Sunday Morning Medicine Vol 157, with Duskus, Boston Bun, ATTLAS, + more

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Sunday Morning Medicine Vol 157, with Duskus, Boston Bun, ATTLAS, + moreSmm@0.

Sunday Morning Medicine is a feature from Dancing Astronaut dedicated to the mellower side of electronic music. We bring you our favorite therapeutic selections—old and new—in attempts to alleviate the agonizing effects of a long weekend of partying.


Lane 8/This Never Happened young gun, Anderholm, is first on the scene with his mellifluous chord progressions and clattering percussion to rouse the sleepiest listener from the worst alcohol-induced slumber. “Timecode”‘s subtle splendor is like a gentle reminder to reacquaint oneself with the universe.

The San Holo-housed, Duskus‘s most recent single, “Where To Go,” has the technicolor tenderness to make your Sunday morning neuroticism cower in its tracks. One rendezvous with the track’s minimal magic—led by simple, saccharine vocal intonations and a deliberate, ardent beat—counts as full weekend’s act of contrition.

Parisian house project, Boston Bun, knows how to not only pull, but full-on yank on the heart strings. “Missing You” exemplifies the Ed Banger producer’s ability to make poignancy feel like ecstasy—which is unanimously at least mildly applicable for some good-old-fashioned requiem for the weekend.


Anjunadeep duo, Eli & Fur, can leave any purposeful listener in utter awe, bringing emotive, cinematic tension to each and every record they let loose in the oh-so-saturated blogosphere. Rodriguez Jr. recently got his hands on “Night Blooming Jasmine,” and even Eli & Fur took a liking to the outcome, bolstering the rework in their sets as of late. The newfangled rendition offers fluttering synth-patterns and the original’s hazy, incantation-like vocalizing, in remembrance of that hazy, sublime figure from the club last night who scampered off just before you could catch her name.

ATTLAS‘s new mau5trap EP, Charcoal Halo, acts as a vessel for listener’s to reconnect with both themselves and the boundless latent energy around them. “Coldest Night,” with its slow-burn breakbeat and blissfully despondent vocals, is like a rhapsodic snapshot of listeners’ end-of-weekend contempt.

ATTLAS invites listeners to frolic under his ‘Charcoal Halo’ [Review]

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ATTLAS invites listeners to frolic under his ‘Charcoal Halo’ [Review]TEST 5 1

ATTLAS has been demonstrating he has all the makings of a mau5trap luminary since his exquisitely executed debut EP of 2015, Siren, on deadmau5‘s auspicious label housing. Now, a handful of emotionally saturated, atmospheric house projects later, he’s resolved to lay 2018 to rest, adorned in a six-piece Charcoal Halo. 

Charcoal Halo is, according to ATTLAS himself, a pensive, deliberate product of long-winded introspection, an emancipation from the confines of screen-induced slavery. Designed for purposeful listening, the project acts, throughout its duration, as a blissful rendezvous point between the narrator’s complex inner life and a heavenly body of newly discovered surroundings.

“Unsurprisingly, the themes, sounds, melodies, and even titles on the final project lean into that push-pull… that, creatively, was about experience and reflection,” ATTLAS says. “Too much experience lacked the patience to learn from it, and too much reflection lacked anchor points of living and story.”

Indeed, there is much to infer from the EP’s eponymous titles. “Water for the Trees,” emphatically exemplifies this notion, with its pastoral and tender piano melodies and synth trickles, which fall like happy rain. ATTLAS’s adept piano playing flows decidedly through the project like a life-giving stream. His kaleidoscopic emotional palette is palpable as ever, as the listener is greeted with the poignant, slow-motion breakbeat of “Coldest Night,” splendidly rendered with melancholic vigor on behalf of 7Chariot (the solitary feature on the EP); but “Cyprus Lake” soon takes hold, with its untethered optimism and vapory synth blasts, falling and crashing, only to take shape again, like a liquid dream one should dance to.

ATTLAS’s Charcoal Halo brings a quixotic splendor to modern, atmospheric house music/electronica. Timeless elements, like the worldly choral emissions of “Fine Modern Structures,” or the winding and furrowing instrumentals of the title track, run abound, allowing the work to eclipse any particular epochal timestamp. Underneath the Charcoal Halo, one can expect, if nothing else, a momentary reconciliation of Yin and Yang.

 

Rinzen and Evan Casey land on Parquet with a magical, ‘Fractal’

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Rinzen and Evan Casey land on Parquet with a magical, ‘Fractal’Rinzen Evan Casey Fractal

It was obvious from his start that Rinzen is primed to lead the next generation of underground greats. He already earned a co-sign from Giorgio Moroder on his very first release, and since being picked up by the mau5trap crew, has been able to spread his musical vision across the states and more recently, Europe. Leaning toward the melodic side of house and techno, it comes as no surprise that leaders in this realm are beginning to recognize the burgeoning talent. Thus, his follow-up to an exploratory, tribal-inspired “Temple” on Chapter 24 records is a signing onto Solée’s iconic imprint, Parquet.

