North Coast touts lush afterparty lineup: Axwell Λ Ingrosso, Manic Focus, RL Grime x Cashmere Cat, + more

This post was originally published on this site

North Coast touts lush afterparty lineup: Axwell Λ Ingrosso, Manic Focus, RL Grime x Cashmere Cat, + moreNorth Coast Afters 1

Just a little more than two weeks out from Labor Day weekend’s annual North Coast Music Festival, organizers have announced the official coinciding afterparty list. North Coast afters are a must for those who are keen on keeping the fun flowing past the fest’s prompt 10 p.m. completion each night.

As always, North Coast’s promoters (Silver Wrapper, Metronome, and Cold Grums) have cast an all-encompassing net of talent across some of the most in-demand venues in Chicago. For the electronic enthusiasts, Axwell Λ Ingrosso will succeed their headlining festival performance Friday night at PRYSM, while Cashmere Cat will accompany RL Grime Saturday night at The Mid.

Meanwhile, jam/experimental devotees will be satiated by a Breaking Biscuits (union of members from both Disco Biscuits and Break Science) performance with support from Thriftworks. Synthwave will run rampant Sunday night at The Mid where The Midnight will be accompanied by Maddy O’Neal. To help close out the weekend, the recently incepted and Vulfpeck-allied Fearless Flyers will be funkin’ out at Concord. There’s a North Coast after party for every attendee’s sonic taste buds this year.

Tickets to North Coast Music Festival are still available here, and official afterparty tickets are available here.

Photo Credit: Josh Timmermans

[Q&A] North Coast’s founder, Michael Berg, talks new developments and acquired wisdom

This post was originally published on this site

[Q&A] North Coast’s founder, Michael Berg, talks new developments and acquired wisdomNorth Coast 1

Every year, some of Chicago’s most all-embracing EDM, funk, rap/hip-hop, and indie event promoters—Silver Wrapper, Metronome, and Cold Grums—unite to piece together “summer’s last stand,” North Coast Music Festival. Since 2010, the festival has returned to Union Park each Labor Day Weekend to house not only world-class acts from nearly every crevice of the musical continuum (deadmau5, Widespread Panic, Portugal The Man, Gucci Mane, Pretty Lights—just to name a few), but also a myriad of visual art installations, ranging from a live, psychedelic graffiti demonstration from Chris Dyer to a unique pop up gallery showcasing solely local Chicagoans.

Tucked between some of Chicago’s most vibrant and energetic neighborhoods, including Wicker Park, West Town, West Loop, and Pilsen, North Coast’s Union Park atmosphere is a happy paradox: a serene, intimate park setting, encapsulated by trees, penetrated by the awe-inspiring urban skyline seen overhead and some of the most in-demand performances of the summer. This year, North Coast touts a larger focus, including its first-time poolside pre-party each day, which itself will host a number of installations, as well as a stark increase of visual performers, like the Bam Creates crew.

Co-founder of North Coast, Silver Wrapper talent buyer, and longtime Manic Focus manager, Michael Berg, sat down with Dancing Astronaut to discuss how the festival has grown throughout its nine years of successfully capping off the brimming Chicago summer events season. He explains how the festival has garnered its serial-attendees by catering to the “original coasties,” who tend to prefer jam and indie acts—like this year’s securing of The Revivalists and funk legend, Jamiroquai, in his first midwest performance in over a decade—while not making the mistake of neglecting the younger crowd, booking budding Chicago rapper Juice Wrld and fan-favorite dance acts like DJ Snake, RL Grime, and Axwell ^ Ingrosso.

What was your initial vision for the festival? Did it turn out the way you conceived it nine years ago?

It did at first. What I’ve noticed is as the market and the festival landscape changes, our goals are shifting with them. As our fanbase ages, things change. We’re still very proud of it. It’s definitely under a metamorphosis right now.

Can you expand on that?

I think that if you went to the festival in the first year, and you were 21-years-old, now you’re 30. That’s a big difference in life as far as maturity and priorities. We’ve always tried to curate the show with a little bit of a younger audience in mind. When we’ve leaned toward the older demographic’s music in the past, it hasn’t translated as well.

But we really saw a different response this year with some of the stuff that we booked. It made us realize that our fans are growing up. You just have to be conscious of who you’re servicing, which goes all the way up and down the ladder from the artists and their agents, to the lifeline of the festival, the fans, who buy the tickets and represent the brand.

We want to be loyal to the original coasties; but we also want to find the balance between doing that and keeping forward-thinking, like booking acts that are maybe for our undercard this year, but are maybe going to be headliners in a year or two. A lot of times the people we book [for North Coast] a year later, will be on the main stage at Lollapalooza.

Aside from lineup curation, what other areas would you say the event has evolved in over the years?

