Jamie xx, Four Tet, Floating Points, and Daphni NTS mix is a music collector’s dream

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Jamie xx, Four Tet, Floating Points, and Daphni NTS mix is a music collector’s dreamJamie Four Tet Mi

Four of the most prolific audiophiles in electronica have come together to release a two-hour mix proving not only that music abides by no boundaries, rules, or expectations but also that artists, too, can share the AUX. Jamie xx, Four Tet, Floating Points, and Daphni took their talents to NTS Radio: an online underground radio station that clearly respects the Four Agreements with their tagline, “Don’t Assume.”

One record at a time, the mix tests the capacity of sound. Entering through an atmosphere of ambiance, the music traverses the boundaries of what one might find sonically appealing. Full vibrations run abound from all contributors, creating a space welcoming to infinite possibilities.

20 minutes in, the listener is in a completely different realm; abundant, soulful energy erupts. Jazz flute, funk horns, and vocals penetrate the space in an effortless sonic flow. The journey progresses into psychedelic rock, European folk, all while staying completely consistent in the task at hand. The mix isn’t demanding, but it does ask something of the listener: their mere attention. This is a mix not to hear but instead, to listen. With the mix, these four experimental geniuses have exuded a nod to true librarians of music with seamless poise.

Photo Credit: Mixmag

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see acts

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All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsDestructo Live Dancing Astronaut

The city of Los Angeles’ continual role in hip-hop and electronic dance music — not to mention the underground niches that helped birth what we now know as the mainstream music in each genre — has only continued to build upon itself over the years. From the days when gangsta rap reigned, to the birth of G-funk and the underground rave scenes, the city’s symbiotic relationship with the two genres is irrefutable.

Today, in an era of festival superfluousness where festivals seem to be dropping off the map like flies, it’s seeming to be inevitable that very few will sustain. That said, Los Angeles’ All My Friends festival seems destined to succeed despite its freshness on the festival circuit. 2018 marks its first year.

Judging by the Billboard hot chart dominations, streaming numbers, and the sheer fact that the teens love both genres — and of course the fact that we live in a world that caters almost entirely to these factors — there seems no better way to christen the city of Los Angeles’ influence in the genres than for it to host a proper celebration. All My Friends is here to host said celebration, as Los Angeles’ finest meeting of dance and hip-hop music in recent memory.

What’s more of the inaugural All My Friends is that not only is the lineup an impressive 40-deep presentation of the genre’s hottest acts, but that its trend-cognizant curation is concise. Thanks to its curator, Gary Richards and AMFAMFAMF, the dance brand he created at LiveStyle, All My Friends’ calculated debut takes place over the two-day time span this August 18th and 19th. With just three stages, AMF is simple, but in that simplicity lies the best thing music can offer: the possibility to connect and build new friendships. As Richards recently told Billboard, “All the cool people in my life, I know through music… ‘All My Friends’ really has a deep-rooted meaning.”

Ahead of the festival’s debut, Dancing Astronaut‘s compiled the five must-see acts, and although the lineup’s not necessarily a daunting display, that really just means that its attendees can’t go wrong no matter who they end up seeing.

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsJamie 2997 Emma Swann

Photo Credit: Emma Swann

Jamie xx

Although Jamie Smith’s All My Friends jaunt does come complete with other Los Angeles dates — or rather, it was intended to, up until the unfortunate cancelation of Goldenvoice’s FYF Festival — it still feels like a rare circumstance. Following his recent stint at San Francisco’s Outside Lands, Smith’s performance as Jamie xx promises an ephemeral experience. Like the chilling air to his 2015 album In Colour, Smith’s performances promise euphoria, nostalgia, jovial dancing, and maybe even some tears, but with his only other public appearance for the rest of this year being at the esteemed Oasis festival in Marrakech, All My Friends is certainly one that’s not to be missed. As such, Jamie xx will be closing out the festival Sunday evening on the main AMFAMFAMF stage. It’ll be a fitting ending to the debut affair.

