Introducing Dorfex Bos: A rising underground bass talent talks inspirations, collaborative hopefuls, and his penchant for low-end vibrations in debut ‘Opinions’ EP [Interview + EP Review]

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Who exactly is Dorfex Bos?

Dorfex Bos may not be a household name in electronic dance music, nor may he ever wish to be. However, the Madison House-signee is one name in underground bass that we’ve been keeping tabs on here at Dancing Astronaut since appearing on Bassnectar‘s tenth full-length studio album, Into the Sun, back in 2015.

“Lorin [Ashton] is an absolute beast. He’s a genius,” Dorfex Bos told us in a recent interview. “I’ve never met someone with such a clear vision of what they wanted and the skills to make it happen so fully.”

Dorfex Bos is Angelo Tursi, an artist emerging from the early 2000s West Coast bass scene. His music is easily discernible by its eclectic, heavy sound stamp that weaves together elements of lush downtempo, dubstep, and left-field electronica.

But, like most free form bass music artists, don’t ask Dorfex Bos to force himself into any narrowly-defined categories. “I don’t really identify completely with any genres,” Tursi says of his experimental sound. “I’m known for making deep, trippy, cinematic tracks that I guess is considered ‘bass music,’ but I’m not really trying to put myself in that box.”

The Brooklyn-based beatmaker further alluded to the bass music genre as one that is as loose and expansive as it is subversive and very much open to creative interpretation:

“I feel like ‘bass music’ as a genre is very much solely focused on the body experience. I like to weave in a melodic and harmonic element that takes the whole experience a little deeper. My music has [an] emotional flavor that I feel is missing from a lot of ‘bass music.’ “


Dorfex Bos plays the Incendia Stage at Okeechobee, Florida, 2018. Photo courtesy of Madison House.

“Okeechobee was absolutely bonkers. I was set to play a smaller, late night stage…and there were a few thousand people there. It was a beautiful sight. It was a super tight, deep set.”


Dorfex Bos is known by many for his iconic collaborations with Bassnectar, including the self-titled track “Dorfex Bos,” which first appeared in 2004 on Diverse Systems of Throb, along with “Horizons” and “Other Worlds“— two mind-melding numbers that appeared on the recently-released Reflective EP.

“Our last two collaborations, ‘Horizons’ and ‘Other Worlds,’ were made in my bedroom studio on two separate occasions. We would start playing with ideas and very quickly a very clear and defined sound would emerge. It’s crazy making music with him because I have to keep in mind that tens of thousands of fans are going to experience these tracks in arenas and stadiums and you have to think about how they are going to sound in huge venues. It’s different than writing music for clubs. It’s a bit of a mind fuck.”

Recently signed to the Boulder-based powerhouse booking and management firm, Madison House — who also represent electronic music careers of Bassnectar, Clozee, Crywolf, Golfclap, Mt. Eden, Polish Ambassador, The String Cheese Incident, William Black, among many more — Dorfex Bos now brings his debut EP, Opinions, to the table. He is poised to stand alone as a new power player within his area of expertise.


“This EP is very special to me. Each track encompasses a specific and unique combination of mood and groove.”


The four-track project is an aural representation of a roundtable discussion on the sheer eclecticism and diversity of sound within the underground bass music scene. Rather than a cohesive journey of musical story-telling, what Tursi is laying down in his Opinions EP is a track-by-track catalog of playful sonic surprises with ever-evolving synth patterns, broken beats, and newly emerging bass lines around every turn. Perhaps no one puts it better than Tursi on his Opinions EP:

“It feels like a cocoon-deep welcoming, charged with just the right kind of rhythmic energy to keep it moving forward into the unknown. It’s music made for dimly lit dance floors or late night car rides down empty highways.”

Tursi’s auspicious sound sits on the horizon of where bass music is heading: It’s a purview into another world, catalyzed by a full-bodied, all-encompassing listening experience. Opinions serves as his artistic vessel into charting this plane: It’s a sonic mosaic that Dorfex Bos pieces together layer by layer, bit by bit, through each of his meticulously-crafted productions.

Take the EP’s eponymous leading track — a stunning, yet jarring composition laced with a sounds often mirrored by Bassnectar himself in his recent work. Complete with gritty electro-style synths, robust, grounding basslines, and highs that resemble the emergency sirens of a national weather warning system, it resembles an aerial adventure through hypnotic sound fx“It’s so big and expansive, it feels like you’re soaring on the back of a dragon very high up in the sky and you can feel the wind whipping through your hair,” says Tursi of “Opinions.”

 

Building upon the steady momentum set by the EP’s beginning, “Teen $pirit” begins much lighter with a keen focus on arpeggiated chords and captivating toy-box synth work. After the song’s first drop is where the intensity culminates into a more foreboding mood; yet, with the continuous use of light-hearted synths, users need not be apprehensive in giving themselves over to the song’s darker elements.

