EDMSauce Premiere: Kompany Drops Fiery New Single ‘Movement’

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If there’s a producer in dubstep who knows how to make people move, it’s Kompany. The California-based artist has gained the spotlight in recent years for his powerful, mind-blowing productions – and ‘Movement’ only adds to this momentum. Released today on Never Say Die Records, ‘Movement’ has arrived at exactly the right time, as things

The post EDMSauce Premiere: Kompany Drops Fiery New Single ‘Movement’ appeared first on EDM Sauce.

Road to Movement Detroit: the years 2008-2018

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With Memorial Weekend fast approaching, Detroit’s beloved Movement Festival will enter its 21st year in the running, bringing forth yet another relentless wave of excitement in its showcase of diverse musical talent. Originally surfacing as a free event, Movement has grown from its beginnings into a nationwide landmark whose dedication to housing premier electronic music attracts music-lovers from all over the spectrum. In recent years, Movement has expanded immensely from its techno and house roots with its polarizing shifts in programming. This year’s lineup undeniably juxtaposes the underground mainstays with new blood, welcoming the likes of FISHER, Chris Lake, and Charlotte de Witte with local legends like Stacey Pullen, Carl Craig, and Octave One.

Encompassing over two decades of performances, curated stages, and transformative industry shifts, Movement has no shortage of monumental highlights that have been captured. As dance music prepares for Movement 2019, look back on Movement’s journey through the last ten years with the Dancing Astronaut team as we chronicle some of the best moments of the historic techno and house gathering.

2008: deadmau5, Beatport Stage

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Photo Credits: Scott Spellman

Racking up an attendance of 75,000 (up 30,000 from the previous year), Movement cemented itself as one of the most important electronic festivals nationwide in 2008. Right at the onset of deadmau5‘ peak touring period, Movement hosted the original helmet-wearing DJ on Saturday, May 24 at its Beatport Stage. Just two studio albums into his now-extensive discography, Deadmau5 made his Movement debut in the early stages of his career, spinning to a packed crowd that received his performance amicably.

2009: Carl Cox, Main Stage

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Photo Credits: Scott Spellman

Dance music titan Carl Cox brought the house down in a two-hour set at the-then Vitamin Water Main Stage, closing out a list of heavy-hitters from Day One. Already eight years deep into his yearly Space Ibiza residence and five years into his Carl Cox & Friends curated stage concept, the acid house veteran and his legendary party-throwing skills catered to new ears and techno-lovers alike.

2010: Plastikman, Main Stage

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Photo Credits: Bryan Mitchell

Marking Richie Hawtin‘s first Plastikman show in Detroit since 1994, the techno trailblazer returned under his Plastikman moniker to deliver an incredible main stage performance on Saturday, May 29 for the tenth anniversary of Movement Festival since its inception in 2000.

2011: Skrillex, Red Bull Music Academy Stage

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Photo Credits: Bryan Mitchell

Making his Movement debut on the Red Bull Music Academy Stage, Skrillex closed out Day 1 on Saturday, May 28 to what many will remember as one of the best sets of the festival. On the cusp of his seminal “Bangarang” release and coming off the success of his 2010 Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites album, the dubstep producer graced the humble, but notoriously diverse Red Bull stage in the midst of his blossoming career.

2012: Public Enemy and special guest Ice-T, Main Stage

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Photo Credits: Douglas Wojciechowski

Breaking its attendance record again with 107,343 fans coming out in 2012, Movement dipped its feet into hip-hop programming, bringing rap legends Public Enemy to the main stage. The performance given by the “Fight the Power” rappers has remained one of the most unforgettable pinnacles of Movement and spoken to the festival’s ability to curate acts that stray from the traditional techno and house genres while maintaining appeal to the Movement audience.

2013: Nina Kraviz, Underground Stage

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Photo Credits: Bryan Mitchell

Since her breakthrough in 2009, Nina Kraviz has been a frequent performer at Movement throughout the years and continued to bring her hypnotic style of music back to Detroit. The Siberian DJ closed out the Underground Stage on Day One of Movement 2013 to a massive crowd. The timing of Kraviz’s appearance also coincided with the release of her divisive Resident Advisor interview and the subsequent controversy.

