Eats Everything on his recent Dirtybird EP and the rise of Edible Records [Interview]

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Feeding the insatiable hunger of dance music fans worldwide for the past seven years, Eats Everything has become synonymous with hard, hypnotic house music. Real name Dan Pearce, Eats has become a sizable personality and creative force within the underground.

With his latest EP for DirtybirdClash of The Tight-Uns, Pearce delivers two abnormally entertaining tracks, “Song For” and “War Rhythm,” both co-produced by rising artist Lord Leopard. Dancing Astronaut recently sat down with Pearce to discuss how the EP came about, his origins with Dirtybird, and what’s in store for the future.

Pearce was born in Bristol, a town that over the last three decades has been deeply influential in providing a dark and rich foundation for underground electronic music. Massive Attack‘s “Unfinished Symphony” (1991), for instance, is an unmistakable example of what’s become known as the “Bristol Sound,” which combines both joy and melancholy in a tasteful blend of soul, funk, and hip hop. The brooding influence of his hometown seeps into many of Eats Everything tracks such as “The Gettup,” “Veronica Electronica,” and his remix of Green Velvent’s iconic “Flash.”

Eats Everything Press

Pearce created Edible Records with fellow Bristolian and former NRK lead Nick Harris in 2015, and has since featured notable releases from Melé, Waze & Odyssey, Emanuel Satie, and Paul Woolford. Pearce admits, that despite meeting Harris late in his career, he’s “a massive fan of NRK and all other things Nick has been involved in, so it’s been amazing to create a label together.”

Their partnership has brought fans a series of unique events traversing the globe, from a boat party at Croatia’s Hideout Festival to a late night set at San Francisco’s Halcyon. Pearce, when asked about the future of his Edible Records’ Showcase, indicates no intention of slowing down: “we’ve just announced a really exciting date in Barcelona during Sonar where I’m doing a huge b2b2b with Richy Ahmed and Patrick so that’s going to be wicked!” Given his participation in and organization of intimate events like this, it’s no wonder Pearce has played such a critical role in perhaps the hottest, slow-cooked, char-broiled events in California, brought on by Dirtybird Records.

In 2011, Pearce joined the quickly rising Dirtybird team, lead by the valiant Claude Vonstroke. Pearce’s enamor for the label began before he joined the team: “Dirtybird has always been my dream label,” he says, “so whilst I was building my career I sent them them a lot of demos.” Even before he released his Eat Everything EP, his first record on the label, he was already on their radar. “It was actually ‘Entrance Song’ that caught Claude VonStroke’s attention,” Pearce says, “but Voitek from Catz ’N Dogz got there before him.”

After his self-titled EP, he went on to release another album and a number of solo releases with Dirtybird. Claude Vonstroke and Eats Everything have maintained a close relationship since — even as Eats has moved away from Dirtybrd. “Throughout my career, he has always given me valuable advice and pushed me creatively,” Peace says.

Eats Everything Press 2

Behind the booth, Pearce is remarkable. Years of professional experience have led to countless back-to-back sets with Claude Vonstroke, Justin Martin, Nic Fanciulli, Jackmaster, and Eric Prydz, and many others. “Going b2b2b with your favorite DJs is always going to be an enjoyable experience,” Pearce says when asked how these complicated ballets of beat-matching pan out. “You don’t really decide who plays what, you follow each other’s lead and just see where you end up really” he says. There’s a beautiful chaos in performances like this. In a recent b2b2b set with Nic Fanciulli and Jackmaster, for instance, Pearce says the chemistry couldn’t have been better, and “Jackmaster and Nic Fanciulli really know how to throw a party and get the crowd going so it’s always really fun playing with them.”

Next up for the forceful house music producer is a handful of North America tour dates this month, including Vancouver, Calgary, Denver, Montreal, Toronto and Las Vegas as part of Dirtybird’s roaming BBQ series. Dirtybird’s distinct experiences began in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, providing the West Coast further exposure to house music and techno. As Dirtybird grew in popularity, these events have expanded considerably. This year’s Vegas iteration will feature Eats Everything, Claude VonStroke, Justin Martin, Shiba San, Ciszak, and Dateless.

