Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – August 15, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

King of King Court

King of King Court by Travis Dandro

King of King Court is a detailed and moving graphic memoir. The book tells the story of Travis Dandro’s life as it intersected with his biological father, Dad Dave, in early childhood and then again as a young teen. Dandro’s art is both bold and tender. The book teems with innovative paneling and intricate textures. The text frequently gives way to expansive images that flicker and intensify just like old memories. The many wordless scenes allow the narrative to wander seamlessly amongst dreams, flashbacks, and traumatic incidents.

While the subject matter of the book is quite heavy, with several scenes portraying suicide, addiction, and familial violence, Dandro traverses these subjects with compassion and complexity. It’s particularly impressive how Dandro is able to balance honouring the intensity of teenage emotions with regard for the struggles of the adults in his life who inflicted harm despite their best intentions. An insightful memoir bound to linger with readers.

How To Be An Antiracist

How To Be An Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

National Book Award winner Ibram X. Kendi is back with How To Be An Antiracist, a book that identifies, describes, and looks to dismantle racism. Kendi explores basic concepts and large ideas and looks at the history and persuasive nature of all forms of racism. Kendi includes his personal story as well as historic events and legal, scientific concepts in this comprehensive exploration of how to combat racism.

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk, trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead is the most recent book from Olga Tokarczuk, winner of the Man Booker International prize in 2018 for Flights, and one of Poland’s most important contemporary writers. This book follows the chronically ill Janina Duszejko during a winter in Poland in which a number of people have been murdered. This philosophical book explores questions of free will, hierarchy, and social rules. It is also a dark comedy, a noir mystery, and tribute of sorts to William Blake. Fitting that this book—translated from the Polish— is published during Women in Translation Month.

The Memory Police

The Memory Police by Yoko Ogawa trans. Stephen Snyder

The protagonist of The Memory Police lives on an island where items keep disappearing while the population does not seem to notice. Thought Police run the society, and as items such as birds and roses are destroyed, all associations with these items die also. As a writer, the main character learns her editor faces the threat of disappearance and attempts to save both her editor and her writing. A dystopian, orwellian thriller from this celebrated author, the recipient of every major Japanese literary prize. This book would be a(nother) great pick as a Women in Translation Month book!

The Remainder

The Remainder by Alia Trabbucco Zerán, trans. Sophie Hughes

Both a road trip and a countdown, Zerán’s first novel in English tells the story of three friends who find themselves travelling together in search of a missing body. The novel, set in the wake of Pinochet’s dictatorship, is fast-paced and gripping. One of the standout features of this book is Zerán’s use of the parenthetical, with both chapters and interludes appearing within parentheses. Shortlisted for the 2019 Man Booker International Prize, and an excellent Women In Translation Month read.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – August 6, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-delusion

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-delusion by Jia Tolentino

This debut collection of original essays by beloved cultural critic and New Yorker staff writer Jia Tolentino is one of this year’s most hotly-anticipated nonfiction titles. Hailed as the millennial Susan Sontag or internet-age Joan Didion, Tolentino has written a book about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly through a culture that revolves around the self. She considers (among other things) the rise of the nightmare social internet; the advent of scamming as the definitive millennial ethos; and the punitive dream of optimization, which insists that everything, including our bodies, should become more efficient and beautiful until we die. Gleaming with Tolentino’s sense of humor and capacity to elucidate the impossibly complex in an instant, Trick Mirror is an instant classic of the worst decade yet.

Laguardia

Laguardia by Nnedi Okorafor

Laguardia is the debut original comic from Hugo and Nebula award- winning author and the writer of Marvel’s Shuri, Nnedi Okorafor! In an alternate world where aliens have integrated with society, pregnant Nigerian-American doctor Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka has just smuggled an illegal alien plant named Letme Live through LaGuardia International and Interstellar Airport…and that’s not the only thing she’s hiding. She and Letme become part of a community of human and alien immigrants; but as their crusade for equality continues and the birth of her child nears, Future–and her entire world–begins to change.

Berta Isla

Berta Isla by Javier Marias

The latest novel from prolific, award-winning Spanish master Javier Marias is a gripping story of intrigue and missed chances–at once a spy story, murder mystery, cerebral caper, and a profound examination of a marriage founded on secrets and lies. When Berta Isla was a schoolgirl, she decided she would marry Tomás Nevinson–the dashing half-Spanish, half-English boy in her class with an extraordinary gift for languages. But when Tomás returns to Madrid from his studies at Oxford, he is a changed man. Unbeknownst to her, he has been approached by an agent from the British intelligence services, and he has unwittingly set in motion events that will derail forever the life they had planned.

