Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 19, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

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Hot Comb by Ebony Flowers

So excited for this expressive and generous collection of short connected stories attentive to black girls’ and women’s relationship to their hair. It features the salons, the products, the hairstyles, the peer pressure, the connotations of hair, its texture, shape, and care. Ebony Flower’s watercolour-stroked drawings in blacks, whites, and greys show movement and form with effortless style.

A Sand Book

A Sand Book by Ariana Reines

With only Kim Gordon’s commanding words – “mind-blowing” – at the back of the book, Ariana Reines’s latest book of poetry A Sand Book is much-anticipated and shines golden like the sun. Tackling our present days with a fresh and decisive voice, she recounts, conveys, feels, and associates with enthusiastic spirit that is all her own.

Penny Nichols

Penny Nichols by MK Reed

This story follows the titular Penny Nichols as a bored and aimless temp professional. Her trajectory drastically shifts when she becomes part of a horror movie production – the ragtag team has energy, enthusiasm, and no budget. A book for the imaginative spirits that need to, must, make their visions of the future come to life.

Oval

Oval by Elvia Wilk

Set in a near-future Berlin, Oval is a penetrative look at what is to come. Wilk imagines the city as a place where artists are hired by corporations as consultants, and the price of housing sky-rockets in the name of “sustainability”. This is one to curl up with and steel oneself for the impending future.

Maiden, mother, crone: fantastical trans femmes

Maiden, mother, crone: fantastical trans femmes ed. Gwen Benaway

Proudly recognized as the first anthology by trans femme authors writing in magic and fantasy, Maiden, mother, crone offers a groundbreaking collection featuring trans heroines. With stories by Gwen Benaway, Casey Plett, Kai Cheng Thom, among many others, we encounter worlds and languages that stir the spirit with visionary imagination.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 14, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The 2019 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology

The 2019 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology by Kim Maltman

As this is being written, Kim Hyesoon (trans. Don Mee Choi) and Eve Joseph have been announced as International and Canadian Griffin Poetry Prize winners for their books Autobiography of Death and Quarrels, respectively. Excerpts from these award-winning books, along with those from the sparkling shortlist (including Dionne Brand and Sarah Tolmie), are featured in this anthology.

Red Ultramarine

Red Ultramarine by Manuele Fior

Manuele Fior, author of the beguiling sci-fi-noir graphic novel The Interview is back with a daring new take on an old tale. In a striking red-and-black palette and an instinctive line, Fior reimagines the life of Icarus and adds his own hijinks to the mythology.

Under the Gamma Camera

Under the Gamma Camera by Madeline Bassnett

“Must I learn / to love this weakness?” Published in a (typically) beautiful Gaspereau Press edition, Under the Gamma Camera is a collection of poems that contend frankly with disease. Bassnett draws from personal history to explore how disease is experienced in the immediacy of the body and at the clinical remove of diagnosis, treatment, etc.

Mrs. Everything

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner

Mrs. Everything is the latest novel from Jennifer Weiner, an outspoken feminist, NY Times Opinion writer, and bestselling author of 16 books. Weiner has been forthright in criticizing the “chick lit” label that dogs women who write accessibly about female experience, and Mrs. Everything is a page-turning generational epic about two different women who grow up in 1950s Detroit and eventually pass through the tumultuous Sixties and after on divergent life paths. It’s an undeniable “summer read” kind of book that asks fundamental questions about how a woman should be in the world.

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory: Stories

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory: Stories by Raphael Bob-Waksberg

The debut short story collection from Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg offers some of the same dark humour, absurdist whimsy, and poignant melancholy that the beloved show is known for. These offbeat love stories include: a young couple engaged to be married, forced to deal with interfering relatives dictating the appropriate number of ritual goat sacrifices for their wedding; the tragicomic tale of a pair of lonely commuters eternally failing to make that longed-for contact; and a struggling employee at a theme park of dead presidents who finds that love can’t be genetically modified. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll probably snort.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 5, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Follies of Richard Wadsworth

The Follies of Richard Wadsworth by Nick Maandag

Best known as the artist behind the cult comic Streakers, Nick Maandag has come out with a new collection with Drawn & Quarterly that is très drole. Do you enjoy watching foolish men look silly and fail miserably? Yes? This book is for you.

