Saturday Night Session 023: Morgan Page discusses drawing inspiration through collaboration and gives fans insight into his forthcoming release

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Saturday Night Session 023: Morgan Page discusses drawing inspiration through collaboration and gives fans insight into his forthcoming releaseMorgan Page Press Shot

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Grammy Award nominated Morgan Page has kept the momentum high in his career for over ten years, and that’s almost certainly thanks to his ability to produce music that stands the test of time and appeals to listeners regardless of what the ‘popular’ sound is. Page is the first to admit that maintaining success for over a decade is a rarity, and it requires his production abilities to evolve and to continue to get better despite his success. A new focus of his has been diving into sound design, synthesis, and experimenting with distortion and treatments to create incredibly distinctive sounds. As he continues to push his creative boundaries, his fans reap the benefit of a diverse collection of work that is all tied together by Page’s ability to identify a polarizing vocal line and a sonic warmth that leaves a listener feeling good despite the genre of his production.

An important component to Page’s ability to stand the test of time has been his ability to read current musical trends and adapt. The producer elaborates on how the bar gets increasingly higher for those who want to thrive as a music producer in 2019, stating, “Records these days are so loud and punchy that the bar is set really high, and they really need to cut through in a live environment. Every element needs to shine.”

2019 has seen a continuation of Page’s dance-inducing creations thanks to his recent release of “Gone My Way” with Pex L, and he will be releasing a new track on Armada titled “Fire and Gold,” which includes Page himself playing guitar on the release. He discusses how this release will be different than what fans have heard from him in the past, stating, “The new single is ‘Fire & Gold’ with Vivid feat. Allé and Damon Sharpe. I really like the way this one turned out. We experimented with a lot of different frameworks, but felt we needed a dancefloor-focused mix that had some edge to it. It’s a very songwriter vibe kind of song, almost with an Of Monsters and Men sound, and I wanted that contrast to work well with a big room progressive sound. I even played the guitar on parts of the song to add some extra hooks. I’m a much better piano player, but writing melodies on a different instrument helps to create something special and original.”

In addition to producing music, Page has more recently taken to mentoring up and coming producers, which in part he is able to do through his own website that features quick tips in addition to his own interests. His quick tips have been such a success that he has even launched the top 20 quick tips into a card deck. Page elaborates, saying, “I’ve taken 20 of my best quick tips and turned them into a professionally illustrated and printed card deck that will be distributed with special orders from OWC.  They make amazing Thunderbolt drives, docks, and Mac upgrades.”

Page’s sets, just like his music, are notorious for keeping the energy high and the mood uplifting, and his Saturday Night Session doesn’t disappoint in this regard. He explains what listeners can expect from the mix, unsurprisingly noting that it will have “lots of energy, unique sound design, and vocals that stick in your head.” In addition to lots of energy, those who want a first listen of “Fire and Gold” will finally get one.

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In the past, you’ve explained that working with up and coming producers in the studio has been a good creative exercise for you. Is there anyone you’ve worked with as of late that has really made an impact on your creative process?

In the last year, there’s been a lot of great collaborations – some in the studio, some with strangers and now friends across the globe. I love how fluid the process can be. With “Gone My Way,” PEXL, a producer from the Canary Islands in Spain, sent me a song he had in progress with a Splice vocal sample, and I went in and added more progressive flavors and chopped up some more bassline samples to give it a hybrid future house / progressive house feel. It came together really quickly and naturally, which isn’t always the case! With songs that are more lead vocal focused, it can take months or back and forth production work. With this collab, it was just us swapping stems back and forth, which felt very natural.

Are you doing anything new as of late to continue to push the boundaries and creativity of your sound?

I’m really diving more into sound design, synthesis, and experimenting with more distortion and treatments to really dial indistinct sounds. Records these days are so loud and punchy that the bar is set really high, and they really need to cut through in a live environment. Every element needs to shine.

You do a lot outside of producing and making music. Can you tell our readers more about your different hobbies and interests outside of working in the studio?

Right now my #1 non-studio project is my baby. She’s almost a year old and it’s been the most insane, beautiful experience. It forces you to be more deliberate with your time because your life and schedule will never be the same again. I’ve also created a site for music producers and creative types called http://mpquicktips.com and @mpquicktips on Twitter. It features over 800-bit sized tips on creativity and workflow methods for the studio. In my spare time to stay sane, I do a lot of trail running here in LA, which is my form of meditation

You have a new single coming out on June 21st on Armada- can you tell us more about this release?

The new single is “Fire & Gold” with Vivid feat. Allé and Damon Sharpe. I really like the way this one turned out. We experimented with a lot of different frameworks, but felt we needed a dancefloor-focused mix that had some edge to it. It’s a very songwriter vibe kind of song, almost with an “Of Monsters and Men” sound, and I wanted that contrast to work well with a big room progressive sound. I even played the guitar on parts of the song to add some extra hooks. I’m a much better piano player, but writing melodies on a different instrument helps to create something special and original.

Do you have any other upcoming projects or singles in the near future you can tell us about?

We are about to launch a card deck for my http://mpquicktips.com project – which is exciting to finally see in physical form! I’ve taken 20 of my best quick tips and turned them into a professionally illustrated and printed card deck that will be distributed with special orders from OWC.  They make amazing Thunderbolt drives, docks, and Mac upgrades.

Can you tell us about your ideal Saturday Night if you aren’t playing a show?

A lot of high-end boutique wine with friends, a great dinner, then bed. I really like the inverted schedule of the DJ life though. I’ll go out mid-week, so Tuesday or Wednesday is Saturday night, then I work Friday through Sunday.

What kind of a Saturday Night is your Saturday Night Session going to get listeners ready for?

Lots of energy, unique sound design, and vocals that stick in your head.

Saturday Night Session 022: Alok reveals his own record label is coming and gives fans a look into growing up with DJs as parents

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Saturday Night Session 022: Alok reveals his own record label is coming and gives fans a look into growing up with DJs as parentsAlok

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Many artists tout the cliché that ‘music is in their blood.’ Few artists can actually claim this as fact, and Brazilian DJ and producer Alok is among the few. Alok Achkar Peres Petrillo was born in Goiânia, Brazil to DJs, Ekanta and Swarup. His parents are pioneers of psytrance in the country, and creators of the Universo Paralello, an electronic music festival. As Petrillo puts it, ‘his video game was a pair of decks as an 11-year-old,’ and growing up with the music has made it only natural for he and his twin brother Bhaksar to pursue careers as DJs and music producers. For those who do not know, breakout hit “Fuego” is a collaboration between the Petrillo twins.

Petrillo is now a globally renowned act, and he is truly one of the first current global powerhouses in electronic music to come from Brazil. The country itself has a vibrant electronic music scene, and Petrillo explains that there are many artists from the market on the horizon who have the potential to be as widely recognized as he is in the years to come.

