Techno Tuesday: Ardalan and the philosophy of being ‘Mr. Good’

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Techno Tuesday: Ardalan and the philosophy of being ‘Mr. Good’Techno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Duality is a concept instrinsically connected with Ardalan‘s life and career. Born in Tehran to parents with international professions, he spent his youth living between Iran and his stateside home in the Bay Area and adapting to each locale’s different societal norms. Oddly enough, it was through his friend in Iran that he discovered DIRTYBIRD, courtesy of Claude VonStroke‘s megahit, “Who’s Afraid Of Detroit?” Not long after, he attended the very first BBQ as a young teenager. He released his first track on the imprint alongside Justin Martin by age 19, forever cementing his status as label family and one to be watched.

It was through this newfound success, and growth into adulthood, that the Ardalan noticed the contrasting nature of human existence, especially in the way one might present themselves to the world versus the person within. Thus, Mr. Good’s story was born. The key lies in its title track, and the more sinister “Mr. Bad,” which are the yin and yang of the album’s story. Just as everyone has a “Mr. Good” that they show off to the world, there exists a “Mr. Bad” to balance it.

The album as a whole is experimental, a step away from the lighthearted shade of tech house one migh have expected from his longform debut. Ardalan is no one trick pony, however, and he pulls off his album and its multi-genre exploration off with polished finess. One might even say that Mr. Good is an entrance into a new sonic era for DIRTYBIRD.

We chat more about the themes of Mr. Good for this Techno Tuesday, additionally taking a gander into its tech side, Ardalan’s artistic journey, his dual lives, and more.

Mr. Good really gave you a medium to explore your sonic range. In doing so, has your overall style in studio and behind the decks changed at all as a result?

In some ways I believe it has. I feel like I am always constantly testing new ideas and taking risks to do something different. Whether it’s in the studio or behind the decks, I really enjoy challenging myself to find a new sound. It’s fun. I look at it like its a puzzle, but with sound! I love playing different styles and creating a journey out of a DJ set. When I am in the studio, I always find a way to use or create something different with each track. I’m now excited to explore uncharted musical territories!

Which songs in particular really pushed you to go outside of your comfort zone musically, and in what ways did they do so?

“Lifted” with Claire George. It’s the one track on the album that isn’t 4 on the floor. I’ve never made a drum n’ bass tune in my life to this magnitude, so when I started working on it I didn’t really know what I was doing or know if there was a rulebook of sorts that I needed to follow. I was just jamming on the SP 1200 and having fun when I realized I could just work with the loop in half time and turn it into drum n bass!

Your dance music discovery really began in Iran. Can you take us to the time of discovering Euro house and techno there and how this ultimately prepared you for your full launch into the music world upon reaching adulthood in the Bay Area?

When I was growing up in Iran, I really didn’t have any sort of knowledge for music. I was just hearing all these cheesy trance melodies and some 90s pop house on bootlegged cassette tapes and satellite televisions from Europe. I was exposed to hearing Persian music as well. In the late 90s early 2000s, my brother got into Progressive House and Techno music from artists such as Deep Dish and Anthony Pappa. I got a taste of that and instantly got hooked. I then moved to the Bay in 2004 and really got into Boards of Canada & Aphex Twin. I then moved back to Iran in 2005 and moved into my brothers old room. He left his old computer behind with all the music mentioned above still in it. I started going through it and found James Holden’s Balance 005 compilation and that changed everything for me. I got into microhouse / minimal around 2006 and moved back to the Bay Area in 07. That’s when I heard Claude Vonstroke’s “Deep Throat” and ultimately DIRTYBIRD!

On that note, you’ve also mentioned that you made an effort to imbue the music of your ancestry into the project; how have you executed this?

I tried to incorporate a track that had those elements but I ultimately ran out of time and didn’t want to rush it as I want to do it right and raw yet keep those Iranian elements balanced.. I will go back to it in the future!

Techno Tuesday: Ardalan and the philosophy of being ‘Mr. Good’Ardalan Shot By Grady Brannan1 1
Photo credit: Grady Brannan

The album process was a long one for you, and with some tracks taking months to finish. How did you get over these periods of writer’s block or override what was holding you back?