“Fractal” is a combination of Rinzen’s talents, and that of of his friend and colleague Evan Casey, resident of the famed Desert Hearts brand. It comes packaged in shadowy overtones, with sinister melodies and bursts of cunning arpeggios creating a feeling of angst in the listeners. Consistency is clearly the collaborator’s modus operandi in this production; rather than including a larger-than-life drop, “Fractal” drives the floor forward at a steady pace, finding impact in its Recondite-esque minimalism. The record is truly class — a standard we’ve come to expect from anything with Rinzen’s name on it.

 

 

Order a copy of ‘Fractal’ here

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 68

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 68Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


It’s been more than two years since StayLoose released his twinkling original, “Let Go,” with Andrew Paley. Today, he blesses fans with an extended vocal cut of the original track, noting that Paley “added some additional vocals to this one to make it extra special.” The inclusion of addition vocals makes this new version particularly dynamic, as Paley’s emotive voice bounces off StayLoose’s timeless future bass stylings.

Laszlo‘s time on Monstercat dates back more than four years, and in that time, he’s delivered a multitude of innovative originals, many playing off an outer space theme. He’s now revealed a full LP on the Canadian label: Liftoff. Laszlo has been building to this 10-track collection for years, with songs like “Airglow” and “Sphere” dating back to 2016. The versatile album sees Laszlo flex a full range of production talents, from drum & bass to trap and everything in between. I instantly gravitated toward “Rendezvous,” a gorgeous piece of work that takes off quietly and builds into a feel-good drum & bass track with a beautiful melody.

SevenDoors makes a bold reappearance on the mau5trap roster with his latest offering, Rising Sun. The EP’s latter half, “Spirit,” is an intricate, seven-minute piece of work that showcases the minimalist techno style he’s been debuting on the label in past releases. “Spirit” is a pensive piece, highlighted by the haunting chants of solemn choirs woven in between its dark, pulsating beat. A variety of airy synth melodies float in and out as well, setting a tranquil tone for the song surrounding them.

Following a mellow remix of TS Graye‘s “Take Notes” in September, Philly’s Instupendo is back with a new rework. This time, he’s taken on sakehands’ “GOODBYE FOREVER.” This rendition is more subdued than the original’s pop-leaning elements, as Instupendo walks the remix along with elements of percussion sakehands’ version lacked. Subtle bass and an easygoing beat make this take on “GOODBYE FOREVER” a fresh listening experience and open it up to the world of dance music a bit more.

“Darkness comes before the dawn,” red. teases to introduce his new original, “Dispatch.” While the minute-long introduction appears to lead into a bright, sunny soundscape, the artist proves to have deceived his listeners by quickly dipping into a deep, resounding bass pattern. While red. appears to have delved into a dark soundscape, he continuously leads listeners back up into the light by introducing glowing melodies. “Dispatch” is a true journey of a song and exudes a vibrantly colored aura from start to finish.

No Mana drops the beautifully complex ‘Melted Candy’ LP

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No Mana drops the beautifully complex ‘Melted Candy’ LPMelted Candy Cover

No Mana has released his second album of the year, Melted Candy. Following the release of Assorted Repetitions released earlier in 2018, this release sees the LA artist explore new territory in sound to round out the year.

While the release opens with “In My Mind,” which starts out with a new, intricate and melancholic take on the acidic synths from the complextro of yesteryear, the song – and the rest of the EP – develops into something exploratory, canvassing a range of dance music sounds. There’s elements of gritty, bass-heavy house as well as familiar progressive basics sprinkled throughout the project. This creates beautifully layered music that at first glance might seem one way, but with each twist and turn tells a beautiful story all its own. No Mana’s talent and focus are clear – and tactfully executed – across the duration of Melted Candy.

This 6-track release is yet another we’ve seen this year that cements 2018 as the year of the short long form release, with Melted Candy dubbed as an LP.

Melted Candy is out now via mau5trap.

deadmau5 collaborates with Nick DenBoer, on avant-garde video, ‘Drama Free,’ featuring Lights [WATCH]

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deadmau5 collaborates with Nick DenBoer, on avant-garde video, ‘Drama Free,’ featuring Lights [WATCH]Deadmau5 Lights

Emerging from a brief hiatus, deadmau5 has partnered with prolific animator and film director, Nick DenBoer, once again on the music video for “Drama Free” featuring the ever-talented Lights off the mau5ville: Level 2 project.