When asked what it is like to be a breakout artist from Brazil, Petrillo states, “It does feel like I am still coming to terms with the reality at times. Although I feel that there is still a lot to be done and achieved, many other Brazilian artists are also progressively gaining recognition and admiration around the globe.”

Petrillo teamed up with Quintino for his latest release titled “Party Never Ends,” and according to him, this is the first of many forthcoming collaborations fans will be able to expect from him for the remainder of the year. “Party Never Ends” is geared towards live performance with its bouncing synths and catchy whistling, which is infused with the production backdrop. The kicking beat takes the listener on an energetic journey with builds culminating in dance-inducing releases, keeping the production true to Petrillo’s signature style.

Petrillo describes his goal for the release, stating, “It’s the type of track that makes people want to let go of their worries and dance. Life should always be a never-ending party. Happiness is healthy, and partying makes people happy. The goal of this song is to put listeners in a party mood forever.”

One promise Petrillo makes about the year to come is, “There are a lot of amazing collabs and productions going on at the moment with very prominent artists and singers, but I can’t give much away. The secret is part of the surprise.”

He will also be launching his own record label, Controversia, and his first release on the imprint is set to come out at the end of June. Petrillo will be putting out the official remake of Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick In The Wall” called “The Wall.” While remixing Pink Floyd may seem surprising, few realize that the group has been one of Petrillo’s largest musical influences to date in addition to The Prodigy and The Chemical Brothers.

Petrillo’s Saturday Night Session is a good representation of what fan’s hear when they see the producer perform live, and it’s a great start to a big Saturday night. As Petrillo puts it, “Saturday night is always magic, so I prepared a set to let the party never end. I like to cross over styles and this is the kind of set I play during my shows. Fun, energetic, and exciting enough to fully charge your energy. Alone or with friends, at home or out, I hope you enjoy this Saturday Night Session prepared especially for you. Have fun!”

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You have really been a breakout artist from Brazil when it comes to being globally recognized. How does it feel?

It does feel like I am still
coming to terms with the reality at times. Although I feel that there is still a
lot to be done and achieved, many other Brazilian artists are also progressively
gaining recognition and admiration around the globe.

We know your entire family has been immersed in electronic music for
your entire life. What was this like growing up?

Let me put it this way: my video game
was a pair of decks when I was about 11 years old. Since then, my entire
existence – as well as my twin brother Bhaskar and both of my parents Ekanta
and Swarup who are DJs – has spun around music. It was quite natural, and I bet
it was much easier for me back then to get in touch with electronic music, CDJs,
mixers and parties as my whole family has always been deeply involved in this universe.

Who were some of your biggest influences growing up? Which artists are
currently inspiring you?

Without a doubt: Pink Floyd,
Prodigy and the Chemical Brothers with their unique style and electronic and
psychedelic influences that they have given the world.

What can we expect from you in the coming year – more new music? Tours?

We have crossed the 4 corners of
the planet in half a year. For the rest of this year and most of next, we are
looking pretty busy tour wise. Next month I’ll be playing in Los Angeles,
Mexico, Ibiza, and then at the end of July, I’ll fire up Tomorrowland in
Belgium. I’m so excited.

I’ve already made some truly
international collaborations this year, including Conor Maynard and Timmy
Trumpet, plus I teamed up with Felix Jaehn and The Vamps. There are a lot of
amazing collabs and productions going on at the moment with very prominent
artists and singers, but I can´t give much away. The secret is part of the
surprise.

What I can say is that I’m very happy to announce my new own label Controversia. It’ll be launching at the end of June and the first release on the label will be my official remake of Pink Floyd’s ‘Another Brick In The Wall’ called ‘The Wall’.

Can you tell us more about your song “Party Never Ends?”

It’s the type of track that makes
people want to let go of their worries and dance. Life should always be a
never-ending party. Happiness is healthy, and partying makes people happy. The
goal of this song is to put listeners in a party mood forever.

A lot of our readers are based in North America. What is the Brazilian
market like in terms of music, festival, and club scene compared to say, the
U.S.?

When it comes to electronic and
pop music in North America and Brazil, both markets have grown exponentially
over the last 3 years in my opinion. Even the more underground artists have
reached places that they never imagined before. I have seen a video of Fisher
playing for thousands and thousands of people at Coachella. For a tech house
artist, that is something so surreal to happen. The same thing is happening in
Brazil where we have artists getting to play their music at places that were
considered “impossible to play” before.

What are your hobbies when you aren’t producing music?

Most of the time when I’m not producing, I’m doing something related to music. I like to listen and search for new songs. It’s so important for me, as an artist, to be involved in different kinds of styles and genres. Besides that, my biggest hobbies are: working out, keeping a healthy lifestyle, reading, and spending time with my lovely wife and family.

What kind of a Saturday Night is your Saturday Night Session going to get listener’s ready for?

Saturday night is always magic, so I prepared a set to let the party never end. I like to cross over styles, and this is the kind of set I play during my shows. Fun, energetic, and exciting enough to fully charge your energy. Alone or with friends, at home or out, I hope you enjoy this Saturday Night Session prepared especially for you. Have fun!

Saturday Night Session 021: Elephante opens up about being a vocalist on more music moving forward and gives fans a look into a day in his life

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Saturday Night Session 021: Elephante opens up about being a vocalist on more music moving forward and gives fans a look into a day in his lifeElephante

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Every artist has a unique story when it comes to their foray into music. Some come into notoriety carrying out their lifelong dream of becoming an artist and others stumble into the career accidentally. Tim Wu, who is more popularly known as DJ and music producer Elephante, found himself sitting alone in a music studio at 25 through neither of these paths. He admits that, would he have been able to go back and tell his 16-year-old self that he would end up becoming a DJ and music producer, he wouldn’t have believed it.

Wu grew up an avid John Mayer fan, which ultimately inspired him to play in bands and write songs that he would perform on the acoustic guitar at local showcases in his hometown of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Music has always been an incredibly big part of his life, but Tennis ultimately landed him at Harvard University where he played and locked in a career in consulting after graduation. When he wasn’t at his consulting job, Wu discovered electronic music production, and he became hooked. The more he produced music, the more miserable he became at his job to the point where he quit. He was so concerned about his parent’s reaction that he spent over a year lying to them about the decision to became a full time musician.

He reminisces on telling his parents he had stopped working as a consultant to pursue music, stating, “I think they were mostly confused, and obviously worried. Like what do you mean you’re gonna be a DJ? Can you get healthcare doing that? But at the end of the day, I think they knew how unhappy I was and that it was something I had to do, and were mostly just hoping I didn’t get hooked on heroin or something. I mean, can you imagine moving to a different country, working your ass off your whole life to give your kids a better life, and then having said kid tell you they were quitting their job to be a DJ? I would have murdered me. Now though they are super stoked – I brought them on stage for a couple shows and fans were asking for pictures with them and stuff, so I think they get a kick out of it. My mom still reminds me every time we talk not to do heroin though.”

