Spotify and Ancestry to curate personalized ‘soundtracks of heritage’

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Spotify and Ancestry to curate personalized ‘soundtracks of heritage’Screen Shot 2017 09 25 At 1.07.22 PM

Spotify and genealogical historical record company, Ancestry, will work together to curate personalized playlists comprised of the top releases from the cultures of the listeners’ ancestors. Ancestry.com users’ AncestryDNA test results will identify the specific cultures to which participants’ ancestors belonged. Spotify and Ancestry will then use that information to craft playlists that encompass the top releases across the cultures of one’s ancestors. “Someone with Chinese heritage might get classical musician Wu Fei on their playlist, while a person with a Spanish background might get the rock band Los Sírex. This will ‘encourage [Ancestry’s] audience to explore the soundtrack of their heritage,’” said Spotify’s Head of Partner Solutions, Danielle Lee.

Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer at Ancestry, Vineet Mehra says the joint initiative between Spotify and Ancestry is about “so much more than the stats and the data and the records.” “How do we help people experience their culture and not just read about it?” Mehra adds. “Music seemed like an obvious way to do that.” Those interested can see how diverse their current musical preferences are via Spotify and Ancestry’s “Musical DNA pie chart,” accessible here.

H/T: HYPEBEAST

Independent Artists Can Now Upload Their Music Directly To Spotify

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Beginning today (9/20), Spotify will begin allowing a select group of independent artists the ability to upload their music directly onto the streaming platform through their Spotify For Artists account, the company announced. The program, which is launching in beta format, has been quietly tested with a small group of artists — including Noname, Michael … More »

Spotify now allows independent artists to publish music directly to the platform, effectively bypassing distributors

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Spotify now allows independent artists to publish music directly to the platform, effectively bypassing distributorsSpotify Testing Skippable Ads

Originally tested among a small sample size of independent artists, Spotify For Artists will now assume full functionality on September 20. New Spotify For Artists accounts will enable select independent artists who maintain their own copyrights and are not required to meet label or distribution agreements to directly upload their releases to the digital streaming platform. The feature allows the artists to immediately make new music available via the platform, or to alternatively schedule songs to go live at a predetermined time, but the central and, for Spotify, unprecedented liberty that the accounts extend to indie artists is the freedom to bypass music distributors, placing the musicians in control.

Spotify plans to extend a limited number of invitations to the Spotify For Artists accounts to a “few hundred U.S.-based independent artists.” Those interested in acquiring one of the accounts can sign up for a mailing list that will announce ensuing invites to come in the time that follows Spotify’s official launch of the new function. “We’ve focused on making the tool easy, flexible, and transparent,” Spotify For Artists’ Kene Anoliefo said. “There will be no limit or constraint on how often [artists] can upload. We think that can open up a really interesting creative space for artists to begin sharing their music to their fans on Spotify.” Artists who independently upload to Spotify will receive royalty payments through Stripe, and can expect to receive 50 percent of Spotify’s net revenue, as well as 100 percent of royalties on their own music.

Spotify For Artists effectively alters the process by which independent artists in charge of their own copyrights disseminate music and earn compensation. Spotify For Artists account represent a seamless all-in-one method by which to distribute music, track streams, in-app followers, royalties, and incoming payments from Spotify.

H/T: Billboard 

Former Spotify sales executive sues company for alleged gender discrimination

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Former Spotify sales executive sues company for alleged gender discriminationSpotify Ceo Daniel Ek Credit Wsj

Former Spotify sales executive Hong Perez has filed a lawsuit against the streaming giant for gender discrimination and defamation. The lawsuit alleges that Spotify was the host of a “boys club” culture that led to “systematic discrimination” against women, and directly names Perez’s prior boss, Brian Berner, as a key perpetrator in the organization of “boys’ trips” that excluded comparatively better qualified women from attendance on trips to large scale events like the Sundance Film Festival in 2016 and 2017.

Perez’s complaint claims that Berner’s ethical misconduct at the company prompted her removal from Spotify’s staff, after Berner supposedly accepted free tickets to Madison Square Garden and carried out an unapproved discounting deal. Perez alleges that her former supervisor blamed her for the code of conduct violations, which led Spotify to fire Perez. Perez’s case maintains that Berner was not only negligent and unprofessional in his company interactions, but “was well aware of [fellow] male employees violating the code of conduct, yet did nothing.”

Perez cites all-male excursions to strip clubs, an HR executive’s comment that his curse word of choice is “c*nt,” and a CFO’s remark that he “does not care about diversity at the company” as further instances of the accused internal hostility at Spotify. “At Spotify, we do not tolerate discrimination of any kind at any level,” a representative for the Swedish media platform told Variety“While we cannot comment on the specific details of a pending litigation, these claims are without merit.”

H/T: High Snobiety

Spotify abandons prior download cap, now allows subscribers to save up to 10,000 tracks per device

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Spotify abandons prior download cap, now allows subscribers to save up to 10,000 tracks per deviceSpotify Testing Skippable Ads

While its questionable whether most casual Spotify subscribers would ever need to download 3,333 tracks, Spotify’s latest update expands the streaming service’s previous song download cap of 3,333 tunes per device. Spotify confirmed that they had increased the number of jams a listener could save on September 12.

“At Spotify, we’re always working on improving the experience for our users,” the company told Rolling Stone. “We can now confirm that we have increased the number of offline tracks per device — from 3,333 on three devices to 10,000 tracks per device for up to five devices.”