Most of the tracks were finished in the last three months of the album process. But it took me forever to finish “Mr. Good” with PartyPatty. It was the first track that I was seriously working on for the album. I had never done an album and I really loved “Mr. Good,” so I wanted it to be perfect and I constantly kept changing it. I literally have about 250 versions of it. I took a break from it and read an article about how “perfectionism” is self-harm . I took a break from it and made “I Can’t Wait” and two weeks later I took one last stab at Mr.Good and I was happy with it. I grew so tired of hearing it in my studio during the album process, but now on my album tour, it’s one of my favorite tracks to play! Other than that, What kept me sane in that period was hanging with my girlfriend and family. Any chance I could I would take breaks as needed from the studio. I would dedicate some time to doing something different which I think really helped the album process for me as a whole. I got addicted to this mobile game called PUBG and was playing it with different producer friends like Sepehr, The Fitness, Option 4, and even Doorly! I thought I wasn’t gonna finish the album because I was having so much fun playing it. But it took some stress out of the process and when I went back to working on the album. I felt recharged.

You’ve gotten your hands on a lot of new hardware for the making of Mr. Good. What’s next in that regard? Have you considered trying your hand at modular production?

I think I have enough gear for now. Modular is a commitment and I know i wont stop once I start. So I think I will have to mess with VCV RACK until my new studio is 100 percent treated and complete. I have now moved to a new apartment and I have a smaller room to work with. I have so much gear so I think I’ll be okay in that department for now. Next thing for me though is to learn my new room the same way I learned my old studio and treat the acoustics more properly.

A major theme of this record is the duality of humanity; you have to be ‘Mr. Bad’ to be ‘Mr. Good’. Can you describe how this theme has played out in your own life, and how you translated it into the album/musical format?

I just think we go through different phases in time. Everyone has some sort of internal battle. Not everyone is 100 percent stress free, maybe a few souls these days. We all have ups and downs. Whether its mental instability, hardship of some sorts, or depression. Without all these negative experiences, how would we learn what’s good or positive in life? Sometimes we just have to accept that were not perfect creatures but we can learn from it and pursue happiness. I think it’s kind of funny because the theme of the album became about self doubt in finishing my album. I was hitting a wall and I wanted everything to be perfect. I was like, “this track needs to be “Mr. Perfect.” I learned that it can’t be perfect. Sometimes you just gotta let go of that self doubt and be bad or get freaky with it. Sometimes you wanna be a Mr. Bad and not sleep. Sometimes you end up going to an underground warehouse and lose yourself in the music till the next morning. These experiences turn out to be good for the soul sometimes.

Going off of the above, a lot of these tracks were written well before the themes of your album came to mind. How did the process play out in pulling these ones out of the archives and fitting into the overall story you wanted to tell?

I wrote a lot of tracks that didn’t make it on the album. There are only two tracks that were made before the theme. I guess in some ways I managed to fit them in the story. After finishing the Mr.Good track with Party Patty, I got really inspired to create tracks from scratch and not go to the old projects. I will eventually release all those. I have so much more music that didn’t make the album.

Now that you’ve taken this leap into album territory, what are some of the next milestones you wish to reach career-wise, and what are you doing now to accomplish them?

I want to explore new sounds and keep making more music. Even releasing different versions of the album perhaps. I am also trying to lean on making my studio more jam friendly and produce “live”. I want to make the leap into the live performance world at some point as well. I think that’s the next step career wise. It will be a fun challenge but very rewarding once I take it more seriously.

What are some of the biggest lessons you’ve learned over the years as you’ve blown up, especially within the last five?

I’ve learned to be extremely humble. I have met so many amazing people and fans in every city and im truly grateful for that. I don’t like being alone for long periods of time. I appreciate the time I have when I’m home. The album process taught me to be positive and not stress about the little things in life such as not allowing myself to get mad or complain that the coffee shop at the airport didn’t have almond milk. I learned to get excited about the small things in life. It’s given me the tools to push through the stress of being a touring artist. I have been touring since I graduated college in 2013. I try and exercise as much as I can. I play soccer every week between gigs. It’s my biggest passion after music. I try and go for a run as much as I can and during tour life. I think Justin Martin has inspired me in that department.