The rest is history with Wu’s production career, although those who are familiar with the producer’s music would hardly be surprised to learn that Wu’s artistry grew out of his love of songwriting as a teenager. In a world where commercial crossover releases dominate the charts, Wu has found a way to bring vocals front and center in his releases without producing a stream of three note drops that leave the vocals and vocals alone to differentiate one track from the next. His body of work spans for folky “Come Back For You” featuring Matluck to beautiful “Catching On” featuring Nevve.

Wu recently released his own cover of “Shooting Stars,” which is the second release he has put out with his own vocals. Wu speaks about the decision to utilize his own vocals on his music, noting, “I was a singer-songwriter before I started producing music, so I’ve been singing for forever. But it was really important that my voice was the right one for the song, and I wasn’t just singing it for vanity’s sake. If someone else could sing it better, I’d have them do it instead.”

Those who have seen Wu perform live will recognize his rendition of the track, which has been cut in and out of his live performances since he made the cover in 2014. Now that he has begun to release music with his own vocals, Wu has developed a stream of covers that he will be putting out over the next few months.

Wu gives fans insight into his decision to utilize his own vocals, which is a decision more producers have seemingly been making over the past few years thanks to artists like Calvin Harris and The Chainsmokers singing on their own original releases. He states, “Especially after The Chainsmokers had so much success with Drew singing – there were a bunch of DJs who were like ‘oh I can sing too,’ and some really can, and others were like… should you though? And I wanted to make sure I wasn’t just doing it for the sake of it. Producing the songs I sing feels somewhat different, just because I know I always can go back and change the line.”

2019 will be a big year for Wu, who notes he has multiple projects in the pipeline. For now, he is still inducing euphoria through his live sets and original releases, including a high energy and genre-bending Saturday Night Session that takes listeners through a dynamic journey. When asked what kind of a Saturday night the mix is going to get listener’s ready for, Wu states, ” The best Saturday night of their life!!! You were planning on taking it easy, but instead you listen and are inspired to go out and you meet the love of your life and go get pizza with them and on a whim buy Powerball tickets and you win a billion dollars. That kind of Saturday night.”

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Where do you draw inspiration from when you sit down to produce music? Can you give us some insight into your creative process?
Honestly, sounds and melodies and lyrics kinda just pop into my head at random times, sometimes in the shower, when I’m about to fall asleep in a hotel, when I’m listening to music or reading or whatever. I have no idea where exactly it comes from though. I’ve learned to write down or record a voice memo any time one of these little moments strikes, so by the time I’m sitting down in the studio I have a bunch of ideas that I’m excited to work on. Once I’m there, it’s all about just really diving in an exploring that idea – I’m always asking myself what comes next? What would be cool with this? I try to work away from the computer as much as possible – playing piano, jamming on guitar, writing/drawing in notebooks, whatever. And I just try to keep finding that next little cool moment, that next little sound, and then on the good days I come to 8 hours later and something exists that didn’t before. On the bad days the voices in my head are silent, and it’s like well, guess I’ll try again tomorrow.

“Glass Mansion” was your first time singing on one of your songs, and rumor has it you’ll be doing this more often moving forward. Were you nervous at all to jump into also being a vocalist? Does producing a track with your own vocals feel different than producing a track with someone else singing on it?
I was, but for different reasons than you’d expect. I was a singer-songwriter before I started producing music, so I’ve been singing for forever. But it was really important that my voice was the right one for the song, and I wasn’t just singing it for vanity’s sake. If someone else could sing it better, I’d have them do it instead. So it took a long time for me to write a song that I knew I absolutely had to sing, and really feel confident in that, and “Glass Mansion” was the first time I was like, ‘I have to do this.’ Especially after The Chainsmokers had so much success with Drew singing – there were a bunch of DJs who were like ‘oh I can sing too,’ and some really can, and others were like… should you though? And I wanted to make sure I wasn’t just doing it for the sake of it. Producing the songs I sing feels somewhat different, just because I know I always can go back and change the line, or change the phrasing or whatever, which can actually be kind of a negative. But over the years I’ve gotten better at understanding what works and really building the song around the vocals, whether it’s me or someone else, and not just slapping a beat over an acapella.

Do you have any guilty pleasures?
Yes, eating almond butter out of the tub. I’m doing that right now actually.

When you aren’t touring, what does a normal day in your life look like?
Ideally I’ll play some pickup basketball in the morning, then eat and hit the studio. I fucking love the studio. It’s what I’d want to do even if I wasn’t making a living doing it. You know how when you’re a kid you have things that you had to finish your homework before you can do, and that’s the thing that gets you through the day? That’s making music for me. It’s so much fun I’m still kinda baffled that I get paid to do it. 

You have a really interesting story- you went to Harvard, got a consulting job, and then quit to pursue music full time. You didn’t tell your parents that you quit for a while though. How did they react when you first told them, and how do they feel about your career as a musician now that you’ve become so successful?
I think they were mostly confused, and obviously worried. Like what do you mean you’re gonna be a DJ? Can you get healthcare doing that? But at the end of the day, I think they knew how unhappy I was and that it was something I had to do, and were mostly just hoping I didn’t get hooked on heroin or something. I mean, can you imagine moving to a different country, working your ass off your whole life to give your kids a better life, and then having said kid tell you they were quitting their job to be a DJ? I would have murdered me. Now though they are super stoked – I brought them on stage for a couple shows and fans were asking for pictures with them and stuff, so I think they get a kick out of it. My mom still reminds me every time we talk not to do heroin though.

What is one thing your fans don’t know about you?
I’m allergic to bees? And dogs and cats and horses and pretty much anything with fur. Which sucks cuz I love dogs. Can’t have it all.

What kind of a Saturday night is your Saturday Night Session mix going to get listeners ready for?
Best Saturday night of their life!!! You were planning on taking it easy, but instead you listen and are inspired to go out and you meet the love of your life and go get pizza with them and on a whim buy Powerball tickets and you win a billion dollars. That kind of Saturday night.

Saturday Night Session 020: DVBBS gives fans a look into their lives when they aren’t in the DJ booth and reveal 2019 will see the most music from the duo fans have ever seen in one year

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Saturday Night Session 020: DVBBS gives fans a look into their lives when they aren’t in the DJ booth and reveal 2019 will see the most music from the duo fans have ever seen in one yearDVBBS Press Shot Paul Capra

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Those who have been electronic music fans since before the boom of music festivals and commercial crossover releases will long be acquainted with electronic music duo DVBBS. Born Alexandre and Christopher van den Hoef, the brothers released breakout single ‘Tsunami” in 2013 and haven’t looked back since. For the past three years, the brothers have balanced playing over 250 tour dates a year amidst releasing a stream of hit singles, including “IDWK” with Blackbear, “I Love It” with Cheat Codes, and “Without U” with Steve Aoki ft. 2 Chainz.

The duo have now released a new track “GOMF” with a thumping bassline that paves the way for friend and vocalist BRIDGE to paint a melancholic vocal storyline. The track builds into a house drop with echoing vocals, all of which has seemingly been manufactured for club play thanks to its bumping backdrop and infectious builds.

