Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 11th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Vagabond Valise

The Vagabond Valise by Siris

From the founding father of Quebec underground comics is the translation of his renowned French original comic, winner of Quebec’s Graphic Novel of the Year award in 2017. Taking place in post-war, working class Quebec, it follows the author during his erratic childhood, in and out of foster homes, trying to find his footing.

Treaty 6 Deixis

Treaty 6 Deixis by Christine Stewart

Written on Treaty 6 land, which encompasses most of Central Alberta and Saskatchewan, the poet writes through physical and symbolic questions about what it means to “be here” as a settler. This long poem — the author’s first book — investigates the author’s ethical obligations to the place and time in which they are situated, while demonstrating how language can re-situate place and experience.

Things to Make and Break

Things to Make and Break by May-Lan Tan

This debut collection of short stories from the dependable Coffee House Press introduces us to a new voice full of magical, quasi-cinematic darkness. Alexander Chee writes that May-Lan Tan has “an imagination like a haunted carousel and each story here is like a ghost that wants only to talk to you.”

Godsend

Godsend by John Wray

This provocative novel from Whiting award-winning author John Wray is inspired by the true story of John Walker Lindh, the “American Taliban.” In Wray’s novel, however, the protagonist is an eighteen-year-old girl who flees the claustrophobia of her American family home to study Islam in Pakistan, taking on the identity of a militant young man named Suleyman. Praised by authors such as Akhil Sharma and Hari Kunzru, Godsend is a coming-of-age novel like no other. (Jacket design by D&Q artist Adrian Tomine)

The Antifa Comic Book: 100 Years of Fascism and Antifa Movements

The Antifa Comic Book: 100 Years of Fascism and Antifa Movements by Gord Hill

From Indigenous writer, activist, and artist Gord Hill comes a comprehensive chronicle (in comic books form) of 20th- and 21st-century fascism and resistance movements against it around the world, from Nazi Germany and Mussolini’s Italy to Greece, Britain, the Ukraine, the USA, Canada, and beyond. With an introduction from Mark Bray (author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook), this is an engaging and accessible guide to the poisonous roots of fascism’s racist ideology and how to fight it today.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 4th, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Art Comic

Art Comic by Matthew Thurber

Art Comic places the art world under a harsh and hilarious microscope, skewering anything and everything at each turn. For the art lover or those exasperated by the art world, Art Comic has something for everyone and is populated with all your favourite artists and celebrities: Robert Rauschenberg, Francesca Woodman, Elton John, Bowie, and more!

The Best American Comics 2018

The Best American Comics 2018 edited by Phoebe Gloeckner

A treasure trove of the diverse and high-caliber comics published over the past year. This carefully chosen collection brings together works originally conceived as graphic novels, comics, periodicals, zines, and online works, and it shows how truly spectacular and genre-defying this art form is. Bonus: you’ll find the above mentioned Art Comic in these pages, testifying to its top-notch hilarity and quality.

The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2018

The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2018 edited by Sheila Heti

Flaunting gorgeous colorful cover art by comics artist Tommi Parrish, edited by the superb Sheila Heti, and chosen by fifteen Bay Area teens, this new collection of non-required reading is a doozy. It features an eclectic array of writing for every mood and season: stories, interviews, journalism, comics, tributes, and even Kara Walker’s incredible unforgettable artist statement.

Revenge of the Translator

Revenge of the Translator by Brice Matthieussent, trans. Emma Ramadan

Here is a thrilling meta novel originally written in French – a peek into the mind of an obsessive, and increasingly unstable translator. Written entirely of footnoted annotations, it’s about a French translator translating a fictional work back into its original language, attempting to justify his growing changes to the text.

The Flame: Poems & Selections from Notebooks

The Flame: Poems & Selections from Notebooks by Leonard Cohen

Collecting poems and entries from Cohen’s notebook in the final years of his life, this posthumous publication offers an intimate selection of writing from the late great artist. Asking dark questions and considering deep sorrows, offering musings and sly jokes, Cohen’s writing is always a pleasure.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 27, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Dementia 21

Dementia 21 by Shintaro Kago

Yukie, a young aide in a senior care home, quickly falls into a series of twisted events in Kago’s latest absurdist manga about growing old in a world gone wacky. It’s weird and spooky, rendered with surreal undertones of cross-generational conflict.

