Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – October 10, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Hard Tomorrow

The Hard Tomorrow by Eleanor Davis

Eleanor Davis has done it again! The latest graphic novel from the creator of Why Art? and You and a Bike and a Road follows Hannah, a social justice activist living with her partner in a truck as the latter builds their new house. Set in the undefined near-future, the couple are trying to get pregnant while grappling with the implications of child-bearing amidst such a tumultuous present, and facing such an uncertain future. This work is so full of humanity and daring and wisdom from one of the most fiercely talented artists in contemporary comics.

Grand Union

Grand Union by Zadie Smith

The Zadie Smith is back with an enormously rich collection of stories. Weaving eleven previously unpublished pieces with a wealth of her best-loved stories from The New Yorker and elsewhere, Smith’s is an ever-prescient and indispensable voice.

I Hope We Choose Love: A Trans Girl's Notes from the End of the World

I Hope We Choose Love: A Trans Girl’s Notes from the End of the World by Kai Cheng Thom

From discussing mental health and Robin Williams to confronting the complications of consent, Kai Cheng Thom’s I Hope We Choose Love is as urgent a collection of essays as any that has been published this year. This is brave and bright writing that gets to the very molten core of what it means to care for oneself and others in 2019. Another essential book from an incredibly versatile writer who’s already given us a novel, a children’s book, and a poetry collection.

Dakwäkãda Warriors

Dakwäkãda Warriors by Cole Pauls

Dakwäkãda Warriors, by Tahltan comic artist, illustrator and printmaker Cole Pauls, is a graphic novel told bilingually in Tahltan and English that offers an accessible and illuminating allegory of colonialism for young adult readers. Pauls’ dynamic duotone panels follow two earth protectors who defend the world from evil pioneers and cyborg sasquatches.

Love and I

Love and I by Fanny Howe

Poet-laureate of sweet bewilderment Fanny Howe is back with the latest installment in an illustrious career. The American author has published over thirty books, and Love and I is yet another glimmering collection full of inquisitiveness, wisdom, and “pure seeing”.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 30, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The River At Night

The River At Night by Kevin Huizenga

In this major new work for D&Q, long in the making, Kevin Huizenga brings back his everyman character, Glenn Ganges, for a surreal, philosophical comic that starts as a creative slacker’s caffeine-fuelled nighttime reverie and becomes an existential disquisition on life, the universe, and everything. This rich and complex graphic novel, with its clear-line style (obviously indebted to both Chris Ware and Hergé), will charm and beguile readers with its interwoven depictions of whimsical mental landscapes and everyday life in banal suburbia.

Rusty Brown

Rusty Brown by Chris Ware

Speaking of Chris Ware, the master is back! Sixteen years in the making, Rusty Brown is part one of an ongoing masterwork from the esteemed author of Jimmy Corrigan: the Smartest Boy On Earth and Building Stories. Like The River at Night, Ware’s Rusty Brown catalogues life’s biggest themes and smallest moments at the same time, with the meticulously detailed diagrammatic style that is his trademark. Rusty Brown is a “museum quality” graphic novel that aims to capture the whole of existence in the entangled stories of a child, a teen, a father and a late-middle-aged woman, all searching for love and acceptance in strange circumstances.

Make It Scream, Make It Burn

Make It Scream, Make It Burn by Leslie Jamison

After establishing herself as one of America’s premier memoirists and essayists with books like The Empathy Exams and The Recovering, Jamison (who now directs the graduate nonfiction program at Columbia University) has returned with fourteen new essays that plumb the depths of longing and the annals of obsession. Her subjects include 52 Blue, the “loneliest whale in the world”; the citizens of Second Life; the museum of broken relationships; and the eerie past-life memories of children. A virtuoso collection!

