Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshed

This post was originally published on this site

Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshedTechno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Over a decade behind the decks and a fierce philosophy of rule-less making has placed Gary Beck atop the ranks of techno and electronica. The Glasgow native has charted a unique path in music that has seen him constantly pushing boundaries in his realm of expertise and letting his instinct guide his musical direction, leading to pickup by some of the most iconic underground imprints that include R&S, Cocoon, and beyond. Not to mention, he scored spots on both Boiler Room and BBC’s Essential Mix series not long after making his break into the scene; a feat not achieved by many in the same position.

Beck’s instinct led to the creation of his latest album, DÁL RIATA, which began as a bit of a homage to his native Scotland but soon became an almagamation of songs born out his club experiences over the years since his last LP, Bring A Friend. It shows off a new side of Beck, one that harkens back to his time learning trumpet in school and his longtime love of instrumental elements and his native culture. Yet, DÁL RIATA remains plenty futuristic in tone, with celestial melodies and off-kilter arrangements becoming an indicator of where clubland, and Beck’s head, is collectively at.

Curious about the new sound on the album, we sat Beck down to dive deep into its production and inspirations, and also picked his brains on his label, BEK Audio — which will be crossing over its milestone tenth birthday this year.

Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshedGARYBECK 4

It’s been six years since your last album. How have you evolved musically since then?
Not too much actually! I still use all the same equipment in the studio however I always have new fresh ideas going on. I don’t want to stray too far away from ‘my sound’ as it works very well on the dance floor and it has an identity. It’s important not to lose that.

In that regard, we’ve noticed that DÁL RIATA seems to see you playing a lot more with orchestral elements, and more melody in general compared to Bring A Friend. Are you able to articulate your move in this direction sonically, or how your recent experiences in clubland might have influenced this direction?
I’ve always had a real love for Orchestral music since I first discovered the music of John Barry and James Horner. I also had some experience of playing trumpet in my school orchestra which I enjoyed immensely. It was quite refreshing to add elements of this into the album, as it’s something I always wanted to do. I love Celtic traditional music in general and I wanted to inject some of this into my album.

What was the decider in you amalgamating your club experiences into an album vs creating something more conceptual?
There wasn’t really a deciding moment. I did initially plan to have a Scottish feel around the album, and I think the name and artwork reflect that. I don’t think that albums should have any rules, however I wanted to showcase everything I’m feeling right now.

Is there a particular moment where you felt like it was time to release another album, and any productions you were sitting on that nudged you into a more compilation-esque direction?
At the start of the year, I moved into my new studio after 2 years of failing to find a proper space that worked for me. It was around this time that I realised all I was doing was releasing EP’s, so I decided a fresh challenge was needed. I also felt that doing an album would be a great way to break the new studio in. It gives you a real focus, and in that time, I must have written close to 60 tracks!

Can you connect certain songs to certain cities/venues that might have inspired their creation? Expand on that if so.
The title track ‘Dàl Riata’ connects me to the west coast of Scotland. I visit this area at least 4 times a year as it’s so beautiful and inspiring for me. It’s hard to describe but this track just seems to take me there. Other tracks such as ‘Mango Circus’ and ‘Macabre’ remind me of my experiences playing in amazing dark venues such as the Sub Club in Glasgow and Berghain.

You’re a seasoned veteran in this industry. What has kept you feeling refreshed and inspired throughout the years? Any routines you practice helping foster this?
It sounds crazy being called a seasoned veteran, as I genuinely still feel like I’ve just started all this! Time goes by so fast. I guess the love of it keeps me going. Nothing beats the feeling of writing a special track and unleashing it to the audiences!

What have been some of your most treasured memories in clubland over the past half-decade?
A few years ago, I decided to take my Dad to one of my gigs in Buenos Aires, as he’s a massive football fan and wanted to see Boca Juniors. Initially, he didn’t want to come to my gig, but I finally persuaded him after a few beers! Next minute, he’s backstage at Crobar watching me play to 1,500 people. This was extremely special to me as he had never seen me play and gave him a real insight into what I was doing.

Have you seen any positive changes of late that have reaffirmed your passion for the scene?
I’ll always have a real passion for it, I can’t see that ever changing. There’s a lot of great producers coming through delivering fantastic music which is always great, however I have seen more negative than positive unfortunately, and I blame this on social media.