In Waves

In Waves by AJ Dungo

Coloured in cool blue and sandy brown tones, In Waves is a beautifully drawn love letter to surf.

It offers a history of surfing, its danger, its heroes, and Dungo’s own personal connection to the sport. For real surfers and summertime dreamers.

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong

With luminaries like Marlon James, Tommy Orange, Celeste Ng, and Ben Lerner singing its praises, there’s no shortage of anticipation for the debut novel of Ocean Vuong, who follows the success of Night Sky with Exit Wounds with a complex, urgent meditation on race, class, and masculinity, all delivered as a letter from a son to a mother who can’t read.

Orange World and Other Stories

Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell

Weirdo at heart and enigmatic storyteller, Karen Russell has come out with a new short story collection that is as strange and wild as you would hope. She finds the familiar in the utterly fantastic. She’s like Italo Calvino meets Sabrina Orah Mark meets Helen Oyeyemi with a dash of climate speculations.

Tin House 80: The Final Issue

Tin House 80: The Final Issue

The beloved Tin House magazine is closing shop and has released its final issue! Spotlighting writing from a truly impressive array of writers, this is a not-to-miss publication. It features store favs like Man Booker International Winner Olga Tokarczuk, Colson Whitehead, Etgar Keret, Kelly Link, the aforementioned Karen Russell, and Brian Blanchfield.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – May 30, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Meat and Bone

Meat and Bone by Kat Verhoeven

A neon-coloured examination of friendship, support, and survival in the big city from Toronto comic artist Kat Verhoeven. Meat and Bone follows three friends and their relationships to food and one another. It’s a thoughtful portrayal of how friendships and circumstances shape experiences in and of our bodies.

The Organs of Sense

The Organs of Sense by Adam Ehrlich Sachs

This debut novel by Adam Ehrlich Sachs is a comic fable set in 1666 whose protagonist is the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz, age 19. As he investigates the apparently prodigious discoveries of a blind astronomer, the young polymath is drawn into a web of noble-family squabbles and obsessions. Described as a “madcap blend of philosophical malpractice and byzantine palace intrigue” and compared to the likes of Helen DeWitt and W.G. Sebald, The Organs of Sense announces a marvelous new voice in cerebral-comic literature.

Frying Plantain

Frying Plantain by Zalika Reid-Benta

Set in Toronto’s Little Jamaica area of Eglinton West, Frying Plantain follows Kara Davis, a second-generation Jamaican immigrant, through twelve interconnected stories that take her from girlhood to high school graduation. It’s a brilliant debut that artfully captures the tensions between Black identity and the prevailing whiteness of “Canadian” identity, between the cultural expectations of first-generation immigrants and their young children, and between mothers and daughters.

Dual Citizens

Dual Citizens by Alix Ohlin

In her fifth novel, Giller Prize finalist Alix Ohlin (who is also the chair of UBC’s Creative Writing Program) introduces us to Lark Brossard, a woman overshadowed by her temperamental mother, her piano-prodigy sister, and her employer/lover, a renowned filmmaker. When her relationship falls apart, she is forced to come to terms with her unrealized ambitions and thwarted desires in ways that draw her closer to her sibling. Shifting between Montreal and New York City, Dual Citizens is a dazzlingly insightful picture of two complicated women.

Wage Slaves

Wage Slaves by Daria Bogdanska

Warsaw-born, Malmö-based Daris Bogdabska’s autobiographical graphic novel tells the story of a young EU citizen discovering how difficult it can be to secure residency papers and a work permit. Having come to Sweden for art school, Bogdanska works under the table in an Indian restaurant, where the poor conditions lead her to spearhead a unionization drive. In a shaggy-yet-cute punk style that recalls Julie Doucet, Bogdanka captures the texture of young life and the urgency of political organization with sensitive realism, political anger, and a sense of fun.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – May 16, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Laura Dean Keeps Breaking up With Me

Laura Dean Keeps Breaking up With Me by Mariko Tamaki & Rosemary Valero-O’Connell

On queer love, bffs, and toxic relationships set against the backdrop of high school discovery. For readers of Tillie Walden’s wise deep-feeling-good-looking comics, this story brings us into the world of young desire, and learning how to tell what is not good for you.

