Kaskade talks new ‘Destinations’ compilation series, the translation of a place into a sound, and plans for upcoming spotlight cities [Q&A]

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Kaskade talks new ‘Destinations’ compilation series, the translation of a place into a sound, and plans for upcoming spotlight cities [Q&A]Kaskade Live Credit Rukes

If a specific place could be translated to sound, then just what might that place sound like? Kaskade envisions an answer to this question on his latest project, Destinations: Tulum, the inaugural installment in the producer’s newly conceived Destinations compilation series. Destinations: Tulum debuted on Kaskade’s Arkade imprint in August. The production sought to embody the spirit of Tulum, crafting a sensory listening experience emblematic of the distinctive personality and aesthetic of Mexico’s coastal getaway spot.

The project’s 18 tracks, hand selected by Kaskade, comprise the first edition of the newly minted series and befit both the character of Tulum, and the larger vision of the Destinations concept. Kaskade describes the actualized product as the result of, “traveling the world and becoming emotionally attached to different locations.” Dancing Astronaut caught up with Kaskade just before his main stage set at Electric Zoo‘s tenth anniversary edition in September to chat about the veteran producer’s newly emerging series.


The first installment of Destinations is out on Arkade and it’s a hefty offering. 18 tracks really gives you a breadth with which to recreate that sensory experience of ‘walking through the town’ or ‘sitting on the beach’ as you’d stated was your objective.

Kaskade: Sounds like you listened to it!

It’s a really dynamic concept. When it comes to translating a place through sound, I’m imagining that the song selection process is different for each compilation. So what were you specifically looking for when it came to choosing the tracks for Destinations: Tulum?

I think I was just trying to capture the mood of that. I’ve been to Tulum, I’ve visited Mexico many, many times, and I came up with the idea for the compilation while sitting in Tulum in a cool café which I don’t know the name of, and they had this DJ playing this really chic, cool music, and in my head it sounded like what’s on the compilation now. It’s been a few years, so I don’t know if it’s actually like that, but it paints a picture in your head. It was this really laidback and chill groove, and I’m sitting at the beach drinking lemonade with my family, and hanging out and I was like, ‘this is amazing,’ and I think the idea for the compilation was just to kind of capture that moment.”

But even if it’s changed you crystallized and froze that moment in time. What is it about these locations — Tulum being the first — that make them canvases for upcoming editions of the series?

I kind of have this theory, and a lot of people agree with me, that you’re inspired by what you’re surrounded with, right? People, places, things, food, you know, family, whatever is happening around you. I think the idea for the compilation is just to have moments, sonic moments, that kind of weave this tapestry and make for something memorable. Then later you’re like, ‘oh my gosh yes, this reminds me of this time I went here or when I went there,’ so yeah I started with Tulum, and we’ll see what comes next, I haven’t started on the next one yet.

So you’re kind of making it up as you go.

Producers are reaching out to me and being like ‘dude, Iceland should be next,’ all these cool places that people want to travel and see and I’m like take it easy! You know, like let’s get the first one out. People have been really receptive to the idea, and other producers who want to contribute. Yeah, I don’t have a place chosen yet, but I have a short list going.

Your Chicago roots — might they lead to a Destinations: Chicago compilation?

There definitely should be a Destinations: Chicago, for sure. 100 percent that needs to happen.

Your Redux shows provide a really intimate and immersive live experience. Destinations seems like it could expand and really lend itself well to a live experience, maybe in a similarly intimate style.

That’s the idea, I hope it grows and expands and people are open minded and want to listen to different locations and what they might sound like, all through the filter of my brain. I’m here letting it unravel and seeing where it takes me.

On the subject of travel, what is your absolute, number one go-to travel essential, the one item you can’t travel without, however general or unusual it might be?

I carry a beanie whether its summer or winter, it doesn’t matter. I travel with those compression socks, it’s kind of a unique thing since everyone else is going to say the same thing, iPhone whatever. But I travel with compression socks, I started doing that before it was cool because now everyone makes compression socks, Nike makes them, Stance, I travel with Stance compression socks since I like them a lot.


While Kaskade returns to the studio to plan the next stop on his musical itinerary, listeners can stream Destinations: Tulum sans jet lag and compression socks here.