BEK Audio is nearing its 10th birthday. Any special plans to celebrate that you’re at liberty to tell us about?
I’m planning it altogether in my head as we speak. It’s very hard to believe the label has been running for 10 years! One thing is for sure, there will be a super compilation on the way.

Is the label going to shift sonically in the way your sound has, or perhaps take on a more expansive palette? Or do you feel there was never really a set aesthetic to shift from in the first place?
I never have any rules with the label. If it’s good, then it’s good and I’ll release it. I’m going to be pushing out some more digital only releases moving forward. With vinyl, I was only managing about 3 releases a year and I really want to expand on that.

Any final words or big goings-on down the line that you’d like to tell readers?
Apart from BEK Audio reaching 10 and the album release, I think that’s all I can announce for now!

 

Pre-order a copy of ‘DÁL RIATA’ — out on November 20 — here

Photo credit: Gary Beck’s team

Premiere: Bob Moses gives a gritty glimpse of life on tour in ‘Back Down’ music video [Watch]

This post was originally published on this site

Premiere: Bob Moses gives a gritty glimpse of life on tour in ‘Back Down’ music video [Watch]Bob Moses Back Down Video Premiere

With a brilliantly evocative new album titled Battle Lines in tow, Bob Moses have brought their latest era to cities across North America this fall. Their Battle Lines Tour is set to wrap after one final show November 16 in Los Angeles, following months of international touring. “Back Down,” a breakaway hit from the new LP, has quickly become a streaming and crowd favorite–and the genre blending duo were kind enough to premiere the song’s official music video here at Dancing Astronaut.

The music video is an intimate glimpse into the Bob Moses tour experience,  with various black-and-white scenes from the road contrasting beautifully with the bright red-orange lights of the stage. Behind-the-scenes footage ranging from hotel room jams to views from the tour bus are sprinkled between shots of Bob Moses tearing through a spirited live performance. Almost imperceptibly, black and white and full color shots converge on the stage for the track’s climax. The duo gave some insight into the music video’s documentary-esque origins:

“We spent a while thinking about what we wanted the ‘Back Down’ video to be. We wanted to be in it which inevitably ended up meaning that the video came to us. It’s a few days in our lives so that means on the road, in the bus, and onstage. No middle of the night truck stops made the final cut.  It was filmed at the very beginning of our most recent US tour so they caught us performing the song for our very first times.   We got to shoot some of this in our hometown of Vancouver too which was special.”

Sunday Morning Medicine, Vol. 152: featuring ATTLAS, Icarus, Khåen, + more

This post was originally published on this site

Sunday Morning Medicine, Vol. 152: featuring ATTLAS, Icarus, Khåen, + moreSMM 2400

Sunday Morning Medicine is a feature from Dancing Astronaut dedicated to the mellower side of electronic music. We bring you our favorite therapeutic selections—old and new—in attempts to alleviate the agonizing effects of a long weekend of partying.


Bristol’s Icarus brethren avoid flying too close to the sun, with this ambient house offering, “October.” Instead, like a warm summer’s rain, they’re here to absolve you of weekend transgressions with skittering, precipitous percussion and revelatory vocal incantations.

Listeners of intention may recognize “Third Evangelist,” as well as most of Khåen’s new Solace In The Night album, from Lane 8‘s adorned seasonal mixes and live sets, as well as featured on the latter’s recently incepted This Never Happened label housing. With minimal production froth, “Third Evangelist” glows with a transcendental twinkle, intended to rescue listener’s from the icy precipice of a Sunday afternoon.

ODESZA addicts will revel inside the redemptive reverb of Satin Jackets’s “So I Heard.” The sultry track’s languorous strings and otherworldly vocal harmonies are likely to incite wakeful dreams through lustrous beaches eons from the throes of office monotony.

Sexy doesn’t even begin to chronicle the audible encounter that is mossy.’s reworking of Lido‘s “Dye.” The track experiments, unfettered, with beat-deliberate downtempo mechanisms, most notably its lush and languid harp plucks.