Some Spotify users noticed the newfound increased download capability before Spotify formally acknowledged the change. The prior limitation of 3,333 songs per device ranked as one of the top complaints among Spotify listeners, but it’s happy downloading for all subscribers given the streaming giant’s policy shift, which now allows for a total of 50,000 saved tracks across five devices.

H/T: Rolling Stone

Less than a year after signing licensing deals with the majors, Spotify is stirring the pot once again

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Less than a year after signing licensing deals with the majors, Spotify is stirring the pot once againSpotify Major Labels Min

Spotify is trying out new business models that test its relationship with major labels. Just a year after renegotiating licensing deals with major labels, Spotify is pushing back against what got them into the industry’s good graces in the first place. The Swedish streaming giant and the record companies that produce its content continue to publicize their tumultuous relationship.

Spotify has already expressed interest in acquiring music by licensing directly from independent artists. They rely heavily on Universal, Warner, and Sony to supply their 35-million-song catalog and recently have been paying advances to management firms and other artist-representation groups in order to obtain direct deals. The major labels see this as Spotify cutting into their territory, and with the current licensing deal, Spotify is not allowed to compete in a substantial or meaningful way with labels’ main businesses. CEO Daniel Ek said “We are not acting like a record label;” however, industry veterans told The New York Times they are growing weary.

Another strain on the relationship comes from music videos. Spotify has started offering video with audio on mobile devices, and they have to pay majors to publish their videos. This has caused disputes over how much the streaming behemoth owes for using those videos. Universal Music Publishing executive Marc Cimino told Bloomberg they want “to allow our digital partners to experiment and at the same time make sure our songwriters are paid properly.” On the other hand, Spotify is arguing their platform’s method of distribution is worth more than what’s credited.

As the methods of distribution shift, this contentious relationship between music licensincing and publishing appears natural. It’s highly unlikely labels or publishers will ever abandon Spotify entirely; however, labels are making it clear they’re restricting Spotify’s leverage in the industry.

H/T: Rolling Stone

Tunemunk Launches New ‘Spotify Playlist Submission Gate’ Service

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Breaking onto the scene about one year ago, Tunemunk has quickly become one of the leading collections of playlists from a Spotify curators around the world. Earlier this week, Tunemunk pioneered the “follow to submit” functionality so that any playlist curator can connect with music producers as long as the producer has followed their playlist

The post Tunemunk Launches New ‘Spotify Playlist Submission Gate’ Service appeared first on EDM Sauce.

Drake, Tiësto, and Calvin Harris dominate Spotify’s most-streamed songs of summer list

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Drake, Tiësto, and Calvin Harris dominate Spotify’s most-streamed songs of summer listDrake Air Ma Plus

Summer coming to an end begs the question, “What was the song of the summer?” Spotify analytics have some answers, touting Drake, Cardi B, Calvin Harris, Post Malone, and XXXTentacion as artists of the summer.

Drake’s “In My Feelings” was streamed more than 393 million times between June 1 and August 20 — more than any other song during that time period. Aside from the Kiki challenge, the Toronto rapper dominated the summer charts, racking up five total tracks on Spotify’s top global songs of the summer list.

“Girls Like You” by Maroon 5 featuring Cardi B came in second with 293 million streams, falling 4 million streams ahead of the third most-streamed song of the summer: “I Like It” by Cardi B, Bad Bunny, and J Balvin. XXXTentacion was the second most-streamed artist of the summer, following his death.

On the electronic side of things, Calvin Harris came in at No. 7 with “One Kiss” featuring Dua Lipa. Tiësto and Dzeko came in at No. 14 with their hit single “Jackie Chan,” featuring Post Malone and Preme.

H/T: Complex

Photo Credit: Prince Williams/Getty

Spotify Responds To Nicki Minaj’s Allegations Of Unfair Treatment

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Nicki MinajNicki Minaj has been publicly thirsty for a #1 debut with her new album Queen, engaging in chicanery such as adding the 6ix9ine collab “Fefe” to the tracklist late to juice streaming figures and selling the album at a bargain-basement price to increase her sales numbers. It still didn’t work: Queen … More »

Spotify partners with Berklee College of Music, Electric Lady Studios to launch EQL Studio Residency Program for women

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Spotify partners with Berklee College of Music, Electric Lady Studios to launch EQL Studio Residency Program for womenSpotify Testing Skippable Ads

Hosted in partnership with Berklee College of Music and Electric Lady Studios, Spotify‘s newly developed EQL [Equal] Studio Residency seeks to support female producers and engineers in the music industry through the introduction of three residencies in New York, Nashville, and London, respectively.

The paid six-month residencies will enable those selected to “work hands-on in [Spotify’s] studios and gain access to invaluable networking and mentoring opportunities to further [their] careers,” according to Spotify’s EQL announcement.

“Women are underrepresented as artists, songwriters, engineers, and producers,” said Kerry Steib, Spotify’s Director of Cultural Impact. “We have to use our resources to create opportunities to address this, and do it with great partners across the industry. This is just the beginning,” Steib added.

The chosen New York resident will work at both the city’s Electric Lady Studios and Spotify Studios. The Nashville and London residents will be based out of Spotify’s Secret Genius Studios.

Interested applicants can find more information about the residencies and apply, here. Applications are now live, and will close at 5 PM EST on August 24.

H/T: SPIN