Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – February 15, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Lost Children Archive

Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli

Following the publication of her slim account of travelling along the US/Mexican border with her family in 2014, Tell Me How it Ends, comes this fictionalized account of the journey. It’s a road trip with the family compiling traces, fragments, and news clippings of children gone missing crossing the border. We are so excited for this book that we will host the upcoming New Reads Book Club on this book March 27 2019.

The Problem of Susan & Other Stories

The Problem of Susan & Other Stories by Neil Gaiman

These four short comics each develop fantastic worlds, revisiting fairy tales, children’s literature, and legends. The illustrations, with a different style for each story, add detail and mystery to Gaiman’s writing. There is a darkness to this book, at first hidden but ultimately enhanced by the bold, expansive graphics.

My Solo Exchange Diary 2

My Solo Exchange Diary 2 by Kabi Nagata

Nagata is back with more diaries to share! This book, a sequel to My Lesbian Experience With Loneliness and My Solo Exchange Diary continues to be full of honest and intimate confessions. Nagata takes readers through the complexities of fame and family, continued isolation, compulsive drinking, and hospitalization. What comes through most in this book, however, is an appreciation of the strength of familial love.

The Source of Self-Regard

The Source of Self-Regard by Toni Morrison

A collection of essays and speeches that spans forty years, the pieces in this collection feel timely and urgent. Arranged into three sections: “The Foreigner’s Home,” “Black Matter(s),” and “God’s Language,” the book is composed of an impressive variety of pieces addressing political, social, and literary matters. This book will delight long-time Morrison fans, as well as those looking for an introduction to her thinking and writing.

The I Wonder Bookstore

The I Wonder Bookstore by Shinsuke Yoshitake

A sweet, fantastical, and clever book of short comics about an imagined meta bookstore that only sells books about books. If you think of it, they’ve got it. Included are: the manual How to Grow a Tree that Writes Books, a training guide Boot Camp for Bookstore Employees, an anthology of Unique Book Festivals, an account of the Village of Raining Books, and a look into The Underwater Library. For the book obsessed, like us.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – February 6, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Black Leopard Red Wolf

Black Leopard Red Wolf by Marlon James

Marlon James highly anticipated science fiction debut is here! The first installment in the Dark Star trilogy, Black Leopard Red Wolf does not disappoint. The Dantesque epic leads readers on a journey through realms with anthropomorphized animals, mystery, and danger. James’ writing spins, with the focus constantly shifting throughout the story. We are very excited to be hosting James on March 5th to launch this book! Tickets on sale now.

Off Season

Off Season by James Sturm

James Sturm’s latest graphic novel opens with devastating victory of Donald Trump during the American 2016 election. The story follows a father, a fervent democrat turned completely disillusioned, and his family, portraying the emotional aftermath of a political debacle. Sturm depicts the political and personal crises of the book with masterfully drawn and illustrative narration.

On the Come Up

On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Although the story is geared towards teens, On the Come Up is a gripping and thoroughly enjoyable for all readers aged 15 and above. As an ode to Hip Hop, it’s a book about growing up Black in an unjust world. The book opens with a disillusioned student in class, dreaming of bigger things.

Figuring

Figuring by Maria Popova

In her new book, Maria Popova of Brain Pickings fame weaves through narratives of various historical figures, mostly women and mostly queer. The book is history set to staccato melody: the writing and characters come alive and feel so current, even when the prose delve into the interconnectedness of various artists, journalists and historical figures. Scientific concepts, philosophy, music, feminism, and what gave rise to the environmental movement are just a few of the themes explored. Throughout, Popova meditates on the impossible question of whether achievement and acclaim bring happiness or not.

The Hundred Wells of Salaga

The Hundred Wells of Salaga by Ayesha Harruna Attah

Set in 19th century Ghana and based on a true story, The Hundred Wells of Salaga is a coming of age novel. It presents the scope of slavery, and how it devastated vast swaths of Ghana and beyond. The narrative centers on the experiences of Aminah and Wurche, two women who come together under in circumstances beyond their control.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – February 1, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

We Cast a Shadow

We Cast a Shadow by Maurice Carlos Ruffin

This searing debut novel by New Orleans author Maurice Carlos Ruffin is at once a pitch-black comedy and a chilling horror story. Set in the near future, heightened targeted surveillance and severe law enforcement regulations have put black lives at an ever terrifying risk. The prospect of demelandization centers the story, with a black father desperately considering it for his son.