Photo Credit: Rukes

Electric Zoo removes plastic straw use from festival

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In an effort to save oceans and raise awareness, Electric Zoo festival has made a commitment to be plastic straw free for this year’s event. The National Academy of Sciences estimated that up to 71% of Seabirds and 30% of turtles have been found with plastics inside their stomachs. The plastic from the straws that

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Electric Zoo unveils first phase of tenth anniversary lineup

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Made Event’s New York-based electronic veteran, Electric Zoo will reach double-digits this year. Slated to return to its long time home of Randall’s Island Park on Labor Day Weekend from August 31–September 2, Electric Zoo’s celebration of a decade of production will see dance music titans Kaskade, Marshmello, Martin Garrix, and Virtual Self as event headliners.

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The first phase of the festival’s supplements its superstar headliners with an array of supporting talent, including 3LAU, Alan Walker, Justin Martin, Illenium, REZZ, and many more. Electric Zoo’s ‘Big 10’ bash will additionally feature stages curated by Anjunabeats, Deadbeats, Hyperhouse, and Sunday School.

Tickets to Electric Zoo’s tenth birthday party are currently on sale to the general public, and can be purchased here.

Electric Zoo announces 10 year anniversary dates & pre-sale ticket information

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EZOO2018

New York City’s pre-eminent electronic music festival Electric Zoo has announced the dates for its milestone 10th anniversary edition.

Taking place Labor Day weekend August 31 – September 2 at Randall’s Island Park, Electric Zoo: The Big 10 promises to be a birthday blow-out of the most epic proportions. The Big 10 will celebrate the wild ride the festival has seen over the years, featuring the world’s finest DJs and mind-melting production.

Pre-sale launches February 15 at 11:00 am ET here.

Electric Zoo Announces Official Dates, Logo, Presale & More For 10th Anniversary Of The Festival

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2018 marks New York City’s pre-eminent electronic music festival Electric Zoo’s 10th birthday and be sure that it will be the biggest, wildest fiesta ever thrown down in its history. Taking place August 31, September 1 & 2 at Randall’s Island Park, ELECTRIC ZOO: THE BIG 10 will be a blow-out of epic proportions, featuring

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Electric Zoo 2017: Thomas Jack on the ‘discovery and curation’ that drives his career [Interview]

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Thomas Jack is in the midst of a transformative musical journey. The Australian DJ and producer rose to prominence in early 2013 after coining the term tropical house and leading the trend in the buoyant and breezy melodic genre. The evocative atmospherics of the genre grew so quickly, in fact, that it could be heard in every corner of the globe, eventually finding its roots in mainstream pop music.

However, for someone who has a taste for consistent experimentation, Thomas Jack’s leading status in tropical house was only one phase in his course for creative ascendancy.

Last month, Jack released The Versus, a genre-defying EP, which showed off a more embellished side of his artistic sense. The project, which built upon songs from RY X and The Acid, communicated a heavier, more profound scope of his musical intuition — something that has, until recently, only been witnessed through his assorted deep and progressive house performances. The Versus solidified the Jack’s steps toward a broader range of directions that will, ultimately, see the artist presenting his extensive proficiencies both in his production and behind the decks.

As Thomas Jack returns to this year’s edition of Electric Zoo, fans can fully anticipate a gratifying and colorful display of the artist’s mellifluous catalog of music. Leading up to his set, the forward-looking artist connected with Dancing Astronaut about his new music and anticipation for his headlining Sunday performance at this year’s Elrow stage at “The 6th Boro” of New York.

Read our interview with Thomas Jack below.

Thomas Jack

 

This isn’t the first time you’re performing at Electric Zoo. Do you have anything special planned to set this weekend apart from other festival sets?

I think all sets I play are different but for sure have some surprises and loads of new tunes for this one. For me, it’s a real honor to be asked to close Elrow. I am such a big fan of their party – so there will be some fun vibes for sure.

What excites you most about joining the elrow lineup this year? What is it about the legendary party series that differentiates it from rest of the stages at Electric Zoo?

I think its got its own special vibe of crazy shit going on I’ve been going to them for awhile and always had a good time. They have such a long tradition and legacy of entertaining, they really understand all the elements that combine to make a great party, and how to make it fun for the artists and the fans. It’s a special group of people!

With this year’s festival theme as ‘The 6th Boro,’ what’s your favorite part of playing to NYC crowds? What’s your favorite thing about the city that never sleeps?