The Water Dancer: A Novel

The Water Dancer: A Novel by Ta-Nehisi Coates

After a series of essential nonfiction works (Between the World and Me, We were Eight Years in Power) and a prolific career as a revered journalist and cultural critic, Ta-Nehisi Coates has written his debut novel. It’s the story of Hiram Walker, a boy born into slavery but possessed of a strange power; as he flees his past, he is drawn into an underground war between slavers and the enslaved, all the while trying to rescue the family he’s left behind. A propulsive, transcendent novel in incantatory prose, redolent of Toni Morrison.

How to Cure a Ghost

How to Cure a Ghost by Fariha Róisín

Brooklyn-based Australian-Canadian writer (and former Montrealer) Fariha Róisín ia a queer muslim femme whose poetry navigates the joys and struggles of her intersectionality. In this debut collection (published simultaneously with Being in Your Body: a Journal for Self-love and Body Positivity), she writes fearlessly about the pain and strength required to attain self-acceptance. Tommy Pico calls her work “personal, national, global, contemporary, and historical.” A writer to watch!

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 18, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Drawing Power

Drawing Power edited by Diane Noomin

A massive undertaking that collects dozens of comics dealing with women’s stories of sexual violence and harassment, Drawing Power brings together the work of big names and store favourites like PowerPaola, Ebony Flowers, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, MariNaomi, Liana Finck, Emil Ferris, and many, many more. The stories, illustration styles, and artists may all be different, but there is a resilience and desire for survival that undeniably unites every voice in this fantastic collection.

Rat Time

Rat Time by Keiler Roberts

Next up after Roberts’s beautiful Sunburning and Chlorine Gardens comes Rat Time, the newest addition to her annual diary comics. This time, Roberts focuses her keen eye and sharp wit on the rats she buys for her daughter, as much a distraction from her own recent MS diagnosis as an addition to the family. Finding, as always, the beauty and the jokes in the small moments, Roberts doesn’t disappoint with another collection full of warmth, wisdom, and wicked humour.

Empire of Wild

Empire of Wild by Cherie Dimaline

A hungover morning in a small Ontarian town is turned upside down for the heartbroken Joan, who suddenly recognizes in the charismatic preacher Reverend Eugene Wolff her lost husband Victor. Inspired by the Métis Rogarou fable, Dimaline follows up her wildly successful YA novel The Marrow Thieves with an eerie, propulsive tale of recaptured love.

On Fire

On Fire by Naomi Klein

Between This Changes Everything and No is Not Enough, Klein has an instinct for seizing hold of our world’s most pressing issues and refusing to let go. In this newest offering she turns to the Green New Deal and the need for a practical framework that allows for a politically viable, just, and sustainable path forward. With her signature clear, incisive and uncompromising style, everything Klein writes becomes necessary reading.

Coventry

Coventry by Rachel Cusk

Though it’s for her fiction that Cusk has become a household name, the arrival of her newest essay collection establishes her as a multifaceted talent, a writer dedicated to bringing out the fearless intricacies of topics as wide-ranging as motherhood, art, and D.H. Lawrence. With powerful insight, Cusk has put together an assemblage of writing that Harper’s Magazine is calling an “object lesson in rigor, elegance, and fury.”

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 14, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Unfurl

Unfurl by Klara du Plessis

In this beautifully bound essay collection from Gaspereau Press, Du Plessis professes gratitude “for a poetic climate of curiosity, resilience, and endless potential,” specifically in the work of Erin Mouré, Dionne Brand, Lisa Robertson, and Anne Carson. While she celebrates the triumphs of these writers, du Plessis also explores the failure of language itself with poise and lucidity. She starts her analysis with this clear signal: “definitions have always been a way of corseting language.”

Creation

Creation by Sylvia Nickerson

Sylvia Nickerson’s debut from D+Q is a beautifully drawn comic about gentrification, motherhood, and creativity. We witness gut-wrenching scenes about the corrosive effects of real estate speculation and displacement, as well as themes of alienation and community building in urban environments. Nickerson’s gorgeous drawings of expansive cityscapes are replete with the very hope and melancholy through which we experience our cities. Wide-ranging themes including decay, empathy, parenting, the value of creativity, and the effects artists can have on gentrification are explored with tenderness and honesty.