You’re currently on one of your biggest, if not the biggest, tour run you’ve ever taken in support of the album. Which places are you most excited about playing the first time?

I am excited to play at Meow Wolf for the first time!

Any final words or thoughts you wish to share?

I just wanna say that it’s been so amazing to see peoples reactions to my new album. I am really thankful for all the support!

Order a copy of ‘Mr. Good’ here

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica Spinelli

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Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE AUG 21 WESC 95 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 154 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 141 Min

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliElectric Island Finale 2019 DAY 02 217 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 94 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE AUG 21 WESC 116 1Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 133 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 97

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE AUG 21 WESC 95 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 100

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliElectric Island Finale 2019 DAY 02 189 1

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RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]

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RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 44

House music is currently going through a third Renaissance. The first took place in the late ’70s when the distinction between disco and house became clear. The four-on-the-floor beat diverged from the glossy strings and sequin outfits.

The second, around 1997 when the styles of Chicago that Frankie Knuckles and company pioneered became worldwide, with Daft Punk releasing their watershed debut album, Homework. By then, house music was a permanent fixture in the standard music vernacular.

The third wave is still in progress. As house music becomes more than just club music. As house artists begin to rival rock stars and mega-rappers in their global omnipresence in pop culture. Those who lived through the first or the second arm might look upon this association with mainstream culture and scoff—longing for the days when house was the sound of the outcast, the counterculture.

Jake Lubell, Ryan Bohnet, and Wyatt Eichhorn are three of those people centralized on preserving the housestoric legacy. To their fans, they’re known as Lubelski, RYBO, and Wyatt Marshall, and they’re giving back to house music through their record label, Percomaniacs.

Just recently, the trio hosted their very first label showcase. In addition to the three of them playing side-by-side for an extended set to a sold-out crowd, Dirtybird boss Claude VonStroke and Desert Hearts‘ own Mikey Lion and Porky showed up to support their good friends and colleagues in their mission that can only be dubbed, “addicted to drums.”

That’s right. These three house thanes all share an austere affinity for drums alongside an unequivocal chemistry as musicians and as human beings. Dancing Astronaut spoke to them just minutes before they took the decks at their branded first party to get an inside look at what “addicted to drums” really means, as well as how the three of them manifest that vision through sound.

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 43

How did the three of you come together, and how did you resolve to start something like Percomaniacs?

Lubelski – Rybo and I met at The Standard in Hollywood like five years ago. I was still in college at the time.

Wyatt Marshall – I’m the late add to the group. Met both of them a little later.

L – But we all just felt like we could talk shit to each other [laughs].

WM – That’s a big part of the dynamic.

RYBO – We had another record label going before [Percomaniacs].

WM – With like five of us right?

R – No there was like six of us, and there were too many cooks in the kitchen.

So it was a blessing in disguise kind of thing?

R – Yeah definitely

WM – But it was more of a natural thing because [Room Temp] kind of disbanded.

L – It fizzled off on its own. There were so many people trying to do it at the same time. It was too many decisions. Too many egos. So it just kind of dispersed.

WM– Things were going way slower and it just wasn’t serious.

L – It was too bureaucratic. So [ RYBO and I] decided to do it with just the two of us at first, but then we were like “Nah we have to have Wyatt as part of the crew. He’s too sick.”

And so as soon as the three of you started working together you knew things were different?

R – Yeah we had a full-on schedule. We were booked out five months in advance.

L – We decided we wanted to be at least half a year ahead before we even got started. We knew we had to do it with a plan.

What do the three of you do for the label individually?

R – I don’t do anything. It’s all Jake [laughs]

WM – I’m part of the label, but I just help out with random shit. 

L – Wyatt’s just a cool factor.

L – To be serious, Rybo and I do most of the A&R and scheduling together. Wyatt does a lot of A&R for us. Finds cool artists —

R – And just releases a shitload.

