Camo & Krooked detail pivoting to singles, upcoming Red Bull Vienna shows, and working with Jeru The Damaja [Interview]

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Camo & Krooked detail pivoting to singles, upcoming Red Bull Vienna shows, and working with Jeru The Damaja [Interview]Camo Krooked Press 2020 1

For veterans holding more than 12 years of music-making, Camo & Krooked continue to ignite the drum ‘n’ bass scene with the fresh energy of newcomers. The Austrian duo consisting of Reinhard Reitsch and Markus Wagner have proved an indomitable force since their formation in 2007—signing to mammoth Hospital Records and winning the Drum&BassArena’s Best Newcomers DJs Award just three years after their debut. After captivating listeners with their explosive debut album, Above & Beyond, Camo & Krooked went on to assert themselves as ambassadors of multi-genre productions in their colorful exploration of d’n’b and its relationship to electronic music as a whole.

If d’n’b were a canvas, the color palette would be sub-genres and the painters: Camo & Krooked. Fundamentally loyal to their d’n’b roots while welcoming intuitive influences from dubstep, house, techno, grime, electro-house, and more, the d’n’b influencers have made it their standard to challenge the boundaries of genre-centric lines and push the sonic expectations exceedingly further.

They have embraced dubstep in their hit single “All Fall Down,” emulated disco in Zeitgeist, played off hip-hop in their 2019 single, “Set It Off” featuring Jeru The Damaja, and recreated their d’n’b sound with ever-cinematic expressions in their latest UKF10’s “Atlas” VIP remix. Now, with two massive orchestral Vienna shows locked in, a highly anticipated Rampage performance, and a pipeline of new music, Camo & Krooked are poised to take on 2020.

Dancing Astronaut sat down to catch up with Camo & Krooked on their pivot to single releases, insights into their Red Bull Vienna show, and the creative process behind “Set It Off.”


For a while, you were quiet on the music front, but 2019 was a massive year of releases with “Atlas,” “Sidewinder,” and recently “Set It Off” among other tracks. Will 2020 be a music-centric year as well or focus more on the tour side?

We are completely back on track musically so 2020 will continue along the lines of 2019 with lots of new music, trying to evolve in music production skills and find new directions. Really loving writing music at the moment!

You mentioned that the two of you went into studio hibernation to concentrate on new music. Do we have a new album in store? 

We are planning on working single-based, as it leaves us more freedom of creativity and we can fully concentrate on one track at a time. Writing an album of 12 tracks you have to apply new learned techniques on each of the tracks while writing over and over again, it takes lots of power and we really like the ease of releasing one tune after another at the moment, feels more up to date.

What inspiration came first for “Set It Off”—wanting to produce a hip-hop/funk-infused track or wanting to collaborate with Jeru The Damaja? 

As always, we tried to make a drop that is different to what everybody is doing at the moment, because that is basically what excites us when producing music, reinventing ourselves over and over again. After nailing it we thought that adding hip-hop flavor would give the tune more character than just your usual DJ tune. After nailing the halfstep part we approached some ’90s hip-hop legends and Jeru got back to us, being totally excited about the project!

Coming up on 12 years since you started releasing music, how has your respective approaches to the creative process evolved? 

When you start making music you imitate and recreate your favorite producers, learning all the techniques needed to find you own niche to explore. Now we feel like being in a position where, with every tune we make, we want to learn something or use new techniques, what makes the tune feel more special and valuable for us. Making simple sounds sound as pristine and big as possible and including new influences in each track.

Speaking of milestones, UKF’s decade anniversary saw your track “Atlas” on UKF10 and the release of its VIP counterpart. What elements did you want to add in remixing the cinematic aspects of the original? 

The VIP got even more cinematic actually and been influenced by the techniques we learned for the Red Bull Symphonic Show, C&K orchestra shows in Vienna beginning of February, at which we perform our biggest tunes with a 70-person symphony orchestra.

We’re just a few weeks away from the Vienna orchestra shows. How did this collaborative concept come alive and what type of experience would you like attendees to take away?

Red Bull approached us with this project and we loved the idea from the very first second. We have been working hard on it for the last three months and its going to be a really special event that no one really can say how exactly it will turn out in the end. We reworked most of our tunes to make space for the orchestral elements, so it’s not just the original tune with another layer, it’s a melting pot for both genres creating something completely unique.

Learn more about the Feb. 1 and 2 Vienna shows here.