ATTLASmau5trap endeavor from earlier this year, “Concussion,” is an equal parts blissful and torrential odyssey that eventually lands listeners back on their feet—once its effects have abated—much like a night of heavy drinking. Its rattling percussion and stormy synth blasts are mediated by a tender, steadying melody that reminds the listener of lighter arenas, like a ghost of dance floors past.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 64

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 64Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


There’s something so intriguingly uplifting about this remix of Above & Beyond‘s “Happiness Amplified” with Richard Bedford. Josep takes the original’s infectious melody and amplifies it (pardon the pun) with a guitar riff that adds a whole new level to an already incredible track. Bedford’s optimistic vocals carry this compelling remix in a powerful way, as it transforms from a trance track to a progressive rock-inspired rework.

warner case‘s good time heart dance arrived just a few days ago, featuring two tracks primed for both easy listening and the dance floor. After delivering “good time” in September with Zak Downtown, the New York artist returns in full force to shore up the full EP via the lighthearted “heart dance.” This one is highlighted by spunky horn stabs and an irresistibly groovy beat. Spencer Ludwig lends his vocals to the EP’s second track, launching “heart dance” into its full funky potential.

Hidden Face isn’t messing around on his latest pieces of work. The Parisian artist has been diving deep into the melancholy dance music realm, channeling ZHU-like vibes with his mystery-shrouded melodies. His newest, “You Don’t Know,” is another dominant display of his style. A minimalist bouncing beat contrasts with vocals that call out, “you don’t know.” Hidden Face takes the time to let each note sink in, and that’s perhaps part of what makes his style so compelling.

Hillsdom and Novokan3 make their return to Pilot Records with a two-part collection of drum & bass goodies. “Obsession” and “Colours” impeccably showcase their style of drum & bass: laid-back and packed with emotion. In “Obsession,” they create a mellow atmosphere that features warped, wonky synths and emotive vocals. A mid-song interlude takes a break from percussion to deliver a smooth-gliding melody before then ramping back up into a rapid drum & bass rhythm.

This. Goes. So. Hard. Known for his well-crafted soundscapes, Au5 takes on Detroit industrial artist Celldweller‘s “Eon.” This seven-minute venture rattles the ribcage with its grinding dubstep elements, intensified by Celldweller’s screamo interludes. Fondly dubbed “metalstep” by a SoundCloud commenter, this classification seems to fit this heavy hybrid perfectly. Both artists’ otherworldly styles mesh incredibly in this remix, highlighting the best of each of their talents. Color me impressed.

ILLENIUM is redefining the live show game with Awake 2.0 & unveils his refreshing new single, ‘God Damnit’ [Interview]

This post was originally published on this site

ILLENIUM is redefining the live show game with Awake 2.0 & unveils his refreshing new single, ‘God Damnit’ [Interview]1

The evolution of live performances in the electronic music world has been nothing short of a phenomenon. Artists across the board, from house to bass, have continually sought to broaden the bounds in which fans can experience their favorite music. Dating back to just the past couple of years, these efforts have ranged across an entire spectrum of legendary acts that have reached the apex of their respective fields, from Odesza’s ‘A Moment Apart’ tour, to Porter Robinson and Madeon’s collaborative ‘Shelter’ tour, to The Glitch Mob’s mind-numbing ‘Blade 2.0’ technology. These artists have found new ways to push the envelope and erase the unfortunate stigma in today’s society that DJs appear on stage with minimal effort and zero live elements or performance aspects. Now, as the calendar moves into the homestretch of 2018, the next phase of this industry-redefining movement has been unveiled at the hands of none other than ILLENIUM.

Following an upward trajectory that has propelled him into headlining status over the past few years, ILLENIUM has consistently topped the billing of some of the planet’s most renowned festivals to become a scorching topic of conversation. He’s cemented his all-star status with the release of two critically-acclaimed LPs in Ashes and Awake, plus a handful of chart-topping originals and an evolving live experience. The latter of the two albums marked a significant moment for ILLENIUM, who introduced his audiences to the ‘Awake’ live show concept amid his widely sold-out US tour. In calling upon the help of his two close personal friends in Dabin and Said the Sky, the eclectic trio granted those in attendance an unparalleled experience that set the bar high for what could be expected going forward in the realm of DJ performances. They transitioned away from the common use of solely CDJs during sets to the incorporation of an array of live instrumentation that gave the spectacle a much more authentic and emotional atmosphere.

The Denver resident began to tease a refreshed approach to his ‘Awake’ tour at the end of July after taking the past summer reinvigorate what he sought to offer on stage. After months of careful planning and what he labeled some of his most intricate work to date, ILLENIUM officially announced his inaugural ‘Awake 2.0’ appearance with a home state event at the iconic Red Rocks Amphitheatre. The August event marked a historical moment in ILLENIUM’s burgeoning career, serving as his first-ever headlining event at the venue — a feat in which only some of electronic music’s most colossal titans have been able to add to their list of accolades.