Jacob’s Ladder

Jacob’s Ladder by Ludmila Ulitskaya

Jacob’s Ladder is a family saga spanning a century of recent Russian history from one of Russia’s most renowned literary figures (and Man Booker International Prize nominee) Ludmila Ulitskaya. Perhaps her final novel, it represents the summation of the author’s career, devoted to sharing the absurd and tragic tales of twentieth-century life in her nation. With a scale worthy of Tolstoy, Ulitskaya’s story spans from the seeming promise of the prerevolutionary years to the dark Stalinist era, to the corruption and confusion of the present day in a pageant of romance, betrayal, and memory.

Valerie

Valerie by Sara Stridsberg

Originally published in Sweden in 2006 (and now longlisted for the 2019 Man Booker International Prize), Valerie is a strangely funny, entirely unconventional novel that conjures the life, mind, and art of Valerie Solanas—the writer, radical feminist, author of the SCUM Manifesto and would-be assassin of Andy Warhol. A leading feminist in Sweden and one of the most acclaimed writers in Scandinavia, Sara Stridsberg here blurs the boundaries between history and fiction, self-making and storytelling, madness and art, reconstructing this most intriguing and enigmatic of women.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 17, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Nickel Boys

The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

Among the most anticipated novels of the year, Colson Whitehead’s follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning The Underground Railroad is a seismic event. Following two boys with conflicting ideals as they are plunged into a hellish reform school, The Nickel Boys is a masterful dramatization of the vast injustices in Jim Crow-era Florida, and more widely across this dark period of American history.

Accommodations

Accommodations by Wioletta Greg

Primarily writing as a poet, Wioletta Greg brings a bite and a polish to each sentence of her latest novel. Swallowing Mercury, her debut novel, followed her experience growing up in Communist Poland, and was met with wide acclaim. Accomodations picks up the lead with a young woman’s move from a small agricultural community to a nearby city, where she bounces between a hostel and a nuns’ convent. This puzzling and delightful book was translated from the Polish by Jennifer Croft.

Knitting the Fog

Knitting the Fog by Claudia D. Hernández

Claudia Hernandez brings the reader into the tumult of her upbringing with this striking memoir. At seven-years-old she had found herself suddenly without her mother, who fled domestic abuse in Guatemala for the pursuit of economic prosperity in the United States. Told in interlocking passages of prose and poetry, Knitting the Fog is a complex and moving account of the immigrant experience and the threads that connect mother and daughter.

Circus

Circus by Wayne Koestenbaum

Praised by the likes of John Waters and Maggie Nelson, one remark about Circus that stands out is from John Ashbery: “If Debussy and Robert Walser had collaborated on an opera, it would sound like this.” Polysexual pianist Theo Mangrove is obsessed with the idea that he must be accompanied by circus star Moira Orfei for his comeback performance. This new edition of a dazzling novel by renowned poet and critic Wayne Koestenbaum includes an introduction by Rachel Kushner.

Aug 9—Fog

Aug 9—Fog by Kathryn Scanlan

Having found an elderly stranger’s diary at an estate auction, Kathryn Scanlan took to its contents in the tradition of erasure poetry. She cut and arranged and rearranged the entries to reveal what is extraordinary in the ordinary, what is remarkable in the humdrum. Mary Ruefle says of Aug 9—Fog: “the ordinary diaries of ordinary people will reassure you that yours is no different than anyone else’s—friends die, flowers come fast.”

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 10, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

So Real It Hurts

So Real It Hurts by Lydia Lunch

This new collection of transgressive punk fiction and essays from legendary no-wave music/film/art/writing luminary Lydia Lunch includes rants, recollections, and stories that date from the late 90s to the present. Lunch celebrates her own exploits without apology, indulges in visceral revenge fantasies against misogynistic men, and offers unromanticized histories of her no-wave years along with scathing reflections on the commodification of counterculture. Introduction by the late Anthony Bourdain!

Notes from the Fog

Notes from the Fog by Ben Marcus

This latest collection of stories by Ben Marcus is now out in paperback! From his 1995 debut, The Age of Wire and String, to his epic 2012 novel, The Flame Alphabet, Marcus has been a torchbearer for unsettling visions of alienated contemporary life. These stories include a hapless corporate drone finding love after being disfigured by tests for a new nutrition supplement; two architects in a failing marriage pondering the ethics of artificially inciting emotion as they construct a memorial to a terrorist attack; and a father beginning to worry that his precocious son may be hiding something sinister.