Definitely the experiential part has changed dramatically. We’ve got a much bigger presence of visual performers and art installations. Something we’re introducing this year that we’ve never done before is a daily pool party. There will be a full curation of art inside the pool. It’s just going to be for a few hundred people per day, including the artists and their guests. But a few hundred people per day will have the opportunity to buy tickets to come to this four or five hour pool party. Bam Creates is going to take over the art and do a lot with that.

The one limitation we have with it is that the festival ends at 10 pm every night. There’s only so many hours of darkness, so the types of installations that we have at something like Suwannee Hulaween, our other festival down in Florida, where things glow at night or things with fire, we can’t really do as much of that at North Coast because the majority of the fest is daylight. So you have to do installations and activations that work in the day time.

What about the venue and the location has kept you there since the first year in 2010?

First of all, we have a great relationship with the city and the park district. It’s really just the perfect location and the perfect size for this type of show. The majority of people who are coming to this show, probably 85 percent, are coming from the greater Chicago area. If you’re looking at Chicago proper, it’s right in the middle of West Town, the West Loop, Wicker Park, Bucktown, Lincoln Park, Pilsen—all those neighborhoods that are hot spots. It’s very centrally located: easy to find parking, it’s right off a train line. If you’re coming from Northbrook, or you’re coming from the West suburbs or the South Suburbs, it’s right off the highway.

The neighborhood has been generally welcoming of us. So, it’s kind of one of those things like if it’s not broken don’t fix it. If we were to sell out in advance five years in a row, maybe we would consider moving up to a bigger location, but it seems to sell out by the weekend of the fest every year. It feels like we have the right size park for the right size crowd that we’re generating.

Another thing that I really like about it is it is a park and a lot of the festivals in the city feel very urban. North Coast is definitely an urban festival, but there’s still trees and it still feels like a park when you’re there. I love how when you’re watching the main stage, you can see the Willis/Sears Tower poking up beyond the trees. So it’s just this little visual reminder that you’re in the city of Chicago.

What’s the thought process behind the lineup, stylistically? I know a lot of people see it as a predominately electronic fest, but you guys bring so much variety.

It’s a pretty diverse festival. If you look at our top ten acts this year, there is definitely a handful of electronic acts. You’ve got Axwell ^ Ingresso, DJ Snake, Yellow Claw. On the immediate undercard, you’ve got RL Grime. So those are clearly our big dance acts. But then you also have Jimaroquai, Moon Taxi, Vulfpeck and the Revivalists, the Strumbrellas, and Robert DeLong which are more alternative, funky, indie types. Then Friday, we’ve got Miguel, who, on paper, is an r&b act, but if you’ve ever seen him, he’s more of a like a live act who plays with a sick full band. Then on the undercard that day you’ve got Byrce Vine, and Juice Wrld who is just exploding right now, a local Chicago guy in that emo rap/r&b style that’s so big right now.

On Sunday, we’ve got the return of Jamiroquai to Chicago for the first time since 2005. It’s the Midwest exclusive for them. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen, but he’s a huge 13-piece funk orchestra. It’s gonna’ be crazy and will close out the festival as the final set of the weekend. He’s doing five shows in the states for the first time in 13 years, and the only one that’s not on one of the coasts is us. It’s special to us as event curators that they chose us as their Chicago show.

We really are a diverse festival. I think there was more of an electronic presence early on. But right now it’s not too much of just one thing.

What other areas have you guys tried to improve on in more recent years?

If you look at the schedule, it all makes a little more sense. We’ve really honed in on, like if you’re there for dance music, and you get there at 2 pm you go from this stage to this stage and then you stay at one stage for the last two, or whatever it is. Or on the other hand, if you’re there for jam bands, you start at one stage then go over here for two sets. Basically every hour there’s non-conflicting stuff for you to see. Obviously once you get into a diverse lineup and a diverse crowd, which North Coast is a diverse crowd, inevitably there’s going to be some ‘Why’d you put this person on at the same time as this person?”

So you’re trying not to make it too hard on people who just want to go one day?

No, I think we’ve embraced the fact that it’s a single-day market, and that everyone wants to go to as many festivals as they can. Somebody might not like North Coast’s [lineup] on Friday, but maybe they’re not going to miss it on Sunday, and that’s cool with us.

Michael Berg is North Coast Music Festival’s co-founder. Tickets to North Coast are still available here.

Fan Leaks That The Anticipated RL Grime x Mr. Carmack Collaboration Will Be On Carmack’s Next Album

This post was originally published on this site

It is something special when two of the most talented artists in the industry team up to produce a one of a kind track. Not long ago it was thought that one of the most sought-after ID’s in all of trap would be featured on RL Grime’s latest album NOVA. When the album dropped, there

The post Fan Leaks That The Anticipated RL Grime x Mr. Carmack Collaboration Will Be On Carmack’s Next Album appeared first on EDM Sauce.

