Premiere: Henry Saiz & Band – Cerulean (Fat Sushi Remix)

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Premiere: Henry Saiz & Band – Cerulean (Fat Sushi Remix)Henry Saiz Band Cerulean Fat Sushi Remi

Henry Saiz took a risk and exceeded expectations in his audiovisual album Human, which sought to expose the globally unifying power and profound beauty of music. To manifest his vision, Saiz and his band travelled around the world and recorded in several unique and inspirational locations.

Following the wave of success from the groundbreaking effort, Human has undergone a transformation  — courtesy of a handful of producers Saiz tapped for remixing his work.

Swiss duo Fat Sushi were tasked with making “Cerulean” into their own. The original, recorded in Tokyo, was a futuristic electronica cut that evoked the imagery of its recording destination with somber vocals and choice instrumentation. It is dressed in club attire by Fat Sushi, who douse it in chugging 4/4 percussion and analog synths that are seamless complements to those used in the original. Meanwhile, subdued vocals ricocheting in the background add further intrigue.


‘Cerulean (Fat Sushi Remix)’ will be released on Natura Sonoris on June 29. Pre-order a copy here 

Henry Saiz & Band define music as a connective force in hauntingly daring LP, ‘Human’ [Album Review]

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There are few forces that unify humanity as greatly as music. It feels as though we’re inherently drawn to rhythm and sound frequencies woven into notes and melodies, with great philosophers like Pythagoras even boasting about its healing powers. More recently, a study proved these notions with the discovery that brain activity is heightened when experiencing live music in a social setting.

Henry Saiz is one who’s been touched profoundly by these properties throughout his life, and has brought a brand new layer in their exploration through Human. The crowdfunded audiovisual album — his third  — is his most ambitious endeavor to date, seeks to connect music to the place it’s written as well as the people listening to it.

His funding campaign considerably exceeded goal, showing just how much trust his fans, and other interested connoisseurs, placed in what would come of this mission. To accomplish it, he and his band embarked on an expansive journey alongside the world, carefully selecting ten magnetic locations to inspire each chapter of the story. A video accompanies each chapter as well, offering a deeper look at the inner workings of the album’s creative process.

“I’ve always considered electronic music as a starting point — a territory without borders,” stated Saiz at the beginning of “Downfall,” Human’s leading single and video. It’s meant to illuminate the album’s core message and aesthetic, synthesizing elements across electronica and ethereal vocals into a bitterweet symphony. Beauty, wonder, and a hint of darkness are captured in “Downfall,” allowing the song to double as a reflection of humanity itself — as perceived by Saiz.

The band venture out to the Canary Islands to begin their, settling down in the picturesque beach town of Lanzarote before traversing over to Australia. Both these places are abundant in natural beauty, and their landmasses are both largely unpopulated; thus, they made for excellent “invitation[s] to escape reality,” per Henry in the second episode of the Human docuseries. “Haven” and “Ghosts,” the finished products of recording in these areas, certainly achieve their intended goal of inserting a sense of surrealism into the album, using futuristic vocals, drums recorded in cavernous volcanoes, eclectic rhythms, airy synthesizers and other dreamy elements to do so.

Next up, “The Golden Cage,” Henry Saiz and Band take listeners to Dubai, which is considered a highly developed and progressive city-state within the Middle East. Its urban atmosphere and oasis-esque location are translated into a flowy soundscape with a hint of edgy, progressive rock-inspired guitar riffs at the end that are reminiscent of solos strummed out in 1970s stadiums. Likewise, “Dragon Hills,” inspired by Saigon, also plays around with retro elements; albeit, in synth form and with added Southern Asiatic melodic arrangement to better emulate its setting.

We head back into the wilderness once more for “Human,” “Time Machine,” and “Me Llama Una Voz,” which were penned in the Kenyan savanna, Joshua Tree, and the Argentian Andes, respectively. Saiz heavily touches upon the tribal, carnal parts of the human nature in these records, with each sharing a common theme of mysticism hidden in their melodies.

“Human” is a rare vocal-less composition on the album, forcing listeners to find piece and meaning within its harmonies and hollow percussion. “Time Machine” is as psychedelic as the desert it was inspired by, hooking the mind in splashes of indie-tinged verses about rebirth and eerie recordings in the background. “Me Llama Una Voz” conveys its sonic message by weaving pan flutes into is underlay, verses sung by a local vocalist, and expansive melodies that give off the feeling of trudging through the mountains — much like Saiz and his band did while searching for inspiration.