The Need

The Need by Helen Phillips

Writing at the intersection of speculative fiction and psychological realism, Helen Phillips has been compared to Borges, Calvino, and Saramago. Her debut novel, The Beautiful Bureaucrat, won numerous accolades for its existential surrealism. Her new novel, The Need, is both a taut thriller, a meditation on the nature of reality, and a primal investigation of motherhood.

The End We Start From

The End We Start From by Megan Hunter

This debut novel from White Review and TLS contributor Megan Hunter — already a breakaway bestselling hit in the UK — is an ambitious climate-fiction dystopia. As floodwaters threaten to consume London, a woman must take her newborn son on the road to safety. Comparing The End We Start From to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, one critic wrote that this book “feels like the other half of the story.”

The Jungle

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, adapted and illustrated by Kristina Gehrmann

This new graphic adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s classic protest novel brings to life the harsh conditions and exploited lives of immigrants in the United States in Chicago and similar industrialized cities at the turn of the century. The novel’s original publication spurred real social change, prompting the passage of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act in the USA. Today, Gehrmann’s adaptation resonates with a revived interest in union activism and labour rights.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 6, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

BTTM FDRS

BTTM FDRS by Ezra Claytan Daniels and Ben Passmore

Ezra Claytan Daniels and Ben Passmore are both major comics talents — Daniels is already celebrated for Upgrade Soul and Passmore for Your Black Friend and DAYGLOAYHOLE — so the two of them together is a real dream-team scenario. BTTM FDRS is a work of afrofuturist gentrification horror-comedy set in a fictional version of Chicago’s south side. Amazing art, visceral horror, and cutting satiric laughs — this graphic novel has it all!

Hawking

Hawking by Jim Ottaviani & Leland Myrick

The writer and illustrator behind Feynman are back with another science-related graphic biography, this time about superstar physicist (and disability rights advocate) Stephen Hawking. From his childhood in Britain and his diagnosis with ALS at age 21 to his eventual groundbreaking work in cosmology and rise to pop culture icon, Ottaniani and Myrick craft an intricate portrait of Hawking as a great thinker, public figure, and flesh-and-blood human.

The Dry Heart

The Dry Heart by Natalia Ginzburg

Natalia Ginzburg (1916-91) is today regarded as one of the leading lights of modern Italian literature, though during her lifetime she was sometimes prevented from publishing under her own name due to anti-Semitic laws. While publishing twelve books and two plays, she raised five children and lost her husband to fascist torture. In The Dry Heart, freshly republished by New Directions, an unhappy wife murders her flighty spouse. It’s a slim, deceptively simple psychological thriller that entrances with its sternly chilling clarity.

Costalegre

Costalegre by Courtney Maum

Inspired by the real-life relationship between legendary heiress, art collector, and gallerist Peggy Guggenheim and her daughter Pegeen, Courtney Maum’s Costalegre is set in a mysterious resort in the Mexican jungle where the fictional Leonora Calaway has spirited an elite group of expat Surrealist artists in order to shield them from the Nazi crusade against “cultural degenerates.” Told from the point of view of Calaway’s neglected fifteen-year-old daughter, Costalegre is a sinuous, strange, heartbreaking coming-of-age story that unfolds in a lush hothouse of art and intrigue.

Malina

Malina by Ingeborg Bachmann

Ingeborg Bachmann (1926-73) is still little-known in English, though she is widely regarded as one of the greatest German-language writers of the 20th century, championed by the likes of Paul Celan, Peter Handke, Thomas Bernhard, and Elfriede Jelinek. This extensively-revised new translation of her 1971 novel Malina depicts an unnamed narrator in Vienna, torn between two men to the point of obsession. With incantatory prose reminiscent of Virginia Woolf or Clarice Lispector, Bachmann’s voice renders a singular portrait of female consciousness.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 28, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Angola Janga

Angola Janga by Marcelo D’salete

Eisner winning comic artist Marcelo D’salete is back, this time telling the thrilling story of Angola Janga, the iconic community of runaway slaves that fiercely opposed Dutch and Portuguese colonial powers in Brazil for over a hundred years. Fugitives, raids, and power struggles populate the pages of this essential history, beautifully told.

Gates of Plasma

Gates of Plasma by Carlos Gonzalez

In this unlikeliest of romances, a semi-truck driver meets a woman with mysterious ear secretions while participating in a pharmaceutical study. Together, they must brave a cult-like inner circle dabbling in untested drugs, plastic surgery, and the theatre. A dreamy, creepy tale, Gates of Plasma does credit to Gonzalez’s previous body of work, a mainstay in the underground comics and music scenes.