L – Yeah he releases a shit ton of music. He’s our main resident.

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 48

This is one for all three of you individually. Percomaniac’s tagline is “Addicted to Drums” so I’m wondering what that means to each of you?

R – For me it’s all about the groove of the track. I’m really into percussion, bongos,  and to me, the drums are what really get you moving and get people dancing.

WM – If you’ve noticed the progression of our productions throughout the years, we’ve all gone so far away from big buildups and drops and it’s just one groove all the way through. You take out a few elements and come back, and it’s all about the drums.

L – Less is more. Bongos not bangers. We’re not here to just fist bump.

WM – Say no to party-tech.

L – Yeah Say no to party tech. Stay addicted to drums. We love the old school stuff because it was never really about the massive manufactured buildups. It’s all got to be groove-driven. If the groove isn’t there it’s not a good track.

R – I could play on a drum machine for days.

Percomaniacs’ catalog is very diverse, including everything from Fleetwood Mac edits to minimal tech-house to more upbeat stuff. Given this wide range of sounds, what do you look for when signing a track to the label?

R – Really it just needs to make the people move.

L – Yeah and if it doesn’t feel manufactured, and it feels like it comes from the heart; if it feels a bit more real.

R – We’re open to any genre as long as it works and sounds cool.

L – Yeah we don’t need a bunch of big ass snare rolls. You can do something that is classically cheesy, but you can still do cheesy tastefully.

You say you’re open to any genre, do you see any hard-hitting 135 bpm techno having a place on the label?

R – Ghostea already released a track at 132 with us.

WM – Shit’s just getting faster in general. Even the groovier tech-house shit is getting faster. I just got a track from my homie Steady Rock that’s at 131 but you wouldn’t even know.

 R – 125 seems slow now.

WM – 125 seems like 120 in the club.

L – I’m at 129 these days.

WM – I can’t even get under 127.

L – 126 used to be our shit. Now it’s way too slow. But Ghostea has a track coming on our next compilation that’s at 135.

Is it heavy or more groovy?

L – It’s deep and fast.

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 45

The three of you all have very strong ties to huge brands in dance music. Wyatt Marshall works at Dirtybird. RYBO works at Hot Creations. Of course all of you have ties to Desert Hearts. How did you take those influences and turn them into something unique like Percomaniacs?

WM – I think one of the reasons Percomaniacs is working so well is because we have role models that have done this shit. And people that we’re so close to and mentors that have all done it so the foundation is already laid out there.

R – We just wanted to make our own thing, and now we know how.

WM – Those guys are just our homies. Just like we’re homies. It’s no different. That’s why they fuck with us. That’s why we really like all them. Cause we’re all friends; just normal guys.

We’re sitting here at the first Percomaniacs party where all three of you are going to play back-to-back, and soon you’re going to do the same thing at Dirtybird Campout. Obviously there are some differences between those two environments. How are you going to approach that set different than this set?

WM – I would honestly say we’re not going to play anything different because it’s a Dirtybird party or this is a Percomaniacs party or we’re playing a Desert Hearts party or we’re playing any fucking party. If we’re all playing we’re just going to play records.

L – Although I will say we’re going to fucking bring it. We’re going to fucking bring it to Dirtybird.

WM – My only goal is to have both of these dudes look over and be like “What track is this” so I can say “You wish you knew.”

L – It is very competitive.

Where do you think Percomaniacs fits in the larger landscape of house music given the mainstream direction that it’s going?

R – I think it can fit anywhere really. That’s our goal: to really broaden people’s horizons.

WM – Be different.

L – Yeah you could listen to it on a massive stage or in a fucking elevator.

R – Or on Sirius XM.

So whatever phase house music goes through in the future, you plan on just maintaining the vision?

WM – Things are always going to be changing. Nothing stays the same forever, but if I look into the future I just see us three making records together.

