Tell You

13. alt-J – Relaxer

12. SZA – Ctrl

11. Cigarettes After Sex – Cigarettes After Sex


10. Mount Eerie – A Crow Looked at Me


Phil Elverum of Mount Eerie recently lost his wife, fellow musician and comic-book artist Geneviève Castrée, to a heartbreaking battle with cancer. This concept album is dedicated to her, and does not shy away from painful details of their story. A Crow Looked at Me is not just about the way sickness and death infiltrate life, but it is an exploration of what it means to carry on. Elverum says, “there is an echo of Geneviève that still rings, a reminder of the love and infinity beneath all of this obliteration.” This album so beautifully captures that echo.

9. Overcoats – YOUNG

Young is a folk-pop testament to friendship, built from the tightly wound voices of Hana and JJ, and fortified in their dancy and electronic production. This album is about what happens when an unhealthy relationship slowly eats away at who you are. Hana and JJ show us that in friendship and harmony, we can find ourselves again and help to build each other back up. Watching these two grow has been an honor for us, whether they were performing in front of a campfire at our very own Welcome Campers or embracing each other on stage in front of a sold-out audience at Bowery Ballroom.

8. Kendrick Lamar – DAMN.

Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN. is a statement piece — an effort that not only showcases the rapper’s immense talent for spitting rhymes that tackle complex social issues, but one that also sets aside Lamar from his contemporaries as a brave voice never lacking honesty in its approach. DAMN. is as bombastic as lead single “HUMBLE.”, as tightly coiled and cutting in meaning as standout track “DNA.” and as expansive as its collaborations with Rihanna, Zacari and U2 might suggest. DAMN. is a much-needed, explosive force, as conspicuous and unabashed as the caps lock and requisite punctuation of its title.   

7. Julien Baker – Turn Out the Lights

This album by Julien Baker is a special one. Baker so candidly shares stories of addiction and what it means to be truly consumed in darkness. However, as she brings us into this place, she infuses it with beauty and grace, delivering so many chilling moments of release. She does not sugar-coat the repeated moments of pain and disappointment, but she does find hope within them, belting out her words so powerfully as if they themselves contain the source of the light (and maybe they do). This album has meant so much to us and I’m sure it has to so many others as well. 

6. St. Vincent – MASSEDUCTION

Prefaced by the gently ridged heartbreak and teetering chords of “New York,” St. Vincent’s fifth studio album served as a concentrated break into pop music. Masseduction is a rollercoaster filled with twists and turns that allow Annie Clark to extend her repertoire — slipping into the role of abandoned lover, disco queen, enabler – all without sacrificing her love for rougher edges. Behind the iron-clad pop hooks lies an album full of complex emotional and social machinery, where Clark can convincingly rouse adrenaline-driven love, or evaporate the shadow of a lover between the swelling of a string orchestra and her own breath.  

5. Lorde – Melodrama

If any moment captures the tender heartbreak behind Melodrama best, it’s the exact midpoint of the album, where, in the midst of the outro to the first part of “Hard Feelings/Loveless,” the song kicks back into one last verse. “Three years loved you every single day, it made me weak…Now I’ll fake it every single day ‘till I don’t need fantasy, ‘til I feel you leave,” Lorde sings, as memories of the rush of first love well up involuntarily. Melodrama is about accepting these pieces as they come back to you, even when doing so is so difficult. The album serves as a beautifully constructed, often pained reminder that even after momentous loss, you are still whole.

4. Bjork – Utopia

It’s no surprise that Bjork made this list, as her innovation has essentially changed music forever. But what does “utopia” sound like for Bjork? This is an album of love songs, a romantic journal containing flutes, choirs and birds that elevate us beyond the reality that we know. She sings of paradise after healing, giving and receiving love unabashedly. She feels lighter here, which is reflected in the airy instrumentals. Bjork sings, “loss of love, we all have suffered / how we make up for it defines who we, who we are” a realization that seems to be the centerpiece of Utopia.

3. Phoebe Bridgers – Stranger In The Alps

Phoebe Bridgers is one of our favorite new artists of the year. Every song on this album feels like a late-night conversation with a trusted friend. Bridgers drops us directly into her world, tackling feelings of unexplainable sadness, friendship and death. Bridgers has a true gift for finding the right words and remaining brutally honest, transforming the mundane into the alluring, making a “stack of mail and a tall can” sound so profound. This album contains echoes of intimacy and morbidity, reminiscent of her emo/folk predecessors Elliot Smith and tourmate/collaborator Conor Oberst. Ultimately, this is an album that we have found so soothing, so inescapably truthful and so reflective of the times. 

2. Moses Sumney – Aromanticism

This debut LP from Moses Sumney stretches wide across space and time. Sumney transcends genre in Aromanticism, weaving together ambient synths, acoustic guitars and soulful melodies. The songs on this album take on many different forms – some just a few sentences spoken above a horn section and some with no lyrics at all, just winding melodies cradled in Sumney’s silky voice. Contrary to many of the albums on this list, this one is not about love but rather the lack thereof. Sumney writes in pure poetry about the relationship to the body and its role in romance and identity. He turns the body to liquid and wings to plastic, disassembling it until it becomes clear that we cannot be defined by our bodies, nor can we be defined by our relationships or our past. Aromanticism may be showing us that we are not meant to be defined at all, but rather, we are just meant to be.

1. Big Thief – Capacity

We chose Capacity as our number 1 album of the year because it is the one we’ve had on repeat since it came out, and it has personally meant the most to us this year. Big Thief continues to amaze us, whether it is the tactful and imagistic storytelling of Adrianne Lenker or the pure magic they create on stage, this band is truly hypnotizing, and Capacity is an excellent portrait of their strengths. I remember the first time I heard the lyrics “there are no enemies / we’re make-believing everything” from the title track. Capacity is a storybook containing several of these wisdom-filled moments. This record is imaginative, emotional and timeless, and we hold it very close to our hearts here at The Wild Honey Pie.