Watch Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis create ‘Used To Love’ in latest series episode

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Watch Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis create ‘Used To Love’ in latest series episodeMartin Garri Dean Lewis

Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis hit the studio in Amsterdam in the latest chapter of The Martin Garrix Show. After watching Garrix struggle through his ankle injury and surgery in previous episodes, this time fans watch Garrix get back on his feet—literally—and return to the studio to record Lewis for their single, “Used To Love.”

Lewis is both the vocalist and guitartist on the track, and the episode largely focuses on how they split up the recording process “Used To Love.” Though the singer had incurred a vocal injury just before hitting the studio, he’s seen making the song work by recording his guitar parts first. Lewis also shares that the chorus of “Used to Love” is one of the highest vocal lines and most challenging singles he’s ever worked on in that regard. Unsurprisingly, Lewis is able to hit a perfect line after only a few takes where he rushes to find the balance of reaching the right notes without straining his voice.

This episode is particularly insightful for those who are keen to learn more about what goes into a studio session and recording the final product of a song.

Photo Credit: PM Studio

Watch Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis write ‘Used to Love’ on the newest episode of ‘The Martin Garrix Show’

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Watch Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis write ‘Used to Love’ on the newest episode of ‘The Martin Garrix Show’Martin Garri Dean Lewis

Martin Garrix continues his post-surgery recovery and break from touring in the newest episode of “The Martin Garrix Show.” Garrix finally gets discharged from the hospital and is sent home to recover for two weeks before he is allowed to resume touring. During this time, Australian singer and songwriter Dean Lewis comes to Amsterdam to finish writing a song he and Garrix had been working on from afar.

The episode depicts the artists working together to finalize now-released single, “Used To Love.” Lewis talks about how Garrix is one of the most energetic producers he has ever worked with. He also affirms Garrix is “as talented” as he is made out to be, which he reveals that for many producers he has worked with, is not the case.

As they continue working on the single, Garrix talks about how excited he is for the song and how he hopes it will really resonate with listeners. He reflects on how he wants people to associate his music with emotions and associate his songs with certain times in their life.

Garrix closes the episode by telling viewers that he believes that it was meant to be that he had to cancel two weeks on tour in order to lead him to that moment where he was writing the release with Lewis in person as he recovered from Surgery in Amsterdam.

Martin Garrix grapples with his health in new episode of ‘The Martin Garrix Show’

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Martin Garrix grapples with his health in new episode of ‘The Martin Garrix Show’Martin Garri Sunburn 2015

The journey of Martin Garrix‘s precarious ankle injury continues in the newest episode of The Martin Garrix Show.

In the episode, Garrix receives the bad news that he has two torn ligaments in his ankle after an MRI scan. The doctor then tells him that he not only needs to get surgery immediately, but that he must cancel all shows for the next month after his surgery, scheduled the following week. Garrix considers going against the doctor’s wishes and doing the upcoming shows anyways; but, after audibly grappling with longterm potential damage, Garrix finally acquiesces and decides to accept the well-warranted time off.

Post-operation, Garrix’s friend and co-producer, Albin Nedler, comes to the hospital to finish writing “Used To Love” with Dean Lewis.

Photo Credit: Sunburn

Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]

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Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]ADE Laura Siliquini

Words by: Josh Stewart & Bella Bagshaw

For a festival older than many of its attendees (including a co-author of this review), Amsterdam Dance Event hasn’t lost an ounce of prerogative in the electronic music space across its 24-year tenure. Much like its increasingly international soil, ADE is voraciously traveled to by electronic infatuates across the globe. This year the industry-oriented endeavor garnered attendees from 146 countries—the most internationally visited installment to date.

But what makes ADE so painfully cool, is not only its chromatic agenda—spanning panels, parties, makeshift productions, and larger-than-life arena stops—but its locational litany. From train stations, to museums, to the warehouse spots, all of Amsterdam is ADE’s playground.

And it feels like the whole city is participating, too. Right outside the Schipol Airport, your humble narrator is greeted by a proverbial ADE cube humming above an information/check-in hut, ready for business at 8 am sharp. Once I secure my media pass, a 40-something cab driver promptly rattles off his week’s after-dark itinerary, with the enthusiasm of a tourist and the precision of a seasoned attendee.

ADE is unique in that it implores you to acquaint yourself with Amsterdam. It’s an unfettered celebration among the city’s quotidian. And that’s undoubtedly why the very best of the dance music business (Garrix, Tiesto, Guetta, Knight, Hawtin, Brejcha, you name it) return year after year. Here are some spots that made ADE sing this year.