Magical Negro

Magical Negro by Morgan Parker

Following up her exquisite book of poems There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé comes a new collection of colloquial, restless, and timely poetry. Cataloguing the black present, her heroes and predecessors, her personal narrative, Parker offers a rich vision of curiosity and grief.

Mephisto’s Waltz

Mephisto’s Waltz by Sergio Pitol, trans. Elena Poniatowska

A strange and bewitching collection of stories from one of Mexico’s leading eccentric authors. The translator Poniatowska calls them “stories that sing like a river,” which I take to mean that they flow through time, elegantly picking up vestiges, tales, and characters on its way.

Black is the Body: Stories from my grandmother’s time, my mother’s time, and mine

Black is the Body: Stories from my grandmother’s time, my mother’s time, and mine by Emily Bernard

Emily Bernard’s new memoir opens with two quotes that introduce the book so succinctly and aptly: James Baldwin responding to an interviewer, “black is a state of mind,” and Simone de Beauvoir writing. “The body is not a thing, it is a situation: it is our grasp on the world and our sketch of our project.” She weaves twelves personal essays, both exploring narratives of blackness and fearlessly sharing the stories that have shaped her.

Ghost Wall

Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

In this wild, thrilling, and mournful look to a time past and changed, a young girl and her father join a field-based anthropology class in lieu of taking a vacation. There, they go back in time, enacting the tools and knowledge of the ancient Britons from the Iron Age. It’s a book that toggles between the past and present, questioning unreserved reverence for former civilizations and their rituals.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – January 23rd, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Bookends: Collected Intros and Outro

Bookends: Collected Intros and Outro by Michael Chabon

Here’s a format we’ve never seen before: an anthology of introductions (and postscripts, plus some liner notes) written for other books. It’s an appropriately “meta” concept for the ever-playful Chabon, and surveying the range of intros here (for the Wes Anderson Collection, a book on superhero fashion, Ben Katchor’s graphic novel Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer, M.R. James’ ghost stories, and D’Aulaire’s Norse Myths, among other things) gives you a sense of Chabon’s kaleidoscopically varied sensibility and genre-busting enthusiasms.

Tentacle

Tentacle by Rita Indiana

Rita Indiana is something of a superstar in the Domican Republic, where she is beloved not only for her novels, but also as the bandleader of neo-merengue group Rita Indiana & Los Misterios and an outspoken advocate for queer issues. Her latest novel, Tentacle (which won the Grand Prize of the Association of Caribbean Writers in 2017), follows a young maid in post-apocalyptic Santa Domingo who finds herself in the middle of a Santeria prophecy that demands she travel back in time, save the oceans and humanity, and change her sex with the help of a sacred Anemone. It’s The Tempest as a telenovela!

Last Night in Nuuk

Last Night in Nuuk by Niviaq Korneliussen

Niviaq Korneliussen is a groundbreaking young writer from Greenland whose debut novel follows the lives of five young people in the capital city of Nuuk (population: 17,000). Queer, urbane, studded with stream-of-consciousnness textspeak, and delirious from nightlife, Last Night in Nuuk is a brave book that’s earned comparisons to Irvine Welsh’s Trainspotting and promises to put Greenlandic literature on the map.

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1900 to the Present

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1900 to the Present by David Treuer

Responding to and refuting the mythology of the “vanishing Indian” that has dominated the settler imagination and the writing of American history, David Treuer’s The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee aims at nothing less than a comprehensive retelling of Indigenous history. Blending history, memoir, and reportage, Treuer (an Ojibwe of Leech Lake, MN) documents how colonial violence has spawned new forms of survival and resistance in each era. A major work.