What can we expect of your first ever back-to-back with Mefjus at Rampage 2020? 

This back-to-back was on our minds for very long already and what better platform than Rampage could you ask for as Introduction of Camo & Krooked b2b Mefjus. We will have lots of exclusive material and looking forward how the set will turn out, will start preparing soon!

Rampage 2020 has locked in an incredible program including you all. Who are you excited to see?

Lots of our friends are there and its going to be good times! Special acts are the Noisia farewell tour and the Pendulum Trinity Show!

You’ve mentioned that Tame Impala and Flume are musical influences for you, respectively (Krooked the former, Camo the latter). They both had returned this year with some pivotal releases. What did you think?

We are huge fans from all their recent output and took some influences from Flume especially as his sound is always changing and very exciting!

Any resolutions for the new year? 

Make new music, be healthy, be happy!

Good Morning Mix: Close out a great year of drum ‘n’ bass with Maduk’s ‘Liquidcity Yearmix’

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Good Morning Mix: Close out a great year of drum ‘n’ bass with Maduk’s ‘Liquidcity Yearmix’Maduk Credit Hana Makovcova

As the year comes to a close, people everywhere come together to celebrate a yearly tradition. While opening presents and watching the ball drop in Times Square is nice, drum ‘n’ bass fans have a better end-of-year treat to look forward to. Maduk is back with his “Yearmix” for Liquicity to wrap up the best of 2019 DnB.

Since 2012, the Dutch drum ‘n’ bass producer has crafted an annual mix celebrating the finest offerings of the genre. The mix focuses more on the liquid side of drum ‘n’ bass, but overall the current state of the genre is well represented. From L Plus‘ massive remix of Rameses B‘s track “Open Your Eyes” to WHATEVA‘s plucky remix of Mura Masa‘s hit “Love$ick,” there’s a little something for everybody in 2019’s Yearmix. Of course, a handful of Maduk tracks deservedly make the cut as well.

Stream the mix on SoundCloud below, or download it here.

Photo Credit: Hana Mokovcoca

Turning it up a notch with RAM Records founder Andy C [Interview]

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Turning it up a notch with RAM Records founder Andy C [Interview]Andy C Press Shot

Decades ago, the electronic music scene was nigh unrecognizable from its worldwide integration and popularity today. Andrew John Clarke was younger then, attending illegal raves with his friends in the English countryside. One such party came to mind when someone sent him a photo from many years over social media, reminding him of years past.

“It was one of those parties where somebody put out a phone number to call, and you met up at a service station on the road. Then this big convoy of cars made its way through the countryside to this back garden [in Kent] and we had a rave,” he recalls. “That’s how we used to do it. But now look at the kind of stages we do at EDC Las Vegas.”

It would be years before Andrew John Clarke would become known to most as Andy C, and he never would’ve guessed he would be where he is today. But his love of music and what would become drum ‘n’ bass led him down an unexpected pathway.

He helped create what many view as one of the most influential drum ‘n’ bass tracks of the 1990s—”Valley of the Shadows” under his Origin Unknown moniker with Ant Miles—and began to make a name for himself through his energetic DJ sets. Around the same time in 1992, he created RAM Records with Ant Miles, not knowing the influence the label would have over the next 27 years.

“Things are doing awesome [at RAM],” Clarke says enthusiastically. “We have an absolute steady stream of releases coming out every week. It’s relentless, but that’s how we like it. We make up one part of this beautiful scene of ours, and we’ve been there for everything. It’s a beautiful thing to still be at the forefront, you know?”

RAM had incredibly humble beginnings, starting out with Clarke picking up records in the trunk of his dad’s car and stamping the labels in his bedroom.

“Now, we’re streaming millions of streams all over these new mediums and touring the world,” he says. “It’s unfathomable, really.”

Though things have changed drastically since 1992 for RAM Records, Clarke maintains an optimistic viewpoint.

“I always think change is for the good,” he says. “I like to look forward. I appreciate the past because it invokes so many beautiful memories for me, but I love to look to the future. That’s what keeps the excitement there for me.”

Clarke is as excited about today’s drum ‘n’ bass scene as he was years ago. He says he’s “seeing a resurgence” in the United Kingdom, where the scene has “gone up to another level” in recent years. He’s also enjoying seeing the genre’s boom in the United States, where it’s been steadily getting more recognition and gaining traction.

“We seem to be seeing a lot of social media talk from people [in the States] who play drum ‘n’ bass tunes in their sets or are wanting to make dnb,” he says. “It seems to me we’re turning it up a notch.”