2014: J.Phlip, Beatport Stage

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Photo Credits: Bryan Mitchell

Both a special night for J.Phlip and spectators alike, the Dirtybird staple stepped on the decks to celebrate her birthday and simultaneously closed out Movement’s final day on the Beatport Stage as a last minute fill-in for Boys Noize.

2015: Dog Blood, Movement Stage

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Photo Credits: Joe Gall

Seeing Skrillex’s return four years later performing under Dog Blood with co-producer Boys Noize, Movement undeniably paid tribute to the rise of burgeoning talent in Skrillex’s graduation to a densely-packed main stage performance. Up until then, Movement had avoided slotting cross-over acts for main stage; however, the praised reception to Dog Blood proved an unlikely payoff that would continue to play an influence in Movement’s ever-expanding roster.

2016: Kraftwerk, Movement Stage

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Photo Credits: Douglas Wojciechowski

Movement 2016 not only celebrated its tenth anniversary relaunching under Paxahau Events, but also capitalized on its place as a leading festival by landing Kraftwerk — one of the most influential forces in modern electronic music and undeniably the most prolific booking of Movement in recent years. The German pioneers made their debut Movement appearance and captivated fans with their 3-D visual performance, solidifying their position as both innovators and improvisational artists.

2017: Richie Hawtin, Movement Stage

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Photo Credits: Douglas Wojciechowski

Electronic mainstay Richie Hawtin brought his new audiovisual show CLOSE – Spontaneity & Synchronicity to Detroit for a surreal 75-minute experience combining elements of DJ and live performance. The minimalist techno-champion presented his latest project Day One during his headlining slot on the main stage. The following nights saw Testpilot and Carl Cox as headliners.

2018: Claude VonStroke, Movement Stage

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Photo Credits: Anthony Rassam

With the Dirtybird brand showing up consistently as a strong presence at Movement, it was only a matter of time before Claude VonStroke got his distinguished spotlight. The head Dirtybird chief closed out Movement’s main stage for the first time in 2018 before heading off on a world tour to Tomorrowland, Shambhala, Dirtybird Campout, and more. VonStroke also released a live mix album of his Movement set Claude VonStroke: Live in Detroit, paying homage to the city where he grew up.

Featured Image: Stephen Bondio

Movement Detroit releases 2019 set times

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Movement Detroit releases 2019 set timesLOCOB2BMBROS MVMT SUN MVMT18 JH 1457 Min

Movement Detroit has announced their set times and stages for the 2019 edition of the festival, held over May 25-27 at the Hart Plaza. With years of cementing their presence into the city’s growing electronic and hip-hop scene, the upcoming event presents a hard-hitting selection of techno, accompanied by ear-pleasing commercial additions to the lineup.

Attendees can witness artist sets over the course of three-day event, spanning from a two-hour set from the scene’s latest powerhouse Amelie Lens, to a late Monday evening gathering with Claude VonStroke and Green Velvet‘s joint project, Get Real. Most notably, the second day of the festival features a special live pop-up performance from Circle of Live, incorporating the collaborative efforts of four unique artists over their event series.

Following suit from previous years, the festival will return with their familiar five stages to support the variety of artists, named as the Movement, Red Bull Presents, Stargate, Underground, and the Pyramid stage.

Single day and weekend passes are available for purchase here.

Movement Detroit releases 2019 set timesMovement 2019 Settimes

Photo credit: Joshua Hanford

10 artists not to miss at Movement 2019

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10 artists not to miss at Movement 2019Movement StephenBondio

Words by Anthony Manganiello and Jessica Mao

Another installment of Detroit’s beloved three-day event brings forth Movement Festival’s ever-expanding roster in its most diverse coverage to date. Spanning city pioneers from Carl Craig, MK, Stacey Pullen to relatively mainstream DJs like Fisher, GRiZ, Disclosure, and a plethora of underground, the 2019 lineup has no shortage of techno and house talent from the powerhouses to emerging. Marking its 21st year in the running, Movement has transformed from its roots as a celebratory ode to the birthplace of techno to an amalgamation of the finest electronic acts currently energizing the scene. Year after year, a growing number of attendees make the pilgrimage to hear and see for themselves both the pillars of artistry living in Detroit and the culmination of culture, history and legendary music—all that reside in none other than the soul and essence of Movement.