In a recent interview for Mixmag with Claude Vonstroke, Pearce claims, “at the end of the day, we don’t do this job to be serious.” Eats Everything’s concoctions are utterly devoid of seriousness, consistently throwing the listener into a bizarre trance of levity and vitality. Here’s to hoping Dan Pearce continues to embrace the weird under his beloved guise of Eats Everything for years to come.

Listen to Eats Everything’s Clash of The Tight-Uns EP below.

H/T: BBC, Mixmag, Resident Advisor

Nicky Romero dishes on new music, Protocol Recording’s five year anniversary and his love for soccer [Interview]

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As dance music continues to move through cycles of divergence and subsequent convergence, progressive house is one of the many genres to fall down most producers’ pecking order, with many up-and-coming artists leaning heavily towards Future Bass and Deep House. But according to Nick Rotteveel – one of the spearheading producers behind the Dutch House invasion circa 2010-11- this shift in the production meta is part and parcel of an industry that is “constantly evolving.”

nicky-romero-press

The veteran producer, who remains at the top of his game after a decade, had a humble beginning – as did many of his peers alongside him today. Music had a profound influence on Nicky Romero from a young age. He started off as a drummer in his band as a teenager, before making the decision to forge a career as an electronic music producer.

“I swapped my drums for a computer when I was about 17. My parents were not happy about it, but for me the future was with producing music digitally.”

Ever since dropping his first commercially successful track “My Friend,” back in 2010, Nicky Romero has continued to grow in stature, creating some instantly recognizable electro and progressive house tunes such as “Toulouse,” “Symphonica,” and “I Could Be The One” with Avicii.


His uncanny ability to produce easily marketable chart-toppers has allowed him to consistently headline the most prestigious dance music festivals like Tommorrowland, Ultra Music Festival and Sunburn Festival in India, while simultaneously creating one of the most loyal fan bases known to the dance music world.

His most recent single, “Crossroads,” is a far cry from his immensely popular festival anthems. It is a refreshing digression from the rapidly stagnating big room genre, and is a testament to Nicky’s ability to adapt and stay relevant.

“My latest single called ‘Crossroads’ was a collaboration between Navarra and me. I think it’s a great merge of sounds & styles, vocal chops and a progressive drop, kind of a hybrid.”

Rather than resting on his laurels, Romero dedicates a majority of his time to his cherished label Protocol Recordings, which “has helped [him] create a platform for [himself] and for other young artists that [he] like[s] to support.”

While most labels “shotgun songs into the world with 5 songs at the same time and see if there is a hit in there,” Romero’s vision and motivation is totally different: to create a brand that serves to expose his fan base to quality rather than quantity.

“We carefully release. It’s not always the best strategy financially but it works best for us as the finance side of things was never our motivation to start in first place!”

Initially created by Nicky Romero in May 2012, the label has evolved into one of the world’s leading artist launch pads, featuring prestigious names such as Blasterjaxx, Hardwell, Krewella and NERVO over its five year history, while also striving to discover fresh talent like Arno Cost and Volt & State. To celebrate the label’s fifth anniversary, Romero has lined up a mammoth party that will last until ADE in October.

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To kick off the celebration, Nicky will live stream the 250th episode of Protocol Radio featuring the label’s best tracks and unreleased singles saved for the special occasion. This will be followed by a huge five-hour mix, containing the label’s defining sonic imprints. To cap it all, Protocol will release re-worked versions of the label’s greatest hits while “announcing the exciting release of a new single” by the Protocol head honcho himself.

A large part of Nicky Romero’s monumental success is due to his shrewd understanding of the trends prevailing in the dance music industry, where “music comes and goes so fast right now.” The scenario has changed considerably since Romero began, with listeners cycling through music at a much more rapid pace than a few years ago.

“When I started you could have a number one at Beatport and it could be there for a month. Now a song is old 5 days after its release! It creates a lot of space for everyone to drop singles.”