**This transcript has been edited slightly for clarity and readability.

Photo Credit: 2nd Nature Photo

Dirtybird brings Birdhouse back to Chicago Lakefront | Photos by Charles Cushman

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Dirtybird brings Birdhouse back to Chicago Lakefront | Photos by Charles CushmanBirdhouse Chicago 2019 Din Ido DIVISUALS 185011 09138

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Claude VonStroke drops his first solo release of 2019 on Dirtybird, ‘Slink’

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Claude VonStroke drops his first solo release of 2019 on Dirtybird, ‘Slink’Dirtybird Bbq Claude Vonstroke Crowd Credit Upperleft

After two top-notch collaborations on Dirtybird, Claude VonStroke has delivered his first solo EP of the year: Slink which features the title track and another original, “Oh Please Oh Please.”

VonStroke’s first release on Dirtybird in 2019 was the motion-inducing “Getting Hot” with Italy’s Eddy M. The second was the eerie-groove machine, “Comments,” which the Bird-boss made with Zombie Disco Squad and Kid Enigma. Both of these tracks are primetime house cuts, ready for when the dance floor is at its highest.

In contrast, the two tracks on Slink represent the lighter, mellower side of VonStroke’s production preferences. Those who have seen him in action know that he can play for any mood at any time of day and give the crowd exactly what they need.

Photo credit: Upperleft

Good Morning Mix: Will Clarke deals out the slappers at his first Desert Hearts

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The Desert Hearts dance floor is the stuff of legends among the West Coast house and techno community. A festival with less than 3,000 attendees that draws some of the most impressive four-on-the-floor masters is the scene. There may not be another event like it left in the world.

To perform at Desert Hearts is to know a specific kind of harmonic experience. The DJ does not play for the crowd. The DJ plays with the crowd, and Will Clarke had his chance to play with the crowd at his first Desert Hearts back in April.

This particular eve of the event was prime for Clarke’s heady-beats. Toni Varga and De La Swing did the warming up and a surprise set from Clarke’s Dirtybird cohort, Justin Martin, came right after. Expect some serious, raw tech house.

Photo credit: Brian Ngo

Dancing Astronaut’s 5 Under 15K: Vol. 22

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Dancing Astronaut’s 5 Under 15K: Vol. 2215k

5 Under 15k is a feature on Dancing Astronaut dedicated to spotlighting talented upcoming and undiscovered artists who we believe deserve more exposure. Each edition of 5 Under 15k will highlight five artists from a wide variety of genres with under 15,000 followers on SoundCloud (at the time of writing).


If Claude VonStroke taps you to remix his undisputed classic, “Who’s Afraid of Detroit” then it means you have something special, and Wyatt Marshall (3,060) has something special indeed. Since the release of that remix last year he has delivered numerous house offerings that are as groovy as they are consistent. Whether it be on Dirtybird or his second sonic home of Percomaniacs, count on Wyatt Marshall for the funk going forward. Hop into his latest EP, My Temple, to get started.


It’s common to find that when one starts DJing before they start producing, their music typically invokes a sense of true freedom; as if the open format of DJing allows them to avoid being bound by traditional genre strictures. Nala‘s (1,197) debut EP, Sirens, does that and more. Beyond tapping four top-notch vocalists for pristine top-lines on the release, this EP is the launch of Unstructured, the collaborative imprint with LA’s Understated Recordings that Nala is curating herself.


Every artist has a defining release—that holy grail track on that one label that puts them into a newer, higher echelon of their craft. For Sueldo (399), that track is ‘OTS’ and the label is 40oz. Cult. Of late Sueldo has been supporting hardened dubstep artists like Gentlemen’s Club and playing well-known parties like Space Yacht. Now with the release of this single, he’s only going up from here.


Don’t let the humorous name fool you, Dadmom (2,323) makes some serious music. His latest EP, Infinity, is aptly named as it represents a very diverse musical palate executed with true poise. Each of the three tracks moves fluidly between different genre influences while demonstrating a flair for sound design.


The fact that Cooper Saver only has 4,965 followers on Soundcloud is a concrete example of why numbers like that are not at all indicative of an artist’s capabilities. Not only has he been booking artists like Four Tet and Floating Points at his Far Away parties for years, but he’s also been touring the world and remixing legends like Jacques Renault. Now he’s diving fully into solo productions and the results speak for themselves.