Orbital

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Photo by Timothy Leary

Thirty years of on-and-off regrouping has not stopped iconic English band Orbital from simultaneously creating awe-inspiring techno and captivating crowds internationally with their live performances. Standing alongside The Chemical Brothers and The Prodigy as some of the most influential electronic acts of the past decades, Orbital latest reunion brought their ninth studio album Monsters Exist and a reignited spark for dance music. Now, Orbital makes their highly anticipated debut performance at Movement 2019.


ANNA

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Photo by Piero Davila

Armed with an early penchant for techno and a bleeding passion for the DJ art, ANNA has come a long way from her quaint beginnings in São Paulo municipality Amparo as the daughter of a club owner. Although spinning for the entirety of her professional career, her foray into production saw its trial-and-error phases right until her 2018 release “Hidden Beauties” hit the techno world with a magnitude that kept the track at no.1 on Beatport’s techno charts for four months. All eyes are on ANNA as she continues to capitalize on her rising momentum. Don’t miss the opportunity to witness an electrifying set by one of the biggest emerging acts yet.


DJ Nobu

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Photo by Cedric Diradourian

When it comes to playing a crowd, DJ Nobu listens to nobody. Rooted in punk and hardcore but masterful in his command of diverse genres, the Chiba-born DJ has infected dance floors with his precise curation of eclectic tracks, disrupting the underground scene in places like Tokyo, Berlin and Movement’s home city—Detroit. Unconventionality is DJ Nobu’s brand, and it repeatedly draws in listeners who yearn to hear his hypnotic style of storytelling. The Future Terror parties founder will grace the Sunday lineup at Movement’s Underground Stage.


Yaeji

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Photo by Lydo Le

As undefined as the lines of identity within her Korean-American culture are equal to that of her floating blend of hip-hop, dream pop and house, Brooklyn-based producer Yaeji has established herself as a contender for one of the most distinct music voices in the past few years. Her second EP, EP2, quickly won her the spotlight with a mellow rendition of Drake’s “Passionfruit” and fan-favorite “Raingurl,” highlighting her forté of producing lush beats in conjunction with performing a signature whisper-rap mix of Korean and English. Groovy yet dream-inducing, Yaeji’s sound reflects the expansion of Movement in programming ever-experimental territories of house.


Madlib

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Photo by Maria Jose Govea

Undeniably one of the most prolific hip-hop producers of the past decades, Madlib will top off Movement day three in a long-awaited return. With a discography so extensive that it easily risks drowning the common man, Madlib and his work span the mainstream appeal of albums like The Life of Pablo to the rarities of exclusive releases, underground artists, and high-profile collaborations under pseudonyms Madvillian and Jaylib. An aficionado of jazz, expert sampler, and decades of experience condensed into the musical prowess of one man, Madlib will not disappoint.


Floorplan

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Photo by Kevin Lake

There are a few names in Detroit techno that all enthusiasts know and Robert Hood is one of them. Working closely with Jeff Mills in the creation of Underground Resistance (and possibly minimal techno as a whole), Hood has a penchant for collaborations and side projects. Perhaps his most intriguing is Floorplan, the soulful, disco-leaning project started with his daughter, Lyric Hood. With two generations of techno playing together on one stage, Floorplan is a must-see set this Memorial Day weekend.


Get Real

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Photo by Daniel Peterson

A duo of house-music heavyweights, Get Real fuses the Green Velvet’s techy sound with Claude VonStroke’s wonky style. With just two songs under the Get Real name, this set is sure to bring out the funkiest Dirtybird tracks, Detroit techno classics, and deep cuts from Green Velvet’s 20-plus years in the industry. With Detroit repping a strong Dirtybird fanbase, this set is sure to be a full-on party.


Shigeto

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Photo by Kristin Adamczyk

Shigeto is one of the most exciting names to come out of Detroit in the past 10 years. A Ghostly signee, his dabbling in textured downtempo work garnered attention before his dance-oriented album, The New Monday. From his live band performances to his no-nonsense DJ sets, Shigeto has become a mainstay of Movement. Continuing to dive deeper into techno in his own work and with his label, Portage Garage Sounds, Shigeto’s developmental trajectory has been fascinating to watch.


