Step aside, men: Study of pop music finds rise in sadness, upward trend in female chart toppers

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I’m gunna let you finish, Kanye, but uh…

Female singers with upbeat dance songs are far more likely to top the music charts nowadays, according to new findings by researchers at the University of California, Irvine. The study also found a downward musical trend in happiness and an increase in sadness.

The study, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, examined 500,000 popular songs released in the UK over a three decade period, from 1985 and 2015, and categorized them each based on their mood.

“‘Happiness’ is going down, ‘brightness’ is going down, ‘sadness’ is going up, and at the same time, the songs are becoming more ‘danceable’ and more ‘party-like,’” co-author Natalia L. Komarova told The Associated Press.

Of course, researchers emphasize that a gradual decrease in the average “happiness” index does not mean that all successful songs in 1985 were “happy” and all successful songs in 2015 were “sad.” They were looking for average trends in the acoustic properties of music and the moods describing the sounds.

The overall mood shifts in the songs’ musical elements fall in line with past studies that have examined lyrical content changes over the years. They have found that positive emotions, on the whole, have declined; while indicators of loneliness and social isolation have increased.

“So it looks like, while the overall mood is becoming less happy, people seem to want to forget it all and dance,” says Komarova, a mathematician and evolutionary biologist who led the study. She added, “The public seems to prefer happier songs, even though more and more unhappy songs are being released each year.”

Some songs with a low happiness index in 2014 include “Stay With Me” by Sam Smith, “Whispers” by Passenger and “Unmissable” by Gorgon City. Songs from 1985 with a high happiness index include “Glory Days” by Bruce Springsteen, “Would I Lie to You?” by the Eurythmics, and “Freedom” by Wham!

Additionally, researchers found the most successful musical genres of recent are dance and pop, with a “clear downward trend” in the success of rock, beginning in the early 2000s.

The researchers also found that the “maleness” of songs — or the frequency of male singers in popular music — has decreased over the last 30 years. “Interestingly, successful songs exhibit their own distinct behavior: They tend to be happier, more party-like, less relaxed and more likely to be sung by a woman than most.”

The same trends hold true for the US market, based on a preliminary review of data by researchers. A few 2014 hits that meet the study’s qualifications for successful pop music include Clean Bandit‘s “Rather Be,” Taylor Swift‘s “Shake It Off,” and Meghan Trainor‘s “All About That Bass.”

The findings arrive at a critical time when the music industry is grappling with issues of gender inequality, where men are overwhelmingly dominating the visible ranks of artists and songwriters, despite studies such as these, which show a strong cultural/consumer yearning for female dance/pop hits in the contemporary global music climate.

Read the fully study by UC Irvine here.

H/T: Stereogum

SOPHIE – Ponyboy (Official Video)

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SOPHIE has released the official music video to accompany her track “Ponyboy.” The Los Angeles-based record producer, singer, songwriter, dancer and DJ started her career with a band called Motherland before releasing a string of singles and collaborations in 2014 that would help catapult her towards a mainstream breakthrough. Now, SOPHIE — with an album coming in the near future — is slated to become one of pop’s most invigorating figures.

The video features captivating light schemes that give rise to SOPHIE’s commanding vocals. As the camera shakes and SOPHIE leads two other women in a synchronized routine, the word “pony” and “boy” alternate on the background screen: the video is visually stimulating, the perfect fit for the ear candy that is “Ponyboy.”

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Alesso Addresses His Transition From House to Pop Music

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Just moments before his performance at the AMAs, Alesso sat down with Billboard to talk about the collaboration for “Let Me Go” featuring Hailee Steinfeld, Florida Georgia Line, and watt. “I used to just think about what will work on a dance floor at a festival. Now, I try to put out a song that

The post Alesso Addresses His Transition From House to Pop Music appeared first on EDM Sauce.

How the Pop-Drop Became the Sound of 2016

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By Charlie Harding

Bearson – One Step At A Time (feat. Natalola)

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Bearson is back! Everybody’s favorite Norwegian follows up on the strength of his last two singles from earlier in the year “Want You” and “Imposter” with what might be the best of all three – “One Step At A Time (feat. Natalola).”