Reproduction

Reproduction by Ian Williams

Reproduction is the debut novel from award-winning Canadian poet (and UBC Creative Writing prof) Ian Williams. It’s a restless, unsentimental, formally inventive story about the often bizarre ways in which people become bonded. A teen girl from an island nation and the lazy heir of a wealthy German family come together over shared grief and simple proximity. Years later, their son forms an unconventional unit with the neighbours: a divorced father, his odd son, and nubile daughter. As the group is reshuffled by death, disease, violence, and desire, Williams illuminates how families are not always born out of blood or even love, at least not on the surface.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – January 10th, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Mouthful of Birds

Mouthful of Birds by Samanta Schweblin

From the author of Fever Dream, Argentina-born Berlin-based author Samanta Schweblin’s latest is one of the most anticipated early January releases here at Librairie D+Q. Mouthful of Birds is a short story collection that looks to be every bit as harrowing, strange, and kafkaesque as Schweblin’s aforementioned first novella.

McGlue

McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

A beautiful new edition of Moshfegh’s first novella, McGlue is out this week. The book takes place in Salem, Mass in 1851 and follows the story of the titular character, waking up from slumber, realizing that he may have killed his best friend.

Breathing: Chaos and Poetry

Breathing: Chaos and Poetry by Franco “Bifo” Berardi

The latest from Semiotext(e) has us salivating. Breathing is a treatise that expands upon Berardi’s earlier works about how poetry and finance intermingle, and explores creativity in relation to Occupy, BLM, and coding. Poetry as Semiotic Insolvency, Postfactual Truth and Ethical Choice, Ethics in Apocalyptic Times are some of the chapter names in this theoretical text. The green to purple fade on the cover is just stunning.

Cane

Cane by Jean Toomer

Zinzi Clemmons gives the introduction in this beautiful new edition of Jean Toomer’s Harlem Renaissance masterpiece, Cane. A tapestry of poetry, prose and play-like dialogue, Cane was originally published in 1923, and is an important portrait of African Americans residing in the north and south during the Jim Crow era.

A Perfect Failure- Fante Bukowski Three

A Perfect Failure- Fante Bukowski Three by Noah Van Sciver

The third and final book in Van Sciver’s story about self-styled wanna-be literary superstar Fante Bukowski. Van Sciver returns with beautifully drawn and coloured panels in this comic, which takes place the midwest and mocks literary pretension.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – December 16th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Insomnia

Insomnia by Marina Benjamin

This slim, beguiling memoir of sleeplessness from award-winning memoirist Marina Benjamin comes with ringing endorsements from leading lights of contemporary creative nonfiction like Deborah Levy and Olivia Laing. Told in short, restless paragraphs reminiscent of Maggie Nelson or Anne Carson, Insomnia elegantly anatomizes how wakefulness warps and deforms reality. Levy writes: “The brightest star in this erudite, nocturnal reverie in search of lost seep is the beauty of the writing itself.”

Seasonal Associate

Seasonal Associate by Heike Geissler

New from Semiotext(e), Seasonal Associate is the first literary account of corporate flextime employment, in which German author Heike Geissler takes a seasonal job at the Amazon Order Fulfillment center in Leipzig. Intended as a stopgap measure to supplement her meagre income as a freelance writer, Giessler’s sojourn soon becomes a descent into brutality and humiliation. Chronicling her unwitting internalization of the dynamics of precarious work, Seasonal Associate is an essential document of labour in the era of megacorporate domination.

How Long ‘til Black Future Month?

How Long ‘til Black Future Month? by N.K. Jemisin

N.K. Jemison is one of the foremost speculative fiction authors of our time — the first to win three consecutive Best Novel Hugo Awards — and this is her first short story collection, which includes Hugo-award-winning story “The City, Born Great” along with several previously unpublished stories. In these tales, monsters and spirits stalk New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a utopian alien society studies our mistakes, and a Black mother in the Jim Crow South works to save her daughter from a fairy’s dangerous promises.

Unclay

Unclay by T.F. Powys

Hailed as a forgotten genius, British writer T.F. Powys (1875-1953, brother of the somewhat better-known John Cowper Powys) is getting the reissue treatment from New Directions. In this mordant fable, Death arrives at a small village but, upon losing his official documents, is freed to enjoy a summer holiday in bucolic Dorsetshire. It’s a witty, metaphysical farce comparable to Swift, Twain, and Austen — high literature that’s also fine entertainment.