While it wasn’t explicitly disclosed what to expect for the ‘Awake 2.0’ environment, ILLENIUM noted that he would be creating more of his darker and heavier live edits along with new music and some potential surprises as well. This turned out to be more than fans could have ever dreamed of, as ILLENIUM followed through tenfold on his promise by debuting an outright band setup with the help once more from Dabin and Said the Sky. The group rightfully took the next step in their artistic progression by utilizing everything at their disposal from a full drum kit to electric guitars to a grand piano.

As if this wasn’t enough excitement for his faithful and self-dubbed ‘Illenials’ community to savor, the artist brought along a special unreleased production during the show that was something his fans had yet to see from the limitless 27-year-old. “God Damnit” wasted little to no time seeing the light of day as ILLENIUM takes a leap of faith into unconquered territory for him to provide something refreshing that dance music devotees had yet be exposed to. Boasting an introspective hook toppled with infectious rap bars from rising lyricist Call Me Karizma, ILLENIUM plasters his trademark drums and haunting melodies for a crisp, intimate production that is primed to send chills throughout the human spine. In talking with us on why he decided to go a more hip-hop inspired route, he made it known that he was fully aware of the reception it may receive, but the story behind the song and the connection he felt with it erased all sentiments of doubt in pushing forward with its release.

ILLENIUM is poised to take his ‘Awake 2.0’ experience to three of the biggest cities in the United States to wrap up 2018 with sold out shows in San Francisco, Chicago and New York City as a continuation of his newly-defined live concept. Having already taken the original ‘Awake’ tour to the city that never sleeps in December of last year, the blossoming talent will be returning for a monumental three-night-stand that will surely be one fans will remember. In preparation of his multi-night journey back to the East Coast, DA met up with one of the biggest names in dance music to talk about expectations for his rejuvenated show concept, his newest release “God Damnit” and potentially working on something with his idol Porter Robinson.

The Awake 2.0 tour has really seen your full transition from a DJ to complete live performer. I can’t really think of any DJ who has done a full band setup before so can you talk a little about what inspired you to go this path? Did it make it easier to put together while working with close friends like Dabin and Said the Sky?

With the first Awake show, we definitely transitioned it to really be a live performance. It was so special and I was able to work with Trevor, who’s an insane musician, Dabin, who’s an insane guitarist and David also, who’s Trevor’s tour manager and does the drums. It was kind of this exciting thing to be surrounded by all these amazing musicians like that and I’m not that crazy of a live musician. Beyond the actual show, it’s really cool to have people that are opening the show to be a part of the main show where it’s like this special thing. For Awake 2.0, we kind of just put all of that on steroids. We have a full live drum kit and we have another guitarist come in so it’s just become an evolution of the Awake show especially because the music I choose to play so I don’t want it to be a rock show.

What was the experience like of bringing that Awake 2.0 experience to the iconic Red Rocks for your own headlining show?

It was really breathtaking honestly. It’s a really sentimental venue for me and I had my whole family there. Just to get the whole Awake 2.0 show ready, with everything from timecoding to rehearsals, it was the hardest work I think I’ve ever done live wise. Shows at this caliber will have lighting choreographers and stage choreographers, and we didn’t have anything so I was micromanaging everyone. It was really cool though because it was like my baby but I definitely learned a lot and think there’s ways we can perfect it even more. I felt like it was a perfect description of when things aren’t too perfect because sometimes you’ll see a show and it’s just too choreographed. The Red Rocks show felt like it had the perfect amount of imperfection.

You premiered a brand new ID during that set as well, which is definitely unlike anything you’ve done before but still has that classic ILLENIUM touch. Can you tell us a little more about that single & how that came about?

I love that song. This past year, I felt like I’ve been listening to a lot more variety of stuff. It’s emotional and I feel like it’s a really cool story, where it’s pretty heartfelt and raw. It honestly just feels like it’s a more raw version of my other music and I’m sure it’ll get ‘mixed reviews’. I think it’ll 100% be some of my fans’ favorite songs but the people that loved “Gold” and the Kill the Noise remix are going to be like “well, what the f*ck is this sad boy rap?”

Before you released your last single, “Take You Down” you spoke about how it was created from personal struggles that you’ve faced in your past. Did you find it difficult to open up like that or did you find relief in being able to share that with your dedicated fanbase?