Alex and Chris speak about the release, explaining the title and the meaning behind it. They state, “It’s simple … ‘GET OUT MY FACE.’ Haha don’t take it (the song) too seriously. This one is for everyone that just needs to know YOU are fucking awesome, and NO ONE can get in your way and stop what you have coming for you in your amazing lifetime.”

The track is only the beginning for them this year according to the brothers, who state 2019 will yield “The most amount of DVBBS music you have ever heard in a year … period.”

While the brothers are seemingly mainstays in the industry now, they are the first to comment on how much the industry has changed since they got their start. When it comes to their personal fulfillment as artists, the industry’s commercialization has encouraged them to give up producing music they only see becoming a ‘hit,’ and focus on releasing music that is fulfilling for them as artists. The clutter has encouraged them to ‘just do them’ as they would put it.

Chris and Alex are discuss how much streaming has impacted not only artists, but how the industry has monetized and functions as a whole. They comment, “The business suits in the industry still control a majority of artists, BUT I do see and pray for movement in the way things are handled in the music industry and what is right and what is wrong. Just like many other movements and voices being heard, I truly think it’s time for the artists themselves the musicians themselves stand up and get what they deserve.”

When it comes to artists getting what they deserve, the brothers do a good job painting a picture for fans as to what this means, and how complicated it can be for them behind the scenes. They state, “Because no one else other than those real true raw emotion filled artists are sitting 18 hours in blacked out rooms and bedrooms creating art that can be ripped away from them or turned down in the matter of minutes because they aren’t fully educated on what their options are.”

DVBBS has certainly found a way to balance the complicated industry, but even they admit that it takes time to adjust to the crazy lifestyle. The duo have crafted an energetic hour long Saturday Night Session that is the perfect soundtrack for a night out. They take the listeners on a hectic journey, leaving everyone wanting for more.

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When did you first start listening to electronic music, and what inspired you to start producing?

Electronic music was instilled in us before we even knew… we spent some time growing up in Greece, and even all the amusement parks or what they called ‘luna parks’ just had trance and euro beats cracking all night long hahaha

I would say we truly got into electronic music when we were around 17 years old and started producing it a few months later … I remember having talks with Chris about not being a band anymore and almost remolding how we performed and crafted music, which turned into DVBBS.

What is the best and worst thing about working together as siblings?

Best thing is that we are blood and nothing can come between that 4 life —- worst thing, things can get brutally honest and flip the switch real quick.

What can we expect from you in terms of new music in the coming year?

The most amount of DVBBS music you have ever heard in a year … period.

Craziest fan story?

Our fans are our family, but we’ve definitely experienced a few crazy ones …. I guess this has happened a few times now, but when people stalk your hotel room and end up banging on it all night until you answer or security comes. There was one incident in China where some random girl was completely naked trying to rip out the wires from where you put the key to your room and trying to break in , meanwhile it was 5am and I was half asleep. My own tour manager thought I was playing a prank on him when I called him tripping out.

Hahaha I don’t know for the most part everything is pretty harmless and we got love for everyone …

Can you tell us about your new release “GOMF” – particularly, what does the title mean?

simple … GET OUT MY FACE

Hahaha don’t take it too seriously, this one is for everyone that just needs to know YOU are fucking awesome and NO ONE can get in your way and stop what you have coming for you in your amazing lifetime.

The electronic music industry has changed a lot since 2013, which is when you all released hit ‘Tsunami.’ As an artist, has your experience transformed as much as it has seemingly changed for the fans and listeners?

Was is 2013 or 2014? Haha I don’t know anymore, man so much has changed with the scene and just even with us as artists and producers

I guess for us, we truly make music for ourselves now. We love that our fans love it, but this shit is therapy to us now, and we are so blessed to be able to just create vibes and be the soundtrack for the world.

Industry wise —- the real survived and the stale ones died off, and everything is pretty much Spotify/Apple/streaming platform based releases —- the business suits in the industry still control a majority of artists, BUT I do see and pray for movement in the way things are handled in the music industry and what is right and what is wrong. Just like many other movements and voices being heard, I truly think it’s time for the artists themselves the musicians themselves stand up and get what they deserve.

Because no one else other than those real true raw emotion filled artists are sitting 18 hours in blacked out rooms and bedrooms creating art that can be ripped away from them or turned down in the matter of minutes because they aren’t fully educated on what their options are.

What kind of a Saturday night is your ideal Saturday Night?

My perfect Saturday night is a relaxing home cooked dinner, and just enjoying the simple things life has to offer now … obviously we still love to go out with the fam and day ones, but things are feeling really good at the moment, just balancing this crazy roller coaster of a life DVBBS, and a personal life.

And then just creating every night of the week, like I said it’s like therapy and a blessing, and we wish to only continue being this blessed forever.

Photo Credit: Paul Capra

Saturday Night Session 019: Nicky Romero discusses how Protocol Recordings empowers his creativity and talks staying balanced despite a near constant life on the road

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Saturday Night Session 019: Nicky Romero discusses how Protocol Recordings empowers his creativity and talks staying balanced despite a near constant life on the roadNicky Romero Press Shot

Few artists have the ability to represent a genre with a simple mention of their name, but when it comes to Nicky Romero, over a decade of producing upbeat progressive house anthems has made the producer’s moniker seemingly synonymous with the genre. While Romero started producing in the early 2000’s, he recalls the moment he realized he ‘made it’ as a music producer.

Romero notes, “‘My Friend’ was the breakout moment for me when I really started getting attention on an international level followed by ‘Toulouse,’ but the game changer was ‘I Could Be The One,’ which I made with Avicii. Working with Tim on that record was a transformative experience, and I’m grateful for the time we had creating together.”

“I Could Be The One” catapulted Romero into international notoriety and gave him the platform to reach a mass audience, and this reach coincided with a fundamental shift in dance music itself. Progressive house peaked from 2010-2013, and from there, the sub-genre played an integral role in the commercialization of dance music. Progressive House allowed for big-name pop artists to come in and be vocalists on electronic music backdrops that were likable to global and commercial audiences. Romero’s own music evolved during this transition, and he has found a way to balance producing mainstage worthy electronic releases while also producing music that could just as easily belong on a top 40 radio station.

Embracing this shift in dance music has enabled Romero to remain at the forefront of the genre for over five years and counting, and he shows no signs of slowing down. When asked about how he manages to balance touring and releasing a steady stream of music over such a long span of time, Romero notes, “It’s not easy. I have a great team that works day and night to keep everything on track. Guarding my rest and health is what keeps me going as well. It’s important to find a balance and remember that there must be time for life as well. Touring and travel has allowed me to see the world, but I also cherish the moments at home with my family and friends.”