The Storm

The Storm by Tomás González

From consistently reliable Archipelago Books comes a darkly elemental novel from Colombian author Tomás González. Set in a Colombian seaside village, a father drags his two sons on a fishing trip despite a burgeoning storm, whose violence is matched by the boys’ bubbling contempt for their father’s delusions of grandeur. Alternately contemplative and monstrous, The Storm is a tale of gripping suspense, rippling with hidden depths.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – December 7th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Ritualities

The Ritualities by Michael Nardone

Michael Nardone is a local poet, scholar, and friend of the store, and The Ritualites is his literary debut, from Toronto’s Book*hug. It’s a book-length poem – the first in a series of planned works – on the sonic topography of North America. Incorporating aspects of Nardone’s academic research into poetics and sound cultures, the book was composed at sites all across the continent and shifts through forms and genres, documenting the poet’s listening amid our public exchanges, mediated ambiances, and itinerant intimacies. Our launch event is Tuesday, December 11th!

Fluorescent Mud

Fluorescent Mud by Eli Howey

Hand painted in watercolour and gouache, Toronto artist Eli Howey’s latest comic (via 2dcloud) is a disorienting, haunting work of art in an eerie nocturnal palette. Following a dissociative route through punk houses, riverside drinking spots, chainlink fences, cemeteries, and surreal dungeons, Howey captures turbulent mental states with atmospheric aplomb.

Fade into You

Fade into You by Nikki Darling

Fade Into You is the debut novel from Nikki Darling, a music correspondent for LA Weekly and the Los Angeles Times. A portrait of a young Mexican-American girl in the glorious wasteland of 1990s Los Angeles, Fade Into You is written like a punk zine, summoning both the battle-cry of riot-grrl rage and the hormonal haze and urgency of adolescence. As high school junior Nikki Darling alternates between cutting class and getting high, flirting with drugs, crushes, and counterculture to figure out how she fits into the world, she pushes herself to the edge only to find herself trapped in the cyclical violence of growing up female.

Bicycle / Race: Transportation, Culture & Resistance

Bicycle / Race: Transportation, Culture & Resistance by Adonia E. Lugo

Far more than a book about the politics of cycling, Bicycle/Race paints an unforgettable portrait of Los Angeles from a two-wheeled perspective. Adonia Lugo weaves the colonial history of Southern California through her own story of growing up Chicana in Orange County, becoming a bucycle anthropologist, and co-funding LA’s landmak open streets cycling event, CicLAvia. The book also recounts how Lugo finds her voice while taking on racism in the world of cycling advocacy in Washington, D.C. before heading back to LA to organize the movement for climate justice in transportation.

Parallel Lives

Parallel Lives by O. Schrauwen

Now out in English from Fantagraphics, Parallel Lives is a collection of six wild and weird short stories from Berlin-based Belgian artist Olivier Schrauwen, hailed by none other than Art Spiegelman as “extraordinary…He’s the most original cartoonist I’ve fallen onto since Chris Ware or Ben Katchor.” Each of these stories is a volume in Schrauwen’s “speculative memoir,” a sci-fi, surrealist recounting of his present and future lives (and progeny), in which he is variously abducted by extraterrestrials, able to dialogue with agents from the future, and receives coded messages in envelopes at breakfast. A truly strange and unique work, Parallel Lives is a veritable portal to another dimension.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – November 29th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Milkman

Milkman by Anna Burns

Winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize, Milkman is a gossip-filled, danger-sensing, enigmatic novel set in Northern Ireland. If the rest of the novel is anything like the first line, we’re in for something special – “The day Somebody McSomebody put a gun to my breast and called me a cat and threatened to shoot me was the same day the milkman died.” Hooked.

Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse

Joe Beef: Surviving the Apocalypse by Frédéric Morin, David McMillan and Meredith Erickson

Another solid cookbook from one of Montreal’s most well-regarded restaurants – no. 3 in Canada according to a nationwide best-of list, no big deal. Referred to as the “rogue princess of Canadian cuisine and hospitality” by the late Anthony Bourdain, the Joe Beef restaurants exemplify an unpretentious approach to food as shown in the over 150 recipes compiled here anticipating the coming world’s end.