100%. I feel like it’s a community now where it’s all about helping people out. I think a lot of fanbases or cultish communities get a bad rap because they love an artist so much that it turns some people off, which isn’t really a fair assessment because people are helping each other in this community. It’s a very personal thing that I was able to put out but that’s where I think I’m really headed with my music where all the stuff I’m working on now is a lot more personal and storytelling.

Through the release of both Ashes and Awake and of course all of the music since, it’s safe to say that you’ve fully mastered your trademark sound. Why do you think that your music has resonated with fans in such a personal way?

I think a lot of comes from the way I create music. I see music as this healing thing where I go in by myself and it’s like this serene area where I don’t feel any pressure and it’s emotional healing so naturally, that creates emotional music. I think that’s just how it works where people connect to that. There’s instances where I’m writing stuff and I just don’t feel it and I’m like “ok, I’m just gonna scrap it” but there’s also moments when I’m making something and I’m like “oh, this is tight”.

You’ve said in the past that your dream collaboration would be with Porter Robinson but is there also anyone else on your bucket list of people to work with?

I would love if Porter did some more Porter. He does his own thing and he fully sent it into the Virtual Self stuff, which is sick because it’s so innovative. He’s more innovative than I am; I think I write music for that healing process that I talked about and sometimes that just means writing songs and it’s as simple as that. I think some people write it where it has to be new, it has to be something they haven’t totally stepped on before. I would love to work with Porter though and I would love to work with Skrillex too.

We know that while your sets feature a lot of tracks that put you in your feels, you also include a lot of hard-hitting songs. Do you enjoy playing more emotional sets or do you prefer when you’re able to throw down a lot of trap and dubstep cuts?

I think too much of anything and I get sick of it. If I was to only play feels-y, vibe-y sets then I would be bored. If I was to only play headbanging sets, I’d be like “oh, I’m gonna die too”. I go back and forth between being able to play an Awake show and then play an afterparty where I have no plans and can just wing it. It’s nice to be in both worlds and I think collabing with the artists I have this past year has helped out with that.

Now looking at the other side of it, was producing harder style tracks always something you sought out to do? Do you think playing them live help to inspire you to collaborate with producers like Zeds Dead, Excision and Kill the Noise?

Those were my original influences like Bassnectar and Zeds Dead. I started out making more bass-heavy music and then when Porter released ‘Worlds’ and Odesza was releasing their music, I really fell in love with that sound so it all combined. I make so many heavy edits of my own music too.

It’s been a little over a year since you released Awake and we know you have your upcoming single “God Damnit” dropping very soon but are there any current plans for a third album in the near future?

Yes there is but I can’t really give much info but it’s definitely happening. I don’t really stop [laughs].

It’s safe to say we’re unbelievably excited that you’re coming back to NYC for 3 sold out shows in December. For fans that haven’t been able to experience Awake 2.0 yet, what would you tell them to expect?

It’s a new experience. If you saw the first Awake show it’s so different than that because I pretty much remixed the entire album and edited it. It’s really just what I for-see electronic music going to where it’s becoming not band-ish, but more than just a DJ. Nothing against DJing but I’m able to do things like showcasing friends too.

 

Photo Credit: Alexandra Gavillet

The Prodigy update the familiar on ‘No Tourists’ (Album Review)

This post was originally published on this site

The Prodigy update the familiar on ‘No Tourists’ (Album Review)Notouristsmain

When an artist has released a vast body of work over multiple decades, engaged multiple generations of fanbases, and driven their genre forward for so long, it is hard to know what to expect from a new album. Was the genre-bending production just the music that came to them at the time, or is there a commitment to experimentation and subversion beyond the first few albums? For the Prodigy, lead by Liam Howlett the answer is somewhat clear. On the band’s seventh studio album, No Tourists, the Prodigy reach for the familiar and inject it with a dose of 2018.

A classic Prodigy record, No Tourists is jam-packed with energizing breakbeats, punk-leaning vocal hooks, and synth and guitar work that could fill the largest of warehouses. In this regard, the album is not a departure from anything the group has put out in the past. Big, high-energy sounds are what put the Prodigy on the map so many years ago. So as a listener with an array of old Prodigy tracks in my music library and a recently purchased vinyl single from 1991, what keeps bringing me back to this album? Why, when this album seems to be textbook Prodigy, do I not toss it to the side for the iconic originals? The answer lies in the production.