Despite the unique instrumentation and vocals that Henry uses to distinguish each song from one another, they are ultimately quite similar in style. Not only does it make his third album a cohesive story, but it additionally shows off just how similar humans can be, despite the distance that separates us. Everyone is drawn to a well-arranged song with a jarring melody, for example, no matter the genre. In creating an electronica album that refuses to adhere to a specific archetype while remaining cohesive overall, we are seeing Henry and his band demonstrating this fact in real time.

Photo taken from Henry Saiz’ Facebook

Human finally closes with a piece called “Answer,” almost challenging to listener to define their own perception of humanity. This piece is particularly special, as its home location was Antarctica. Like “Downfall,” a bittersweet nature pervades once more as its vocalist states that “this story never ends.” These words ring true; life seems to be an eternal learning experience for all involved. For Henry Saiz & Band and this album project, however, one theme rises above all else: music is a unifying force, and a key to finding one’s own meaning of life and connectivity with others.

Meet the underground talent of CRSSD Fest: Henry Saiz

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Henry Saiz

CRSSD‘s 7th edition is a special one —it marks the official third birthday of the festival. Hosted at its usual location at the picturesque Waterfront Park in San Diego, the semi-annual event certainly hasn’t faltered in its lineup curation, inviting the likes of Cirez DEmpire of the SunHenry Saiz, and Tchami onto its bill across March 3 & 4. Dancing Astronaut joins organizers in digging a little deeper into its roster to unearth its top underrated performers to find out their backstories thus far.

From ethereal, dark progressive to avant-garde electronica, Henry Saiz sits firmly on the cutting edge of dance music. Earning inspiration from natural places, his music is often a blend of profound melodic elements, comforting samples, and wistful progressions. His Natura Sonoris label additionally reflects this ethos, bringing caliber acts like Dosem, Clarian, Gab Rhome, and more into its fold.

Lately, however, Henry has drifted farther and farther away from the tropes of contemporary dance music, seeking reinvigoration once more to create music that he adored. His solution? An immersive revolutionary audiovisual album that took him all around the world to help spark ideas for what would soon become a veritable fable in sonic form. To boot, the project was entirely crowdfunded, demonstrating just how much trust his fans had in him to create something truly special.

The album is still a ways out from its official release; however, Saiz and his band will be providing fans a taste of what’s to come with a special live performance on CRSSD Fest‘s Ocean View stage. Dancing Astronaut was able to nab him for a quick discussion ahead of time to talk about his musical pathway, what excites him musically, and more.

CRSSD Fest is sold out, but you can still view further information about the fest here.


What catalyzed your love for dance music?
I´ve had a strong relationship with music since I was a child. My parents have great taste in music so they introduced me to such artists like Vangelis, Tangerine Dream or Mike Oldfield when I was very young and I was mesmerized by those synth tones and textures.

What was your first label release? Would you still play it?
That must´ve been ´You, The Living´ back in 2006. And no, I don’t play it anymore. My taste and music evolved from that kind of sound so it just wouldn’t work for me at this point. I have no regrets though, it was good for its time 🙂

Describe the moment or event that made you realize that you were meant to be a full-time DJ.
I don’t think there was specifically a moment like that, but probably when i got signed to the UK label Renaissance… Ever since I remember myself I knew that what i´m going to do in life would be related to music and for the majority of my existence i´ve actually been involved in music one way or another. Full-time djing just came naturally.

What’s your opinion of the dance scene in the US right now?
EDM hype seems to be almost gone and that´s all that matters haha. But yeah, people´s tastes are evolving into something better, they are moving to more authentic and true styles within dance music so I guess you guys are going in the right direction. But there´s also a good thing to it and it´s that it made electronic music more popular in general in the US so people who started with listening to mainstream EDM eventually became a techno or a house fan, and got to know me, for example.

What are you looking forward to most about CRSSD Fest?
I just love to play in California and I´ve heard many good things about CRSSD. Cant wait to play our new live show to such a crowd for the first time. My bandmates and I have been working on this audiovisual project for the past 1.5 years, and now the record is almost finished and so we changed our live show entirely to tour the new album with. So it´s very thrilling and exciting.

And also we´re looking forward to just playing such a cool festival, really. We love these, we love the atmosphere, we love the vibe and all the beautiful people.

