Lido shares visual accompaniment for ‘I O U 2’ EP [Watch]

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Lido shares visual accompaniment for ‘I O U 2’ EP [Watch]Lido Iou2 2

Although Lido‘s visual I O U 2 EP may have received limited screenings in a handful of US theaters last month, Lido has now released the transcendent project in its entirety to YouTube.

Directed by close Lido confidant, Arudz Goudsouzian, the visual realm of the EP is highly emblematic of Lido’s own coming to terms with a real-life lost love; an exploratory journey reflecting on despondence, confusion, and eventual resolve. The visceral tour through Lido’s psyche oscillates between immaculate baths of light and forestry (including pensive pans over the project’s British Columbia backdrop) and poignant, lone bedroom scenes.

Lido’s own vocals, heard homogeneously throughout the five-part project, bolster the narrative’s accessibility in regards to the artist’s path to self-reconciliation. The story is a timeless one: unflinchingly relatable, while remaining empirically authentic to its creator.

Lido lets his own pipes pave the way for reflective ‘I O U 2’ EP [Stream]

This post was originally published on this site

Lido lets his own pipes pave the way for reflective ‘I O U 2’ EP [Stream]Lido Iou2 1

Lido has released part two of his I O U concept album, featuring a plethora of his own vocals–a rare and, at present, particularly warranted inclusion for the multi-talented instrumentalist.

The boundless bearer of beats also packed the highly personal I O U 2 with a visual accompaniment, which saw limited theater release in Chicago, Toronto, and Seattle. The short film, like the EP itself, is quite meta. Ascribing his Everything album from two years back as the official introductory offering to the extended project, a post-breakup catharsis of sorts, Lido deems the I O U EPs as a “reflection on that process.”

Fittingly, Lido’s R&B-routed vocals encircle this conflicted tale of an ex-lover emerging from his scorn, not entirely ready for reconciliation. From newfound perspective, Lido posits on the violin-infused “Ex” that perhaps the romance was ill-fated from the beginning, when he “borrowed” her “‘from the universe.”

While “Flaws” touts ’90s-inspired R&B harmonies and organ synths under the guise of a forthright pop ballad, “Vultures,” “The Lonely Slow Ones,” and “Son Of Simon” exude Lido’s characteristic experimental flickers that render his work so compelling: ambient interruption, vapory synth emissions, and billowy, melancholic vocoder–to name only a few.