A Fortune for Your Disaster

A Fortune for Your Disaster by Hanif Abdurraqib

Loss and transformation are two overarching themes in this highly anticipated poetry collection from Hanif Abdurraqib. Over the last half decade, Abdurraqib has produced the widely celebrated non-fiction texts—They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us and Go Ahead in the Rain—and we’re elated to have this new poetry collection in stock, the follow up to 2016’s The Crown Ain’t Worth Much.

Whose Story is This?

Whose Story is This? by Rebecca Solnit

The latest from Rebecca Solnit chronicles how distinct narratives are being told from different perspectives in society. Solnit tackles subtle and overt forms of racism, systemic oppression, and subjugation with nuance and grace. Her examination of the macro and micro along with an indictment of societal frameworks is refreshing. As we’ve come to expect from Solnit, these essays are expertly crafted and speak to essential currents of our politics.

Press Enter to Continue

Press Enter to Continue by Ana Galvañ

August’s celebration of Women in Translation has strutted into September’s National Translation Month. We celebrate Ana Galvan’s Press Enter To Continue with both of these notions in mind. The comic is a visually stunning kaleidoscope of bright colours. The work has aesthetic and narrative parallels with Jesse Jacob. Both works even feature a character crawling through a washing-machine-sized portal to an alternate universe. The figure drawing is evocative of Eleanor Davis. Love the futuristic themes and the experimental nature of this comic.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – September 5, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Are You Listening?

Are You Listening? by Tillie Walden

Tillie Walden’s latest graphic novel brings back her signature super-saturated colour schemes and sprawling landscapes, but with a darkness we haven’t seen before. This touching intergenerational road trip story explores trust and trauma, with a little help from a magic cat.

Quichotte

Quichotte by Salman Rushdie

When you’ve been a literary superstar as long as Rushdie, what’s left for you to write? Don Quixote, of course. In this Booker-shortlisted new novel, Rushdie demonstrates that his ability to keep a finger on the pulse of contemporary life has kept pace with his evergreen reputation.

The Tenderness of Stones

The Tenderness of Stones by Marion Fayolle

In this new book, Fayolle takes the fragmentation that comes with family illness literally, and then some. The characters’ father becomes a larger-than-life presence in their lives, leaving a trail of useless body parts that the whole family must come together to take care of.

Like

Like by A.E. Stallings

Stallings’ latest collection is crowded with both familiar things and things so ubiquitous that mentioning them is unfamiliar. Nowhere is this more clear than in the poem for which the collection is named, a sestina in which we witness “like” as it transforms into both subject and object.

Cantoras

Cantoras by Carolina de Robertis

Set in Uruguay in the ’70s and ’80s, this new novel offers a new take on queer love. Five women make a home for themselves in a coastal retreat amidst a turbulent and hostile political landscape.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – August 22, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Bad Gateway

Bad Gateway by Simon Hanselmann

The latest installment of Hanselmann’s ongoing Megg, Mog, and Owl series is one of the most anticipated graphic novel releases of the year! As grim as things have gotten for our lovable slacker-stoner anti-heroes, they’re about to get grimmer: Owl’s moved out, Werewolf Jones has moved in, and years of heavy drug use are taking a brutal psychological toll on Meg, who must turn to her past to find the root of her self-destructive habits.

Snow, Glass, Apples

Snow, Glass, Apples by Neil Gaiman and Colleen Doran

The inimitable Neil Gaiman’s latest voyage into the fantastic is this chilling, not-for-children retelling of Snow White, illustrated by Colleen Doran (who also worked with Gaiman on Troll Bridge). With his usual sense of darkness and sensuality, Gaiman twists the classic fairy tale: what if Snow White, rather than the stepmother, was the villain? Doran’s art borrows from the art-nouveau tradition of Aubrey Beardsley to steep this tale in an atmosphere of Gothic horror.