DenBoer worked on the producer’s previous music video “Monophobia” featuring Rob Swire, with the weirdness level of kooky, colorful creatures grooving to the beat of Joel Zimmerman’s house yielding a second hire. The new video takes on a different, off-the-wall narrative alongside familiar animation themes, accompanied by a cacophony of hands, a tentacle-like circulatory system, and squirmy ravers from deadmau5’s previous pool party, Lights commands center stage with cuts to the inner workings of DenBoer’s mind throughout the intentional chaos.

The mau5trap mastermind has had a productive-as-ever 2018, absolving himself from standard practices with his own creative liberties such as his orchestral cover album, where’s the drop?, and the collaborative mau5ville: Level 1 export. These last two music videos show a side of Zimmerman listeners shouldn’t be surprised to see; however, should still be surprised upon first, (and probably second and third) viewings.

 

REZZ delivers decadent Porter Robinson ‘Divinity’ remix

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REZZ delivers decadent Porter Robinson ‘Divinity’ remixRezz Divinity 1

REZZ never shies from an opportunity to provide her fans with precisely what they’ve been craving. For her latest demonstration, REZZ has dimmed the lights on a feverishly beloved Porter Robinson production, “Divinity” from his iconically insurgent Worlds album.

REZZ’s commanding rendition of “Divinity” materializes like a malevolent stepsister. Glitchy and deliciously wicked, REZZ’s “Divinity” is like a fiery lullaby from the netherworld, as the track’s original, ethereal vocals and twinkling synth allure give way to her thunderous and highly nuanced bass and percussion infusion.

Quite characteristically of the Canadian mau5trap talent, REZZ delivered on her Twitter intonations of the remix in under a week. Her patently expedient turnaround in the studio is evident in her packed release record in recent years, with back-to-back August album releases in 2017 and 2018 amid a wall-to-wall touring schedule.

REZZ delivers decadent Porter Robinson ‘Divinity’ remix

This post was originally published on this site

REZZ delivers decadent Porter Robinson ‘Divinity’ remixRezz Divinity 1

REZZ never shies from an opportunity to provide her fans with precisely what they’ve been craving. For her latest demonstration, REZZ has dimmed the lights on a feverishly beloved Porter Robinson production, “Divinity” from his iconically insurgent Worlds album.

REZZ’s commanding rendition of “Divinity” materializes like a malevolent stepsister. Glitchy and deliciously wicked, REZZ’s “Divinity” is like a fiery lullaby from the netherworld, as the track’s original, ethereal vocals and twinkling synth allure give way to her thunderous and highly nuanced bass and percussion infusion.

Quite characteristically of the Canadian mau5trap talent, REZZ delivered on her Twitter intonations of the remix in under a week. Her patently expedient turnaround in the studio is evident in her packed release record in recent years, with back-to-back August album releases in 2017 and 2018 amid a wall-to-wall touring schedule.

REZZ delivers decadent Porter Robinson ‘Divinity’ remix

This post was originally published on this site

REZZ delivers decadent Porter Robinson ‘Divinity’ remixRezz Divinity 1

REZZ never shies from an opportunity to provide her fans with precisely what they’ve been craving. For her latest demonstration, REZZ has dimmed the lights on a feverishly beloved Porter Robinson production, “Divinity” from his iconically insurgent Worlds album.

REZZ’s commanding rendition of “Divinity” materializes like a malevolent stepsister. Glitchy and deliciously wicked, REZZ’s “Divinity” is like a fiery lullaby from the netherworld, as the track’s original, ethereal vocals and twinkling synth allure give way to her thunderous and highly nuanced bass and percussion infusion.

Quite characteristically of the Canadian mau5trap talent, REZZ delivered on her Twitter intonations of the remix in under a week. Her patently expedient turnaround in the studio is evident in her packed release record in recent years, with back-to-back August album releases in 2017 and 2018 amid a wall-to-wall touring schedule.

i_o tempts listeners with a dance in ‘Low’ places on new two-track EP

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i_o tempts listeners with a dance in ‘Low’ places on new two-track EPVhs I O E1542405102991

From the smoldering crevices of a mau5trap backroom, i_o is feverishly taunting listeners to get “Low.”

Hot out of the oven of his new two-track Low EP, i_o uses the lead track–which avid fans will recognize from mau5trap’s mix series (Ep 6) where it was teased earlier this year–to continue his maniacal spiral into the deepest throes of torrential techno. As the bass line throbs like its hooked up to an EKG, a decadent female vocal cut declares: “I don’t wanna get high / I wanna get low.” The LA producer’s intentions for the Low EP become clear with the second track, titled “Move,” solidifying the devilishly dancey motif with its skittering hi-hats and abundant low-end bass–topped off by another hypnotic, looping vocal, of course.

When he’s not on Twitter faux-beefing with his like-minded producer pal, No Mana, he’s relentlessly churning out gritty, pulsating dance music as a mainstay on mau5trap, in spite of i_o-scorning “techno purists,” who helped spawn his pervasive recent single, “Not Techno.”