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsYo Gotti Press 2013 650 430

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Yo Gotti

Yo Gotti

No hip-hop heavy festival would be complete without the addition of Yo Gotti. Consider the facts — “Rake It Up,” “Champions,” and “Down In The DMs” — all of which are party anthems and all of which cement the anthemic proportions of Gotti. His set promises to be an essential weekend experience.

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsBarclay Crenshaw Coy Boy Scout Press Shot 2017

Photo Credit: Photo credit of Barclay Crenshaw

Barclay Crenshaw

Any devout Dirtybird fan will tell you that the flock’s hip-hop affinity runs deep. Long story short, it’s nest overseer, also known as Claude VonStroke, began experimenting with hip-hop, jungle, and drum ‘n’ bass long before the label’s inception. Today, Barclay has a collaboration with The Cool Kids — enough said.

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsLorenzo

Photo Courtesy of Red Light Management

Chris Lorenzo

Chris Lorenzo‘s garnered support from major labels like Dirtybird, Food Music, and Night Bass and collaborated with some of the biggest names in EDM — Skrillex, Steve Aoki, and Chris Lake — to name a few. But, he’s also a vehement producer in his own right, too – known for his distinct remixes of Disclosure, Rudimental, A-Trak, and more.

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsRL Grime Day Of Dead Billboard 1548

Photo Credit: Photo credit of RL Grime

RL Grime

RL Grime‘s All My Friends performance comes fresh on the heels of his highly-anticipated sophomore album release. NOVA is a sound marriage of the two worlds of R&B and EDM – where melodic rap and R&B refrains from hip-hop and R&B heavyweights bridge the gap between the two genres and EDM.

  Check out the festival’s set times below and snag any last-minute tickets here.

All My Friends Festival to make vehement LA debut: Check out DA’s must-see actsAll My Friends Lineup

Jamie xx co-produces Florence + The Machine’s new single, ‘Big God’

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Jamie xx

Jamie xx and fellow Young Turks artist, the modern jazz maestro Kamasi Washington, have co-produced Florence + The Machine’s new single, “Big God.”

Enveloping and soulful, led by Florence Welch’s billowing vocals, “Big God’s” production is joyfully simplistic. With a driving piano at its heart, “Big God” is a congregation of sounds in the trio’s own sonic house of worship. Stripped of most of Jamie xx’s characteristic electronic tendencies, save for subtle drum padding, Washington’s jazz accents and Welch’s anthemic soul shine brightest on the new collaboration.

Of course, this production doesn’t mark the first time Jamie xx has taken on a tune outside of his electronic wheelhouse. Celebrated for his work with The xx, as well as his unique revising of Florence + The Machine’s “You’ve Got The Love,” as well as inventive takes on Adele, Jack Peñate, Glasser, and more.

Florence + The Machine will drop their impending new album, the highly anticipated High As Hope, on June 29. The record features credits from Emile Haynie — known for his work with Kanye West and Kid Cudi — as well as Sampha, Andrew Wyatt, and others.

Jamie xx co-wrote Florence + The Machine’s new single, ‘Big God’

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Jamie xx

Jamie xx and fellow Young Turks artist, the modern jazz maestro Kamasi Washington, have teamed up for Florence + The Machine’s new single, “Big God,” which Jamie xx co-wrote.

Enveloping and soulful, led by Florence Welch’s billowing vocals, “Big God’s” production is joyfully simplistic. With a driving piano at its heart, “Big God” is a congregation of sounds in the trio’s own sonic house of worship. Stripped of most of Jamie xx’s characteristic electronic tendencies, save for subtle drum padding, Washington’s jazz accents and Welch’s anthemic soul shine brightest on the new collaboration.

Of course, this production doesn’t mark the first time Jamie xx has taken on a tune outside of his electronic wheelhouse. Celebrated for his work with The xx, as well as his unique revising of Florence + The Machine’s “You’ve Got The Love,” as well as inventive takes on Adele, Jack Peñate, Glasser, and more.

