Nicholas Krgovich – “thank u, next” (Ariana Grande Cover)

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Nicholas-Krgovich-Thank-U-NextAlmost two months ago, Nicholas Krgovich released a new album called OUCH. In songs like “Rosemary,” “Lido,” and “Belief,” he portrayed the wreckage of a failed relationship, the first real heartbreak he’d experienced in his life. Krgovich has described the flood of inspiration that came with OUCH and one … More »

Nicholas Krgovich – “Lido”

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Nicholas Krgovich’s breezy, lushly orchestrated lounge-pop often has a touch of winking artifice about it, but the feelings on display on his new album are all too real. Last year, the Vancouver multi-instrumentalist fell in love for the first time, got dumped for the first time, and had his heart broken for the first time. More »

Nicholas Krgovich – “Belief” Video

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Nicholas KrgovichNext month, Vancouver musician Nicholas Krgovich is releasing a new album, OUCH, the follow-up to last year’s In An Open Field. It’s a break-up album, as Krgovich laid out in a statement that accompanied its first single, “Rosemary,” and his new song “Belief” also bears the scars of the intense period … More »

Nicholas Krgovich – “Rosemary”

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Nicholas KrgovichLast year, Nicholas Krgovich got dumped. At 35 years old, the Vancouver multi-instrumentalist experienced real, true heartbreak for the first time. It sucked. And suddenly, after not writing any new music for almost three years, songs started pouring out of him. “It was like this whole ordeal turned on a tap,” he explains. “I’d finish … More »

Stream Nicholas Krgovich In An Open Field

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Vancouver-bred musician Nicholas Krgovich is already following up last year’s The Hills with a new album called In An Open Field, which is out at the end of the week. The album’s title nods towards the plaintive, pleasant, and subdued mood that Krgovich captures on it, more concerned about the journey than getting there. More »