Rijksmuseum

Rijksmuseum, Dancing Astronaut‘s quintessential stop on the ADE agenda. The storied subterranean dwelling of the historic Dutch landmark make for a sublime dance music backdrop—invoking elegance and clandestine cadence all at once. Raw Rave sanctioned Boys Noize Thursday night for a long dance (the kinetic vernacular in Europe is actually swaying) in the dark, as Maceo Plex and Underworld had so notably done just a few years prior.

The hallowed columns cast great, oblong shadows through the crowd, while fog dances in time with Boys Noize‘s beguiling analog techno. It’s an altogether post-apocalyptic display; as if all the wide-eyed pedestrians who normally flood the area by day are gone for good and there’s nothing left to do but soak up the smoke and party (if you can maneuver to the bar, that is). The air buzzed with sweet and sweaty malice, beneath a collection of Rembrandts resting soundly upstairs, no less! The historic holdings are a smoldering embodiment of ADE’s ability to make Amsterdam’s cornerstone conventions come alive.

Paradiso

Of all the Amsterdam club locales, Paradiso is likely the most atmospherically adjacent to a US spot ADE has to offer. Though, its architectural grandeur is singularly European. The assuredly haunted ex-church, with its resplendent stained glass windows and intricately etched balcony arrangement, seems destined for a back-to-back DJ set from priest vestment-donning Tchami and his perpetually pernicious aural associate, Malaa. A far cry from the litany of icons Paradiso once welcomed—The Rolling Stones, Prince, Patti Smith, The Cure, Nirvana (just to name a few)—the duo’s Dutch rendition of No Redemption was, nonetheless, entertaining as hell.

The hard-house maestros topped giant LED cubes which lit up in sync with painstakingly on-brand visuals when the respective DJ took his turn. For Tchami, a storming jungle scene evocative of his recent melodic house sensation, “Rainforest.” For Malaa, the expected illicit and explicit imagery: lines of white powder, skin-clad, ski-masked women, and otherwise. PSA: Moshing to dance music is apparently not just an American phenomenon.

Above section by: Bella Bagshaw

Armada Office

Days before the release of his 7th studio albumArmin van Buuren opened the doors to Armada’s office, sitting on the city’s outskirts for a cranked-up ADE-themed recording of A State Of Trance. Attendees were welcome to wander the corridors of the iconic trance label’s home base, with over two dozen guest sets spinning between “The Club” and the infamous recording studio where Armin streams his weekly shows. The who’s who of trance ticket gave fans a chance to see tastemaker after tastemaker, mainstay after mainstay, bringing the likes of Richard DurandMarkus SchulzFerry CorstenSander van Doorn, and even BT, for eight hours of intimate trance bliss.   

NDSM Wharf

DGTL brought four nights of ADE-insanity to NDSM Wharf, a former shipyard with grounds big enough to house 10 soccer fields. As massive of a venue as it was, another few soccer fields probably could’ve housed the droves of ravers who kept the waterfront warehouse’s sprawling mainstage saturated. A headlining lineup of Richie HawtinRÜFÜS DU SOLBonoboOrbital, and Ben Klock back to back with Marcel Dettmann proved too tempting a ticket for thousands of ADEers. There’s no doubt that the music is the focal point of a week like ADE, but it’s hard not to see the event for the grand portrait of dance music that is when showing up to NDSM. Between the ferry from Central Station, that showcases much of the city’s forward-thinking architecture, to the street art that blankets the hip, developing wharf, and fresh fruit the warehouse served until wee hours of the morning, a trip to NDSM shines a light on many of the enchanting idiosyncrasies that make ADE so distinctly Amsterdam.

Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]TIMBUITING NDSM Ade
Photo: Tim Buiting/NDSM

Lil’ Central Station

ADE fever even spread to Amsterdam’s very own Central Station (think Grand Central), which was effectively party-fied by Audio Obscura for the whirlwind weekend. Tucked just a few stories below the rails that funnel people in and out of Amsterdam by the thousands was Lil’ Central, a cozy nightclub space with DJs that encouraged a bit of loco and a lot of motion. From Motor City Drum Ensemble‘s swerve-inducing Thursday night set to Tchami‘s afterparty the following evening, express tickets to a good time were wholesale at Lil’ Central. Every city has nightclubs, most even have particularly cool ones, but how many municipalities are willing to turn their central transport hub into an all-night rave?

