Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – December 16th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Insomnia

Insomnia by Marina Benjamin

This slim, beguiling memoir of sleeplessness from award-winning memoirist Marina Benjamin comes with ringing endorsements from leading lights of contemporary creative nonfiction like Deborah Levy and Olivia Laing. Told in short, restless paragraphs reminiscent of Maggie Nelson or Anne Carson, Insomnia elegantly anatomizes how wakefulness warps and deforms reality. Levy writes: “The brightest star in this erudite, nocturnal reverie in search of lost seep is the beauty of the writing itself.”

Seasonal Associate

Seasonal Associate by Heike Geissler

New from Semiotext(e), Seasonal Associate is the first literary account of corporate flextime employment, in which German author Heike Geissler takes a seasonal job at the Amazon Order Fulfillment center in Leipzig. Intended as a stopgap measure to supplement her meagre income as a freelance writer, Giessler’s sojourn soon becomes a descent into brutality and humiliation. Chronicling her unwitting internalization of the dynamics of precarious work, Seasonal Associate is an essential document of labour in the era of megacorporate domination.

How Long ‘til Black Future Month?

How Long ‘til Black Future Month? by N.K. Jemisin

N.K. Jemison is one of the foremost speculative fiction authors of our time — the first to win three consecutive Best Novel Hugo Awards — and this is her first short story collection, which includes Hugo-award-winning story “The City, Born Great” along with several previously unpublished stories. In these tales, monsters and spirits stalk New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a utopian alien society studies our mistakes, and a Black mother in the Jim Crow South works to save her daughter from a fairy’s dangerous promises.

Unclay

Unclay by T.F. Powys

Hailed as a forgotten genius, British writer T.F. Powys (1875-1953, brother of the somewhat better-known John Cowper Powys) is getting the reissue treatment from New Directions. In this mordant fable, Death arrives at a small village but, upon losing his official documents, is freed to enjoy a summer holiday in bucolic Dorsetshire. It’s a witty, metaphysical farce comparable to Swift, Twain, and Austen — high literature that’s also fine entertainment.

The Storm

The Storm by Tomás González

From consistently reliable Archipelago Books comes a darkly elemental novel from Colombian author Tomás González. Set in a Colombian seaside village, a father drags his two sons on a fishing trip despite a burgeoning storm, whose violence is matched by the boys’ bubbling contempt for their father’s delusions of grandeur. Alternately contemplative and monstrous, The Storm is a tale of gripping suspense, rippling with hidden depths.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – December 7th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Ritualities

The Ritualities by Michael Nardone

Michael Nardone is a local poet, scholar, and friend of the store, and The Ritualites is his literary debut, from Toronto’s Book*hug. It’s a book-length poem – the first in a series of planned works – on the sonic topography of North America. Incorporating aspects of Nardone’s academic research into poetics and sound cultures, the book was composed at sites all across the continent and shifts through forms and genres, documenting the poet’s listening amid our public exchanges, mediated ambiances, and itinerant intimacies. Our launch event is Tuesday, December 11th!

Fluorescent Mud

Fluorescent Mud by Eli Howey

Hand painted in watercolour and gouache, Toronto artist Eli Howey’s latest comic (via 2dcloud) is a disorienting, haunting work of art in an eerie nocturnal palette. Following a dissociative route through punk houses, riverside drinking spots, chainlink fences, cemeteries, and surreal dungeons, Howey captures turbulent mental states with atmospheric aplomb.

Fade into You

Fade into You by Nikki Darling

Fade Into You is the debut novel from Nikki Darling, a music correspondent for LA Weekly and the Los Angeles Times. A portrait of a young Mexican-American girl in the glorious wasteland of 1990s Los Angeles, Fade Into You is written like a punk zine, summoning both the battle-cry of riot-grrl rage and the hormonal haze and urgency of adolescence. As high school junior Nikki Darling alternates between cutting class and getting high, flirting with drugs, crushes, and counterculture to figure out how she fits into the world, she pushes herself to the edge only to find herself trapped in the cyclical violence of growing up female.