Wajatta

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Photo by Robyn VonSwank

For those who don’t know Reggie Watts, the idea of James Corden’s band leader playing Movement might seem out of place. However, Watts’ fascination with analog gear and looping technology fits quite well with the live house and techno acts that populate the Movement lineup. Teaming up with Austrian producer John Tejada, the duo have been making waves with just a few performances of their live show, featuring vocals from Watts and live programming from both.


Justin Cudmore

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Photo by The Vinyl Factory

Coming in from New York City, Justin Cudmore is truly Brooklyn’s master of acid and funky techno. A mainstay at The Bunker parties, which take over Brooklyn’s darkest nightclubs, Justin Cudmore is returning to his Midwestern roots with his second Movement performance. Cudmore’s set will provide the opportunity to hear the best of both New York and the Midwest from some of the most intriguing emerging talent on the lineup.


Featured image credit: Stephen Bondio

Movement 2019’s curated stages are here

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Movement 2019’s curated stages are hereDSCF8666 Movement Douglas Wojciechowski

Movement Detroit is fully prepared for its Hart Plaza takeover on May 25-27. The family-friendly jewel of the American underground celebrated its 20th birthday in summer of 2018, and will be continuing the celebration in fine fashion for its upcoming iteration with a diverse, all-star lineup. With names like Charlotte de Witte, LSD (Luke Slater, Steve Bicknell, Function), Orbital, and Get Real locked in and the main stages unveiled, the final piece of the festival has been unveiled: showcases.

May 25 sees Movement institution Detroit Love return to its home of the Stargate stage and featuring legacy talent like Carl Craig, Seth Troxler, Stacey Pullen, and Octave One to name a few. Sebastian Mullaert will be hosting a special Circle of Live performance alongside VRIL, Mathew Johnson, and Amp Fiddler on May 26, while Richie Hawtin will also be bringing along a strong cast of friends to join him at his PLAYdifferently takeover of the Pyramid stage. Finally, Ghostly International will be curating the Redbull stage once more with Audion, Shigeto, and more.

Full breakdown here 

 

Credit: Douglas Wojciechowski

AXIS 202: Loco Dice b2b The Martinez Brothers

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AXIS 202: Loco Dice b2b The Martinez BrothersLOCOB2BMBROS MVMT SUN Credit Joshua Hanford

There’s an undeniable air of showmanship The Martinez Brothers put out with each gig. Born performers, the two are masters at filling the room with infectious, pumping house for hours on end. Their peer Loco Dice has an equal flair for expressing himself behind the decks, putting his head down and using his hip-hop influences to put forth spastic, yet carefully thought-out voyages through gritty soundscapes.

When these stalwarts come together, it becomes difficult not to get ensnared in their captivating rhythms. Take their b2b at Movement, for example, which Dancing Astronaut has successfully nabbed to become this edition of AXIS. Listeners who were there are immediately transported back to the packed mainstage that they dominated while closing down the festival on Sunday night, May 27. One need not have been in attendance to fully enjoy the pleasant melange of house and tech they’ve selected, however; the energy pouring out of the speakers is palpable, and it becomes easy to melt into the grooves and become part of the cheerful crowd while listening.


Photo credit: Joshua Hanford

Claude VonStroke releases surreal ‘Maharaja’ video

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Claude VonStroke has just unveiled the official video to accompany his new release, “Mahraja,” a track equally unorthodox as its visual counterpart.

Initially debuted on his live album, recorded at VonStroke’s headlining set at Movement festival in May, the intergalactic-styled track draws from Detroit’s own classic electro breakbeat fervor, with VonStroke’s offbeat jive rippling throughout.

The hypnagogic video is equal parts inspired by the surreal absurdism of Salvador Dali, the New York B-boy dance stylings and fashion of the ’80s film Beat Street, and the quixotic luminescence of Tron. Set, of course, in a desolate warehouse, a group of hip-hop dancers’ limbs melt and contort as they move about the space. Futuristic, Tron-like beams of light swirl and form grids along the dilapidated walls, while a series of outlandish objects, including giant golden eggs (a Dirtybird nod) and elephant statues allow the video the oddity and nonsensicalness of a bizarre dream.