Florence + The Machine will drop their impending new album, the highly anticipated High As Hope, on June 29. The record features credits from Emile Haynie — known for his work with Kanye West and Kid Cudi — as well as Sampha, Andrew Wyatt, and others.

Florence + The Machine – “Big God”

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"Big God"Florence + The Machine have a new album, High As Hope, coming out out at the end of the month. We’ve already heard two songs from it, “Sky Full Of Song” and “Hunger,” and Florence Welch has been performing the hell out of those on late-night shows and debuting moreMore »

Destructo announces debut headliners for inaugural All My Friends Music Festival

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LA is getting a brand new two-day summer music festival, programmed by a man who’s intimately familiar with the live events landscape in Southern California — after all, he helped build it. Destructo‘s new dance and hip-hop event, All My Friends Music Festival, slated for August 18-19 at ROW DTLA, has now announced its first-run of artists, topped this year by RL Grime, Gucci Mane, and Jhené Aiko on the first day, followed by headlining performances from M.I.A.Jamie XX, and house legend Armand Van Helden on day two.

Each headliner brings their own distinct appeal to the bill, from an ultra-rare Armand outing to Gucci Mane’s booming catalog of iconic southern rap hallmarks. Going back to a tried and true festival playbook, Destructo’s first AMFMF is shaping up to look a lot like early editions of HARD Summer with underground dance and rap hybrid bookings rubbing shoulders, matched with a central downtown Los Angeles location as the festival’s backdrop. Some considerable refinements are bound to be announced as the inaugural event nears its debut, and with a stacked first talent phase now announced, expect the rest of the lineup to follow and similarly enticing pattern.

Jamie xx and SebastiAn score new Romain Gavras film, ‘The World Is Yours’

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Jamie xx is filled with surprises, such as when he produced the title track from Drake‘s album Take Care, or when he co-produced the song “When It’s All Over” with Alicia Keys off her LP, Girl on Fire, or that time he composed the entire score for a ballet inspired by Jonathan Safran Foer’s book, Tree of Codes. Now, it seems Jamie Smith’s has yet another surprise up his sleeve.

He’s just soundtracked Romain Gavras’s next film, The World Is Yours, alongside the French musician SebastiAn, who’s produced for the likes of Frank Ocean, Kavinsky, and more.

The French film director, who’s perhaps best known for his controversial cinematography with M.I.A has also worked with artists like Justice, Simian Mobile DiscoKanye West, Jay-Z, and even Smith in the past. Gavras has just released the teaser trailer for the upcoming film and it’s absolutely stunning.

The World Is Yours will premiere at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, slated for May 8–19. It’ll appear in French cinemas on August 22, and will seek a US distributor after the festival.

H/T: Resident Advisor

Outside Lands reveals The Weeknd, ODESZA, DJ Snake, Jamie xx & more atop 2018 bill

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Outsidelands 2015

Outside Lands has revealed the 2018 lineup for its 11th installment in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park August 10-12.

Following a fervent 2017 edition of Gorillaz, The Who, and Metallica headlining, 2018 boasts a hefty onslaught of acts, and although the headliners see earlier appearances in the festival season  — The Weeknd at Coachella and Janet Jackson at both Panorama and FYF Fest  — the lineup remains rife with talent and excitement.

The Weeknd is set to perform, where he’s likely to play out his recent slew of new material which features the aid of Nicolas Jaar, Daft Punk‘s Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo, and Gesaffelstein. Both Florence + The Machine and Janet Jackson front the bill with performances that will be nothing less than excellent and the lineup also promises a plethora of beloved dance acts. From ODESZA, Chromeo, and Claptone, to DJ Snake, Jamie xx, Tycho, CHVRCHES, James Blake, Gryffin, Lauv, and Whethan, Outside Lands is a music lover’s oeuvre in its late-summer installment.