Flocks

Flocks by L Nichols

L Nichols has created a searing coming-of-age comic memoir about growing up queer in a small ultra-Christian household and community. Nichols has depicted the surrounding world in a visually realistic manner, while rendering himself as a soft button-eyed rag-doll, removing the easily recognizable and leading attributes that may have distracted readers from Nichols core honest story.

Split Tooth

Split Tooth by Tanya Tagaq

Nominated for the 2018 Giller Prize, internationally acclaimed Inuit throat singer Tanya Tagaq has published this novel about growing up in 1970s Nunavut. After 17 years of wordless expression with her work in music, the artist offers us this piercing story into the lives of girls and women living in northern and rural communities.

Your Duck is My Duck

Your Duck is My Duck by Deborah Eisenberg

From the much-acclaimed American author comes this unpredictable and fearless collection of short stories. New York Times book critic Parul Seghal calls the new book “cannily constructed, and so instantly absorbing that it feels like an abduction.”

The Deeper the Water the Uglier the Fish

The Deeper the Water the Uglier the Fish by Katya Apekina

From the experimental small press Two Dollar Radio is this story of two grieving and homesick sisters fiercely aching for their parents’ affection. The story is full of conversations and letters, bits and pieces, pulling together the story of different familial relationships built around trauma

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 20, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Pyongyang

Pyongyang by Guy Delisle

First published in French in 2003 and in English (by Drawn & Quarterly) in 2005, Pyongyang is one of Guy Delisle’s most iconic travelogue comics, taking the reader on an unprecedented and wryly humorous docu-graphic tour of closed-off North Korea, where photography is restricted and journalists are forbidden. More relevant than ever, Pyongyang has been freshly reissued with a brief introduction by Gore Verbinski, who had hoped to adapt the book for film before the project was shelved as too geopolitically volatile.

Theory

Theory by Dionne Brand

A former Poet Laureate of Toronto and recipient of the Order of Canada, Dionne Brand’s poetry, stories, novels, essays, and documentary films are among Canada’s foremost literary considerations of gender, race, sexuality and feminism. Theory is perhaps her most ambitious work to date, narrating the story of a grad student of unspecified gender, attempting to write a wildly ambitious thesis on the past, present, and future of art, culture, race, gender, class, and politics while being transformed by encounters with three successive lovers.

Maggie Terry

Maggie Terry by Sarah Schulman

American novelist, activist, playwright, nonfiction writer, screenwriter and AIDS historian Sarah Schulman has worn many hats over her long career. Most recently, her non-fiction book Conflict Is Not Abuse, which considers the ethics and politics of power relations on both interpersonal and group scales, has spurred much interest and discussion. Her new novel, Maggie Terry, may surprise some of her readers: it’s a police thriller influenced by her 19 years of teaching at CUNY Staten Island and her experience working with students who are police officers, or from NYPD families.

Obits

Obits by Tess Liem

Obits is the debut poetry collection (via Coach House Books) from breakout Montreal writer Tess Liem. In it, she attempts to write obituaries for those whose memorials are missing. She considers victims of mass deaths, fictional characters, and her own aunt, asking questions — from her perspective as a mixed-race queer woman — about how to remember, and who receives that privilege.

Shiner

The Latest Winter

Shiner and The Latest Winter by Maggie Nelson

Thanks to recent books like Bluets, The Art of Cruelty, and The Argonauts, Maggie Nelson has become an icon of contemporary creative non-fiction. But interest has also been mounting in her earlier books of poetry. Following close on the heels of this year’s new edition of Something Bright, Then Holes (originally published in 2003), Zed Books has re-published Nelson’s first two books, Shiner and The Latest Winter, which heralded the arrival of her virtuoso voice.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 13, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Woman World

Woman World by Aminder Dhaliwal

Behold, the feminist book of the year. Dhaliwal began writing the warmly cathartic Woman World as an Instagram comic in 2017 following the energizing Women’s March. Set in a futuristic world, a strange birth defect renders the planet void of men, destroying patriarchy in its process.

Berlin

Berlin by Jason Lutes

20 years in the making, this epic graphic novel tracks the rise of fascism during the Weimar Republic years in the titular city. Following journalists and artists, communists and fascists, the hopeful and the resigned, this beautifully-told story works as essential reading for those trying to understand the current high-stakes divisions overwhelming globalized nations – especially those impacted by migration.