In addition to releasing his own music, Romero is label head and founder of Protocol Recordings, one of the most impactful labels for dance music as it stands. Record deals, management, and a multitude of other factors make the music world a tricky one. Romero’s favorite thing about running Protocol is that the label is an outlet for him to bypass what can be an admittedly complicated world and release what he feels passionately about, whether the music is his own or another artist’s.

He elaborates on this, noting, “We get to release the music we want without restrictions. When we find an artist we’re passionate about or I produce a record I’m in love with, we don’t need to ask for approvals or waste time. We just release it to the world.”

Romero put together a high energy hour long Saturday Night Session mix, which is the best representation of the producer’s ability to float between hard-hitting and festival-ready tracks alongside smooth vocal driven releases. He tries to tell a different story through each of his sets, and the mix certainly does just that in order to get listeners’ ready for their Saturday night.

PC: Darryl Adelaar

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You have been releasing music now for over a decade. Are any of your track’s particularly personal to you or stand out to you as being one of your favorites above the rest?

“My Friend” was the breakout moment for me when I really started getting attention on an international level followed by “Toulouse,” but the game changer was “I Could Be The One,” which I made with Avicii. Working with Tim on that record was a transformative experience, and I’m grateful for the time we had creating together.

You produce everything from mainstage electronic tracks to commercial crossover releases to working with big-time acts like Rihanna. Do you have a specific genre of music you prefer producing?

Progressive house will always be my starting point but I’ve loved experimenting and pushing my boundaries over the years. Its tough to put yourself in a creative box and only stick to certain forms of music. I find it challenging and exciting to push my limits. 

What is your favorite part about running the label?

We get to release the music we want without restrictions. When we find an artist we’re passionate about or I produce a record I’m in love with, we don’t need to ask for approvals or waste time. We just release it to the world.

Is there any part of you that still gets nervous for big performances or studio sessions with other high profile artists? Or have you been doing this for long enough now that it is all standard and just another day on the job?

Of course, that is being human. Festivals still give me a rush and I hope that is a feeling that never goes away. I feel most alive when I’m on the stage playing my songs for fans that have given me so much support over the years. 

The amount of music you put out is incredibly impressive. How do you balance it all? Running a label; touring; putting out new originals and remixes; and theoretically having time for a personal life as well?

It’s not easy. I have a great team that works day and night to keep everything on track. Guarding my rest and health is what keeps me going as well. It’s important to find a balance and remember that there must be time for life as well. Touring and travel has allowed me to see the world, but I also cherish the moments at home with my family and friends.

You’ve got a lot of great shows coming up this summer including your performance at Laroc Club – how much do you enjoy playing in front of a Brazilian crowd?

The fans in Brazil are some of the most supportive in the world. It’s such a beautiful country and I’m always welcomed with open arms. I cannot wait to be back.

What kind of a Saturday Night is your Saturday Night Session going to get listener’s ready for?

I try to tell a story in my sets and keep the momentum going while still allowing the listener to experience different emotions through the music. 

Saturday Night Session 018: Young Bombs explain their unique creative process and tell the story of how their artist name came to be

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Saturday Night Session 018: Young Bombs explain their unique creative process and tell the story of how their artist name came to beYoung Bombs 2

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Canadian friends and self-proclaimed ‘bros,’ Martin Kottmeier and Tristan Norton have a lengthy history when it comes to creating music together. While many DJs set out from the start to be the next Calvin Harris, Kottmeier and Norton started their journey in an indie rock band. After discovering hybrid acts like Cut Copy, they started layering in synths and drum machines into their music, infusing an electric flair into their indie-sound. It wasn’t until a few years later that Kottmeier visited Sweden, where he notes that he “discovered a bubbling artist named Avicii’s demo “Spår”, which actually ended up being “Bromance.” That’s when we caught the EDM bug. From that moment on, we both knew this is what we wanted to do.”

Now known as Young Bombs, Kottmeier and Norton have been picked up by the same management team as The Chainsmokers, and in the last year alone, they have played the mainstage at Ultra as well as released no less than 85 remixes in addition to their own original track, “Starry Eyes.” Because their musical style has evolved over the years, doing remixes has often kept the duo engaged, allowing them to experiment with a variety of musical genres, tempos and moods.

If one were to expect a meaningful explanation behind their chosen moniker of Young Bombs, Kottmeier and Norton would be the first to admit the origin of the name is far from significant.

They explain, “Once upon a time, we temporarily formed a band with a friend. We say temporarily because it only lasted a day but that friend of ours came up with the name. After we parted ways we asked if we could keep it because we thought it was cool. He was fine with it. It’s a very inaccurate name. “Middle-Aged Bombs” would’ve been more appropriate.”

Kottmeier and Norton’s production process is nearly as unique as how they selected their moniker. The duo happens to have an assortment of talented videographer friends, and they draw sonic inspiration from the visual. They explain, “we often mute their videos on YouTube while creating music and draw inspiration from the visuals. Nature videos inspire us.”

Young Bombs aim to release new music every four to six weeks in the new year, which is aggressive, but if they can release 85 remixes in one year, its most certainly doable. The duo crafted an hour long Saturday Night Session, and they explain what the listener can expect to come, mentioning, “There’s three moods with this mix: the first is a bit more vibey and ambient; the second is energetic and slightly ironic; and the final third is sad and reflective. We wanted to capture the highs and lows of everyday life. Sometimes you’re on top of the world sharing a laugh with your friends, other times you’re lost in your own thoughts, contemplating everything. Hopefully this mix captures a bit of that.” If one thing is for certain, there is certainly a lot to expect from the up and coming group, and 2019 might just be the year they bring it.

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I know you both started your foray into music by playing in bands. Can you tell us about how you eventually ended up in music production and what that journey from band to Young Bombs looked like?

That’s a great question. Yes, we played in an indie rock band that initially was a guitar/bass/vocals classic type set up but as our musical taste evolved and we began to discover hybrid/electronic bands like Cut Copy and the Presets, we started  incorporating synths and drum machine elements into our sound. But it wasn’t until a few years later when I (Martin) went on a trip to Sweden and discovered a bubbling artist named “Avicii”’s demo “Spår”, which actually ended up being “Bromance”, that we caught the EDM bug. From that moment on, we both knew this is what we wanted to do. Tristan already had Logic on his laptop at this point so it was just a matter of figuring out how to make it haha. I think we’ve watched every YouTube tutorial ever made

Young Bombs- whose chose the name and what is the story behind it?

Once upon a time, we temporarily formed a band with a friend. We say temporarily because it only lasted a day but that friend of ours came up with the name. After we parted ways we asked if we could keep it because we thought it was cool. He was fine with it. It’s a very inaccurate name. “Middle-Aged Bombs” would’ve been more appropriate.

What is your dynamic? Both extroverts? One the loud one and one the quiet one?

I’m (Tristan) definitely more introverted and need my alone time to recharge. We both alternate back and forth a bit but Martin definitely energizes off of people. He’s like the Energizer bunny if the Energizer bunny looked like Jon Snow.

Who do you draw inspiration from when producing?  