Bicycle / Race: Transportation, Culture & Resistance

Bicycle / Race: Transportation, Culture & Resistance by Adonia E. Lugo

Far more than a book about the politics of cycling, Bicycle/Race paints an unforgettable portrait of Los Angeles from a two-wheeled perspective. Adonia Lugo weaves the colonial history of Southern California through her own story of growing up Chicana in Orange County, becoming a bucycle anthropologist, and co-funding LA’s landmak open streets cycling event, CicLAvia. The book also recounts how Lugo finds her voice while taking on racism in the world of cycling advocacy in Washington, D.C. before heading back to LA to organize the movement for climate justice in transportation.

Parallel Lives

Parallel Lives by O. Schrauwen

Now out in English from Fantagraphics, Parallel Lives is a collection of six wild and weird short stories from Berlin-based Belgian artist Olivier Schrauwen, hailed by none other than Art Spiegelman as “extraordinary…He’s the most original cartoonist I’ve fallen onto since Chris Ware or Ben Katchor.” Each of these stories is a volume in Schrauwen’s “speculative memoir,” a sci-fi, surrealist recounting of his present and future lives (and progeny), in which he is variously abducted by extraterrestrials, able to dialogue with agents from the future, and receives coded messages in envelopes at breakfast. A truly strange and unique work, Parallel Lives is a veritable portal to another dimension.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – November 29th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Milkman

Milkman by Anna Burns

Winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize, Milkman is a gossip-filled, danger-sensing, enigmatic novel set in Northern Ireland. If the rest of the novel is anything like the first line, we’re in for something special – “The day Somebody McSomebody put a gun to my breast and called me a cat and threatened to shoot me was the same day the milkman died.” Hooked.

Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse

Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse by Frédéric Morin, David McMillan and Meredith Erickson

Another solid cookbook from one of Montreal’s most well-regarded restaurants – no. 3 in Canada according to a nationwide best-of list, no big deal. Referred to as the “rogue princess of Canadian cuisine and hospitality” by the late Anthony Bourdain, the Joe Beef restaurants exemplify an unpretentious approach to food as shown in the over 150 recipes compiled here anticipating the coming world’s end.

A Matter of Taste

A Matter of Taste by Rebecca Tucker

The newest installment in Coach House Books’ Exploded Views series questions the concept of organic farming culture as the be-all end-all of sustainable food production. What do we mean when we say “good food” and how can we to go forward providing good food globally and affordably when we’ve exploited the traditional means?

Talking Back to the Indian Act

Talking Back to the Indian Act by Mary-Ellen Kelm and Keith D. Smith

This book takes a detailed look at the Indian Act – legislation that has profoundly shaped the Canadian government’s relationship with Indigenous peoples and communities. Offering readers tools to engage with the historical document in a thoughtful and critical way, the authors demonstrate a deeply informed close reading that makes the veiled, multi-layered text all the more accessible and comprehensible.

Granta

Granta

Leaving impressions of the ghostly and the spectral, the latest issue of Granta is an eerie punch-to-the-gut. It includes writings from Anne Carson, Sheila Heti, Amos Oz, Eugene Lim, Andre Aciman, Jana Prikryl, and more, ensuring that you’ll be in good hands from beginning to end.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – November 24th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Blame This on the Boogie

Blame This on the Boogie by Rina Ayuyang

Inspired by the artist’s love of musical theater and Hollywood films, this comic so accurately captures the infectious joys of collective song and dance. Following the coming of age of a young Filipino American girl, Ayuyang explores how the glittery charms of cinematic musicals can transform one’s reality therapeutically.

Evening in Paradise

Evening in Paradise by Lucia Berlin

Following up the massive success of A Manual for Cleaning Women, this new posthumous collection of short stories by Berlin is a MUST READ. Included are twenty two stories from the late great writer that brazenly highlight the gritty humour and ache of human experience.

Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism

Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism by Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

Stemming from the author’s ground-breaking undergraduate class, “Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism,” this book expands her rich research and observations outside academia towards a wider public. She argues that Lemonade is “most widely distributed black feminist text of the current moment,” while deftly weaving her own story into the analysis.

Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism

Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism by Kristen R. Ghodsee

Ghodsee offers a compelling case how for market forces affect sexuality. Deeply informed and spirited, this book is a deep dive argument for better sex through social and political reform.

Autobiography of Death

Autobiography of Death by Kim Hyesoon, translated by Don Mee Choi

Here is a collection of poems that charts the limbo period between death and reincarnation where a spirit lingers and roams. A poem for each of the 49 days. Hailed as Korea’s most important living poet, Hyesoon chronicles Korea’s contemporary violent history with strangeness and intimate precision.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 31st, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Beautiful Darkness

Beautiful Darkness by Fabien Vehlmann and Kerascoët

Newly released in paperback form, Vehlmann and Kerascoët’s frightening fairytale makes a triumphant return with the addition of new material, unpublished art, and preparatory sketches. The tale of newly homeless fairies who must learn to survive in the woods is as surreal and unsettling as ever, and guaranteed to enchant a whole new wave of devotees.

Well-Read Black Girl

Well-Read Black Girl by Glory Edim

In this beautiful, necessary anthology, Glory Edim (founder of the Well-Read Black Girl Book Club) has brought together essays by luminaries such as Jesmyn Ward, Jacqueline Woodson, Gabourey Sidibe, and Rebecca Walker, all in an effort to discuss the importance of literary representation. After all, everyone deserves to see themselves within the pages of a good book.

Useful Phrases for Immigrants

Useful Phrases for Immigrants by May-Lee Chai

Deemed a “writer to remember” by Kirkus Review, Chai is an author for a globalized world. Exploring China, the Chinese diaspora, and beyond, her characters are uniquely relatable as they navigate the solace of old lovers, the shock of family secrets, grudges, traditions, forgiveness, and long-buried skeletons.

On Haiku

On Haiku by Hiroaki Sato

Fresh from New Directions, fifty years of Sato’s thought, translations, and poetry are collected in On Haiku. A seminal text that explores the many facets of the form, whether classical, contemporary, or international, it is essential reading in poetry.

Paperback Crush

Paperback Crush by Gabrielle Moss

From babysitters to horseback riders, gymnasts to Sweet Valley twins, the totally radical history of ’80s and ’90s teen fiction is given its due in Moss’s shockingly comprehensive—and fun—exploration.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 24th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Dirty Plotte: The Complete Julie Doucet

Dirty Plotte: The Complete Julie Doucet by Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet’s entire revolutionary body of work is collected in this new box set, spanning from the acclaimed My New York Diary to rare comics and previously unpublished material. Emerging onto the 1990s comic scene a fully formed cartoonist, Doucet’s work is dense, witty, and fully confident as she explores the depths of the female psyche, and the fragility of the men around her.

Chlorine Gardens

Chlorine Gardens by Keiler Roberts

After the success of her 2017 Sunburning, Roberts is back, deftly dealing with pregnancy, art-making, and mental illness. It’s with her signature humour that the Chicago-based artist faces life’s darker moments, in a comic collection that Publisher’s Weekly deems poignant and “deeply satisfying.”

Friday Black

Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

Roxane Gay’s commanding “read this book” rings true for Adjei-Brenyah’s debut, a collection of stories haunting in their portrayal of the dangers and absurdities faced by black Americans. From an all-too-real account of the injustices of the justice system to an all-too-easy-to-imagine tale of racism as sport, these stories grip and never let go.

Roaming Foliage

Roaming Foliage by Patrick Kyle

Following the journey of two boys, a girl, a small head without a body, a humanoid robot, and a pumpkin through the wild overgrowth of a mysterious garden, Kyle’s latest offering is a feast of fantastical flora and fauna. It’s only the latest world to be built by the Toronto-based artist’s unique touch.