Normally when I’m in New York I stay in Brooklyn. Love all the food around that area and the night life. This is one of the world’s best cities, and it has such a rich history of electronic music and clubbing – from disco, to house and techno. It’s always fun to come back, and great that we get to play a festival of this size in the city.

The new ‘The Versus’ EP that you released last month presents a shift from your former tropical house output. Compared to your previous releases, what made you want to switch things up in this EP?

I always want to continue to evolve throughout my career and for me I felt this was the vibe I wanted to go, there’s loads more to come. Tropical house for me was just a moment in time, a new sound I found. That’s really what I’m all about, discovery and curation, it just happened that one blew up. But I’ll always be searching for what’s next, and the chance to get to work with folks like Ry-X and The Acid was so exciting, they are amazing talents I’ve admired for years.

If you could give some advice to your past self just entering the music business, what would it be?

Don’t second guess yourself, do exactly what you think you should be doing. I’m enjoying living my own advice at the moment!

What are your plans for the future of Thomas Jack? Any exciting releases or performance in the works?

Yeah there is load of new music, I haven’t toured as much this year so I’ve had a lot more time to create. I’ve filled my studio with analog gear which has been amazing. I have been in Europe at Hi with a residency all summer, and that’s been really inspiring to be based over there. I’m really excited about the future, and eager to hear what people think of the new stuff.

Photos by Neil Favila.

Read More:

Electric Zoo 2017: Paul Kalkbrenner discusses why he went ‘Back to the Future’ [Interview]

Thomas Jack abandons the balmy beach for the darkened club with ‘The Versus’ [EP Review]

Thomas Jack – Rise Up (Original Mix)

Electric Zoo Is Going Bollywood Sept 3rd With The Elrow Stage & It Looks Insane

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elrow, the legendary party series produced by Spain’s Arnau family since the 1800’s, is one of the most beloved dance music institutions in all of Europe. This Labor Day Weekend on Sunday, September 3, elrow’s Bollywood spectacular dance party returns to NYC’s longest running and largest electronic music festival–Electric Zoo: The 6th Boro–marking its only

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Party Favor reveals future collaborations, his craziest tour stories and more [Interview]

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Dylan Ragland, known by most as Party Favor, has cultivated an edgy, exhilarating and thrilling style that has helped pioneer the festival trap genre. With anthems such as “Bap U,” “Booty Loose,” and his latest release, “Caskets,” the young artist has garnered support for his signature trap style that infuses different musical elements in each release, creating a diverse lineup of tracks in his arsenal of original music. The Mad Decent regular delivers an energetic, innately danceable sound, and his high-energy live performances, are exhilarating and unforgettable.

This Sunday, July 23, Party Favor will deliver a headlining set at Hakkasan Nightclub in Las Vegas where he is rumored to drop several IDs that have been in the works. The Los Angeles producer has numerous upcoming shows planned, including appearances at HARD Summer Music Festival and Electric Zoo. Party Favor will undoubtably bring passion into his set, moving the crowd with his eclectic song selection and seamless transitions. In an exclusive interview, Party Favor sheds light onto some of the projects he is currently working on, and mentions who should be on our radar in 2017.

Read our interview below and get tickets here.

Party Favor JoeJanet_Hakkasan_6.11.17_HighRes-60

Photo by Joe Janet, courtesy of Hakkasan.

Your new song “Caskets” has that radio crossover appeal. You deviate from your traditional sound but keep your signature elements in the track. What was your inspiration for the piece?

For me I’ve always been trying to evolve my sound and everything that I’m doing in terms of music, and what’s fun for me is that I’m able to make a song like WAWA a couple months ago which is kind of a crazy big festival trap banger and then I can make something like this which is really fun for me, and is more of like a song, and I’m trying to build my songwriting abilities and different production for other people and other producers and pop stars and it was really fun for me to make a summer song, it was a challenge for me to make a fun summer vibe song that made me feel good, and hopefully people can still hear me in the song, I don’t think I sold out at all.
FKI first, who you collaborated with on “Caskets” is a producer from Atlanta known for his trap infused melodic instrumentation. What was your experience like working with him?

It was great, he and I have been working on a lot of stuff, so it was really cool to work and get with someone who sits more on the other side of things of the isle on the hip hop world. I actually mainly worked with him and he originally recorded the vocal for it, so I took the acapella and made the song my own, and then I kind of brought him in last minute and he added a couple of things and that’s what became the track, for me I wanted everyone who had a hand in the song to get credit for it.
You starred in the HARD Summer Music Festival trailer which was the center of some controversy. It is true, that 97% of producers in DJ Mag’s top 100 are men. How do you think we can achieve equal representation of men and women at big festivals?