But Clarke would love to see even more drum ‘n’ bass coming out of the States. In fact, he encourages it.

“I know the United States is full of sick producers and people who want to smash the sound,” he invites. “Bring it to us.”

To those pursuing production, he offers advice that rings true for many aspects of life:

“If you want longevity, you’ve got to be true to yourself. If you’re pushing a sound and you’re passionate about it and love it, then you should stick at it and somewhere, hopefully, the crowd will get on your wave.”

When it comes to the style of music, Clarke notes he’s noticed today’s drum ‘n’ bass returning to “rawer sounds,” which delights the producer since that’s background he comes from.

“It’s been great to see the younger generations sort of battling it out week in and out to see who can make the sickest drop,” he says. “That’s what I’m feeling right now.”

But trends in music are unpredictable, and many producers scramble to figure out how to ride the current wave while staying true to their own sounds. For Andy C, though, the capricious nature of electronic music is a huge part of what makes it fun.

“I have no clue what drum ‘n’ bass will sound like in five years or even six months, and that’s part of the excitement” he says. “It just takes someone to come along and do a genre-defying song or create the next big bassline or take on a beat, and then it goes off on a tangent. That’s the beauty of it. Time goes pretty fast, but I know [drum ‘n’ bass is] going to be in an even healthier position than it is now.”

Clarke’s passion for drum ‘n’ bass and the scene surrounding it is driven by “the energy, the people, and the sense of community.” He calls the genre unique and says that “when you feel it, you really get it, and it becomes a strong passion within you.”

Those who have embraced this strong passion span generations—something that’s truly special to Clarke when he performs.

“At the events I do, there can be people spanning a 25-year age gap, and everybody will be raving together. It’s all ages, but that passion is always there. There’s a real beauty to a passion that never leaves for a style of music.”

When asked if he thinks the scene has changed for the better over the past few decades, Clarke’s answer is instantaneous.

“Of course! As much as I like raging in the back garden with 12 people, I definitely love being able to play all over the world to thousands of people. I’m such a lucky guy. It’s humbling and beautiful.”


Catch Andy C at one of this remaining 2019 shows. Learn more and get tickets here.

Turning it up a notch with RAM Records founder Andy C [Interview]Andy C Tour Dates Fall 2019

Flite re-doses RL Grime’s ‘Core’ with drum ‘n’ bass magic

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Flite re-doses RL Grime’s ‘Core’ with drum ‘n’ bass magicFlite 2019

In spite of his young age, Flite has navigated the drum ‘n’ bass scene with the prowess and maturity of an experienced artist. Producing as early as 16 years old and breaking onto the scene at 19 years old in 2014 with debut single “Featherfall,” the Texas-based talent has gained rapid momentum in recent years—following through with 14 releases in 2017 and garnering support from drum n’ bass giants like Andy C, High Contrast, Netsky, and more. With diversity ingrained in his artistic pursuits, Flite and his sound fluctuate in its exploration of the drum ‘n’ bass spectrum. Now, the rising star reworks an RL Grime classic, “Core,” with his latest UKF release.

In his flip of “Core,” Flite transforms the original trap soundscape into a massive drum ‘n’ bass track. Energizing the quintessential drop with flesh-crawling synthesizers and rolling breakbeats, the remix kicks the tempo up while maintaining the dark essence of the original. Deliciously sinister with potent pace, Flite’s remix delivers the drum ‘n’ bass makeover without straying from the skeleton of the beloved RL Grime original.

Mat Zo chills with galvanizing intricacy on ‘Emotion Sickness’

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Mat Zo chills with galvanizing intricacy on ‘Emotion Sickness’Mat Zo Press Photo E1552406771509

Undeniably one of the most dynamic producers to mark his lasting influence on the scene, Mat Zo returns to his drum ‘n’ bass roots with his latest release, “Emotion Sickness.” Although the Mad Zoo label head has kept relatively quiet under his beloved drum ‘n’ bass moniker MRSA—most recently resurfacing with a VIP of 2017 single, “Bio Weapon” via Noisia‘s Invisible imprint—the newest track arrives under his main pseudonym. pointing to an expanding experimental palette. Effectively exploring diverging branches of genres and mastering the complex sound designs that accompany each, Zo links with Bassrush Records to deliver an auditory whirlwind for the senses on “Emotion Sickness”.