Shame is an Ocean I Swim Across

Shame is an Ocean I Swim Across by Mary Lambert

Known in equal measure as singer, songwriter, and spoken word artist, Lambert includes poet in her impressive list of accomplishments with this new collection, a stark and vulnerable discussion of sexual assault, mental illness, and body acceptance. In healing herself through poetry, Lambert provides guidance and hope for those who have been beaten down, but aim to lift themselves back up.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 11th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Vagabond Valise

The Vagabond Valise by Siris

From the founding father of Quebec underground comics is the translation of his renowned French original comic, winner of Quebec’s Graphic Novel of the Year award in 2017. Taking place in post-war, working class Quebec, it follows the author during his erratic childhood, in and out of foster homes, trying to find his footing.

Treaty 6 Deixis

Treaty 6 Deixis by Christine Stewart

Written on Treaty 6 land, which encompasses most of Central Alberta and Saskatchewan, the poet writes through physical and symbolic questions about what it means to “be here” as a settler. This long poem — the author’s first book — investigates the author’s ethical obligations to the place and time in which they are situated, while demonstrating how language can re-situate place and experience.

Things to Make and Break

Things to Make and Break by May-Lan Tan

This debut collection of short stories from the dependable Coffee House Press introduces us to a new voice full of magical, quasi-cinematic darkness. Alexander Chee writes that May-Lan Tan has “an imagination like a haunted carousel and each story here is like a ghost that wants only to talk to you.”

Godsend

Godsend by John Wray

This provocative novel from Whiting award-winning author John Wray is inspired by the true story of John Walker Lindh, the “American Taliban.” In Wray’s novel, however, the protagonist is an eighteen-year-old girl who flees the claustrophobia of her American family home to study Islam in Pakistan, taking on the identity of a militant young man named Suleyman. Praised by authors such as Akhil Sharma and Hari Kunzru, Godsend is a coming-of-age novel like no other. (Jacket design by D&Q artist Adrian Tomine)

The Antifa Comic Book: 100 Years of Fascism and Antifa Movements

The Antifa Comic Book: 100 Years of Fascism and Antifa Movements by Gord Hill

From Indigenous writer, activist, and artist Gord Hill comes a comprehensive chronicle (in comic books form) of 20th- and 21st-century fascism and resistance movements against it around the world, from Nazi Germany and Mussolini’s Italy to Greece, Britain, the Ukraine, the USA, Canada, and beyond. With an introduction from Mark Bray (author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook), this is an engaging and accessible guide to the poisonous roots of fascism’s racist ideology and how to fight it today.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 4th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Art Comic

Art Comic by Matthew Thurber

Art Comic places the art world under a harsh and hilarious microscope, skewering anything and everything at each turn. For the art lover or those exasperated by the art world, Art Comic has something for everyone and is populated with all your favourite artists and celebrities: Robert Rauschenberg, Francesca Woodman, Elton John, Bowie, and more!

The Best American Comics 2018

The Best American Comics 2018 edited by Phoebe Gloeckner

A treasure trove of the diverse and high-caliber comics published over the past year. This carefully chosen collection brings together works originally conceived as graphic novels, comics, periodicals, zines, and online works, and it shows how truly spectacular and genre-defying this art form is. Bonus: you’ll find the above mentioned Art Comic in these pages, testifying to its top-notch hilarity and quality.

The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2018

The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2018 edited by Sheila Heti

Flaunting gorgeous colorful cover art by comics artist Tommi Parrish, edited by the superb Sheila Heti, and chosen by fifteen Bay Area teens, this new collection of non-required reading is a doozy. It features an eclectic array of writing for every mood and season: stories, interviews, journalism, comics, tributes, and even Kara Walker’s incredible unforgettable artist statement.

Revenge of the Translator

Revenge of the Translator by Brice Matthieussent, trans. Emma Ramadan

Here is a thrilling meta novel originally written in French – a peek into the mind of an obsessive, and increasingly unstable translator. Written entirely of footnoted annotations, it’s about a French translator translating a fictional work back into its original language, attempting to justify his growing changes to the text.