I think creating a place where women feel more comfortable, where women can get out there and make their voices heard in terms of what their making music wise. There’s a lot of talented female producers out there, but a lot of times they aren’t heard or get chosen over by a man. A lot of times women get discouraged because if you look out it’s kind of man’s game, in a lot of music genres as well, its not just a problem in Electronic music, I think creating a dialogue and creating more opportunities for women to be able to showcase their skill, because obviously they have just as much talent as men do, I think the trailer is what they were trying to push, and it pushed some buttons but that’s what the directed (who was a female)’s goal was to get the conversation started. And Its never going to be an easy cakewalk.
How would you describe your sound to someone who has never heard you before?

Hectic, in a good way. I like to say that just because I love stuff that has a lot of energy, I love dance music because it makes me feel a certain way and it makes me feel happy and energized, you don’t even need coffee or a Redbull when you have those heavy beats. I think for me I like when people can come and they can get a little bit of twerk, get some trap vibes, some house, some poppier throwback elements all in one, and for me I try to mash everything up together.
After you graduated college, you worked at NBC and you originally aspired to be an actor. What changed that led you in the direction of making music?

I kind of stop going after the actor thing when I was a freshman in college because I was like there is no way I’m going to make it because its really hard to make it in that industry, so I gave up on the actor thing.  I had always loved making my own films and went to film school and graduated and worked in the film industry and i still love it, I’d love to go back and work there again, but I’ve always wanted to do music as well and I hadn’t found the outlet that was right for me. It turns out I really fell in love with dance music in the end of high school and through college and started kind of dabbling and making my own, and after a long time of making bad music, here I am now.
What’s your favorite thing about the Mad Decent label?

Diversity in the music and how they are always pushing forward sounds and vibes and styles. You look at all the guys and girls on the label and they are always on the forefront of whats next. For me, its an honor to be a part of a group of people that are always pushing me to be better.
What is the craziest thing a fan has done at your show?

There have been people that have climbed on the rafters and jumped off into the crowd. Two girls took off their underwear mid-set and threw them onstage, and one actually hit me in the face. I saw a girl who was sitting on top of a subwoofer at this ratchet warehouse party in New York and just orgasming. Things have definitely calmed down once I began to play more legitimate events. One time a couple was having sex in the crowd during one of my sets, if they had a kid I hope they name it after me.
You’ve worked with a number of artists in the past including Dillon Francis, Sean Kingston, Gucci Mane, and Rich the Kid to name a few… Any future collaborations you may be doing?

I’m doing some stuff in the hip hop world making some hip hop beats with some really big names such as 2 Chainz and Lil Jon among others, so it’s really exciting for me to not just put my name on it but being the producer and trying to branch out and do a lot of different stuff. I have a lot of bigger collabs coming out later this year but I’m keeping tight lipped for now. Kendrick if you’re reading this, shoutout, I’d love to collab with you
Who are you currently listening to, and who, in your opinion should be on our radar?

I was actually listening to Tom Petty on the plane ride over here… but someone on the radar who I’m listening to is Awoltalk who is based out of San Diego and is making some crazy stuff. He’s an awesome dude who’s done a remix of “Caskets” for me which is going to be really cool. There is a lot of talent out there, I make the mistake of not paying attention to up-comers because I’m so focused on my own stuff. But I love hearing new songs from people because it makes me work even harder.

Read More:

Party Favor & NJOMZA – Caskets ft FKi 1st

HARD Summer DJs get in touch with their feminine sides for new trailer [Video]

Party Favor – Wawa (Original Mix)

 

Electric Zoo Is Going To Brasil!

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After a successful 2016 season for Electric Zoo, selling out their flagship festival in New York as well as introducing the festival to Shanghai this year, the major festival brand is looking to expand even further.

For the first time, Electric Zoo will be heading to Brasil in 2017. Joining the ranks of Ultra, Tomorrowland, and Lollapalooza, Electric Zoo will touch down in São Paulo on April 21, 2017. Pre-sale registration begins January 7th. The festival is a collaboration between Made Event, ID&T and plusnetwork.

Check out the video below!

 

Image via aLIVE Coverage on behalf of www.electriczoofestival.com

This article was first published on Your EDM.
Source: Electric Zoo Is Going To Brasil!