Where are your favorite places to play in the world, and why?
Honestly, I can never choose one. Every place i´m playing has its own magical atmosphere, crowd and is just special in its own way. But if I had to choose a small few I’d say Crobar in Buenos Aires, Ministry Of Sound in London, Input in Barcelona, The Block Tel Aviv, Vent in Tokyo and Stereo Montreal. These would probably stand out.

What are the biggest things in your pipeline at the moment?
Finishing up this whole audiovisual album, you guys. Album is to be out in just a couple of weeks, so it´s a very stressful time haha. Other than that, working on some new stuff to release as Henry Saiz as well, so 2018 should be interesting.

If you could recommend three artists to catch from the lineup, who would you pick?
I´d probably be checking out Empire of The Sun and Little Dragon, and then Sasha and Cirez D too (Eric going techno is always a lot of fun).

Henry Saiz & Band’s latest release taps into classic 80s noir vibes

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Henry Saiz & Band

Natura Sonoris visionary Henry Saiz & Band have unleashed a funky new track, “Ghosts.”

After successfully crowdfunding his ambitious new audio-visual album Human, Saiz and his band traveled to the ends of the Earth in 2017. They dropped off a stunning debut single and are now back with more.

“Ghosts” is irresistible with its funk-driven bass lines and enticing vocals. The track is ridden with sumptuous ‘80s guitar licks and the calculated progression of sheer emotion to match. As a blissed-out half-time breakdown moves its way into icy, gated synth chords, an infectious chorus jolts the track back to life.

Saiz and co. channel the best of ‘80s synth-pop into a number that wouldn’t be out of place in a Blade Runner 2049 trailer. “Ghosts” reads like an impeccable love letter to the ’80’s and neo-noir.

As progressive and electronica continue to have a moment in the modern dance scene, artists like Saiz ensure the revolution’s in good hands.

DA Presents: 15 artists that rocked the underground in 2017

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DA Presents: 15 artists that rocked the underground in 2017

Dance music’s second wind persists at a seemingly endless rate. In fact, its current boom has resulted in a complete infusion of the genre and into the fabric of the mainstream; megastars like Calvin Harris, The Chainsmokers, and Kygo have helped shepherd in a new age of ubiquity and recognition from the masses.

The mainstream isn’t the only area of EDM that has flourished. A renaissance of sorts is currently underway below the surface, with subgenres like progressive, techno, and house exploding back into the public eye with new vigor.

As 2017 comes to a close, Dancing Astronaut undertook the arduous task of selecting 15 underground artists that were particular standouts throughout the past year — in our subjective opinion, of course. We also made special mention to two artists that consistently push music forward in their respective arenas.

 

Words by Christina Hernandez, Grace Fleisher, and John Flynn

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DVS1

Zak Khutoretsky, better known onstage as DVS1, has brought warehouse techno to some truly interesting places. The Berghain/Panorama Bar resident has pushed the sonic boundaries of techno in obvious places like London and Berlin, but has also found himself at more all encompassing festivals such as Florida’s Okeechobee, Belgium’s Tomorrowland, and Ibiza’s CircoLoco event. Equipped with an arsenal of more than 30,000 records, experience at some of the world’s most established techno clubs, and an admiration for purist techno, Khutoretsky has broken ground in the global technosphere by forming his own dark sonic landscape.

Words by: John Flynn

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Amelie Lens

Amelie Lens is on the ascension as Belgium’s latest techno stalwart. After debuting on the Italian Lyase Recordings, Lens is paving her way as an impenetrable force in the genre. She’s finished off the year with her Stay With Me EP, which is a heightened juxtaposition of both the beauty and form of techno. In an utmost surrendering to the astounding, Lens boasts her ominously pulsating prowess, complete with a thrilling remix from the esteemed Perc.

Considering Lens’ 2017 standing with Drumcode labelmates, an occupation of copious underground lineups around the world, and her own nights at Labyrinth club in Hasselt, she brought her foreboding techno to a circuit where it will deservedly reign for quite some time.

Words by: Grace Fleisher Photo Credit: Guy Houben

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Jeremy Olander

Jeremy Olander had an undeniably powerful 2017 — a result following his creativity down a path that has since placed him among the ranks of fellow Swedes like Eric Prydz and Adam Beyer. The year saw his Vivrant imprint come into its own, defining its dark, progressive ethos with releases by Khen, Tim Engelhardt, and more recently, André Hommen. Additionally, the former Pryda Friend released some of his most well-loved pieces yet on his label, in the form of his Damon and Gattaca EPs.