That being said, a large majority of popular DJs credit their success to the very industry Romero talks about, due to its constant state of dynamism, with opportunities being presented to new artists to try and differentiate themselves from an ocean of other producers – a factor which is generally missed by most fans. Romero once fell in this category as well, and believes that “we should appreciate the music that’s being released,” while also understanding the increasing difficulty in making a mark as “people are bored after three days” of songs that may take “a month or longer to finish.”

Another rather overlooked facet of being an electronic music superstar is the emotional difficulty that can plague the very symbols for spreading happiness and “good vibes” through their music. They have to constantly ignore their personal concerns in order to keep the act going. Nicky himself faced his fair share of problems including a chronic anxiety issue that almost ended his career back in the early days.

He has since managed to get his anxiety under control, but highlights the importance of taking regular breaks from his hectic schedule to unwind and relax.

“I still play drums, and really enjoy it!”

Nicky Romero Drums

Also an avid fan of legendary Dutch soccer team Ajax Amsterdam, he had a few words regarding the Europa League final between Ajax and European giants Manchester United, with the match holding special importance for the English club in light of the recent terror attack in the city.

“I’m kind of tense about it all to be honest, especially after the awful Ariana Grande attack in Manchester. A good match is what I hope for, and of course I hope Ajax wins, but one of my good friends plays at Manchester United, Daley Blind, and I support him also! I think it’s gonna be a very exciting match.”

While Nicky could easily have taken time out of his busy schedule to watch his favorite team in action, he remains laser focused on his duties and obligations towards the entire community, drawing inspiration from Martin Garrix’s tireless endeavors.

“I think there is still a lot to achieve. I’m motivated by what Martijn does right now. He is, at his age, an inspiration to the whole DJ scene. I love to see that he’s opened so many doors for everyone, it’s inspiring!”

His parting statement captures what the person behind Nicky Romero truly stands for – a determined and humble operator, whose undying work ethic and desire to keep improving has helped him climb to the very heights of musical stardom. Adored by fans and respected by peers, Nicky Romero is a fitting role model for any aspiring producer.

Read More:

Nicky Romero comes clean on struggle with anxiety: ‘I felt guilty to all my fans’

Florian Picasso & Raiden release “Hanabi” on Nicky Romero’s Protocol Recordings

Nicky Romero takes on Linkin Park’s ‘Heavy’

The Blu Party with Sydney Blu [EDM Sauce Interview]

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Now that Movement week has officially begun, and one thing is for sure that Toronto’s tech-house siren Sydney Blu, and her enchanted Blu Party: Detroit Edition, is a must to attend on Monday night concluding Eastern America’s most important techno event, Movement Electronic Music Festival. With a huge lineup inducing Christian Martin, Gene Farris, and

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Paul Van Dyk Answers Our Questions About Trance, The Dreamstate Tour and More

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An icon to the dance music world, and a revolutionary leader in production; Paul Van Dyk is a figure that not only represents undeniable expertise and talent but also, resilience. After a fatal accident that left him in the hospital last year, he’s back on the map and paving the road to the rebirth of

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Grabbitz discusses the evolution which led to his debut album, ‘Things Change’ [Interview]

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Over the past few years, New York producer Nick Chiari has risen to the challenge of personally handling every aspect of music production on his own. A skilled producer, vocalist and musician, Chiari has released a string of strong tracks on Canadian label Monstercat and independently under his alias, Grabbitz.

Chiari’s musical inclination was obvious from early on — the producer wrote his first song before his age hit double digits. Since then, he’s produced everything from hip-hop to drum & bass to alternative tracks. The versatile artist’s style continually evolves each release, with the greatest example being his debut album, Things Change.

Released on May 19, Things Change consists of 12 markedly unique tracks. We caught up with the producer alongside the album’s release to discuss what went into this LP and he was excited to talk about the new direction he’s taking with his music.

“You can’t sacrifice your art for anything.”

Chiari’s previous release, the Better With Time EP, released on Monstercat in February 2016, is indicative of the vastly different angle he pursued on Things Change, which Chiari says is due to a realization of wanting to create a personally authentic sound.