I Become a Delight to My Enemies

I Become a Delight to My Enemies by Sara Peters

From the new Strange Light imprint, highlighting experimental literature, comes this polyvocal story of lives lived in fear. Written in poetry and prose, set in the ambiguous town called “Town,” Peters creates an atmosphere of strangeness amidst recognition.

Lanny

Lanny by Max Porter

Also from the Strange Light imprint, Max Porter’s Lanny is a once-upon-a-time story where a young boy goes missing. The novel speaks through different modes of storytelling – myth, fairy tale, parable – as if under an incantatory spell in the middle of the forest.

Before I Was a Critic I Was a Human Being

Before I Was a Critic I Was a Human Being by Amy Fung

A radical collection of essays from critic, organizer, and curator Amy Fung who has worked in the arts across Canada for the past decade. She looks critically at Canada’s art world in her debut book and how it continually implicates itself in the systems of oppression it seeks to critique.

Cannonball

Cannonball by Kelsey Wroten

Described as “Art School Confidential for the Tumblr generation,” this comic is about being young, rebellious, and ambitious. It is also about desire, with the central figure Caroline crushing hard on a wrestler names Cannonball, lost in a fantasy world of love and heroism.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – May 8, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Exhalation

Exhalation by Ted Chiang

Inspiring the award-winning film Arrival with his debut collection, Stories of Your Life and Others, Chiang is back again with nine stories, from rare classics to previously unpublished work, exploring poignant new ground with portals through time, alien scientists, and literacy-destroying search engines.

New Daughters of Africa

New Daughters of Africa by Margaret Busby (editor)

A staggering international collection of the writing of over 200 women of African descent, New Daughters of Africa spans centuries, continents, and every genre imaginable with contributions from some of the greatest writers of today, including Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yrsa Daley-Ward, Edwidge Danticat, Esi Edugyan, Roxane Gay, Imbolo Mbue, Nnedi Okorafor, Zadie Smith and many, many more.

Rabbits for Food

Rabbits for Food by Binnie Kirshenbaum

With Paul Beatty calling Rabbits for Food “psychiatric dayroom dark and just as funny,” Kirshenbaum’s newest novel delves deep into the crisis of art-making, loneliness, love, and hospitalization, with an acerbic New York writer protagonist whose New Year’s Eve breakdown sees her admitted to a prestigious hospital and refusing all forms of treatment.

Call me American

Call me American by Abdi Nor Iftin

Abdi Nor Iftin’s path to becoming an American seems almost unbelievable: learning English from American pop and Arnold Schwarzenegger movies, posting secret dispatches from al-Shabaab-controlled Somalia to a worldwide audience, winning the annual visa lottery. Now in Maine and working toward citizenship, Iftin is sharing this dramatic memoir, a must-read for an age of increasing immigration crisis.

Revenge of the She-Punks

Revenge of the She-Punks by Vivien Goldman

Concentrating on four main themes–identity, money, love, and protest–music journalist and post-punk musician Vivien Goldman tells the liberating, visceral story of women and punk through interviews, history, and personal experience. From Patti Smith and Poly Styrene to Grace Jones and Blondie, Revenge of the She-Punks is a carousing, celebratory musical tour.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – April 26, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

When I Arrived at the Castle

When I Arrived at the Castle by Emily Carroll

Emily Carroll’s Through the Woods was a breakout horror comic hit, and her latest is another masterfully creepy, sexy gothic tale of fanged-femme body horror. Carroll’s unique sensibility evokes classic fairy-tale and vampire tropes only to rip them to shreds, with gorgeous black-and-white (and red!) art and a savage-yet-tender narrative sensibility that will thrill, surprise, and arouse.