The Porpoise

The Porpoise by Mark Haddon

From the author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time comes a retelling of the legend of Antiochus and Appolinus of Tyre. A fierce, ambitious follow up to his previous celebrated novel, it is a tale of female agency stolen, of voyages both mythic and real, of the importance of storytelling.

I Like to Watch

I Like to Watch by Emily Nussbaum

Pulitzer prize-winning writer Emily Nussbaum has been the New Yorker’s resident TV critic since 2011 (and, before that, for New York magazine). In this collection of essays and reviews (including two previously-unpublished pieces), Nussbaum presents nothing less than a new way of looking at television, intimately attuned to the ins and outs of the so-called “Golden Age” of prestige TV in the era of streaming services.

How Could She

How Could She by Lauren Mechling

Lauren Mechling is a prolific reporter and columnist who has written for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and Vogue. Her debut novel is a savagely funny story of female friendship set inside the catty, cutthroat world of New York media, hopping from rooftop parties to downtown art galleries as its protagonists navigate the world of influencers while trying to juggle life as writers, mothers, and wives.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 19, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

TITLE

Hot Comb by Ebony Flowers

So excited for this expressive and generous collection of short connected stories attentive to black girls’ and women’s relationship to their hair. It features the salons, the products, the hairstyles, the peer pressure, the connotations of hair, its texture, shape, and care. Ebony Flower’s watercolour-stroked drawings in blacks, whites, and greys show movement and form with effortless style.

A Sand Book

A Sand Book by Ariana Reines

With only Kim Gordon’s commanding words – “mind-blowing” – at the back of the book, Ariana Reines’s latest book of poetry A Sand Book is much-anticipated and shines golden like the sun. Tackling our present days with a fresh and decisive voice, she recounts, conveys, feels, and associates with enthusiastic spirit that is all her own.

Penny Nichols

Penny Nichols by MK Reed

This story follows the titular Penny Nichols as a bored and aimless temp professional. Her trajectory drastically shifts when she becomes part of a horror movie production – the ragtag team has energy, enthusiasm, and no budget. A book for the imaginative spirits that need to, must, make their visions of the future come to life.

Oval

Oval by Elvia Wilk

Set in a near-future Berlin, Oval is a penetrative look at what is to come. Wilk imagines the city as a place where artists are hired by corporations as consultants, and the price of housing sky-rockets in the name of “sustainability”. This is one to curl up with and steel oneself for the impending future.

Maiden, mother, crone: fantastical trans femmes

Maiden, mother, crone: fantastical trans femmes ed. Gwen Benaway

Proudly recognized as the first anthology by trans femme authors writing in magic and fantasy, Maiden, mother, crone offers a groundbreaking collection featuring trans heroines. With stories by Gwen Benaway, Casey Plett, Kai Cheng Thom, among many others, we encounter worlds and languages that stir the spirit with visionary imagination.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 14, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The 2019 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology

The 2019 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology by Kim Maltman

As this is being written, Kim Hyesoon (trans. Don Mee Choi) and Eve Joseph have been announced as International and Canadian Griffin Poetry Prize winners for their books Autobiography of Death and Quarrels, respectively. Excerpts from these award-winning books, along with those from the sparkling shortlist (including Dionne Brand and Sarah Tolmie), are featured in this anthology.

Red Ultramarine

Red Ultramarine by Manuele Fior

Manuele Fior, author of the beguiling sci-fi-noir graphic novel The Interview is back with a daring new take on an old tale. In a striking red-and-black palette and an instinctive line, Fior reimagines the life of Icarus and adds his own hijinks to the mythology.

Under the Gamma Camera

Under the Gamma Camera by Madeline Bassnett

“Must I learn / to love this weakness?” Published in a (typically) beautiful Gaspereau Press edition, Under the Gamma Camera is a collection of poems that contend frankly with disease. Bassnett draws from personal history to explore how disease is experienced in the immediacy of the body and at the clinical remove of diagnosis, treatment, etc.

Mrs. Everything

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner

Mrs. Everything is the latest novel from Jennifer Weiner, an outspoken feminist, NY Times Opinion writer, and bestselling author of 16 books. Weiner has been forthright in criticizing the “chick lit” label that dogs women who write accessibly about female experience, and Mrs. Everything is a page-turning generational epic about two different women who grow up in 1950s Detroit and eventually pass through the tumultuous Sixties and after on divergent life paths. It’s an undeniable “summer read” kind of book that asks fundamental questions about how a woman should be in the world.