 

“Cyalafalora” subsumes the EP’s most mysterious appeal. Laid across an experimental landscape, the track features outer space bass elements, retro 1980s synths, like something out of Stranger Things, and laidback tones that allows the listener to explore the unmapped terrain of the human psyches. Upon the song’s second drop, Dorfex Bos takes a complete 180-degree turn into what sounds like a completely different song. 

 

Finishing off the EP is “Ralph’s Dance,” complete with a dark, anthemic quality that only Dorfex Bos can replicate. It catapults listeners into a side show circus tent, as if one is lining up to watch a traveling freak show somewhere in an arid desert county in the 1950s. 

 

In short, Dorfex Bos’ breakout EP is a statement of what is to come from the rising artist. Though eclectic as ever, that isn’t to say that the EP is disjointed by any means. For Opinions features a unique, experimental, and amorphous sound so as to explore the deeper possibilities of free form bass. “It’s thick, it’s bouncy, it’s deep, it’s dreamy,” says Tursi.

Dorfex Bos plays the Incendia Stage at Fractal Beach, Florida, 2018. Photo courtesy of Dorfex Bos.

“I wanted to present a mini-journey of what Dorfex currently represents and what I’m doing in my live sets — which is [using] very big, expansive beats with a mysterious, almost haunting, narrative running through it.”

Still in the early development phase, Dorfex’s live show is a rollercoaster ride of raw, undefined emotion and low-end frequencies that incorporates original tracks from Tursi’s sizable back catalog of music. Visually, there is still much left to map out for the young artist: “Up to this point, I have been the sole designer of all Dorfex visual art. I enjoy having a lot of creative control over how my work is presented. But I do look forward to collaborating with the right artist in the future if that magical synergy is there.”

“The live show is very me in that it will be an interesting dichotomy of ‘dark’ and ‘light’ imagery.”

Tursi’s approach to his live experience is laced with the kind of DIY sensibility that runs deep within the spirit of the underground bass scene. It is a sense for which he also takes cues from Tipper, whom he has opened for in the past, and Bassnectar, who he will open for during night two of Freestyle Sessions. On playing the upcoming event, which will be full culty bass heads:

“I’m super excited for Freestyle Sessions! I’m playing on ‘Dreamtempo’ night so it’s going to be a dreamy, bouncy set. I’m not really nervous about it, a lot of Bassnectar fans come out to my shows and they are usually super engaged and excited about me playing.”

As for his other upcoming appearances throughout the year, Dorfex Bos is also booked as direct support for The Glitch Mob on their new album-accompanying world tour, dubbed “Blade 2.0,” a interactive live music spectacle with visuals powered by Dell and an immersive VR experience from Strangeloop Studios.

“I’ve been friends with Ooah and Boreta for a very long time, about 15 years,” Tursi explained matter of factly. “They got in touch with me because their original support Elohim was unable to do [one particular] date.”

Dorfex Bos was beaming at the opportunity to play on The Glitch Mob’s cutting-edge stage set-up. “It’s a game-changer,” alluded Tursi. “I very quickly said yes because I know they have a very open-minded fanbase that would be down to go on the Dorfex journey, which is going to lean a little on the cerebral.”

With mentors like Tipper, Bassnectar, and The Glitch Mob — each with their clearly-defined respective sounds, and their shared roots in psychedlica and new-age spiritualism — there is no doubt that Dorfex Bos is one breakout artist whose climbing the swift ladder to success. Not only is he set to expand the sonic worlds of the three aforementioned artists, who all share a similar musical flavor, as well as crossover fanbases, DA asked what other artists made Tursi’s list of collaborative hopefuls.

“I’d love to work with Four Tet… he’s been a big inspiration to me for years. I’d love to make something with Potions (of the Lab Group)… he has such an amazing sense of sound design. Some other names I’d like to throw out on my collab wishlist… ELWD, Nils Frahm, EPROM, Oneohtrix Point Never, FlyLo, and Björk.”


So what exactly is a Dorfex Bos?

“I like my audience to experience ‘feels,’ and not just solely a beat to bang their heads to. It’s a fully sensory experience.” – Angelo Tursi

Tursi conjured up his moniker from a wildly imaginative place. The root, “Dorfex,” refers to some imaginary rural county in the British countryside, complete with lush rolling hills and dew-filled forests; the stem, “Bos,” he’s always thought about in terms of a fantasy computer-coded language. Juxtaposing the two creates a kind of elemental synergy — between nature and machine — for the artist. It’s a space Tursi says he enjoys dwelling in, both mentally and physically.

As for Dorfex Bos’ vibrant future, 2018 has much in store for the Brooklyn-based producer, including several more releases and collaborations for which the artist remained rather vague about going into detail over.