Alienation

Alienation by Ines Estrada

This dystopian near-future sci-fi comic mixes the punk-feminist raunch of Julie Doucet with the visceral psychedelia of Suehiro Maruo and a distinctly millennial whirlwind of pop-culture absurdism. The story follows Elizabeth, a cyberspace exotic dancer, and Carlos, just fired from the last human-staffed oil rig, as they attempt to keep their romance alive. Living in a VR-enhanced corporate monopoly in which fossil fuels have run dry and global climate and wildlife are decimated, the couple is anxious about dangerous cyber-stalkers and faulty brain implants, but mainly, they have to contend with their own boredom.

Walking: One Step at a Time

Walking: One Step at a Time by Erling Kagge

Erling Kagge is the type of renaissance man who seems to have stepped out of an earlier era: as a gentleman explorer, he is the first person to set foot on both the North and South Poles and the summit of Mount Everest. He has written six books on exploration, philosophy, and art collecting, and runs the publishing company Kagge Forlag in his native Oslo. His latest book, Walking, explores the universal appeal of pedestrian ambulation as a spur to thought and creativity.

Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl

Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl by Andrea Lawlor

Andrea Lawlor’s debut novel is a queer coming-of-age tale set in the Midwest of the early 90s and it arrives studded with lavish praise from luminaries like Eileen Myles, Maggie Nelson, Michelle Tea, and Danez Smith. Paul Polydoris studies queer theory, makes zines, and tends bar at the only gay club in his university town, but Paul has a secret: he’s also a (riot) girl. As Paul’s horizons expand, s/he crosses the country, shifting their body and gender at will in a bildungsroman that may well become a touchstone for a new generation of queer readers.

Machines Like Me

Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan

The latest novel from master storyteller Ian McEwan is set in a version of 1980s London in which it’s possible to design and purchase synthetic humans. When Charlie, a semi-employed layabout and amateur robotics buff, comes into money, he buys one of these cyborgs, a near-perfect being named Adam…which leads to certain complications with his lover, Miranda, who is hiding a secret of her own. It’s a subversive tale of love, technology, and humanity by a major contemporary writer venturing (for the first time) into sci-fi and alternate history.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week -April 19, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Credo: The Rose Wilder Lane Story

Credo: The Rose Wilder Lane Story by Peter Bagge

Following his critically-acclaimed biography of Zora Neale Hurston, Peter Bagge is back with Credo, a graphic account of Rose Wilder Lane’s life. As a thoughtful and thorough biographer, Bagge excels at illustrating what a true trailblazer Lane was politically and as a writer: she founded the American libertarian movement and helped bring her mother’s Little House on the Prairie series to its status as a classic. Drawn in vivid colour, Bagge illustrates a life full of spunk and bite.

Normal People

Normal People by Sally Rooney

Much lauded in Europe as the novel of the generation, Sally Rooney’s Normal People is a book you will start, inhale with delight, and feel totally nourished from afterwards. It is about the tenuous relationships held with the people closest to us – full of shame, devotion, warmth, and the inability to communicate clearly.

Optic Nerve

Optic Nerve by Maria Gainza

This English debut from Maria Gainza, a major Argentine author, recounts a woman’s obsession with art. The story merges odd moments of art history with the narrator’s reflective yet unglamourous life in Buenos Aires. It is part Ways of Seeing, part How Should a Person Be?, and part fantastical Calvino.

The House of the Pain of Others

The House of the Pain of Others by Julián Herbert, translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney

In a rigorous and passionate attempt to excavate a painful piece of North American history, Mexican writer Julián Herbert writes about the 1911 massacre during the Mexican Revolution. Some three hundred Chinese immigrants in the newly founded city of Torreón were violently murdered. Retelling the events through a mix of “journalism and literature, objectivity and subjectivity,” Herbert works to dig out the deeply planted roots of anti-Chinese prejudice and racism in Mexico.

Native Country of the Heart

Native Country of the Heart by Cherríe Moraga

A fervent feminist, queer, and indigenous activist, Cherríe Moraga tells her own story through her mother’s rejection of a traditional female life. Julia Alvarez’ endorsement sums up the book beautifully and poetically: “This defiant, deep, and soulful book about all our mothers, mother cultures, motherlands, and languages is both political and ceremonial.”