I can only think of one.

Above section by: Josh Stewart

Photo Credit: Laura Siliquini

Watch Martin Garrix’s fateful fall and recovery in the return of ‘The Martin Garrix Show’

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Watch Martin Garrix’s fateful fall and recovery in the return of ‘The Martin Garrix Show’Martin Garri Breach

The Martin Garrix Show has returned for its fourth season, and the 13-minute episode recaps Martin Garrix‘s EDC Las Vegas performance and takes listeners on the journey of how he injured his ankle in Las Vegas that same week.

The producer starts the episode by returning to EDC for his sixth year, and REZZ makes a cameo when she asks Garrix if he still gets nervous before big performances like EDC (he does). Garrix proceeds to perform at Wet Republic and Omnia until he takes the fateful fall that resulted in the producer canceling his upcoming shows. Viewers can see behind-the-scenes footage from the hospital and watch the producer recuperate wheelchair-bound in his home in Amsterdam while he waits to get his MRI.

In his home, Garrix tells the full story of the fall. It occurred when he was performing at Omnia during his 10th day in Las Vegas, and because he is smaller, he always utilizes a riser so that he looks taller for the crowd. When landing after a jump off of the DJ booth, his foot landed on the edge of the riser, causing his ankle to snap as he fell into a glass wall behind the booth. After taking a break in the green room immediately after the fall, Garrix returned to the booth to finish out his set against his team’s will before heading to the hospital.

Photo credit: Rukes

NMF Roundup: Laidback Luke remixes Knife Party, Jason Ross and Dabin team up + more

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NMF Roundup: Laidback Luke remixes Knife Party, Jason Ross and Dabin team up + moreLaidbackLuke TimSnow 20140816 3

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

After the release of their Lost Souls EP earlier this year, Knife Party have tapped Laidback Luke for a groovy remix of “Death & Desire,” and Jason Ross, Dabin, and Dylan Matthew team up for “One That Got Away.” Wave Racer has released a new single, “This N That” with LunchMoney Lewis, and Martin Garrix links with Dean Lewis for “Used to Love.” Walker & Royce tackle Dom Dolla’s “San Frandisco,” and Hot Since 82 takes it one deeper on “Tilted.” Arty lends his spirited hand to Gorgon City and MK’s “There For You,” and Axwell remixes Halsey’s “Graveyard.” Four Tet’s dingbat-riddled moniker unveils new content, and Nicky Romero, Mike Williams, and Amba Shepherd collaborate on “Dynamite.” REZZ and Malaa take no prisoners on “Criminals,” and Golf Clap deliver their iteration of “Let It Go” by Hood Rich and BRUX. NGHTMRE flexes on an interpretation of Habstrakt’s “The One,” and Herobust cranks up the intensity on “Smoke.” Chime keeps the Halloween spirit alive with “Haunted,” and Modestep sound the “Alarm” on their new single.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Tim Snow

Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis team up for breathy new tune ‘Used To Love’

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Martin Garrix and Dean Lewis team up for breathy new tune ‘Used To Love’Martin Garri

Martin Garrix has enlisted Australian singer/songwriter Dean Lewis for the former’s latest commercial dance release, “Used To Love.” The pair spent a few weeks together in Amsterdam last summer, getting the crux of the track together.

“Used To Love” is vocal-led by Lewis’s impassioned vocals, while Garrix foregoes a heavy electronic emphasis, trading it in for a subtle production backdrop accented with acoustics. Instead he favors an energy-building violin line and acoustic elements that create a simplistic framework for Lewis’s vocals to shine through and serve as the centerpiece of the song.

Lewis spoke on collaborating with Garrix and how it has opened his mind to the idea of collaborations:

“Since my career began, collaborations never felt like something I saw myself pursuing. As a song writer, who also sings, the entire concept just felt foreign. Until I met Martin. We spent about a week together locked behind closed doors in Amsterdam working on a song, which thought might end up be sung by someone else. But as the track progressed is started to sound a lot like me, but also very Martin. It’s a real collaboration with a guy who’s now become a great friend.”

“Used To Love” is out now on Garrix’s own STMPD RCRDS.