Producer Sessions 002: Movement 2018 Sounds of Detroit

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Producer sessions

Producer Sessions is a series from Dancing Astronaut meant to shine a brighter light on the producer community. Each volume will guide producers towards some of the freshest sample packs, plugins, FX, and presets out there. Today’s session: Movement Sample Pack

This week, Splice celebrated Detroit’s rich history in techno music with a series of sample packs, contests, interviews, and editorials. The series is called The Sound: Detroit, starting off in the 1980’s and leading into the creative process of today’s most innovative artists. Following Motown’s Movement Electronic Music Festival, Splice facilitated the curation of their new Movement Sample Pack. Click HERE to check out sounds of Detroit perfect for house heads.

Spearheaded by Shigeto and Waajeed, the sample pack came together in Detroit during this past edition of Movement, with so many artists returning to the city, making the event an opportune time to gather talent and sounds. To truly capture the sounds of Detroit, Shigeto and Wajeed drove across Motor City, making stops along the way to capture hours of field recordings from scapes along the I-75 bridge to kicks at the Eastern Market and mechanical foley of the Archer Record Pressing plant.

These field recordings led to dissected, deconstructed, and transformed samples from artists who were in town for Movement festival, transforming each sound into loops and one-shots with their own unique approaches.

Artists that contributed to the pack were Andrés, Antenes, Mija, Black Noi$e, Blake Baxter, Chuck Daniels, Chris Koltay, Delano Smith, Mark Flash, Shady P, Ectomorph, Gene Farris, Jon Dixon, Ariel, Marco Shuttle, Kweku Saunderson, Marshall Applewhite, MGUN, Milan, The Saunderson Brothers, and Venture to the D. This collection contains over 400 percussive one shots, synth loops, ambient textures, and vocal FX. Click HERE to start a 14-day free trial and start producing like the pros.

Background

A serious producer should have an extensive audio library, filled with a variety of organized samples and more companies like Splice are filling that need every year. These days, a subscription to Splice is a no-brainer for producers at any level. For $7.99 a month, Splice gives producers access to their entire library of high-quality samples, loops, FX, and presets, coming in at over 2 million sounds. At that price, producers get 100 credits per month to explore Splice’s massive library, save sounds they like, and download-to-own at a rate of 1 sample per credit.

Producers at the highest levels use Splice to find inspiration because it’s so easy with their massive library and quality partnerships. Some of the most popular sound designers have contributed to Splices’ library, including exclusive packs from KSHMR, Sonny Digital, deadmau5Amon Tobin, Zaytoven, KRANE, Lex Lugar and more.

Photo Credit: Joseph Pearson/Unsplash

Movement, capured: Photos by Aaron Eschenburg, Katie Laskowska, Douglas Wojciechowski, Stephen Bondio, Steven Pham, Bryan Mitchell, Anthony Rassam, and Jacob Mulka.

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Featured Image credit:  Bryan Mitchell

DA’s Movement 2018 soundtrack: 10 tracks that rocked the festival

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Movement

1) Andrés – New For U (Live)

From DJing with Slum Village back in the day, to playing congas, to rocking the MPC and making some of the most soulful house around, Dez Andrés is one of the finest that Detroit has to offer. Andrés had a jam-packed Movement weekend filled with afterparty appearances, contributions to Shigeto‘s set, and even his own set at the Stargate stage with a live band featuring a who’s who of musicians such as the likes of Ian Fink (Scott Grooves’ keyboard player). His timeless classic “New For U” sounded so fresh with live instrumentation as it wafted over Hart Plaza.

2) Psychedelic Research Lab – Keep On Climbing

Eris Drew was one of the most anticipated performances of the weekend and she definitely delivered on the hype. Playing a moody, tension-filled set at RA’s Underground Stage before Helena Hauff, the smartbar affiliate ripped through her wax-filled set with poise and passion. Building deep grooves and maintaining the crowd’s attention, this classic rave track from Scott Richmond and John Selway, together as Pyschedelic Research Lab, was a highlight, sounding fresh as ever. Perfect timing to drop the track too, as Kim Ann Foxman’s Firehouse label is re-releasing it with a set of remixes from Deetron and herself.

3) Floorplan – Let The Church

Whenever Carl Craig takes the stage at Movement, it’s must-see entertainment. The Planet E don commands a crowd so well, especially in Detroit, and started off his set on the mic preaching Detroit Love. As his set progressed into thicker and more energetic cuts, this one from fellow Detroit-er Robert Hood and his daughter under their Floorplan moniker made a huge impact on the crowd. Hammerings drums gave way to a tweaked-up gospel vocal for pure techno madness and a big reaction.