We have a lot of talented videographer friends so we often mute their videos on YouTube while creating music and draw inspiration from the visuals. Nature videos inspire us. If we ever get stuck on a track we put on “Sailing” by Christopher Cross and let the smoothness carry our worries away. After one solid listen we’re usually good to go again.

You guys have done a TON of remixes. Are there certain genres that are harder to remix than others?

In a strange way the more that we bounce around genres/styles the more we keep the creative juices flowing and avoid our sound becoming repetitive. It’s always a fun challenge. Coming from a band background it only feels natural to cover different tempos and moods.

What can we expect from you guys this year? Do you have specific goals for yourselves and your career?

In terms of goals, we definitely just want to keep these originals flowing now. We’d ideally like to have a brand new release every 4-6 weeks and  make the best music possible. If we could sell out Wembley Stadium 5 nights in a row that would be great too.

What kind of a Saturday night is your Saturday Night Session going to get us ready for?

There’s three moods with this mix: the first is a bit more vibey and ambient; the second is energetic and slightly ironic; and the final third is sad and reflective. We wanted to capture the highs and lows of everyday life. Sometimes you’re on top of the world sharing a laugh with your friends, other times you’re lost in your own thoughts, contemplating everything. Hopefully this mix captures a bit of that.

Saturday Night Session 016: Sunnery James & Ryan Marciano talk making it work as a musical duo and the meaning behind their ‘Sexy By Nature’ brand

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Saturday Night Session 016: Sunnery James & Ryan Marciano talk making it work as a musical duo and the meaning behind their ‘Sexy By Nature’ brandSJRM Press Photo

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Sunnery Gorré and Ryan de Lange have come quite a long way since the pair met by chance working retail in Amsterdam in 2006. Now internationally renowned electronic music producers, label owners, and clothing line founders, retail is only a fraction of what keeps them busy thanks to their creative flair and infectious personalities. More popularly known as Sunnery James & Ryan Marciano, the duo’s music career is what pushed them into notoriety, and it all started with a release in 2009 on Chuckie‘s Dirty Dutch imprint. After cementing a strong fanbase in The Netherlands, James and Marciano began to grow a steady following internationally thanks to their unique sound and high energy productions. A decade in, their career is as vibrant as ever.

All of the different elements of James & Marciano’s creativity fall under the master brand they have made for themselves, ‘Sexy By Nature.’ Inspired by confidence, they speak about what the brand means to them, and how it shapes their approach to life, stating, “We think being sexy is all about attitude and confidence. In our opinion every single person can be sexy in their own way. For us it’s not so much about the way you look or dress, but the way you present yourself. Being sexy is being comfortable with who you are and that is why it’s so important to us and why we started our ‘Sexy By Nature’ brand.”

Brands, labels, and songs aside, it is no secret that being a part of a music duo or a group can be taxing and ultimately career ending due to interpersonal conflict and differing of directions. James and Marciano are still going strong after a decade, and they speak on why they have been able to make it work, saying, “Besides working together, we’re best friends. We were already best friends before we started our DJ career. We get along so well, so we never ever fight. We spend so much time together, the only thing we do separately is sleeping haha.”

The product of their friendship and stellar working relationship, the duo have a truly distinctive sound, which isn’t something many of the electronic music artists in the current commercialized landscape can say. James and Marciano blend elements of house, tribal, techno, and electro all rolled up with some Latin flavor. All of these elements are displayed throughout their hour long Saturday Night Session, which takes the listener on a ride of club music and recent hits by the artists.

When asked what kind of a Saturday night the mix would get listeners’ ready for, James and Marciano unsurprisingly note it will be a ‘sexy and funky one!” The mix is the perfect representation of their dynamic soundscape bundled into one high energy set, and it’s the perfect backdrop for a club night.

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It can be tough being a duo/group in music, and we’ve seen a lot of breakups. How do you guys make it work?
Besides working together we’re best friends. We were already best friends before we started our DJ career. We get along so well, so we never ever fight. We spend so much time together, the only thing we do separately is sleeping haha.

What can we expect from you guys in 2019? Any exciting new projects?
Last month we released a new track with Bruno Martini and Mayra called “Shameless.” Besides this release there is a lot of new music on the way. We’re also playing a lot of cool shows and festivals like Tomorrowland, Balaton Sound and Mysteryland, where we also host our own stage with Sexy By Nature. And of course we have our own residency again at Hi Ibiza, every Wednesday together with Armin van Buuren.

What is the best and conversely worst part about this career?
The best part is that we get to see the world and we get to meet so many cool and inspiring people all over the world. What we dislike the most is the fact that we’re away from our families a lot.

How did you guys decide on ‘Sexy by Nature’ as your brand name/thematic?
We think being sexy is all about attitude and confidence. In our opinion every single person can be sexy in their own way. For us it’s not so much about the way you look or dress but the way you present yourself. Being sexy is being comfortable with who you are and that is why it’s so important to us and why we started our ‘Sexy By Nature’ brand.

Is this a career you would encourage your kids to pursue?
We always encourage our kids to do what they love. If they have the passion to become DJs we will support hem in every way we can, but of course we will warn them about the side effects and the fact that it’s a quite intense profession. It’s not for everybody.

What kind of a Saturday Night is your mix going to get us ready for?
A sexy and funky one!

Saturday Night Session 015: Armin van Buuren discusses how his heart will always be with trance music and teases a return of his ‘classical’ Armin sound later this year

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Saturday Night Session 015: Armin van Buuren discusses how his heart will always be with trance music and teases a return of his ‘classical’ Armin sound later this yearULTRA MIAMI BY BART HEEMSKERK

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Dutch DJ and producer Armin van Buuren has been called many things. ‘Trance legend,’ a ‘godfather’ of modern day electronic music, and ‘musical icon’ are a few of the many descriptors that he has amassed throughout his 20 year career. The artists who do end up becoming global headliners typically ride the five-year wave of being at the top before they either burn out or the next new act comes and takes their place. Van Buuren has found a way to maintain his stature in the industry over the long term while also balancing teaching a masterclass, touring, releasing copious amounts of new music, and most importantly, having a family at home.

Those who have been fans of the producer for the longer term know he has continued to innovate sonically and push the boundaries of what is considered ‘his style.’ While Trance is the genre van Buuren is most closely associated with historically, his releases over the past few years have become increasingly diverse. In 2019 alone, the producer has released hardstyle, DnB, Trance, and Big Room singles.

While it may seem that van Buuren’s increasing sonic diversity and musical experimentation have been a purposeful and strategic decision, the artist clarifies otherwise. Van Buuren states, “As an artist, I’m always looking to reinvent myself, to try new things and get creative. I don’t want to be a prisoner of my own style. Sometimes, that means I create music that some people may not expect or even encourage.” He continues, “But it’s not even about wanting to change it up. It’s not as if I decide to create a certain style of music even before I set foot in the studio. Instead, I just let inspiration take me into the direction it wants to. My heart will always be with Trance, but I need it to explore my boundaries to innovate.”