One thing we know for sure of the left-field bass producer is that he has a clearly-marked sound, with a penchant for low-end vibrations, and a definitive map for where he’s going.

 

How this will come to take shape for the audience?

Only time will tell.

 

But Dorfex Bos is not just a moniker, or even a man behind a moniker. According to Tursi, it’s a fully immersive experience: “The Dorfex Bos experience is a balanced combination of bass heavy beats and a rich cloak of melodies and harmonies that feel very much like a film score.”

Cinematic and fully sensory, on the one hand. Heavy, cumbersome, and yet fully palatable, on the other.

Bassnectar unveils Naux Faux side-project

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Who other than Bassnectar would debut a brand new side-project, then release the very first single as an official remix?

Coming as the third teased track off his Reflective Part 2 EP, Bassnectar has teamed up with long-time collaborator and friend Sayr for a throw-back psychedelic downtempo project called Naux Faux. The two producers haven’t worked together since the early 2000s — on the tracks “Enter The Chamber,” from Bassnectar’s Mesmerizing The Ultra LP, and “Grampa Slams” off Beatfreak Bohemia .

As its title suggests, “Psyopia” lays down a transient utopian landscape that calls upon a long-lost era of deep, mystical electronic music. Strewn across this scenery are analog synths, shimmering effects, and pulsing chords over chopped-up breaks and low-frequency subwoofer bass lines. The track is ultimately a tribute to the magical days of the side room, the sunrise set, and the discovery of new spellbinding frequencies, says Lorin Ashton..

“Although the finishing touches are still being added to the Naux Faux EP (thank you to all patient trainspotters!), we couldn’t resist including this remix of Psyopia on Reflective Part 2. It rounds out this 2nd chapter so nicely, and offers a glimpse of things to come…”

Pre-order Reflective Part 2, out December 1st.

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Bassnectar unveils unearthly second single off upcoming EP [UPDATED]

Bassnectar reveals release date for new EP, shares first single with Digital Ethos

 

 

Bassnectar unveils unearthly second single off upcoming EP [UPDATED]

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Still fresh off the news of his Atlanta NYE special event and the announcement of a headline appearance at Buku, Bassnectar has been focused on mastering and promoting his Reflective: Part Two EP, out December 1 on Amorphous Records. The bass music powerhouse recently teased the first single off the project, an earth-shattering track with Wakaan’s own Digital Ethos.

Now, Bassnectar shares another single featuring Dorfex Bos, which follows their initial “Horizons” collaboration on part one of the Reflective EP. Their sophomore collaboration, “Other Worlds,” while equally celestial and downtempo to its core, will take listeners into a completely different direction, instilling the two tracks with a yin and yang type of relationship.

“Other Worlds” utilizes a similar sound design as “Horizons,” with a repetitive grinding synth and “Shepard’s tone” effect that creates an auditory illusion effect on the ear, where listeners feel the tension as constant and never-ending. With each drop, however, rather than being taken down into a seismic direction, listeners are lifted a bit higher into the cosmos and gently dropped off on the track’s sublime lead out. The result is a track that is reminiscent of some 1980s Hans Zimmer-scored sci-fi film, taking listeners on a ride that goes up and down and around and round.

“Other Worlds” was inspired by a new collage from Sebastian Wahl, which we brought to life with the help of Black Lake Media. The collage shows portals emerge and unfold and evolve within and around a picture frame… a magical gateway, like the wardrobe in The Chronicles of Narnia.

On a sunny day in Brooklyn I sat down with Dorfex Bos to write a piece of music to go along with the visuals, and the ideas just came pouring out. We finished the song in 24 hours flat, with various instruments and sounds mapped to various details and dimensions of the various worlds within the collage.

Pre-order for Bassnectar’s Reflective: Part Two EP is available November 17, 2017.

UPDATE: Bassnectar has just released the EP’s official tracklist, which includes his long-awaited remixes of Eprom‘s “Pineapple” and Naux Faux‘s “Psyopia,” along with a previously-teased track ID with G Jones that Ashton premiered at Hulaween a few weeks ago.

Tracklist:

1. Bassnectar & Dorfex Bos – Other Worlds

2. Bassnectar & Digital Ethos – Slather

3. Bassnectar & Peekaboo – Disrupt The System ft. Azeem

4. Bassnectar & G Jones – Chromatek

5. Eprom – Pineapple (Bassnectar Remix)

6. Naux Faux – Psyopia (Bassnectar Remix)

Read More:

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5 reasons to never miss a Bassnectar curated event [Event Review]

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5 reasons to never miss a Bassnectar curated event

BassCenter has cemented itself as Bassnectar‘s most-anticipated event of the year among his cult-like family following. Set inside the famed indoor venue of Hampton Colosseum in Hampton, Virginia this year, the event offers 3-days of top-notch “underground” bass music curation to fans, alongside a plethora of other live acts and interactive community building activities. Every single detail is finely tuned with utmost scrutiny by none other Lorin Ashton himself, according to a Bassnectar Reddit AMA he’d done.