His success extended outside Vivrant in plenty of other ways as well: in May, he made his debut on Bedrock alongside Cristoph, only to move onto Anjunadeep in December with a euphoria-inducing Crossed. Having also underwent an enormous year of touring, which included a residency in LA, it’s safe to say that 2017 was the year of Olander.

Words by: Christina Hernandez

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Floating Points

Floating Points — real name Sam Shepherd — has been a mainstay in experimental techno for quite some time, but it was only until this year that he began to boil to the surface of mainstream music. After releasing the wildly innovative Nuits Sonores/Nectarines, he released his debut album Elaenia much to the acclaim of critics. Performances at large scale festivals such as St. Jerome’s Laneway, Disclosure’s Parklife, and Pukkelpop under his belt, 2017 marked a capstone year for Floating Points.

Possibly the largest indication of mainstream infiltration, though, were Shepherd’s performances at Coachella this year, performing both with his expansive 11-piece live band The Floating Points Ensemble and in a packed Yuma tent for a three hour back to back DJ set with colleagues Four Tet and Daphni. Needless to say, 2017 marked a momentous year for the intellectual techno auteur.

Words by: John Flynn

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Honey Dijon

With the release of her highly anticipated album, The Best Of Both Worlds, in the fall of 2017, Honey Dijon has delivered a testament to her extensive background and immense knowledge of dance music with a compelling bevy of material. As a black, trans woman, Dijon’s relationship with dance music is a culminated collection of necessity. Her music is beyond passion. In 2017, her cross-genre sets at Berghain, Space, Smart Bar, as well as her speaking out on issues of gender in club culture, solidified the need of cultural representatives like Honey Dijon in underground dance music culture. Considering Dijon’s involvement in the dance scene dates back to when she was 12-years-old, it’s likely that the future has even more in store, and thankfully so.

Words by: Grace Fleisher

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Bedouin

Bedouin‘s late 2016 Essential Mix served as an indicator of the kind of year the pair would have in the coming months. However, 2017 brought even more milestones than one might have expected, and secured their reign over the deep, desert-inclined tech realm. They have been utterly unstoppable in past months, charting releases on Cityfox, All Day I Dream, and Crosstown Rebels with their sought-after remix of Pink Floyd’s classic, “Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun.” While dominating the music sphere with a plethora of new records, Bedouin also broke new ground in the promotion arena with the foundation of their SAGA series Ibiza, which saw the likes of Guy Gerber, Damian Lazarus, and more transform Heart into a mecca for all things mystical. The duo will only continue to build upon their strong 2017 foundation until they’ve reached the top.

Words by: Christina Hernandez

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I Hate Models

Green to the techno world, the mysterious nature of I Hate Models is part of the purist techno producer’s M.O. Steeped in nebulous synth work and carried by the gut wrenching thud of fibrillating pulsations, I Hate Model’s brilliant soundscape is the result of authentic emotions and nothing less than a perfectionist desire to create near perfect techno music. Their 2016 EP Warehouse Memories catapulted I Hate Models to stardom with the seminal tune “Daydream,” which amalgamates a rapidly paced, thunderous kick pattern with Detroit-inspired space synths and acid melodies. “Melancholy, nostalgia, passions, the suffering self,” reads their official Biography, “The expression of personal feelings” it continues, “The taste for loneliness, the desire to flee, travel, dream…” IHM’s State of Control EP was another step in their artistic evolution, further solidifying them as one of underground techno’s most audacious newcomers in 2017.

Words by: John Flynn Photo Credit: Helena Majewska

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Chicola

Despite having over two decades of music production experience, and releases on Hernan Cattaneo’s Sudbeat, Guy Mantzur’s Plattenbank, and more, Chicola just released his debut album Could Heaven Be on Guy J’s esteemed progressive label Lost & Found earlier this year. The LP spans twelve tracks and is an eloquent exploration of the Israeli artist’s personal dealings. Could Heaven Be boasts sinister drum work, but soars in its serene, cinematic soundscapes. Such sophistication is exactly what has allotted Chicola’s impressive array of work and sustained friendships in the underground. Chicola’s delectable builds and swathing beauty are inching towards the work of Dixon, Sasha, John Digweed, and Hernan Cattaneo; which is certainly something we can’t wait to watch come into fruition.