Human Relations & Other Difficulties

Human Relations & Other Difficulties by Mary-Kay Wilmers

Mary-Kay Wilmers is the co-founder of the London Review of Books and has been its editor since 1992 — before that, she worked at Faber, making for a fifty-year career in literature in which her exactingly observant eye has groomed the words of others. In this collection of essays, published between 1972 and 2015, Wilmers trains that same clear-eyed scrutiny on topics ranging from Jean Rhys and Joan Didion to mistresses, motherhood, and menopause. Throughout, Wilmers exercises a keen attention to relations between the genders, delivering hard-earned insights into the work of being a woman.

Socialist Realism

Socialist Realism by Trisha Low

In this seamless hybrid of memoir and cultural criticism, poet Trisha Low describes how she has pursued both a passion for radical politics and a sense of belonging. Low grapples with her beliefs and life decisions in a non-chronological narrative that follows her westward trajectory: leaving Singapore for college in Philadelphia, followed by grad school in New York City, and then heading on to California. If you enjoyed Amy Fung’s equally excellent Before I Was a Critic I Was a Human Being, Low is making similar cross-genre moves with a focus on American (rather than Canadian) sites.

The World Doesn’t Require You

The World Doesn’t Require You by Rion Amilcar Scott

This dazzling debut book of linked short stories, Rion Amilcar Scott invents the mythical town of Cross River, Maryland, established by the leaders of America’s only successful slave revolt in the early nineteenth century. Among its residents are David Sherman, a struggling musician who just happens to be God’s last son; Tyrone, a ruthless PhD candidate, whose dissertation about a childhood game ignites mayhem in the neighboring, once-segregated town of Port Yooga; and Jim, an all-too-obedient robot. Wild, darkly comic, and surreal, Scott’s universe is among the most memorable products of the recent rennaissance of African-American literature.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – August 15, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

King of King Court

King of King Court by Travis Dandro

King of King Court is a detailed and moving graphic memoir. The book tells the story of Travis Dandro’s life as it intersected with his biological father, Dad Dave, in early childhood and then again as a young teen. Dandro’s art is both bold and tender. The book teems with innovative paneling and intricate textures. The text frequently gives way to expansive images that flicker and intensify just like old memories. The many wordless scenes allow the narrative to wander seamlessly amongst dreams, flashbacks, and traumatic incidents.

While the subject matter of the book is quite heavy, with several scenes portraying suicide, addiction, and familial violence, Dandro traverses these subjects with compassion and complexity. It’s particularly impressive how Dandro is able to balance honouring the intensity of teenage emotions with regard for the struggles of the adults in his life who inflicted harm despite their best intentions. An insightful memoir bound to linger with readers.

How To Be An Antiracist

How To Be An Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

National Book Award winner Ibram X. Kendi is back with How To Be An Antiracist, a book that identifies, describes, and looks to dismantle racism. Kendi explores basic concepts and large ideas and looks at the history and persuasive nature of all forms of racism. Kendi includes his personal story as well as historic events and legal, scientific concepts in this comprehensive exploration of how to combat racism.

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk, trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones

Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead is the most recent book from Olga Tokarczuk, winner of the Man Booker International prize in 2018 for Flights, and one of Poland’s most important contemporary writers. This book follows the chronically ill Janina Duszejko during a winter in Poland in which a number of people have been murdered. This philosophical book explores questions of free will, hierarchy, and social rules. It is also a dark comedy, a noir mystery, and tribute of sorts to William Blake. Fitting that this book—translated from the Polish— is published during Women in Translation Month.

The Memory Police

The Memory Police by Yoko Ogawa trans. Stephen Snyder

The protagonist of The Memory Police lives on an island where items keep disappearing while the population does not seem to notice. Thought Police run the society, and as items such as birds and roses are destroyed, all associations with these items die also. As a writer, the main character learns her editor faces the threat of disappearance and attempts to save both her editor and her writing. A dystopian, orwellian thriller from this celebrated author, the recipient of every major Japanese literary prize. This book would be a(nother) great pick as a Women in Translation Month book!