4) Paul Nazca – Memory

Laurent Garnier hardly ever makes an appearance stateside, which made the legend’s Sunday closing slot at Movement extra special. As his two-hour set reached its peak, he dropped a monstrous record which he and Sven Väth have supported heavily throughout the past couple years: “Memory,” by Paul Nazca. The song’s classic edge and cunning central hook whipped the audience into a frenzy with each post-break, and felt like the perfect selection for the moment.

5) Jeff Mills –  The Bells

One simply cannot do Movement, or celebrate Detroit techno in general, without the ever-iconic Jeff Mills single, “The Bells.” Its synth stabs and clanging melody that embedded itself deep into electronica’s psyche so many years ago could be heard throughout several sets during the festival — from the Underground to the Stargate stage — and each play sparked joyous looks of recognition and subsequent madness. It’s pure, raw techno that defines the genre itself, which is why the single remains fresh and widely rinsed today. To top off the festivities, techno founding father Juan Atkins also paid homage to his colleague by kicking his set into high gear with the classic.

6) Prince – Head (Hazmat Live cover)

Taking place at Detroit’s fabled TV Lounge, Soul Clap‘s annual House of Efunk party is really a can’t miss — the lineup is always packed with a diverse set of heavy hitters, the vibe is so fun and jovial, and the curation of set times between the outside patio, side alley, and indoor club is just perfect. When the magic hour came and the sun started to rise, Detroit’s own Hazmat Live took the reins with a seriously impressive live house set, filled with drum machines, samplers, analog keyboards and vocoder talk box vocals. The diversity in his live set was fantastic, as he peppered in his own take on classics such as The O’Jays “I Love Music” and Prince’s “I Wanna Be Your Lover”. Keeping the purple theme going, his dubbed out version of “Head” was blissful at whatever morning hour it was (we forget, ha).

7) Aretha Franklin – Never Grow Old

The newly re-positioned Pyramid Stage was a highlight for many during Movement weekend, and with due reason. Looking out on the Detroit River and Windsor, Ontario, the Pyramid Stage was not only arguably the most scenic of the stages, but also packed a serious punch with it’s lineup. Radio Slave was a name we were super excited for, and he delivered a diverse heavy-hitting and funky set that got the final day festers pumping and moving. Dropping unexpected bombs such as Frankie Goes To Hollywood’s Relax, Radio Slave also paid a cheeky homage to Detroit’s Robert Hood, breaking down his set to go into the velvet-y vocals of Aretha Franklin’s “Never Grow Old” which Hood famously sampled on his techno version of the track with the same name. The angelic vocals were uplifting right when the crowd needed them, and then was followed up with Hood’s banger “Baby, Baby”, a perfect tip of the cap to one of Detroit’s legends.

8) Wu-Tang Clan – C.R.E.A.M

Wu-Tang Clan were one of the most sought-after, and unifying forces of Movement; no matter one’s musical preference, attendees flooded the main stage en masse for this legendary reunion. They celebrated their 25th birthday as a group at the festival as well, to add to the fervor. Naturally, they couldn’t go without performing some of their most well-known classics to their packed and adoring crowd. “C.R.E.A.M” was one such single that they pulled out of their archives, which proceeded to be met with supreme hype from viewers.

9) Regal – L’Éternité (Charlotte de Witte Remix)

Many are in agreement that Charlotte de Witte destroyed the Underground stage during her sub-closing set on Monday. In addition to earth-shaking techno she unearthed for the affair, the rising Belgian talent also threw in a few of her favored productions as well. One of these was her sultry remix to Regal’s “L’Éternité,” which was strategically placed within her mix to up the momentum. The original’s French vocals captivated the sweaty onlookers, while thunderous kicks anchored feet to the ground.

10) Maceo Plex & Maars – Mutant DX

Maceo Plex and his wife Christine Maars of the Odd Parents are electronic royalty, and thus a collaboration between the two is bound to be brilliant. Their recently-premiered “Mutant DX” shows off all their chemistry as producers and as lifetime collaborators, and serves as a nice, grooving tune that’s raunchy enough to rock a festival dancefloor as hard as a club. When Maceo played it during his set closing the Pyramid stage on Day 1, madness ensued as gazes remained transfixed on the hollow synth pangs flowing out of the speakers.