Things Change is a more drastic step into the direction I’ve been wanting to go in, which is more of a rock hybrid sound,” he says. “Better With Time still had its tiptoes in the dance world and, while there’s a little influence from dance music in the new album, Better With Time had more. This new record leans into the full song spectrum.”

Chiari says Things Change has been complete for nearly a year. Instead of releasing it immediately, however, he spent time planning and assembling a live show to accompany it.

“We realized these records weren’t DJ-able. We had to take a step away from it and build the live show and get the performance right. We also had to transition everyone who was expecting EDM at the time to accepting a different kind of sound from me.”

As an artist, Chiari says he’s constantly growing and exploring new sounds. Looking back at his productions from three years ago, he says he realized he was trying to “emulate the EDM-type sound [his] idols were making at the time.” Once he felt like he had perfected those sounds, though, Chiari recognized it wasn’t truly the music he wanted to make.

Grabbitz embraced his rock, alternative and hip-hop roots and the musical inspirations he grew up listening to, like Kurt Cobain, Alice in Chains, Led Zeppelin, Nine Inch Nails, and Eminem. These influences shine through in Things Change, evidenced by its embrace of a wide range of musical elements and a deliberate desire to not be confined to an EDM-constricted box.

Things Change is a 12-song musical journey about accepting change and learning to grow with it. It’s about being able to understand that things aren’t always going to be the way you thought they were going to be, Chiari explains. The name has a dual meaning, because the record is about that happening in his own personal life, but for the fans, it’s also what happened with his music.

“It’s a double meaning I take a lot of pride in. I overcame a really tough time and came out better, and now the music’s going to be come out better, too.”

Going forward, Chiari will be stepping away from DJing for the most part and focusing on his newly-developed live performances. Fans who come out to the live shows are going to be in for “a wild ride,” he says.

“I’m going to perform my heart out at every show,” he says. “I may still DJ at after parties, because that’s still really fun, and I love dance music.”

He also notes that the next album is “pretty much ready” already, and that he will be touring with his live show later this year.

The artist says that feedback on the album so far has been overwhelmingly positive but notes the importance of deeper, analytical listening. “I hope people get to marinate on it,” he says. “Everyone takes a certain amount of time to digest music, so I just want to give it time to sink in.”

Musically, Chiari has already learned an important lesson that takes some artists decades to realize.

“You can’t sacrifice your art for anything. When it comes to people wanting you to make a certain sound or make money of of you… You can never let anything like that control the art, because then you’ve already lost.”

As an artist, Chiari notes that he has the ability to make music that he truly feels and is passionate about instead of feeding into what the industry wants.

“That’s what’s going to set this album apart,” he says. “It’s not made for any specific reason or to try to appeal to a certain group. It’s just me.”

Read our full interview with Grabbitz below.

It’s been a little over a year since Better With Time came out. What are some key differences between Better With Time and Things Change?

Things Change is a more drastic step into the direction that I’ve been wanting to go in, which is more of a rock hybrid type of sound. Better With Time still had its tiptoes in the dance world. There’s a little influence from dance [music] in the new album, but Better With Time had more. This new record is a little more leaning into the full song spectrum.

How long has this album been in the works?

The album’s been complete for a long time, actually. It’s been a year, almost. We basically realized that these records weren’t DJ-able. We had to take a step away from it to build the live show and get the performance right. We also had to transition everyone who was expecting EDM at the time to accepting a different kind of sound from me.

Will we see more of a focus on your live performances going forward rather than DJ sets?

100 percent. You’re going to get a wild ride. It’s going to be a crazy show. I’m going to perform my heart out at every show. I may still DJ after parties, because that’s still really fun and I love dance music.

How would you say you’ve evolved over the past few years as a musician and producer?