While the boisterous sound of Howlett’s production is nothing new, there is something cleaner and more refined about the entire sound of the album. Even compared to their 2015 offering The Day Is My Enemy, the samples are crisper, and the bass lines straddle that perfect line between distortion and clarity. Take the album’s lead single and opening track, “Need Some1.” With sloppier production, a track with a big, slow, hip-hop breakbeat, a variety of vocal samples, and explosive synths may have sounded cluttered and disorienting – but Howlett creates the perfect amount of space and depth to make the track work. And while an all out assault of noise may have been what drove the Prodigy’s success on Experience and The Fat of the Land, the musical landscape has changed. The Prodigy’s audience is no longer blasting tracks on massive speakers in their garage or at warehouse raves – this is an album for the headphone generation, exemplified greatly by tracks like “Boom Boom Tap” and “Light Up the Sky.” Sounds from every sector of the EQ spectrum shine through, with intricate synth work not feeling overpowered by the forceful low end. With the streaming economy making on-the-go listening more accessible, a crowded project full of distortion and a less precise mix could lead to an album that does not connect in this new era of music consumption.

While the album is sonically solid, No Tourists does not push the boundaries of what can be expected from the Prodigy. There is a small part of me that is disappointed that Howlett and the band did not take the group in any new direction. After seven albums, I (perhaps foolishly) expected a bit of deviation from the stylistic norm. However, a standard offering from the Prodigy is not anything to be scoffed at. I’d take No Tourists over ‘The Prodigy goes festival trap’ any day of the week. And when albums like Tom Morello’s feature-laden The Atlas Underground are missing the mark without a distinct sound or direction, a cohesive yet familiar project from the big beat progenitors may be what we needed. We are just lucky that, when it comes to the Prodigy, the familiar still hits hard.

Axis 205: Lost Frequencies drops off fresh mix, talks touring with The Chainsmokers & more

This post was originally published on this site

Axis 205: Lost Frequencies drops off fresh mix, talks touring with The Chainsmokers & moreLost Frequencies Ais 205

Past hits like 2014’s “Are You With Me” have made Lost Frequencies a certified star in his home country of Belgium. Stateside, the melodic electronica virtuoso has dazzled crowds opening for heavyweights including Don Diablo, and more recently The Chainsmokers. Releasing a steady stream of wistful deep house cuts through Armada and his own aptly named Found Frequencies imprint, Lost Frequencies is carving out his own four-to-the-floor formula with lethal crossover appeal.

This year has been another big one for the producer, with high profile slots at festivals like Electric Zoo, and infectious singles like “Melody” and “Like I Love You” leading the way. On the heels of a standout remix of the newly formed LSD’s “Thunderclouds,” the Lost Frequencies dropped by to look back on his whirlwind year and talk what’s next – and drop off a textbook feels-inducing journey for the 205th edition of our Axis series. In typical form, the one-hour ride blends anything everything soothing and uplifting, spanning recognizable hits and some of some juicy IDs from the artist and his label mates.

You were recently listed on DJ mag’s top 100 DJ list at #17. What are your feelings about making it, and the recent online backlash to the list? 

It felt amazing to hear that I reached #17, I climbed 9 places which I certainly didn’t expect and I’m very thankful to all my fans and friends supporting! I think with a list, poll, or anything that “ranks” artists will always face backlash, there is always someone, or another scene, that doesn’t agree! But overall, the response has been very positive and I’m grateful to be recognized alongside so many leaders in dance music!


Last year, you were able to join The Chainsmokers on tour. What are some personal lessons and takeaways from the experience? 

I did, it was crazy! I learnt; pranks can bring you all together and keep you sane on the road – it was one of my favorite memories in such a huge year, Alex and Andrew are so much fun and the vibes were crazy! It was amazing to be able to take my sound to so many huge arenas in the States.


Outside of your own music, what can fans expect soon from your recently revealed Found Frequencies imprint? 

We’ve just released remixes from of ‘Like I Love You’ but for me, it’s also important for us to help introduce new artists that are making music we think is really cool! We have new music from Pretty Pink, Jameson and Mordkey next month, get ready!

The Lost Frequencies catalogue is stuffed with vocal features – Who’re some artists on your wish-list to collaborate with next?

I would love to work with MØ, her voice sounds so fresh, different and exciting on every release.

What’s next in the evolution of the Lost Frequencies sound?

My recent remix for LSD’s (Labrinth, Sia & Diplo) latest track I really enjoyed but I have already started working on new tracks – they may appear on my next album but nothing is set in stone yet, my calendar is super busy but new music is something that is definitely on my mind. You’ll be able to keep up to date on anything and everything across my social media!