Perforated by relentless drum lines and texturized with shape-shifting synth pads, the track brings forth a mind-melting amalgamation in the form of warped soundscapes and synapse-firing energy. Haunting harmonic progressions ease into reverberating bass-induced layers that gradually trickle into a metronomic chaos of percussion and syncopated top lines. In the spaces left unmarked by frenzy, Zo fills the interludes with enchanting melodies of equally galvanizing energy and succeeds in proliferating the 7:23 minute-track with intoxicating momentum.

Order a copy of “Emotion Sickness” here

Hospital Records works toward gender equality with first Women in Drum & Bass London Workshop

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Hospital Records works toward gender equality with first Women in Drum & Bass London WorkshopHospitalRecordsWomeninDNB

“At Hospital Records, Med School and Hospitalitydnb we recognise the gender imbalance within drum & bass. We want to be at the forefront of pushing through a positive change for the scene and music that we all love, towards a more representative community that creates equal opportunities for everyone.”

Being the change that you want to see in the world is often easier said than done—unless you’re Hospital Records, that is. On Sept. 17, the south London drum ‘n’ bass co-op took a massive stride forward in remedying the gender inequality found both within their genre and the wider music industry by hosting their very first Women In Drum & Bass London Workshop.

The Shoreditch event featured an industry-wide panel of tastemakers that evaluated gender issues facing the underground bass scene and brought in Hospital’s Head of Business & Sync Megan Bean to host a workshop on getting demos heard and eventually signed.

The Women In Drum & Bass London Workshop follows a pledge from Hospital Records earlier this year to increase their efforts to sign more women to the label roster and host more female DJs at their flagship Hospitality events. While there is no doubt that the industry is still male-heavy, it’s ultimately refreshing to see record labels and brands alike using their amplified voice in the industry not just to sell the next release, but to bring attention to the social issues that they resonate with.

LUUDE Returns With A New Sensual Remix From The Hit HBO Series Euphoria

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Australian electronic producer LUUDE is back, coming at you with a brand new flip of a theme from the very popular HBO series, ‘Euphoria’. The remix comes at a time where LUUDE is thankfully on the road to recovery from a life threatening motorbike accident which happened earlier this year. The accident left him with

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Bensley Releases Glimmering Tribute to ‘Muskoka’ With Sophomore Album

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It’s good news for fans of Bensley today, as he releases his long-awaited sophomore album ‘Muskoka’. Four years have passed since Bensley released his debut album ‘Next Generation’ on Andy C’s RAM Records, which catapulted the Canadian producer in to the limelight and secured his position as one of electronic music’s most innovative young creators.

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 100: The Ultimate Drum ‘n’ Bass Playlist

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 100: The Ultimate Drum ‘n’ Bass PlaylistDeters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.


There’s just something about drum ‘n’ bass that’s always spoken to my soul. I remember hearing my first Pendulum song a decade ago and thinking “what on earth is this, and where can I get more?”

The genre began making its way into the electronic music sphere in the early 1990s, right around the time I was born. Its rapid breakbeats took over London and Bristol, ramping up the jungle and rave scene to 160-180 BPM. While still more widespread in the UK to this day, the genre has slowly trickled into the United States EDM scene. We still have a long way to go before drum ‘n’ bass artists are regularly installed as main stage performers at major US festivals, but there’s so much to discover and embrace in the US drum ‘n’ bass scene (I see you, Flite and Boxplot). There’s also an endless stream of quality dnb being churned out overseas, with imprints like RAM Records, Hospital Records, and Liquicity Records as strong as ever in their supporters and fan base.

I regularly tell people that have never really gotten into drum ‘n’ bass to just try. It’s a diverse and ever-evolving genre, full of sub-genres and offshoots. I guarantee you’ll find something you like in some format. Dig through the 100-song playlist I’ve compiled to celebrate 100 installments of this series to see if there’s something there for you!

Thank you, drum ‘n’ bass, for your tireless energy, emotive vocals, and the ability you always have to yank me out of a bad mood and reignite my love for electronic music in today’s day and age. Here’s to you, and the brilliant artists who create you.

Bensley Returns with Vibrant New Single ‘Hard Times’ Ahead of Album Release

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Bensley releases the third single from his upcoming sophomore album today, ‘Hard Times ft. Emer Dineen’. With the album fast approaching on RAM Records, Bensley works his magic again with a beautifully constructed track that showcases his multifaceted production abilities. ‘Hard Times’ demonstrates why Bensley is regarded as one of the scene’s most exciting and

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