For such a prolific annual gathering, topping it from year to year is no easy feat. Just last year, for instance, BassCenter pulled 25,000 fans to Commerce City, Colorado. Such inflated numbers eventually led its hair-thrashing visionary to make the executive decision to pull in the reigns a bit for his brainchild’s 10th iteration, with an aim to make it a smaller, more intimate affair. Indeed, is what unfolded at Hampton’s sold-out 10,000 limited capacity venue, a space dubbed “the Mothership” by bass heads, dead heads, and Phish heads alike.

Fresh off last week’s conclusion, we’ve compiled 5 reasons why one of Bassnectar’s special events should be in your travel plans soon.

All photos courtesy of Reston Campbell Photography

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1. An abundance of impressive, up-and-coming bass music

At each and every Bassnectar event, there is a slew of opening talent that Ashton hand picks with specific purpose. Yet, since BassCenter is the premier event of Bassnectar’s year, both creatively and communally, artists seem to really bring their A-game to each of their sets. Bleep Bloop came to impress with his usual brand of weird space bass. Clozee is becoming a mainstay of Bassnectar’s events, making her second appearance in two months, with her organic Eastern-influenced line of bass music. Direct openers for Bassnectar were Mr. Carmack and Cashmere Cat, who brought something different to the table, pumping in a lot of his melodic productions for Ariana Grande, while delivering heavy sub bass to get the crowd in the right space for Bassnectar.

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2. Live roaming performers, pop-up acts, and vendors at every corner

From official vendors lined up along the outside of the venue to the more organic sales of homemade goods by passionate, artistic festival-goers, one should bring their pocket book armed to any Bassnectar event. Even the hotel lobby turns itself into a market place for selling shirts, pins and gifts, and all kinds of merchandise. Those who also chanced upon The Lot’s musical musings were fortunate enough to discover a hoop squad grooving and spinning to heart thumping bass music from The Librarian, Dorfex Bos, and The Fungineers.

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3. The production quality is second to none

Cutting edge technology what makes Bassnectar events so special. The sound in itself is a physical, visceral, emotional rollercoaster that can be seen and felt as it reverberates throughout the entire body. Paired with the visuals, which are also carefully planned by Lorin and his team, the event becomes a psychedelic and communal experience. As if the sound and visuals weren’t enough to overload the senses, there were also points at which rose petals fell from the ceiling and large inflatable animals were released into the crowd. Ashton conjured up three completely distinctive, “full-throttle” sets for the weekend, complete with all his favorite music that he adapted to fit a more contemporary frame. The themes for each two-hour-long performance were Space, Earth, and Ether, whereby the iconic figure structured thematically around fan requested songs leading up to the event.

More notably, Bassnectar brought special guest Chase Iron Eyes during his Earth set, onto the stage. Iron Eyes is an American Indian activist and member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and he donated his time onstage to give a conscientious speech about the continued protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. He then ended his stirring monologue with a powerful chant that resonated with those watching through out the weekend, “Water is Life!,” before providing a number for guests to contact so they could assist with the ongoing protests.

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4. Activities and art at every corner

BassCenter additionally provided an endless amount of options to pass one’s time outside of just the music. From games and booths to massages and a gift alter in The Haven, every corner of the Mothership seemed to provide a new adventure. The Lots was an enhanced gathering space outside the venue, was complete with renegade sound systems, pop-up arts & crafts fair, and guest performances. The Center itself was akin to a teeming bazaar of art, with painters showcasing their work live to a backdrop of curious spectators buzzing about.

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5. The passionate community of bass heads is one of a kind

BassCenter is not a typical large-scale electronic music event. For one, it boasts an exceptional amount of love for community. Across all three days, you’ll see selfless bass heads practicing random acts of kindness and treating others with respect, gratitude and equality. Gifts from random strangers are a regular occurrence. Meeting your new best friend in the host hotel’s elevators is not unlikely. Trading kandi, smiles, and hugs with police officers is routine social practice. Any given show feels like Ashton’s very own pop-up hippie commune. These unified ravers are not only committed to chasing Lorin’s music all over the country, but to spreading his message of love and acceptance.

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There’s Bassnectar festival sets, and then there’s Bassnectar curated events. The proof is in the pudding with BassCenter X, and seeing is believing if one wants to know – truly know – what this immersive community is really about. The next chance to commune with the progressive, fun-loving and wildly ostentatious Bassnectar community is New Years Eve in Atlanta, Georgia!

Featured photo courtesy of aLive Coverage

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