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week -April 9, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy

How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy by Jenny Odell

Our world is one defined by a mental overcrowding; at any moment dozens of forces clammer for our attention, our productivity, our personal information. In How to Do Nothing Jenny Odell writes that nothing is more crucial, more politically important, than learning to do nothing. Indeed, she argues that a recentering and refocusing of our attention is what will open us up to bolder political change, in a work billed as “a four-course meal in the age of Soylent.”

Trust Exercise

Trust Exercise by Susan Choi

In a 1980s American suburb, students struggle their way through a highly competitive performing arts school, pursuing movement, music, and acting classes in turn. The school provides an insulated bubble, apart from family life and economic status, in which David and Sarah can fall in love. But their peers and teachers are determined to get involved, and the school may prove not to be the safe haven it was believed to be.

Sabers and Utopias: Visions of Latin America

Sabers and Utopias: Visions of Latin America by Mario Vargas Llosa

Assembling never-before-translated criticisms and meditations, Nobel Prize in Literature winner Vargas Llosa’s newest collection, translated by Anna Kushner, explores the recent past of Latin America, its political groups, famous figures, and place on a global stage. From FARC to Fidel Castro, the prolific author’s famously uncompromising eye nevertheless remains optimist and thoughtful, committed to facing head on the fear and discrimination that rupture societies.

Naamah

Naamah by Sarah Blake

In the well-trod tale of Noah and his arc, there remains one figure shrouded in mystery. Sarah Blake’s inventive novel cedes the floor to Noah’s wife Naamah, the matriarch responsible for keeping her family of sole survivors alive through divine cataclysm. A woman caught between faith and fury, tormented by questions, regrets, and temptations, Naamah survives by sheer resilience in this age-old parable for the modern day.

Notes from a Young Black Chef

Notes from a Young Black Chef by Kwame Onwuachi, with Joshua David Stein

Praised by the likes of Carla Hall, Michael W. Twitty, and Questlove, Onwuachi’s culinary coming-of-age story is a journey from selling candy in the subway and cooking on a Deepwater Horizon ship, to training in (and launching) some of the finest fine dining establishments. Exploring the intersections of race, fame, and food, this Top Chef alum’s autobiography shows just how powerful an enduring passion can be.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week -April 3, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Leaving Richard’s Valley

Leaving Richard’s Valley by Michael Deforge

Michael Deforge’s newest comic tells the story of an eccentric group of animal friends who are forced out of their beloved valley and must learn to make their way in the Big City. In Deforge’s world, frogs become bodybuilders, raccoons start noise bands, and spiders try to make it as male models. Anything can happen.

Death Threat

Death Threat by Vivek Shraya & Ness Lee

Author of the bestselling strike against toxic masculinity, I’m Afraid of Men, artist extraordinaire Vivek Shraya has collaborated with mural artist and illustrator artist Ness Lee to create this dynamic meta-comic about receiving a death threat. A collaboration in the truest sense of the word, Shraya and Lee both become characters in this fluid story. They negotiate how to make responsive work in the face of threats and violence.

Lot: stories

Lot: stories by Bryan Washington

In this debut story collection set in Houston, Texas, we are guided through the stories by an unnamed Afro-Latinx boy narrator. He takes readers to various corners of the city, observing the intimate dynamics and whispers between its inhabitants with spirited aplomb.

Sabrina & Corina: Stories

Sabrina & Corina: Stories by Kali Fajardo-Anstine

From the consistently excellent One World imprint comes this debut collection of stories featuring indigenous Latina women in the American West. Brutal, tender, and sure-footed, these stories are about women witnessing the haunting destruction of their lands, community, and bodies.

Who Killed my Father

Who Killed my Father by Édouard Louis

Following the success of Louis’ previous novels, The End of Eddy and The History of Violence, is this new translation from French against France’s rigid class system. The author brings together memories of his childhood and his father, recalling incidents of masculine rage and insanity in the face of social neglect.

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