Call Them by Their True Names

Call Them by Their True Names by Rebecca Solnit

In her new collection of essays, Solnit (the essential guide to our times) writes about the crises and injustices repeating themselves over and over again in North America – police shootings, ecological destruction, climate change, demagoguery, gentrification, to name a few. She argues that we are mis-naming these crises – we use words that disguise the true horror of what they mean for our world.

Crudo

Crudo by Olivia Laing

The author of the wildly popular The Lonely City, has come out with her first work of fiction and we are delighted! It’s an experimental novel following Kathy, a composite of the author and punk writer/provocateur Kathy Acker, as she witnesses the threat of nuclear war creep into reality.

Sprawl

Sprawl by Danielle Dutton

In this reissue by Wave Books, poet and fiction writer Danielle Dutton observes the suburban. She walks along sprawling suburbs and considers the eeriness of its normalcy, the stillness of its imagination, with wry graceful attention.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – August 3, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Incendiaries

The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

A brilliant exploration on the impact of extremism. Lin and Will are in love. Lin is diving deeper and deeper into a cult legacy, with a crossover into her family history. Will is driven further and further away from his family’s fundamentalism. Interweaving both perspectives into one love story, R.O. Kwon masterfully investigates what drives an individual to either side.

Fruit of the Drunken Tree

Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

Inspired by the author’s own life, and told through the alternating perspectives of seven-year-old Chula and her freshly hired young maid Petrona. Fruit of the Drunken Tree intersects the feminine challenges faced by both characters despite their generational divide—united in their gendered and lived experiences.

Black Klansman: A Memoir

Black Klansman: A Memoir by Ron Stallworth

Now a motion picture directed by Spike Lee, produced by Jordan Peele and starring John David Washington and Adam Driver. Detective Ron Stallworth investigates the presence of the Ku Klux Klan in his local community and enlists the help of his white-passing partner Chuck to to work as an undercover KKK member. Set in 1978, during the rise of the Ku Klux Klan in America, what develops is an all too timely (and true to life) tale.

The Story of a Marriage

The Story of a Marriage by Geir Gulliksen & Deborah Dawkin

Nominated for the Nordic prize, this compilation details with great intimacy and lyrical precision the ending of a marriage. Editor of the infamous Karl Ove Knausgaard, Geir Gulliksen writes of the grief processed by a man losing his wife to another man. In a deeply empathetic approach, our narrator poses questions, heavy with meaning, trying to trace back the dissolution of their marriage from her perspective.

Permanent Press

Permanent Press by Luke Healy

Store favourite and author of bestselling comic How to Survive in the North, Luke Healy returns with Permanent Press. Our narrator is severely depressed suffering from a case of “metaphoritis” and other non-existent diseases. From here, he sets out on a mission to create the best-selling and award-winning comic in order to win the respect of his peers.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 26, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

We’re Still Here: An All Trans Comics Anthology

We’re Still Here: An All Trans Comics Anthology edited by Tara Avery and Jeanne Thornton

Created by Tara Avery and Jeanne Thornton, this is the first anthology of comics entirely by and for transgender creators. It includes five different creators, with stories that vary from fiction to non-fiction. Ranging from an evening discussing the terrors of Donald Trump at a Japanese bar for trans men to a devotional essay about angels beyond gender or understanding—it marks a wonderful addition to the comics landscape.

Now My Heart is Full

Now My Heart is Full by Laura June

Readers will explore the ongoing lineage of motherhood in this collection of non-fiction. In facing the fresh birth of her child, Laura Jane reflects on her own relationship to her own mother—an absent alcoholic. In doing so, readers will meditate on the patterns bloodlines can both perpetuate and shatter.

Inappropriation

Inappropriation by Lexi Freiman

An innovative take on the coming-of-age genre, Inappropriation centers around a young female-identified reader, forced into a gang of radical feminists as a result of her school’s social hierarchy. With this as her tipping point, we follow her obsession with the seminal text: A Cyber Manifesto, wherein gender revelations unfold into a lively and satirical read.

Little Stranger

Little Stranger by Edie Fake

Catch the last edition of The Paris Review? Illustrator Edie Fake took to the cover. In Little Stranger, Fake asks “What’s silly, scary, and sexy?” This is the first time these rare comics have been made available in a physical collected edition like this—a reading experience to remember.