As always in a Bearson release, first and foremost the single is just such a ‘feel-good’ track. The production is a whimsical blend of tropical influences with indie pop laced with enough indie dance synths to get any fan of dancier-pop music excited. In short, Bearson manages to wonderfully combine a whole lot of elements in three minutes and fifteen seconds to give you that perfect aural satisfaction.

This article was first published on Your EDM.
Source: Bearson – One Step At A Time (feat. Natalola)

Martin Garrix Wants To Be A Household Name In Pop Music

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It’s no secret Martin Garrix has some huge aspirations, especially regarding his lack of confinement to a single musical genre. However, in a new interview with with Times of IndiaGarrix explains just how far he wants to transcend both trends and genres.

“Experimental, deep house is the way I want to go! I want to produce more number one hits but not follow trends blindly! What I really hope to achieve in the long-term is to get that cross-over status such as Calvin Harris and Avicii. I’d love to be a household name in pop music.”

When asked about what it was like to be featured alongside the legendary Carl Cox in the forthcoming EDM documentary What We Started, Martin Garrix was quick to praise the house mainstay.

“He is such a legend and has been doing this for 30 years, which is something I really look up to. I admire and respect Carl, he has so much positive energy. I’m very humbled and excited to be a part of this project! He is an amazing guy who has been in the scene for a long time. I remember listening to his music when I was younger, so to be featured in this next to him is amazing.”

And he’s not worried about people streaming or downloading his music for free. Playing his tunes out live is what Garrix is all about, and he understands that the organic proliferation of his music, whether he gets paid or not, will only benefit that end goal.

“If it’s someone at their house streaming music, I don’t mind if they don’t pay. In the end, you get more famous if they listen to your tracks all the time and show it to their friends. Then they buy tickets to your shows anyway. The amount of money artists get from touring is ridiculous. You’re talking about millions, millions, and millions.”

But when asked about how he goes about making music, and what he chooses to focus on the most, Garrix is a firm believer in genuine inspiration to avoid getting stuck in formulaic compositions and trends. He even mentions his “album taking shape” in the response, which has us thinking the recent seven-track release is just a warm up for an honest LP.

“The hardest part for me is to finish a track. I start new projects all the time. I make drafts and then we have a sit-down with my team, and we discuss which track would be dope with a particular singer. Then we send it to them and they start writing lyrics, or I’ll send it to them with me humming a melody. This way, I slowly see my album taking shape. Some people enjoy gaming or drawing, for me this is it. You start out with nothing, and with different sounds, you complete the puzzle.”

For the full interview, click here.

 

Source: Times of India | Photo: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

This article was first published on Your EDM.
Source: Martin Garrix Wants To Be A Household Name In Pop Music

Publication Fakes Interview With Martin Garrix

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UPDATE: It has come to our attention that the original interview from Times of India was fabricated, and Martin Garrix never answered the questions provided by the publication. It is our understanding that the answers provided by the publication are the creation of the publication alone.


It’s no secret Martin Garrix has some huge aspirations, especially regarding his lack of confinement to a single musical genre. However, in a new interview with with Times of IndiaGarrix explains just how far he wants to transcend both trends and genres.

When asked about what it was like to be featured alongside the legendary Carl Cox in the forthcoming EDM documentary What We Started, Martin Garrix was quick to praise the house mainstay.

And he’s not worried about people streaming or downloading his music for free. Playing his tunes out live is what Garrix is all about, and he understands that the organic proliferation of his music, whether he gets paid or not, will only benefit that end goal.

But when asked about how he goes about making music, and what he chooses to focus on the most, Garrix is a firm believer in genuine inspiration to avoid getting stuck in formulaic compositions and trends. He even mentions his “album taking shape” in the response, which has us thinking the recent seven-track release is just a warm up for an honest LP.

 

Photo: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

This article was first published on Your EDM.
Source: Publication Fakes Interview With Martin Garrix