Martin Garrix brings out David Guetta and Tiësto for a three-pronged ADE-venture [Watch]

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Martin Garrix brings out David Guetta and Tiësto for a three-pronged ADE-venture [Watch]Martin Garri Breach

Martin Garrix may no longer be considered the world’s No. 1 DJ by some, but that isn’t to say that the Dutch-born superstar isn’t still upping his game. Garrix returned home to ADE Oct. 16-20, bringing a two-night showcase back to Amsterdam’s RAI Convention Centre, where he debuted his ANIMA live show this time last year. While the program for Friday night event promised that the world-renowned house producer was planning to “wow the crowd once again,” fans were left wondering what exactly he had up his short, black sleeves.

Garrix’s set gave fans a taste of tracks that are coming down the pipe, with this ID being about as fresh as it gets, but the showstopping moment came when dance music icons David Guetta and Tiësto joined the headlining Garrix for an ultra-rare back-to-back-to-back set among three of the industry’s top main stage acts. As exciting of a moment as it was for fans, it’s also great to see Garrix walking the walk after referencing his mentor Tiësto earlier in the week.

“I really don’t care, the so-called world ranking,” Garrix said. “I don’t need a list to do what I like. I [was] at 1, yes. And Tiësto is very many places below me. That doesn’t make sense, does it? I started playing music through him. I am not a better DJ than him, maybe now I just have a bit more hype around me...”

Photo credit: Rukes

Martin Garrix tapped to write UEFA Euro 2020 anthem

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Martin Garrix tapped to write UEFA Euro 2020 anthemMartin Garri Anima

Martin Garrix has been named as the official artist for the UEFA Euro 2020 tournament, known colloquially as the European Championship. The event is the biggest soccer (or as the locals call it, “football”) tournament in the region, whose final rounds kick off on June 12 and will take place across 12 different cities for the first time in its history. Currently, teams from across the European Union and beyond are competing in qualifying matches.

The Dutch prodigy will be penning both the official anthem of the tournament, as well as the walkout song for each game. He announced the news during his headlining set at ADE 2019 at RAI Amsterdam. UEFA is also hosting a meet & greet giveaway with Garrix on November 30 when the tournament’s official competitors are revealed in Bucharest. Expect to hear the song in Spring 2020 when it’s debuted along with another vocal collaboration. In June, Garrix will perform the theme song live for its first time.

Of this milestone task, the artist stated, “It’s crazy to think that UEFA EURO 2020 will be held across 12 different cities but it’s the perfect way to celebrate 60 years of this incredible competition. Music is my passion but I’m also a huge football fan, so it’s extra special for me to be able to create the official song for what will be the biggest EURO in history.”

H/T: UEFA

Martin Garrix, Travis Scott, Armin van Buuren, and more top 2020 Lollapalooza Chile, Argentina, and Brazil editions

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Martin Garrix, Travis Scott, Armin van Buuren, and more top 2020 Lollapalooza Chile, Argentina, and Brazil editionsLolla Argentina Photo Credit Alive Coverage

In March and April 2020, Lollapalooza makes its high-profile stops in South America with an eye-popping lineup that features some of the best in today’s music scene.

The last weekend in March, Lollapalooza Chile celebrates its 10th anniversary with a lineup that includes Guns n’ Roses, Travis Scott, The Strokes, Lana Del Rey, Martin Garrix, Gwen Stefani, and many more. Other dance music offerings include Armin van Buuren, REZZ, Illenium, Alan Walker, and more. The festival will take place at O’Higgins Park in Santiago.

The same weekend, Lollapalooza Argentina delivers a similar lineup, topped by all of the above, along with other headliners who will make their mark on Hippodromo de San Isidro in Buenos Aires.

The first weekend in April, Lollapalooza Brazil offers a comparable lineup to its South American predecessors, also featuring performances by Armin van Buuren, REZZ, Illenium, Alan Walker, along with the headliners. It takes place at Autódromo de Interlagos in São Paulo.

Tickets and more information about Lollapalooza Chile are available here.

Tickets and more information about Lollapalooza Argentina are available here.

Tickets and more information about Lollapalooza Brazil are available here.

Martin Garrix, Travis Scott, Armin van Buuren, and more top 2020 Lollapalooza Chile, Argentina, and Brazil editionsUnnamed 1
Martin Garrix, Travis Scott, Armin van Buuren, and more top 2020 Lollapalooza Chile, Argentina, and Brazil editionsUnnamed 2
Martin Garrix, Travis Scott, Armin van Buuren, and more top 2020 Lollapalooza Chile, Argentina, and Brazil editionsUnnamed 3

Photo credit: Alive Coverage