Words By: Grace Fleisher

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Fur Coat

Venezuelan duo Fur Coat have asserted their authority in the melodic techno realm, helping pioneer the rise of this relatively new sound with innovative new music and in purveying it to the global masses. After opening their year with an EP on Sasha’s Last Night On Earth, they proceeded to carve an even deeper niche into the underground with the foundation of their Oddity imprint and the subsequent release of a breathtaking Genesis EP. While only containing two bodies of work thus far, the fact that Dubspeeka, Natural Flow, and Slam have signed work onto the fledgling label demonstrates its caliber moving into the new year.

Fur Coat’s recognition extended into the indie pop world in 2017, with the outfit being tapped for re-working both Röyksopp and Sailor & I into their own ethereal interpretation.

Words by: Christina Hernandez

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Charlotte De Witte

Charlotte De Witte spends most of her days traveling for gigs or at home in Belgium, where she is working steadfast to promote up and coming talent on her local radio show. Her native Belgian roots in the underground have provided a more than apt framework for the young DJ & producer to work from, but the world is also calling Charlotte De Witte’s name. The myriad festivals that De Witte has performed at in 2017 is striking: Dour Festival, Awakenings, Tomorrowland, EXIT, Oasis Festival, the list goes on. With four EPs under her belt in 2017, and a plethora of commanding live performances, Charlotte De Witte has solidified herself as one of techno’s most forthright newcomers.

Words by: John Flynn

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Shall Ocin

Maceo Plex pupil and Argentinian techno phenom Shall Ocin has carved himself a unique niche in sinister techno over the last few years. Ocin has a knack for the foreboding analog, which is largely driven by the use of modular synths. The underground mainstay has even established his very own Clash Lion imprint. The label’s very first release was from Maceo Plex himself, albeit under his Maetrik alias. Shall Ocin’s doubled down on his diverse output of gut-wrenching techno in his latest EP Bounty Hunter. It’s brimming with atmospheric modulations, slow pulsating synth work, and an experimental analog amalgam. Ocin’s passion for innovation is clear, and with a demonstrated ability to continually work outside of his previous material — he’s even closed out the year with a Beatport artist of the week mix — Ocin’s proving to be an impenetrable installment in the underground circuit.

Words by: Grace Fleisher

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Rinzen

The word “Rinzen” translates to “sudden awakening” — a definition that couldn’t be any more pertinent to Michael Sundius’ development under the moniker throughout the past year. He found a new home on Mau5trap beginning with his original debut “Renegade,” and has since shown the dance sphere just how deep his creativity runs. Years of hardwork culminated in Forbidden City — his first ever EP — which stole music afcionados’ hearts with its enchanting, yet sinister storyline that depicts a hero’s journey by way of cinematic string elements and clever synthwork. Not to mention, his skills attracted promoters at Brooklyn’s prolific club Output, who placed trust in him to spend the entirety of NYE weekend opening for both Cristoph and Eric Prydz. With a fire that burns stronger, tangible passion for his craft, and a strong sense of humility, we predict great things are in story for Rinzen after such a dynamic first year on the scene.

 

Words by: Christina Hernandez Photo credit: Michael Drummond

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Palms Trax

UK based Jay Donaldson — aka Palms Trax — has acquired a taste for a plethora of world influences ranging from Chicago house to European Nu-Disco, and everywhere in between. Donaldson has made waves with his Cooking with Palms Trax radio show (which has now become a full blown residency at Glasgow’s intimate , expansive boiler room sets, and performances at festivals such as Dekamantel, Glitch Festival, and CRSSD, as well as in such legendary clubs as Berlin’s Berghain. By amalgamating sounds from across the entire globe, Palms Trax’s sets feel like a voyage from nation to nation, plucking groove heavy flutes, synths, and drums from nearly every geographic region and time period.

Words by: John Flynn

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Rødhåd

Since the inception of Rødhåd’s first record on his Dystopian label in 2012, the underground purveyor has been praised by innumerable global mavens. Artists like Jeff Mills, Marcel Dettmann, Ben Klock, Laurent Garnier, Sven Väth, and more, have praised Rødhåd as the king of the anti-establishment underground. He’s built his reputation on an immersive idiosyncrasy and delivered dramatic, engulfing sets at industrial utopias around the world. More recently Rødhåd’s slung out a cavernous catalog of brooding, cinematic techno. In 2017, the Berlin native delivered his enveloping 10-track album Anxious. The record’s an aptly-named theatric affair, which Rødhåd’s described as “the time we live in.” Expectedly, it served as an integral timepiece of the brooding, underground circuit, which will propel the brand of afflicted release to entirely new heights, and continue to allow listeners to lose themselves, only to discover new dimensions in the acts that will follow in Rødhåd’s foreboding footsteps.