More information and tickets, which are available starting at 10 a.m. PST April 5, can be found here.

Outside-Lands-2018

Thousands of dollars of DJ gear stolen from promoters following The xx’s Sydney after-party

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Sydney’s fans of The xx were in for a treat this weekend as the group was in town finishing up their Australian tour. To mark the occasion, Jamie xx, the group’s Romy Madley Croft, Warpaint’s Stella Mozgawa, and Jaguar Ma’s Jono Ma were also set to DJ a secret after-party location outside of the city. An unused bunker venue allowed local label Siberia Records to host its “S3ret d00f part Deux” party into the early hours in the morning.

Unfortunately, things took a dark turn when someone managed to snatch the decks, lights, mixers, and CDJs at the end of the night, equating to more than $6,000 worth of stolen DJ gear from the promoters. It’s incredibly disheartening, considering Siberia Records was to walk away empty-handed, too, as the event was free of admission.

Fortunately, Siberia Records has created a link for those who feel inclined to support the loss.

H/T: Stoney Roads

Photo Credit: Siberia Records

How Houston’s Day For Night festival served as a sound intersection of curatorial excellence

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How Day For Night festival achieved curatorial excellence

Houston, Texas’ Day For Night festival has established itself as an unconventional, hyper-sensory utopia. Bolstering an exemplary menu of avant-garde talent, the festival satiates thousands all while blurring the boundaries of performance and offering the utmost in aural phenomena in its industrial warehouse setting.

Day For Night prided itself on its snapshot booking in its third year, by and for the experimentally-inclined. Enlisting artists like Nina Kraviz, Kaytranada, Justice, Jlin, Jamie xx, Mount Kimbie, Solange, REZZNine Inch NailsTyler, the Creator, and Thom Yorke, among others, the gathering has situated itself as an unorthodox standout from an at times mundane, and largely counterfeit American festival circuit.

Words by Grace Fleisher Featured image courtesy of Theo Civitello

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In its immersively emblematic nature, Day For Night’s third edition was a polyamorous union of music, culture, and digital art. It was a multifarious destination, and offered its attendees a mode of escapism while simultaneously defying how they explored their own, as well as others’ relationships with art and reality.

Those who attended were immersed in an epicenter of capitalism’s desolation, i.e the former Barbara Jordan Post Office, only to enter a sprawling industrial wonderland; complete with capacious lasers, fog machines, and immersive visual art open to infinite interpretations. Despite its growing pains, Day For Night was an unparalleled destination in the American festival circuit, protruding the landscape with its singularity in 2017, as it likely will in years to come, too.

Photo Credit: Katrina Barber

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Embracement of Reflection: Houston & Beyond

It would be naive to ignore how Houston’s rampantly evolving cultural and developmental environment shaped Day For Night. A look at almost any sect of the city points to hyper-gentrification and a lack of zoning restrictions that are rendering a city of cultural depth increasingly unrecognizable. Festivals have the potential to be the 21st-century’s greatest linking apparatus, and Day For Night embraced multiple methods of coupling reflection in an immensely immersive fashion. Summits delved into socio-political discourse by way of Laurie Anderson, Chelsea Manning, Pussy Riot’s Nadya Tolokonnikova, and more. The gathering challenged its attendees toward an attainment of outward-awareness.

Photo Credit: Charles Reagan Hackleman

 

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Woven into the very seams of artistic discourse at Day For Night was a thread on how the world’s 24-hour loops and radical advances in technology and communication are seamlessly moving faster than behavioral evolution, rendering many helpless in the interim. In a hyper-connected sect of the world, it’s ironically never been easier for one to feel helpless. Day For Night ruminated on how these very advancements can work to foster connections and discoveries in the world which will propel us further as a collective entity.

Photo Credit: Chad Wadsworth

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Post HTX Served As A Model Venue

“The way one sees things, and the expectations one brings to a performance, or any art form, really, is completely determined by the venue,” articulated David Byrne of the seminal group, The Talking Heads.