How Sunday School catalyzed a house and techno revolution in the US

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Long before Winter Music Conference morphed into a sensationalized mecca for electronic music lovers, two New York party promoters started something special: Sunday School. The event began as a whisper of a thing in the early 2000s. American audiences, unfriendly to their own creations, weren’t quite ready to embrace the dance music of European club culture. But Mike Bindra and Laura DePalma wanted to change that.

The event took form as a WMC closing party in downtown Miami, arm’s length from the sleaze of South Beach, in a venue called Pawn Shop after the building’s former incarnation. Complete with rows of airplane seating, a converted 18 wheeler DJ booth, and an old school bus moonlighting as a lounge, the venue often packed hundreds of bodies into their eclectic space. The crowd was largely European and desperately hungry for the trance, house, and techno rotation they just couldn’t get elsewhere.

Before long, the party caught fire in underground circles, growing ever larger with the help of Facebook — a then revolutionary tool which amplified word of mouth. The party itself blossomed organically. The name was almost a colloquial quip from designer Jeff Wright who’d never experienced an event of such magnitude. “Man,” he thought to himself, “this is like Sunday School for degenerates.”

He thought of both the madness of the parties and their brand’s enduring desire to educate the then dance music illiterate American public about what was happening just under the surface. “Man,” he thought to himself, “this is like Sunday School for degenerates.”

“Those nights were truly legendary,” says longtime Marketing Director Michael Julian. Though he spent those first few years at the Pawn Shop dancing along as a fan, Julian jumped at the chance to get involved. Above all else, Sunday School was the first to define what would become underground club canon with back to back sets from legendary artists on the cusp of international fame and a music-first attitude.

“It was the first big party in America for many of the DJs. We had guys like Solomun playing outdoors in the rain and two guys covering his head with a sheet. Sunday School is only associated with really fun memories. It was all one big family.”

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Classic posters from Sunday School’s Miami days

The parties grew wilder and longer, ballooning into 36 hours of delicious madness and eventually began making appearances in New York. 2008’s party, for example, involved guests being shuffled between Manhattan boat parties and Brooklyn warehouse ragers in school busses. Bindra and De Palma helmed the inaugural Electric Zoo the following year.

“We were helping this music evolve in America,” says Julian. “It’s what Mike and Laura had been doing for many years. That was their passion and the music they loved. In those moments, they couldn’t be happier.”

In a hacked to death turn of events, dance music experienced a resurgence in American mainstream popularity with the voraciousness of a rabid animal. Electric Zoo took off. South Beach became a caricature of itself. Sunday School’s popularity was growing too fast to sustain and the burgeoning models & bottles scene seemed like a confetti canon shaped warning sign for the beloved underground party.

So, in 2011, the brand pivoted. Though they had hosted a stage at Electric Zoo since its inception, the party’s organizers set about creating a niche for house and techno lovers in the festival’s staple Sunday School Grove.

“It’s really a core group of people that come and spend their weekend at the Sunday School tent… we wanted to make sure that it is part of the DNA of Electric Zoo. This music will always have a place at the festival,” says Wright. Wright looks to last year’s school bus art installation as the perfect metaphor–lurching up from the depths of the underground, its grill pointed up over the grounds to the main stage.

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2015’s Sunday School art installation

As the brand has grown, their vision has remained the same: to provide support and promote discovery of underground talents. This year’s Electric Zoo pits mainstream success stories like The Chainsmokers alongside hometown heroes Alex English and Hiyawatha and underground prophets like Anjunadeep’s Lane 8.

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Mockups of the Anjunadeep, Ants, and Elrow hosted stages in Sunday School Grove at this year’s Electric Zoo

Sunday School has also partnered with three boutique guests: deep house heads at Anjunadeep, the techno legends at Elrow, and Ushuaia’s homegrown party series Ants. Together, the institutions will bring a little bit of the underground to Randall’s Island.

“If you go to any show with multiple dance music artists, the trend is that you will hear at least a couple of tracks multiple times,” says Julian. “You’ll hear pieces of sets from dozens of artists at the same festival and they play songs over and over and over. If you go to a marathon techno party that goes for 24 hours, I can almost guarantee you that you will never hear the same track twice.”

Electric Zoo will take place Labor Day Weekend on Randall’s Island. Tickets are still available for purchase here

Read More:

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