The Flame: Poems & Selections from Notebooks

The Flame: Poems & Selections from Notebooks by Leonard Cohen

Collecting poems and entries from Cohen’s notebook in the final years of his life, this posthumous publication offers an intimate selection of writing from the late great artist. Asking dark questions and considering deep sorrows, offering musings and sly jokes, Cohen’s writing is always a pleasure.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 27, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Dementia 21

Dementia 21 by Shintaro Kago

Yukie, a young aide in a senior care home, quickly falls into a series of twisted events in Kago’s latest absurdist manga about growing old in a world gone wacky. It’s weird and spooky, rendered with surreal undertones of cross-generational conflict.

Flocks

Flocks by L Nichols

L Nichols has created a searing coming-of-age comic memoir about growing up queer in a small ultra-Christian household and community. Nichols has depicted the surrounding world in a visually realistic manner, while rendering himself as a soft button-eyed rag-doll, removing the easily recognizable and leading attributes that may have distracted readers from Nichols core honest story.

Split Tooth

Split Tooth by Tanya Tagaq

Nominated for the 2018 Giller Prize, internationally acclaimed Inuit throat singer Tanya Tagaq has published this novel about growing up in 1970s Nunavut. After 17 years of wordless expression with her work in music, the artist offers us this piercing story into the lives of girls and women living in northern and rural communities.

Your Duck is My Duck

Your Duck is My Duck by Deborah Eisenberg

From the much-acclaimed American author comes this unpredictable and fearless collection of short stories. New York Times book critic Parul Seghal calls the new book “cannily constructed, and so instantly absorbing that it feels like an abduction.”

The Deeper the Water the Uglier the Fish

The Deeper the Water the Uglier the Fish by Katya Apekina

From the experimental small press Two Dollar Radio is this story of two grieving and homesick sisters fiercely aching for their parents’ affection. The story is full of conversations and letters, bits and pieces, pulling together the story of different familial relationships built around trauma

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 20, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Pyongyang

Pyongyang by Guy Delisle

First published in French in 2003 and in English (by Drawn & Quarterly) in 2005, Pyongyang is one of Guy Delisle’s most iconic travelogue comics, taking the reader on an unprecedented and wryly humorous docu-graphic tour of closed-off North Korea, where photography is restricted and journalists are forbidden. More relevant than ever, Pyongyang has been freshly reissued with a brief introduction by Gore Verbinski, who had hoped to adapt the book for film before the project was shelved as too geopolitically volatile.

Theory

Theory by Dionne Brand

A former Poet Laureate of Toronto and recipient of the Order of Canada, Dionne Brand’s poetry, stories, novels, essays, and documentary films are among Canada’s foremost literary considerations of gender, race, sexuality and feminism. Theory is perhaps her most ambitious work to date, narrating the story of a grad student of unspecified gender, attempting to write a wildly ambitious thesis on the past, present, and future of art, culture, race, gender, class, and politics while being transformed by encounters with three successive lovers.

Maggie Terry

Maggie Terry by Sarah Schulman

American novelist, activist, playwright, nonfiction writer, screenwriter and AIDS historian Sarah Schulman has worn many hats over her long career. Most recently, her non-fiction book Conflict Is Not Abuse, which considers the ethics and politics of power relations on both interpersonal and group scales, has spurred much interest and discussion. Her new novel, Maggie Terry, may surprise some of her readers: it’s a police thriller influenced by her 19 years of teaching at CUNY Staten Island and her experience working with students who are police officers, or from NYPD families.

Obits

Obits by Tess Liem

Obits is the debut poetry collection (via Coach House Books) from breakout Montreal writer Tess Liem. In it, she attempts to write obituaries for those whose memorials are missing. She considers victims of mass deaths, fictional characters, and her own aunt, asking questions — from her perspective as a mixed-race queer woman — about how to remember, and who receives that privilege.

Shiner

The Latest Winter

Shiner and The Latest Winter by Maggie Nelson

Thanks to recent books like Bluets, The Art of Cruelty, and The Argonauts, Maggie Nelson has become an icon of contemporary creative non-fiction. But interest has also been mounting in her earlier books of poetry. Following close on the heels of this year’s new edition of Something Bright, Then Holes (originally published in 2003), Zed Books has re-published Nelson’s first two books, Shiner and The Latest Winter, which heralded the arrival of her virtuoso voice.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
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Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

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other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)