This phenomenon of a concert space shaping context, and in turn, enjoyment, is explored in Byrne’s book How Music Works. Surely, the way in which performances are perceived en masse is in relation to the space they’re experienced in. At times this is an obvious element. Take the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, for example. Burning Man’s sustenance relies on the desert space it resides in, and while this may be an extreme example, space is becoming a deeply entwined element in the worldwide festival circuit. The relationship between attendees and venues is why scenes blossom, and it’s why destination festivals are becoming increasingly popular.

Photo Credit: Sara Marjorie Strick

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Day For Night’s decision to place a hyper-sensorial paradise across four stages in a dimly lit, abandoned post office was a masterful one. Ironically, the nucleus of the performance venue were the veins of the warehouse, many of which contained captivating art installations. Unlit hallways that separated the “blue” stage from the intimately circular “yellow” stage, for example, beckoned an art form in themselves. For in these empty spaces, attendees prepared to ascend into visual or aural titillation. Whether it be disco balls adorned from a ceiling in netting, illuminating an entire room, moving mechanical cranes paired to ominous music, or synced screens around a ground level stage, the once-vacant warehouse was flooded with an innate intertwinement of senses.

Photo Credit: Theo Civitello

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Exemplary Curatorial Intent

A festival’s success begins in its curatorial intent. Founded in 2015 by the Free Press Houston and the New York-based creative agency Work-Order, Day for Night established itself as a visually immersive music and art festival from the very beginning. By embedding an exploration of the elements of light, space, and sound in its mission, Day For Night has transformed the festival landscape by combining new media art with envelope-pushing musicians. It may still be a young festival, but its surely created a unique experience. Day For Night’s careful selection of artistry and curatorial intent spoke to several sects of music, tech, and art lovers. Planning such a feat does not come without intent or without a deeply embedded audience understanding, though.

Photo Credit: Katrina Barber

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Appealing to the experimentally-inclined, for example, Day For Night brought forth Nina Kraviz, who’s on the heels of a momentous 2017, and largely regarded as a queen of techno. The festival also booked her трип (or Trip) labelmate Bjarki. Jlin, who’s set ironically rivaled her longtime purveyor Aphex Twin‘s 2016 DFN appearance, was also a standout experimental act. Her album, Black Origami, was an exemplary experimental record of the past year. Additionally, artists like Forest Swords, Jenny Hval, Shlomo, and Roni Size, all capitalized on the use of live sets as a medium for either outward, emotive release or social commentary.

Photo Credit: Julian Bajsel

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Day For Night also booked standout artists like the esteemed Nine Inch Nails, who’ve been touring their immensely accessible EP Add Violence. Solange stunned in her Houston homecoming, merging art and popular culture with an affirming image of black pride and femininity.  Cardi B gave the 12-minute performance of the year, encapsulating a tumultuous 2017 with her ominous hit “Bodak Yellow.”  Tyler, The Creator gave a fervent performance which was brimming with tracks off his introspective new work Flower Boy. Pussy Riot, Pretty Lights, Justice, and REZZ — with her exceptional Mass Manipulation tour visuals — all expectedly stunned.

Day For Night displayed a keen understanding of the experimentally inclined, but also served as an apt pop culture gathering.In bringing together artists who continue to challenge the status quo, the festival’s curational intent was two-fold — displayed initially by the festival, and then, by each and every artist that performed.

Photo Credit: Ismael Quintanilla

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Embedding a Festival Framework for the Future

As more and more festivals continue to emerge on the American festival circuit, immersive affairs such as Day For Night will continue to be a saving grace. It’s one thing to have an exemplary understanding of an audience, but as festival-goers grow into an increasingly digitized world, a means of facilitating connection through art and performance will be needed more than ever. Day For Night blurred the lines between its attendees and artists, it’s an environment where everyone was on an even playing field, as an observer, student of performance, and the outside world itself.

Photo Credit: Sara Marjorie Strick