The Greatest Day Ever Music Festival NYC – Recap

This post was originally published on this site

The Greatest Day Ever music festival came back to the Bronx this year with some big names from Hip-Hop and EDM. The event toke place in the New York Expo Center with the stage itself inside a huge warehouse and a ton of rides and games outside. Day 1 got packed real fast with many

The post The Greatest Day Ever Music Festival NYC – Recap appeared first on EDM Sauce.

Stream RL Grime’s highly anticipated sophomore album, ‘NOVA’

This post was originally published on this site

Stream RL Grime’s highly anticipated sophomore album, ‘NOVA’RL Grime Day Of Dead Billboard 1548

Four years ago, RL Grime‘s unique sound design and production arrangements took the electronic music world by storm. Since then, many in the community have hailed Henry Alfred Steinway’s debut a masterpiece, some even going so far so to reminisce on the album as trap music’s magnum opus. Unarguably, tracks like “Scylla” and “Core” have gone on to become staples in the trap music community, just as much as they have in the EDM community at large. They created an era of producers all over the world that were hoping to embody an ounce of the raw, thumping 808s that Steinway’s early material so exuded. But, Steinway has always been one to suggest that his influence would not diminish, even without directly saying the words, his annual mixes, and festival appearances have always suggested so much.

The inception of RL Grime came at a time when electronic music was at its height in the states — Skrillex‘s Recess had just been released that spring, and deadmau5 was fresh off the summer release of his album while(1<2). and now, with a visibly changed dance landscape in the states and an assimilation of the music into the very fabric of contemporary culture — what many refer to as the post-EDM era, and an age of electronic music that dips its toes in the proverbial ponds of hip-hop and pop — RL Grime’s returned with his second album, NOVA, an effort that channels the sheer potential for the genre’s production future while also providing a range of sounds that harken back to the early material that drove his project in the beginning.

On NOVA, RL Grime’s collaborations run wild. He’s created a collection of searing coalescences of melodic rap and R&B refrains from some of  hip-hop and R&B heavyweights like Miguel, Jeremiah, Chief Keef, Tory Lanez, and Ty Dolla $ign; taking the depth of his project to unforeseen heights. Meanwhile, though Steinway’s beats are less concerned with trap than they used to be, his music’s fitting for the US festival circuit, with moments of sheer ecstasy, rolling drum’n’bass, and the same unfathomable drops the world has grown to know, love, and look forward to.

RL Grime’s ‘NOVA’ Proves To Be Well Worth The Wait With Masterful and Matured Production

This post was originally published on this site

I remember the first time I ever heard ‘Core’. The single from RL Grime’s iconic album VOID changed the way I listened to electronic music forever. Many producers have echoed this belief over the years. There was nothing average about the entirety of VOID. In almost every way it stood out as the pinnacle of

The post RL Grime’s ‘NOVA’ Proves To Be Well Worth The Wait With Masterful and Matured Production appeared first on EDM Sauce.

RL Grime unveils psychedelic music video for ‘Pressure’ [Watch]

This post was originally published on this site

RL Grime unveils psychedelic music video for ‘Pressure’ [Watch]Screen Shot 2017 12 22 At 11.45.55 AM

Technicolor hues, hi-definition psychedelic landscapes, and heart pumping cuts of a motorbike rider comprise the official music video for “Pressure,” notably RL Grime‘s last release leading up to the arrival of his sophomore album, NOVA, due out on July 27.

The action packed production capitalizes on visual thrill, engrossing viewers with its successive scenes of RL Grime’s biker navigating constantly contorting territory. The titillating nature of the video complements the single’s gritty, bass heavy technical constructions.

Listen to RL Grime’s latest NOVA heresingle, “Light Me Up,” .

Billie Eilish, A Teen Pop Star Who Has No Time For Teen Pop

This post was originally published on this site

Billie EilishOne of the foundational principles of being a teenager is posturing like you’re cooler and more grown-up than you actually are. The budding career of Billie Eilish is this ruse writ large with a major-label budget, presented so convincingly you wonder whether it might actually be authentic. More »

RL Grime – “Light Me Up” (Feat. Miguel & Julia Michaels)

This post was originally published on this site

RL GrimeRL Grime teamed up with Miguel last year on a song called “Stay For It,” and now they’ve linked up again. “Light Me Up,” which comes from the trap-rave producer’s forthcoming full-length Nova, features Miguel and pop hitmaker Julia Michaels, and it actually started out as a demo from the Skrillex/Diplo team-up Jack Ü. More »

RL Grime Drops Jack Ü Demo ‘Light Me Up’ Featuring Miguel & Julia Michaels

This post was originally published on this site

In two shorts days, RL Grime will officially be releasing his new studio album Nova. In anticipation of his new album, RL Grime has released an unreleased demo from Jack Ü featuring Miguel and Julia Michaels. Apparently, the demo was resurrected from Jack Ü’s unreleased songs and given new vocals, production, and a handful of

The post RL Grime Drops Jack Ü Demo ‘Light Me Up’ Featuring Miguel & Julia Michaels appeared first on EDM Sauce.