Words by: Grace Fleisher

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Henry Saiz

Henry Saiz is an artist in every sense of the world, pouring his entire being into each production and going above and beyond to seek innovative new ways to compose music. Having succeeded in crowdfunding his expansive new audiovisual album project, 2017 saw the artist and his band travel to new realms to both create and roadtest new musical concepts. This endeavor bled into his outputs for 2017; at the tail end of September, he earned a nomination for the Essential Mix of the Year after making his debut on the series. Prior to that, he celebrated the 10th anniversary of his Natura Sonoris label with a rare second contribution to the Balance mix series. Progressive and electronica are having a moment currently, and Saiz has proved himself to be one of the leaders in this new revolution.

Words by: Christina Hernandez Photo credit: Chris Soltis

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Special Mention: The Black Madonna

Marea Stamper told Resident Advisor in 2014 that she hoped to embody “the core values of inclusion and pure dance euphoria.” In the year of #MeToo, where women spoke out against their oppressors, and where sexual assault outings, misogyny, and political turmoil seemed to unravel on an endless timeline, The Black Madonna doubled down on the use of her platform as a voice for the voiceless. Her music amplified the voices of women, people of color, and the LGBTQ community. Stamper’s sets raised up the central voices of club history — ones that have been forced to the periphery or silenced entirely — through a provocative exudence of acid house, disco, and outright emotion. In 2017, the Black Madonna seamlessly linked the past and the present through her track “He Is The Voice I Hear.” Dedicated to a string of disco legends —Larry Levan, Walter Gibbons, and Loleatta Holloway — the multifarious number rode out a spine-tingling idiosyncrasy, encapsulating her aforementioned goal — as if she hadn’t already — with an apt juxtaposition of anxiety and groove. Without uttering a word, the harrowing empowerment of “He Is The Voice I Hear” spoke volumes and epitomized the socioeconomic atmosphere of an entire year that had still yet to unfold.

Words by: Grace Fleisher

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Special Mention: Hernan Cattaneo

There’s a reason why Hernan Cattaneo is called “El Maestro” among fans. He possesses an uncanny ability to mix records, making seamless transitions and taking his audiences on a deep journey within themselves through each of his sets. While he serves as a continual pillar of inspiration within the progressive, and underground sphere as a whole, the Argentinian legend also had some key milestones in 2017 to date. His Sudbeat label saw an abundance of releases, and he was also able to assemble a powerhouse slate of artists to help kickstart the year with a Balance compilation. We imagine this incredible artist will continue to use his platform to proliferate top quality music as 2018 sets into place.

Words by: Christina Hernandez

Henry Saiz – The Golden Cage (Sebastien Léger remix)

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French producer Sebastien Léger is definitely an electronic music veteran in his own right, with almost 20 years of experience under his belt. interestingly, throughout the duration of his lasting career, Leger has stayed true to his experimental style— a trend that a worrying number veteran DJs tend to shun in modern times.

His latest remix of Henry Saiz‘s “The Golden Cage” is an eight-minute-long auditory voyage in continuity with his time-tested style. Using his abundance of experience, Leger is able to meticulously craft an intriguing soundscape, filled with an abundance of analog elements that give the remix character, a quality missing from a majority of songs in current circulation.

 

 

 

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Henry Saiz debuts first track off of forthcoming album

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Spanish progressive & electronica star Henry Saiz has released the first taste of his forthcoming Kickstarter-funded album Human, which he will be releasing as Henry Saiz & Band. He raised over €73,000 for the project, which saw him travel to different corners of the earth to record in unusual natural settings and with unexpected local collaborators.

“The Golden Cage,” is an indie electronica hybrid with breathy vocals shimmering over slow-motion beats and a languid bassline as melancholy chord progressions play out through glistening synths. Saiz commented on this debut single and his inspiration for the project. He also notes that “The Golden Cage” was inspired by Dubai.

We were interested in those places that reveal aspects of what it means to be human, for better or for worse. It’s one of those places, a mirage that rises as if by magic in the middle of what until a few years ago was only desert, a place of wonders that hides a dark side, just like we all do.

“The Golden Cage” certainly leaves listeners wanting more. Humans’ full release date is yet to be announced.

 

 

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