I feel like I’m evolving all the time. I write music every day and naturally, everything just slowly grows and expands every day in different areas. Sometimes things get more experimental in certain areas and you get better at something. Over the last three years of putting out music, I realized I was trying to emulate the EDM-type sounds my idols were making at the time. Guys like Skrillex and people who gave the feeling of community where you can make these records and make the coolest wobbles and dubstep sounds. I was really into that. But when I felt like I’d perfected that, it wasn’t necessarily the records I wanted to make as a person. You only get to live one time, so I need to make the records I really want to make: full-blown songs.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned over those past few years?

I think the most important thing I’ve learned musically is you can’t sacrifice the quality of your art for anything. When it comes to people wanting you to make a certain sound or make money off of you… You can never let anything like that control the art, because then you’ve already lost. As an artist, we have the ability to make songs, and you’d better believe I’m going to make what I feel instead of feeding into some big money play or industry play. That’s what’s going to set this album apart. It’s not made for any specific reason or to try to appeal to a certain group. It’s just me.

Who has had the most influence on your music over the years?

I love Eddie Vedder, Kurt Cobain, Alice in Chains, Led Zeppelin, Nine Inch Nails, Eminem, The Gorillaz… I get inspired by a lot of different people. My library contains an outrageous amount of music.

What’s the next instrument you’d like to learn how to play and why?

I can play a little bit of cello, but I would never in a million years that I’m a cello player. I want to master that. There’s a whole lot to master. It’s so much harder than it looks.

What has listener feedback on the album been like so far?

The feedback so far has been fantastic. A few of my really diehard fans that I love to communicate with have just been flipping out. That is very important to me. Everyone’s really digging it. I hope people get to marinate on it. Everyone takes a certain amount of time to digest music, so I just want to give it time to sink in.

What do you hope people take away from the album?

This album is about accepting change and learning to grow with it. Being able to understand things aren’t always going to be the way you thought they were going to be. That has a double meaning, because the record is about that happening in my own life, but to the fans, that happened with my music. It’s a double meaning that I take a lot of pride in. I overcame a really tough time and came out better, and now the music’s going to come out better.

What do you see for the future of your music?

I have the next album pretty much ready already. I have a new song coming up with Savoy. We’re supposed to be playing a couple of shows together, because our styles fit together and coincide in a way. I’m going to keep releasing content and music and videos. We’re going to be playing shows, so you can come see the live show later this year.

Spinnin’ Superstar Throttle Gives Us An Exclusive Interview & Spotify Playlist

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Melbourne based Robbie Bergin AKA Throttle has been working his profile for quite some time already. Kickstarting his Throttle persona at the age of 15, he quickly gained a solid fan base with his early productions. Throttle also released a dirty-disco remix of ‘Hit The Road Jack’ that absolutely blew up, and hit #1 on the

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Q&A: EDM Godfather Paul Oakenfold On Playing Mt. Everest And The State Of Electronic Music In 2017

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Arguably the progenitor of EDM music and culture, DJ/producer Paul Oakenfold has no qualms about the hyper-colored, mainstream juggernaut he has spawned. In his 53rd year, Oakenfold is more interested in playing Mt. Everest then bemoaning a culture that has been co-opted by the likes of the Chainsmokers, flower crowns, and the disastrous Fyre Festival. More »

All New EDM Livestream Premieres Tonight Via Twitch

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An all new take on EDM journalism hits the the internet tonight at 8pm EST. Sauce’d Music TV is a livestream talk show all about dance music that will be aired on a bi-weekly basis via twitch, facebook, and a new music platform called wav. Powered by yours truly EDMSauce.com & KRATE KOLLECTIVE, each show

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Get To Know What It Takes To Continually Improve Euphoria Music Festival

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Last year we visited the fifth edition of Euphoria Music Festival right outside of Austin, TX. It was an emotional experience for all involved. Not only was it a mind blowing experience music and production wise, but myself and my friend who did photography for us were grieving the loss of his brother, who had

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Meet illuciid, The Newest Artist With The Mau5trap Cosign

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In the past week illuciid has: released his first EP, mau5trap reposted his song, and he started his second semester as a college freshman. Quite the whirlwind of a week for this young producer who has less than 5 tracks out and already has the mau5trap cosign. His track ‘Summit’ is currently sitting at #2

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