Van Buuren recently released a new single, “Turn It Up,” and he explains that the track was created for the sole purpose of inciting energy in a crowd during a live performance. When asked if fans could expect to hear new music coming out that is a closer listen to the ‘old school’ Armin style versus the ‘new school’ releases such as “Turn It Up,” he explains that the answer to that question would entirely depend on one’s definition of his ‘old school’ style.

He notes, “Music is always evolving, so to reach back for that classic sound of, say, the early ‘90s or early 2000s might not even work in today’s scene. That being said though, I still love Trance music as much as I did back when I first started out, and I still love creating it. So I’m definitely up for it. That’s why later this year you will hear more “classic” Armin sounds coming out of my studio. Let’s just see what happens!”

While the prospect of the ‘classic’ Armin sound returning makes it nearly impossible to be patient for his new music coming later this year, van Buuren’s Saturday Night Session throws the listener straight into A State of Trance set, showcasing his finest and most energetic Trance work.

When asked what kind of a night his Saturday Night Session is getting listener’s ready for, he notes, “A Saturday night you won’t forget for the rest of your lives! All funny business aside though, it’s a very energetic mix perfect for the bigger stages. Could even be a mainstage set for an A State Of Trance event! Hope you guys like it!”

Photo Credit: Bart Heemskerk

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The music you’ve been putting out is becoming increasingly diverse in genre. What made you want to start changing it up?


As an artist, I’m always looking to reinvent myself, to try new things and get creative. I don’t want to be a prisoner of my own style. Sometimes, that means I create music that some people may not expect or even encourage. But it’s not even about wanting to change it up. It’s not as if I decide to create a certain style of music even before I set foot in the studio. Instead, I just let inspiration take me into the direction it wants to. My heart will always be with trance, but I need it to explore my boundaries to innovate.

Can you tell us more about your new song?

“Turn It Up” is a real club/festival track made for the sole purpose of making a crowd go crazy. And, judging by the response of the ASOT Utrecht 900 audience when I played it, it does it’s job quite well. You could say it’s a follow-up to “Blah Blah Blah,” but I also feel it’s a solid mainstage banger in its own right.

Can we expect to hear any more ‘Old School’ Armin Trance releases in the near future?


That would mostly depend on your definition of ‘Old School’. Music is always evolving, so to reach back for that classic sound of, say, the early ‘90s or early 2000s might not even work in today’s scene. That being said though, I still love Trance music as much as I did back when I first started out, and I still love creating it. So I’m definitely up for it. That’s why later this year you will hear more “classic” Armin sounds coming out of my studio. Let’s just see what happens!

Are there any up and coming artists who you feel are rising superstars?


I really like what Fatum are doing, but also Avao and Maarten de Jong.

The amount of music you have been releasing is impressive, especially when considering you were teaching a masterclass, touring, and you have a family at home among the many other things you do. How do you manage to do it all?

It’s quite a tough act to balance, that’s for sure. Luckily, I’m surrounded by wonderful people and an amazing team, all of whom look out for me. I also have a wonderful wife who helps me keep both feet on the ground. It’s safe to say I wouldn’t be able to do all of this without them.

What are you listening to right now? Outside of your own music, of course.


It largely depends on the mood I’m in. I tend to enjoy many different kinds of music and always try to keep an open mind. For instance, some of my favorite all-time dance tracks range from Jules Verne’s mix of L.S.G.’s “Netherworld” to The Prodigy’s “Smack My Bitch Up” – I still can’t believe we lost Keith Flint so suddenly – to the Ben Liebrand remix of Phil Collins’ “In The Air Tonight.” So there’s not a specific artist or genre I’m listening to at the moment, but rather a lot of different tracks and styles that I just find very enjoyable right now. If a record strikes a chord in me, I like it, no matter which genre or style is. Currently I’m listening to Derelicts by Carbon Based Lifeforms.

Did you grow up listening to electronic music? What spurred your love for it and made you want to make this a career?

I actually grew up listening to lots of different kinds of music. My mom and my dad both enjoyed various styles of music, from Jazz to Classical music to The Beatles. Electronic music was barely a thing back when I grew up. The first time I heard dance music was when a friend of mine gave me a cassette tape with a mini mix from Ben Liebrand on it. I was sold ever since. I spent all of the money I earned with my paper route on buying new records and experimented a lot with mixing and sequencing on a computer my mom had won when I was ten years old. That was the start of it all for me.

Do you have a favorite year or era of electronic music?

Not really. One of the things I truly love about electronic music is that it changes so frequently. There are genres that merge, styles that evolve, and even new musical waves that just seem to come out of nowhere every few months or so. I love it. It’s what make this whole scene so unique. And that’s also why I don’t have a favorite. Each “era” has its own small wonders.

Are any of your children interested in being a music producer like you? Would you encourage them to do so if this is what they wanted?

I don’t think they’re interested in being a music producer as of yet, but they’re also still quite young. And, as any dad, I just want them to be as happy as they can possible be throughout their lives. If that means they want to pursue a career in music, I’m okay with that and can probably teach them a lot about the lifestyle and all. If they’d rather pick something else, I’m perfectly fine with that as well. I’ll support them no matter what.

What kind of a Saturday Night is your mix getting us ready for?


A Saturday night you won’t forget for the rest of your lives! All funny business aside though, it’s a very energetic mix perfect for the bigger stages. Could even be a mainstage set for an A State Of Trance event! Hope you guys like it!

Saturday Night Session 014: Oyster Kids refresh listeners in ways they didn’t know they needed with exclusive mix

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Saturday Night Session 014: Oyster Kids refresh listeners in ways they didn’t know they needed with exclusive mixOysterKids DancingAstronaut Photo

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

It’s seemingly summer all year round for Oyster Kids, whose moodiest tunes have a hint of refreshing optimism shine through the instrumentals and smooth vocals. The LA based music producers and instrumentalists may not be a household name in the electronic music community, but the founder Andrew Eapen’s musical accolades are lengthy, including the fact that he has helped score a Disney movie, and has been featured on shows like “Shameless” and “Jane the Virgin” among others.

Oyster Kids began as a home recording project for multi-instrumentalist Eapen, who writes, records, and produces the music. On tour and in the studio, Eapen (vocals, guitar) is joined by Jonathan Bradley (drums), Robbie Gullage (bass), and Roy Tanaka (keyboards).

When describing why the name Oyster Kids was chosen Eapen notes, “As kids, you have the whole world at your fingertips and nothing to lose. You can be anything, and nothing can hold you back. For me, the name Oyster Kids embodies this ideal. As we all grow older every day, I don’t want to ever forget that wide-eyed feeling that we can do anything we want to do.”

The group is set to release an EP this summer, but that isn’t stopping them from dropping new tracks along the way. “Losing My Mind” is the latest from Oyster Kids, and the new song is the sound one didn’t know they needed in the middle of a gray winter day. Echoing vocals are juxtaposed with strumming guitars, and its sonic warmth transports the listener to a day with friends driving down a country road with the windows open.