The Remainder

The Remainder by Alia Trabbucco Zerán, trans. Sophie Hughes

Both a road trip and a countdown, Zerán’s first novel in English tells the story of three friends who find themselves travelling together in search of a missing body. The novel, set in the wake of Pinochet’s dictatorship, is fast-paced and gripping. One of the standout features of this book is Zerán’s use of the parenthetical, with both chapters and interludes appearing within parentheses. Shortlisted for the 2019 Man Booker International Prize, and an excellent Women In Translation Month read.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – August 6, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-delusion

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-delusion by Jia Tolentino

This debut collection of original essays by beloved cultural critic and New Yorker staff writer Jia Tolentino is one of this year’s most hotly-anticipated nonfiction titles. Hailed as the millennial Susan Sontag or internet-age Joan Didion, Tolentino has written a book about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly through a culture that revolves around the self. She considers (among other things) the rise of the nightmare social internet; the advent of scamming as the definitive millennial ethos; and the punitive dream of optimization, which insists that everything, including our bodies, should become more efficient and beautiful until we die. Gleaming with Tolentino’s sense of humor and capacity to elucidate the impossibly complex in an instant, Trick Mirror is an instant classic of the worst decade yet.

Laguardia

Laguardia by Nnedi Okorafor

Laguardia is the debut original comic from Hugo and Nebula award- winning author and the writer of Marvel’s Shuri, Nnedi Okorafor! In an alternate world where aliens have integrated with society, pregnant Nigerian-American doctor Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka has just smuggled an illegal alien plant named Letme Live through LaGuardia International and Interstellar Airport…and that’s not the only thing she’s hiding. She and Letme become part of a community of human and alien immigrants; but as their crusade for equality continues and the birth of her child nears, Future–and her entire world–begins to change.

Berta Isla

Berta Isla by Javier Marias

The latest novel from prolific, award-winning Spanish master Javier Marias is a gripping story of intrigue and missed chances–at once a spy story, murder mystery, cerebral caper, and a profound examination of a marriage founded on secrets and lies. When Berta Isla was a schoolgirl, she decided she would marry Tomás Nevinson–the dashing half-Spanish, half-English boy in her class with an extraordinary gift for languages. But when Tomás returns to Madrid from his studies at Oxford, he is a changed man. Unbeknownst to her, he has been approached by an agent from the British intelligence services, and he has unwittingly set in motion events that will derail forever the life they had planned.

Jacob’s Ladder

Jacob’s Ladder by Ludmila Ulitskaya

Jacob’s Ladder is a family saga spanning a century of recent Russian history from one of Russia’s most renowned literary figures (and Man Booker International Prize nominee) Ludmila Ulitskaya. Perhaps her final novel, it represents the summation of the author’s career, devoted to sharing the absurd and tragic tales of twentieth-century life in her nation. With a scale worthy of Tolstoy, Ulitskaya’s story spans from the seeming promise of the prerevolutionary years to the dark Stalinist era, to the corruption and confusion of the present day in a pageant of romance, betrayal, and memory.

Valerie

Valerie by Sara Stridsberg

Originally published in Sweden in 2006 (and now longlisted for the 2019 Man Booker International Prize), Valerie is a strangely funny, entirely unconventional novel that conjures the life, mind, and art of Valerie Solanas—the writer, radical feminist, author of the SCUM Manifesto and would-be assassin of Andy Warhol. A leading feminist in Sweden and one of the most acclaimed writers in Scandinavia, Sara Stridsberg here blurs the boundaries between history and fiction, self-making and storytelling, madness and art, reconstructing this most intriguing and enigmatic of women.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 17, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

The Nickel Boys

The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

Among the most anticipated novels of the year, Colson Whitehead’s follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning The Underground Railroad is a seismic event. Following two boys with conflicting ideals as they are plunged into a hellish reform school, The Nickel Boys is a masterful dramatization of the vast injustices in Jim Crow-era Florida, and more widely across this dark period of American history.