A Matter of Taste

A Matter of Taste by Rebecca Tucker

The newest installment in Coach House Books’ Exploded Views series questions the concept of organic farming culture as the be-all end-all of sustainable food production. What do we mean when we say “good food” and how can we to go forward providing good food globally and affordably when we’ve exploited the traditional means?

Talking Back to the Indian Act

Talking Back to the Indian Act by Mary-Ellen Kelm and Keith D. Smith

This book takes a detailed look at the Indian Act – legislation that has profoundly shaped the Canadian government’s relationship with Indigenous peoples and communities. Offering readers tools to engage with the historical document in a thoughtful and critical way, the authors demonstrate a deeply informed close reading that makes the veiled, multi-layered text all the more accessible and comprehensible.

Granta

Granta

Leaving impressions of the ghostly and the spectral, the latest issue of Granta is an eerie punch-to-the-gut. It includes writings from Anne Carson, Sheila Heti, Amos Oz, Eugene Lim, Andre Aciman, Jana Prikryl, and more, ensuring that you’ll be in good hands from beginning to end.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – November 24th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Blame This on the Boogie

Blame This on the Boogie by Rina Ayuyang

Inspired by the artist’s love of musical theater and Hollywood films, this comic so accurately captures the infectious joys of collective song and dance. Following the coming of age of a young Filipino American girl, Ayuyang explores how the glittery charms of cinematic musicals can transform one’s reality therapeutically.

Evening in Paradise

Evening in Paradise by Lucia Berlin

Following up the massive success of A Manual for Cleaning Women, this new posthumous collection of short stories by Berlin is a MUST READ. Included are twenty two stories from the late great writer that brazenly highlight the gritty humour and ache of human experience.

Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism

Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism by Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

Stemming from the author’s ground-breaking undergraduate class, “Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism,” this book expands her rich research and observations outside academia towards a wider public. She argues that Lemonade is “most widely distributed black feminist text of the current moment,” while deftly weaving her own story into the analysis.

Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism

Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism by Kristen R. Ghodsee

Ghodsee offers a compelling case how for market forces affect sexuality. Deeply informed and spirited, this book is a deep dive argument for better sex through social and political reform.

Autobiography of Death

Autobiography of Death by Kim Hyesoon, translated by Don Mee Choi

Here is a collection of poems that charts the limbo period between death and reincarnation where a spirit lingers and roams. A poem for each of the 49 days. Hailed as Korea’s most important living poet, Hyesoon chronicles Korea’s contemporary violent history with strangeness and intimate precision.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 31st, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Beautiful Darkness

Beautiful Darkness by Fabien Vehlmann and Kerascoët

Newly released in paperback form, Vehlmann and Kerascoët’s frightening fairytale makes a triumphant return with the addition of new material, unpublished art, and preparatory sketches. The tale of newly homeless fairies who must learn to survive in the woods is as surreal and unsettling as ever, and guaranteed to enchant a whole new wave of devotees.

Well-Read Black Girl

Well-Read Black Girl by Glory Edim

In this beautiful, necessary anthology, Glory Edim (founder of the Well-Read Black Girl Book Club) has brought together essays by luminaries such as Jesmyn Ward, Jacqueline Woodson, Gabourey Sidibe, and Rebecca Walker, all in an effort to discuss the importance of literary representation. After all, everyone deserves to see themselves within the pages of a good book.

Useful Phrases for Immigrants

Useful Phrases for Immigrants by May-Lee Chai

Deemed a “writer to remember” by Kirkus Review, Chai is an author for a globalized world. Exploring China, the Chinese diaspora, and beyond, her characters are uniquely relatable as they navigate the solace of old lovers, the shock of family secrets, grudges, traditions, forgiveness, and long-buried skeletons.

On Haiku

On Haiku by Hiroaki Sato

Fresh from New Directions, fifty years of Sato’s thought, translations, and poetry are collected in On Haiku. A seminal text that explores the many facets of the form, whether classical, contemporary, or international, it is essential reading in poetry.

Paperback Crush

Paperback Crush by Gabrielle Moss

From babysitters to horseback riders, gymnasts to Sweet Valley twins, the totally radical history of ’80s and ’90s teen fiction is given its due in Moss’s shockingly comprehensive—and fun—exploration.

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other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)