When speaking to Eapen about how the Oyster Kids sound is characterized, he answers, “people have described us as: infectious melodies, strong grooves, and a melancholic atmosphere. I can live with that.” The group put together an hour long mix for Saturday Night Sessions, and the vibe of the compilation can be described as just that.

As Eapen puts it, “my mix is all about dancing around the house in your socks, with close friends and some good wine. Centered around chill grooves with an Indie feel. Hope you like it as much as I do!”

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What inspired you to start making music?

Creating music has always been an outlet for me to express my emotions and create the moods that I want to feel. When I’m sad, I tend to write more uplifting music – and when I’m happy, I tend to write sadder songs. I started writing when I was 8, and I’ll continue doing it for the rest of my life. Writing music lets me feel a sense of relief from the every day.

Which artists are you drawn to/influenced by?

I like anything that has a strong pop sensibility and a good vibe. Whenever I hear a beautifully written vocal melody, I become an instant fan. The artist I’m obsessed with currently is Sigrid. I looove her vocal melodies!

How would you characterize your sound?

People have described us as: infectious melodies, strong grooves, and a melancholic atmosphere. I can live with that.

Least favorite and favorite electronic music song?

My friends that know me best would agree that my favorite mood is lounging in a pool on a hot summer day, listening to some deep house. For this, I’d recommend anything by Parra For Cuva. On the opposite end, a song that I’ve never understood the allure of is that Kungs Vs. Cookin on 3 Burners track – I don’t know what it is, but its never sat right with me. Oh well, just proves that music is so subjective.

How did you choose the name Oyster Kids? What is the story behind this?

As kids, you have the whole world at your fingertips and nothing to lose. You can be anything, and nothing can hold you back. For me, the name Oyster Kids embodies this ideal. As we all grow older every day, I don’t want to ever forget that wide-eyed feeling that we can do anything we want to do.

Which artist would you most like to collaborate with?

This answer is difficult for me because there are soo many. I love the art of songwriting, and I most respect the people that can tell a story and create a mood really well. Currently, Id love to work with Sigrid, Leon, MO, Kacey Musgraves – the list could go on forever…

What kind of a Saturday Night is your mix getting us ready for? 

My mix is all about dancing around the house in your socks, with close friends and some good wine. Centered around chill grooves with an Indie feel. Hope you like it as much as I do!

Saturday Night Session 013: Yves V teams up with KSHMR and Krewella for new release and crafts hour long high energy mix

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Saturday Night Session 013: Yves V teams up with KSHMR and Krewella for new release and crafts hour long high energy mix41962074 1946733222050806 4586319297332117504 N 1

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Belgian born Yves V has been known for big room performances and progressive house hits for over ten years, and he’s found a way to adapt with the changing musical landscape to stay more relevant than ever. His weekly radio shows are the perfect backdrop for a Saturday night, and he is known for teaming up with unexpected artists for new releases to keep his sound fresh and innovative. His latest track, “No Regrets,” sees him join forces with KSHMR and Krewella to create a track that transports the listener to a far away place. The release is a fitting addition to KSHMR’s label Dharma with its exotic notes and high energy progressive drop.

Yves V talks about how the track came to be, saying, “I received the vocal and fell in love with it the first second I heard it! I sent a very raw demo to Niles (KSHMR) and after 30 minutes he already sent me two ideas back including the melody we’re now using on the track.” He continues, “So, everything went really fast because we were both so excited and Niles is without a doubt one of the most talented producers out there, so it’s an honor to work with him. I’m also super happy to have Krewella on the vocals. I’ve been a fan of what the girls have been doing for many many years.”

Having lived through electronic music’s many phases throughout the past 20 years, Yves V is excited about the prospect that previously below the radar genres are making a resurgence. With the commercialization of electronic music, pop has infiltrated the sound of mainstream electronic music, but the producer predicts that 2019 will bring back the diversification of electronic music and what is popular.

Yves V comments, “Artists are getting a lot more diverse, at least within EDM and the techno scenes.” He continues, “Those two may seem polar opposites, yes, but to hear EDM artists and headlining guys not just playing big room but playing hardstyle and old school house again really makes these events electric. Trance is making a huge comeback in techno and underground circles, too, it almost feels ‘cool’ again!”

The producer put together an hour long mix featuring his own releases and a variety of high energy tracks to keep the night moving and vibrant. When asked to describe what kind a Saturday night his Saturday Night Session will bring, he answers, “A night where you forget all your problems and just enjoy, lose yourself in the music and the energy! I hope you guys have as much fun listening to it, as I did making it…” The mix certainly does just that, and it’s the perfect complement to a party-filled evening.

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Do you have any artists you have not collaborated with that you would like to?

I would love to collaborate with Tiesto, he’s still at the top of his game and one of the reasons why I first became a DJ – he’s a living legend!

Who were some of your early influences, and what got you into electronic dance music in the first place?

I was totally into rock music when I was younger but my first introduction into electronic dance music was seeing Daft Punk at a festival. Not long after that, I started to buy my first vinyls and some of my influences back then were Jeff Mills, Dave Clark and Belgium trance DJ’s like Push.

How did your new track “No Regrets” come to be?

I received the vocal and fell in love with it the first second I heard it! I sent a very raw demo to Niles (KSHMR) and after 30 minutes he already sent me two ideas back including the melody we’re now using on the track. So, everything went really fast because we were both so excited and Niles is without a doubt one of the most talented producers out there, so it’s an honor to work with him. I’m also super happy to have Krewella on the vocals. I’ve been a fan of what the girls have been doing for many many years.

Is there a favorite city or venue that you like touring in?
So difficult to name one, there are so many beautiful and amazing places that I’ve been! Think Brazil is still one of my favourite countries, amazing crowds, good food, it really is a beautiful country with that carnival feel 24/7.

What are your hobbies outside of producing music?
Music is my hobby and passion but besides that I love to go to the gym, it’s so important for me to stay healhy on the road with both my body and my mind. I also like to think I’m a bit of a foodie, bright, punchy flavours and a good glass of wine? Heaven!

Are there any trends that you predict or changes coming to the electronic music scene in 2019?

That’s a very difficult question, I wish I could predict the future! Artists are getting a lot more diverse, at least within EDM and the techno scenes. Those two may seem polar opposites, yes, but to hear EDM artists and headlining guys not just playing big room but playing hardstyle and old school house again really makes these events electric. Trance is making a huge comeback in techno and underground circles, too, it almost feels “cool” again!

Favorite and least favorite food?

Favorite food: I’m in Mexico whilst I’m writing this so let’s say I could eat tacos everyday! 🙂
Least: Cheese

What kind of a Saturday Night is your mix getting us ready for?

A night where you forget all your problems and just enjoy, lose yourself in the music and the energy! I hope you guys have as much fun listening to it, as I did making it…