Accommodations

Accommodations by Wioletta Greg

Primarily writing as a poet, Wioletta Greg brings a bite and a polish to each sentence of her latest novel. Swallowing Mercury, her debut novel, followed her experience growing up in Communist Poland, and was met with wide acclaim. Accomodations picks up the lead with a young woman’s move from a small agricultural community to a nearby city, where she bounces between a hostel and a nuns’ convent. This puzzling and delightful book was translated from the Polish by Jennifer Croft.

Knitting the Fog

Knitting the Fog by Claudia D. Hernández

Claudia Hernandez brings the reader into the tumult of her upbringing with this striking memoir. At seven-years-old she had found herself suddenly without her mother, who fled domestic abuse in Guatemala for the pursuit of economic prosperity in the United States. Told in interlocking passages of prose and poetry, Knitting the Fog is a complex and moving account of the immigrant experience and the threads that connect mother and daughter.

Circus

Circus by Wayne Koestenbaum

Praised by the likes of John Waters and Maggie Nelson, one remark about Circus that stands out is from John Ashbery: “If Debussy and Robert Walser had collaborated on an opera, it would sound like this.” Polysexual pianist Theo Mangrove is obsessed with the idea that he must be accompanied by circus star Moira Orfei for his comeback performance. This new edition of a dazzling novel by renowned poet and critic Wayne Koestenbaum includes an introduction by Rachel Kushner.

Aug 9—Fog

Aug 9—Fog by Kathryn Scanlan

Having found an elderly stranger’s diary at an estate auction, Kathryn Scanlan took to its contents in the tradition of erasure poetry. She cut and arranged and rearranged the entries to reveal what is extraordinary in the ordinary, what is remarkable in the humdrum. Mary Ruefle says of Aug 9—Fog: “the ordinary diaries of ordinary people will reassure you that yours is no different than anyone else’s—friends die, flowers come fast.”

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
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Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week – July 10, 2019

This post was originally published on this site

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal’s premiere independent bookstores.

So Real It Hurts

So Real It Hurts by Lydia Lunch

This new collection of transgressive punk fiction and essays from legendary no-wave music/film/art/writing luminary Lydia Lunch includes rants, recollections, and stories that date from the late 90s to the present. Lunch celebrates her own exploits without apology, indulges in visceral revenge fantasies against misogynistic men, and offers unromanticized histories of her no-wave years along with scathing reflections on the commodification of counterculture. Introduction by the late Anthony Bourdain!

Notes from the Fog

Notes from the Fog by Ben Marcus

This latest collection of stories by Ben Marcus is now out in paperback! From his 1995 debut, The Age of Wire and String, to his epic 2012 novel, The Flame Alphabet, Marcus has been a torchbearer for unsettling visions of alienated contemporary life. These stories include a hapless corporate drone finding love after being disfigured by tests for a new nutrition supplement; two architects in a failing marriage pondering the ethics of artificially inciting emotion as they construct a memorial to a terrorist attack; and a father beginning to worry that his precocious son may be hiding something sinister.

The Need

The Need by Helen Phillips

Writing at the intersection of speculative fiction and psychological realism, Helen Phillips has been compared to Borges, Calvino, and Saramago. Her debut novel, The Beautiful Bureaucrat, won numerous accolades for its existential surrealism. Her new novel, The Need, is both a taut thriller, a meditation on the nature of reality, and a primal investigation of motherhood.

The End We Start From

The End We Start From by Megan Hunter

This debut novel from White Review and TLS contributor Megan Hunter — already a breakaway bestselling hit in the UK — is an ambitious climate-fiction dystopia. As floodwaters threaten to consume London, a woman must take her newborn son on the road to safety. Comparing The End We Start From to Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, one critic wrote that this book “feels like the other half of the story.”

The Jungle

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, adapted and illustrated by Kristina Gehrmann

This new graphic adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s classic protest novel brings to life the harsh conditions and exploited lives of immigrants in the United States in Chicago and similar industrialized cities at the turn of the century. The novel’s original publication spurred real social change, prompting the passage of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act in the USA. Today, Gehrmann’s adaptation resonates with a revived interest in union activism and labour rights.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly’s blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)