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory: Stories

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory: Stories by Raphael Bob-Waksberg

The debut short story collection from Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg offers some of the same dark humour, absurdist whimsy, and poignant melancholy that the beloved show is known for. These offbeat love stories include: a young couple engaged to be married, forced to deal with interfering relatives dictating the appropriate number of ritual goat sacrifices for their wedding; the tragicomic tale of a pair of lonely commuters eternally failing to make that longed-for contact; and a struggling employee at a theme park of dead presidents who finds that love can’t be genetically modified. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll probably snort.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 5, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Follies of Richard Wadsworth

The Follies of Richard Wadsworth by Nick Maandag

Best known as the artist behind the cult comic Streakers, Nick Maandag has come out with a new collection with Drawn & Quarterly that is très drole. Do you enjoy watching foolish men look silly and fail miserably? Yes? This book is for you.

In Waves

In Waves by AJ Dungo

Coloured in cool blue and sandy brown tones, In Waves is a beautifully drawn love letter to surf.

It offers a history of surfing, its danger, its heroes, and Dungo’s own personal connection to the sport. For real surfers and summertime dreamers.

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong

With luminaries like Marlon James, Tommy Orange, Celeste Ng, and Ben Lerner singing its praises, there’s no shortage of anticipation for the debut novel of Ocean Vuong, who follows the success of Night Sky with Exit Wounds with a complex, urgent meditation on race, class, and masculinity, all delivered as a letter from a son to a mother who can’t read.

Orange World and Other Stories

Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell

Weirdo at heart and enigmatic storyteller, Karen Russell has come out with a new short story collection that is as strange and wild as you would hope. She finds the familiar in the utterly fantastic. She’s like Italo Calvino meets Sabrina Orah Mark meets Helen Oyeyemi with a dash of climate speculations.

Tin House 80: The Final Issue

Tin House 80: The Final Issue

The beloved Tin House magazine is closing shop and has released its final issue! Spotlighting writing from a truly impressive array of writers, this is a not-to-miss publication. It features store favs like Man Booker International Winner Olga Tokarczuk, Colson Whitehead, Etgar Keret, Kelly Link, the aforementioned Karen Russell, and Brian Blanchfield.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – May 30, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Meat and Bone

Meat and Bone by Kat Verhoeven

A neon-coloured examination of friendship, support, and survival in the big city from Toronto comic artist Kat Verhoeven. Meat and Bone follows three friends and their relationships to food and one another. It’s a thoughtful portrayal of how friendships and circumstances shape experiences in and of our bodies.

The Organs of Sense

The Organs of Sense by Adam Ehrlich Sachs

This debut novel by Adam Ehrlich Sachs is a comic fable set in 1666 whose protagonist is the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz, age 19. As he investigates the apparently prodigious discoveries of a blind astronomer, the young polymath is drawn into a web of noble-family squabbles and obsessions. Described as a “madcap blend of philosophical malpractice and byzantine palace intrigue” and compared to the likes of Helen DeWitt and W.G. Sebald, The Organs of Sense announces a marvelous new voice in cerebral-comic literature.

Frying Plantain

Frying Plantain by Zalika Reid-Benta

Set in Toronto’s Little Jamaica area of Eglinton West, Frying Plantain follows Kara Davis, a second-generation Jamaican immigrant, through twelve interconnected stories that take her from girlhood to high school graduation. It’s a brilliant debut that artfully captures the tensions between Black identity and the prevailing whiteness of “Canadian” identity, between the cultural expectations of first-generation immigrants and their young children, and between mothers and daughters.

Dual Citizens

Dual Citizens by Alix Ohlin

In her fifth novel, Giller Prize finalist Alix Ohlin (who is also the chair of UBC’s Creative Writing Program) introduces us to Lark Brossard, a woman overshadowed by her temperamental mother, her piano-prodigy sister, and her employer/lover, a renowned filmmaker. When her relationship falls apart, she is forced to come to terms with her unrealized ambitions and thwarted desires in ways that draw her closer to her sibling. Shifting between Montreal and New York City, Dual Citizens is a dazzlingly insightful picture of two complicated women.

Wage Slaves

Wage Slaves by Daria Bogdanska

Warsaw-born, Malmö-based Daris Bogdabska’s autobiographical graphic novel tells the story of a young EU citizen discovering how difficult it can be to secure residency papers and a work permit. Having come to Sweden for art school, Bogdanska works under the table in an Indian restaurant, where the poor conditions lead her to spearhead a unionization drive. In a shaggy-yet-cute punk style that recalls Julie Doucet, Bogdanka captures the texture of young life and the urgency of political organization with sensitive realism, political anger, and a sense of fun.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)