Axis 205: Lost Frequencies drops off fresh mix, talks touring with The Chainsmokers & more

This post was originally published on this site

Axis 205: Lost Frequencies drops off fresh mix, talks touring with The Chainsmokers & moreLost Frequencies Ais 205

Past hits like 2014’s “Are You With Me” have made Lost Frequencies a certified star in his home country of Belgium. Stateside, the melodic electronica virtuoso has dazzled crowds opening for heavyweights including Don Diablo, and more recently The Chainsmokers. Releasing a steady stream of wistful deep house cuts through Armada and his own aptly named Found Frequencies imprint, Lost Frequencies is carving out his own four-to-the-floor formula with lethal crossover appeal.

This year has been another big one for the producer, with high profile slots at festivals like Electric Zoo, and infectious singles like “Melody” and “Like I Love You” leading the way. On the heels of a standout remix of the newly formed LSD’s “Thunderclouds,” the Lost Frequencies dropped by to look back on his whirlwind year and talk what’s next – and drop off a textbook feels-inducing journey for the 205th edition of our Axis series. In typical form, the one-hour ride blends anything everything soothing and uplifting, spanning recognizable hits and some of some juicy IDs from the artist and his label mates.

You were recently listed on DJ mag’s top 100 DJ list at #17. What are your feelings about making it, and the recent online backlash to the list? 

It felt amazing to hear that I reached #17, I climbed 9 places which I certainly didn’t expect and I’m very thankful to all my fans and friends supporting! I think with a list, poll, or anything that “ranks” artists will always face backlash, there is always someone, or another scene, that doesn’t agree! But overall, the response has been very positive and I’m grateful to be recognized alongside so many leaders in dance music!


Last year, you were able to join The Chainsmokers on tour. What are some personal lessons and takeaways from the experience? 

I did, it was crazy! I learnt; pranks can bring you all together and keep you sane on the road – it was one of my favorite memories in such a huge year, Alex and Andrew are so much fun and the vibes were crazy! It was amazing to be able to take my sound to so many huge arenas in the States.


Outside of your own music, what can fans expect soon from your recently revealed Found Frequencies imprint? 

We’ve just released remixes from of ‘Like I Love You’ but for me, it’s also important for us to help introduce new artists that are making music we think is really cool! We have new music from Pretty Pink, Jameson and Mordkey next month, get ready!

The Lost Frequencies catalogue is stuffed with vocal features – Who’re some artists on your wish-list to collaborate with next?

I would love to work with MØ, her voice sounds so fresh, different and exciting on every release.

What’s next in the evolution of the Lost Frequencies sound?

My recent remix for LSD’s (Labrinth, Sia & Diplo) latest track I really enjoyed but I have already started working on new tracks – they may appear on my next album but nothing is set in stone yet, my calendar is super busy but new music is something that is definitely on my mind. You’ll be able to keep up to date on anything and everything across my social media!

A five-track collection of Louis The Child’s most novel cuts

This post was originally published on this site

A five-track collection of Louis The Child’s most novel cutsLouis The Child Press By Cameron Postforoosh 2018 Billboard 1548

It is hardly any wonder that each release bearing the “Louis The Child” moniker embodies a youthful spirit that will never age, given both members’ keen ear for whimsical and timeless productions. A credit to ceaseless experimentation ever since their step onto the dance music playing field, Louis The Child consistently tee up productions defined by anecdotal lyrics that envision common experience through a playful lens, idiosyncratic arrangements, and some of the punchiest synth work to circulate in the current electronic context. It is Louis The Child’s sonically unpredictable personality that instills excitement in listeners of the Chicago based DJ duo with each successive release. Hot on the heels of Louis The Child’s new EP, Kids At Play, Dancing Astronaut throws it back to five of Louis The Child’s most novel cuts, in homage to their ongoing North American tour.

“The City”

“The City” sees the producers convene with Quinn XCII for a wonky, beat driven single off of the then unreleased Kids At Play. The futuristic sounding, mid tempo shaker marries Quinn XCII’s vocal to glitchy electronic elements to create a carefree atmosphere well-suited for strolls in a city of the streamer’s choosing.