Ma Bole’s Second Life

Ma Bole’s Second Life by Xiao Hong

Xiao Hong was one of the most important Chinese novelists of the twentieth century. Ma Bole trails a “cowardly layabout” who escapes from his family life in order to escape an imminent Japanese invasion. Explore early twentieth century China from the lens of this comic narrator.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 12, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Shit Is Real

Shit Is Real by Aisha Franz

In this new graphic novel from the German artist, we follows heartbroken Selma in a futurist unnamed city. She’s sad, she’s lost, and she’s having nightmares about being lost in a desert, all until she peers into her glamourous neighbour’s apartment. She sneaks in, lives there while her neighbour is away, and begins to live more glamorously, carelessly, and, at last, freely.

My Year of Rest and Relaxation

My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh

New Moshfegh means a new darkly funny tale of alienation and existential ennui. Here, back in the year 2000, our narrator is a young, financial supported, educated woman who rejects expectations of her and notions of how to make a life.

Confessions of the Fox

Confessions of the Fox by Jordy Rosenberg

There have been rave reviews pouring out for this novel about eighteenth century pickpocket and jailbreaker Jack Sheppard. It’s both historical, based on a true person, and theatrically speculative and political, imagining Sheppard as a trans man.

The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars

The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars by Paul Broks

For the science curious, a deeply reflective book about life and death and consciousness from a longtime neuropsychologist. Following the death of his wife and taking insights from his work as a clinician, Broks tries to unravel eternal questions on the mind and makings of selfhood.

Kinfolk

Kinfolk vol. 28

New Kinfolk means glossy photographs of beautiful people, macro close-ups of hair, an interview with hip Canadian politicians, and writing on matchmaking.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 27, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

A Bubble

A Bubble by Geneviève Castrée

This beautiful and heartbreaking board book was crafted near the end of the artist’s life. It was intended as a gift for her two-year-old daughter before she passed away in 2016 from pancreatic cancer. Her illness takes on the form of a bubble in the child’s eyes. The bubble is both isolating and protective, enveloping and distancing for both during a confusing time.

Flâneuse

Flâneuse by Lauren Elkin

Rejecting Baudelaire’s flâneur, Elkin proposes the flâneuse in her broad cultural study. A flâneuse is a wandering, attentive, light-footed city woman who idles and drifts against the current.

Sludge Utopia

Sludge Utopia by Catherine Fatima

Told with great intimary, Fatima’s novel is a about desire under capitalism, ethics, love, depression, etc. Reminiscent of Sheila Heti’s narrators, the narrator of Sludge Utopia is reflective, revealing, and deeply curious on having and wanting.

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassination

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassination by Terrance Hayes

In a pressing collection of seventy poems bearing the same title, Hayes elicits the weight of America’s past while enduring Trump’s present. He is deftly observant, sober, and tender in his varied musical sonnet formations.

Gumballs

Gumballs by Erin Nations

This collection offers an array of candy-colored, crisply drawn short comics about Erin Nations’ gender transitioning, toils in customer service, and search for connection and love. Refreshingly honest and silly in equal measures.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – June 21, 2018

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Convenience Store Woman

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

A thirty-six-year-old woman in Tokyo lives alone and works at a convenience store. She is totally content and at peace with her life and this confuses everyone around her. Comical, cute, and haunting.

Ayiti

Ayiti by Roxane Gay

Ayiti was Roxane Gay’s debut collection of stories, the book that launched her career as a fearless writer and essayist. Now reissued with two previously uncollected stories, these wise, fanciful, and daring stories of the Haitian diaspora confirm Gay’s singular vision and brilliance as a prose stylist.

Room to Dream

Room to Dream by David Lynch

In this unique hybrid of biography and memoir, David Lynch’s lyrical and unfiltered personal reflections riff off biographical sections written by close collaborator Kristine McKenna, based on more than one hundred new (and surprisingly canddid) interviews with intimates and colleagues of one of our most enigmatic and utterly original living artists.

Something Bright, Then Holes

Something Bright, Then Holes by Maggie Nelson

This re-issue of Nelson’s 2007 collection of poems shows the celebrated author in her most incisive and economic form — a record of a protean talent in the making. Whether writing from the debris-strewn shores of a polluted canal or from the hospital room of a friend, Nelson charts each emotional landscape she encounters with unparalleled precision and empathy.

Apartamento #21

Apartamento #21

New Apartamento! Everybody’s favourite magazine on unconventional domestic spaces. In this issue, you will find interviews with painter Henry Taylor, gay icon Peter Berlin, Italian designer Lapo Binazzi, photographer Lina Scheynius, and much much more.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)