NMF Roundup: Headhunterz returns to hardstyle, Marshmello links up with Logic, and Ookay drops off bouncy new single

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The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.


Chopped vocal samples and hip hop-inflected rhythmic additions make for an eccentric sound on Hanz‘s “Clutched.”

Progressive mastery is alive and well on “Keep My Light On,” a single that sees DubVision and Raiden team up for a release on Martin Garrix‘s imprint, STMPD Records.

Headhunterz makes his return to hardstyle production via a massive new LP, The Return of Headhunterz.  

Anjunabeats entity, Jason Ross puts forth his first single of 2018, “Through It All,” an uplifting number that harmoniously balances Fiora‘s soaring vocal with the song’s ascending synths.

Black Tiger Sex Machine make a statement on New Worlds, an album that sees the Canadian trio wield trap, bass, and electro production elements.

Dance music’s saccharine sweetheart Marshmello links up with Logic for “Everyday,” a single that epitomizes the carefree vibe characteristic of Friday.

Gareth Emery and Ashley Wallbridge jointly take on Signum and Scott Mac‘s “Coming on Strong.”

Paris Blohm and Myah Marie prove to be a collaborative dream on “Body High.”

Element constructs the quintessential filthy drop on his hard-hitting new release, “Needles.”

A soothing guitar melody complements Nevve‘s fluid vocal contribution on Boombox Cartel‘s latest, “Whisper.”

Ookay channels the bouncy synth work that has come to be characteristic of a Marshmello production on his whimsical new offering, “Loved or Lost.”

QUIX and JVMIE’s “I’ll Give You The World” is an expert example of lush future bass production.

Reminiscent of Foster the People and Portugal. The Man, the vocals in Lemaitre‘s “Machine” create an indie-infused groove.

Tisoki takes on Oliverse‘s “Leave Them Behind,” flipping the track into a smooth-gliding dubstep rendition.

KDrew and KVNNIBVL bring the weekend vibes with a smattering of falsetto-like vocals and a lighthearted, bobbing beat in “Body of Gold.”

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 18

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA music editor and staff writer Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.


We’re kicking things off this week with a chilled-out track from Gill Chang and Rahn Harper. “By Your Side” features a catchy, simple trumpet melody that serves as a perfect backdrop for Harper’s emotive vocals. With a noninvasive trap beat in the background, they’ve crafted a beautifully mellow journey that will fit in perfectly with any “chill out” type playlist.


I first heard Icehunt‘s music when he released the wonderfully glitchy “Paint the Sky” a few months ago. His next release following that is a melodic masterpiece: a remix of KDrew‘s “Back To You.” Upon first listen, it flows along smoothly with vibrant synths and playful vocal chops. About halfway through, Icehunt changes gears completely and flips his remix into a fast-paced drum & bass revival, giving it an extra touch of ferocity that sets it apart from other remixes of the track.


In those first few bars, the nostalgia hits like a brick wall. It’s been more than a decade, but Eric Prydz‘s iconic 2004 “Call On Me” is a classic that still gets nightclubs full of people shouting those three words at the top of their lungs (I know this because I’m one of them). “Call On Me” is one of the first dance music tracks I remember listening to on repeat, never tiring of its simple vocals and timeless house beat. When I saw Crystalize had remixed it just a few days ago, I braced myself. He’s been gutsy enough to remix some truly iconic tracks and has done them all justice — this one included. He’s put a bass-heavy, future bass-like spin on the track and even incorporated some saxophone riffs. It’s just plain awesome.


Grandtheft and vocalist MAX are the perfect combination. With the incorporation of a variety of genres, “Square One” effortlessly appeals to listeners of all realms of dance music. Heavy bass and a trap beat in the chorus flow seamlessly into vocal-centered verses from MAX, bridging gaps between pop, future bass and even R&B. It’s been stuck in my head since its release on Dec. 5, and I find something new I like about it with each listen.


Xan Griffin continues his stellar zodiac series with his latest, “Sagittarius,” featuring the vocals of Alexa Lusader. Lusader’s serene voice lends itself impeccably to the ethereal soundscape of the track, making it one of the best in the series. Xan Griffin is a master at building dramatic, cinematic journeys with his music, and “Sagittarius” just demonstrates he’s been able to fine-tune his sound even more as this series has progressed.


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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 1

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA music editor and staff writer Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.


I’ll start Volume 1 with a confession: I didn’t know the original version of this song when I heard this edit. Laszlo, an 18-year-old up-and-comer from The Netherlands, has continuously impressed with releases both on Monstercat and independently. He usually produces epic electro house tracks, so this smooth, sexy Post Malone rework was a bit unexpected. Lazslo toys with the vocals layered over slick synths and a melody that glides the listener effortlessly through the track. It’s completely refreshing, and I haven’t been able to stop listening to it since it came out on June 27.

(Note: I did finally go out and listen to the original. I much prefer Laszlo’s version).


Gareth Emery and Christina Novelli‘s “Concrete Angel‘ is an iconic example of the emotional beauty that permeates trance music. Celebrating the song’s 5-year anniversary, Emery released a set of remixes to “Concrete Angel” and among them was this perfect trance rework of the original track, masterfully done by ReOrder. It packs a harder punch than the original, but still maintains the initial integrity of the track. ReOrder’s trance beats are slightly more aggressive than Emery’s, but his builds are beautiful and soulful.


Drum & bass has a special place in my heart. Since Pendulum established my love of electronic music in 2010, I’ve always gone back to the genre-well in search of tracks that give me the same euphoric feeling songs like “Witchcraft” and “Watercolour” did when I heard them for the first time. When I first heard T & Sugah’s “Cast Away” three years ago, I got that same feeling. After following the Dutch duo’s music and loving everything they released, seeing a new track of theirs pop up was a thrill. “Sleepless” showcases the duo’s mastery of drum & bass with a swift beat that intensifies MVE’s vocals in the best way.


While browsing the latest content on SoundCloud’s feed, something unexpected cropped up: a new track from KDrew. KDrew has always made consistently solid music (c’mon, who doesn’t love “Last Train to Paradise” and “Summer Ashes“?) so it was interesting to see what his latest original track was like, especially since he hasn’t released new music in a while. With fun pitched vocals and a rushing trap-infused beat, “Back To You” marks KDrew’s triumphant return to the dance music world.


Since its release earlier this year, Zedd and Alessia Cara‘s hit “Stay” has, unsurprisingly, gotten a whole variety of remixes. Among these is a refreshing remix from producer Aylen. In a world where so many remixes sound the same, Aylen’s funky take on the track is catchy and new. He takes an otherwise mainstream-sounding track and pumps it up with a heightened tempo. Flawless harmonies line the bridge of the song, building up to a driving drop that begs shufflers to hit the dance floor and bust out their moves.


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