“Right To It (with Ashe)”

Louis The Child capture the spirit of ‘Sunday Funday’ in a neat near three-minutes of playtime on “Right To It.” An early instantiation of Louis The Child’s manipulation of classic pop sound into attention grabbing reconstructions, the track lays Ashe‘s flirtatious vocal atop steely synths that undulate. “Right To It” tells a lyrical narrative of kickin’ it into oblivion, with “some vodka with some OJ,” of course.

“Phone Died (feat. blaise railey)

Louis The Child take a satirical sonic stab at modern day cell phone saturation in “Phone Died,” an electronic/hip-hop amalgamation that pairs chorus sang background parts with a stuttering background beat evocative of hip hop style. Blaise railey comes through with a raspy vocal overlay, proving to be the song’s key “no charge superstar.”

“Go”

Louis The Child chop up “Go’s” vocal, and simultaneously play with sonic effect on the single, by fading the song’s vocal in and out at certain junctures. The indie-electronically tinged track is the host of what is perhaps one of Louis The Child’s most experimental drops.

“Shake Something (feat. Joey Purp)”

It’s a Chicago creative affair on “Shake Something,” a gritty, hip-hop inflected number that joins Windy City rapper, Joey Purp, with Louis The Child. While Louis The Child frequently invoke traces of hip-hop beat arrangements in their productions, “Shake Something” is grounded firmly in hip-hop influence, rather than in fragmentations. Purp’s laidback flow contrasts with the comparatively more forceful body of the song’s metallic drops.

Photo Credit: Cameron Postforoosh

Louis The Child are currently in the midst of their North American fall 2018 tour. Listeners can find a complete list of tour stops, and tickets to each date, here.

A five-track collection of Louis The Child’s most novel cuts

This post was originally published on this site

A five-track collection of Louis The Child’s most novel cutsLouis The Child Press By Cameron Postforoosh 2018 Billboard 1548

It is hardly any wonder that each release bearing the “Louis The Child” moniker embodies a youthful spirit that will never age, given both members’ keen ear for whimsical and timeless productions. A credit to ceaseless experimentation ever since their step onto the dance music playing field, Louis The Child consistently tee up productions defined by anecdotal lyrics that envision common experience through a playful lens, idiosyncratic arrangements, and some of the punchiest synth work to circulate in the current electronic context. It is Louis The Child’s sonically unpredictable personality that instills excitement in listeners of the Chicago based DJ duo with each successive release. Hot on the heels of Louis The Child’s new EP, Kids At Play, Dancing Astronaut throws it back to five of Louis The Child’s most novel cuts, in homage to their ongoing North American tour.

“The City”

“The City” sees the producers convene with Quinn XCII for a wonky, beat driven single off of the then unreleased Kids At Play. The futuristic sounding, mid tempo shaker marries Quinn XCII’s vocal to glitchy electronic elements to create a carefree atmosphere well-suited for strolls in a city of the streamer’s choosing.

“Right To It (with Ashe)”

Louis The Child capture the spirit of ‘Sunday Funday’ in a neat near three-minutes of playtime on “Right To It.” An early instantiation of Louis The Child’s manipulation of classic pop sound into attention grabbing reconstructions, the track lays Ashe‘s flirtatious vocal atop steely synths that undulate. “Right To It” tells a lyrical narrative of kickin’ it into oblivion, with “some vodka with some OJ,” of course.

“Phone Died (feat. blaise railey)

Louis The Child take a satirical sonic stab at modern day cell phone saturation in “Phone Died,” an electronic/hip-hop amalgamation that pairs chorus sang background parts with a stuttering background beat evocative of hip hop style. Blaise railey comes through with a raspy vocal overlay, proving to be the song’s key “no charge superstar.”

“Go”

Louis The Child chop up “Go’s” vocal, and simultaneously play with sonic effect on the single, by fading the song’s vocal in and out at certain junctures. The indie-electronically tinged track is the host of what is perhaps one of Louis The Child’s most experimental drops.

“Shake Something (feat. Joey Purp)”

It’s a Chicago creative affair on “Shake Something,” a gritty, hip-hop inflected number that joins Windy City rapper, Joey Purp, with Louis The Child. While Louis The Child frequently invoke traces of hip-hop beat arrangements in their productions, “Shake Something” is grounded firmly in hip-hop influence, rather than in fragmentations. Purp’s laidback flow contrasts with the comparatively more forceful body of the song’s metallic drops.

Photo Credit: Cameron Postforoosh

Louis The Child are currently in the midst of their North American fall 2018 tour. Listeners can find a complete list of tour stops, and tickets to each date, here.