Dirtybird to bring Chicago round two of Birdhouse Festival, with Claude VonStroke, Walker & Royce, and more

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Dirtybird to bring Chicago round two of Birdhouse Festival, with Claude VonStroke, Walker & Royce, and moreBirdhouse 1

Claude VonStroke is officially bringing a litany of label favorites from his resoundingly rowdy Dirtybird flock back to Chicago for the second annual edition of Birdhouse Festival.

Setting up shop again at Lakefront Green, but this time on an all-new grassy terrain overlooking Lake Michigan and the sublime Chicago skyline, on September 7, just before the sun begins to set on summer 2019, Dirtybird will welcome sets from Walker & Royce, Mason Maynard, and an extended set from VonStroke himself, in the city where housework began. The crew will also be bringing along a special, yet-to-be-announced guest in tow, whom VonStroke will be partaking in a highly anticipated back-to-back set with.

Last year’s seminal, sold-out installment of Birdhouse featured appearances from, of course, Dirtybird’s main man, VonStroke, as well as all different accents of the tech-fueled four-on-the-floor rainbow, like J.Phlip, Gene Farris, Will Clarke, and Christian Martin, to name a few.

The second arm will launch equipped with deliciously odd amenities, true to the offbeat Dirtybird emblem, spanning cotton candy to specialty branded prizes. Tickets to Birdhouse Chicago are on sale here.

Dirtybird to bring Chicago round two of Birdhouse Festival, with Claude VonStroke, Walker & Royce, and moreImage 20

Photo Credit: Aaron Engler

Bassnectar’s next Deja Voom bass pilgrimage to be led by Sub Focus, GRiZ, and Caspa

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Bassnectar’s next Deja Voom bass pilgrimage to be led by Sub Focus, GRiZ, and CaspaDejavoom

For Lorin Ashton, widely known as Bassnectar‘s wide and unwavering following, a destination festival headlined by Ashton himself (among a number of resounding guests) on a Cancun resort is nothing short of an earsplitting fantasy.

The four-day festival’s second charter will summon Sub Focus, GRiZ, Caspa, and Claude VonStroke to its sandy forefront. VonStroke will be bringing a highly potent dose of his Dirtybird crew to the beachfront endeavor’s new location, the Grand Oasis resort (a departure from last year’s touchdown in Riviera Maya), too, including longtime label habitues, Justin Jay, Christian Martin, and Worthy.

Per Bassnectar’s website, he and his team have rented out the entire Grand Oasis property for the occasion, likely in response to last year’s installment prompting a number of noise and behavioral complaints from various Rivera Maya non-Deja Voom vacation-goers staying near the festival.

Deja Voom is sold out, but those interested can join the festival’s waitlists for particular packages of interest here.

Bassnectar’s next Deja Voom bass pilgrimage to be led by Sub Focus, GRiZ, and CaspaBassnectar Dejavoom

Featured Photo Credit: DejaVoom

Ardalan announces inaugural LP on DIRTYBIRD, tour to follow

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Ardalan announces inaugural LP on DIRTYBIRD, tour to followArdalan Shot By Grady Brannan1

Ardalan grew up with DIRTYBIRD, growing from the label’s wunderkind at the age of 21 with his Justin Martin collaboration “Mr. Spock” into a veritable powerplayer in the American underground. The time has now come for the talented producer to give back to his label home through his debut album, Mr. Good. He’s shared a taste of the album via “I Can’t Wait,” and it’s already proving to be a delightfully out-of-the-box offering.

“‘I Can’t Wait’ is a duet with my girlfriend. It’s one of the last songs I made on my album. Through the process, she was always waiting for me to watch Game of Thrones with her and would say, ‘I can’t wait any longer.’ I never ended up watching it. The song is open to interpretation for the listener,” states Ardalan of the single.

The single is melancholic in nature, conjuring imagery of personal sacrifice at the hands of a heavy drive to succeed in one’s career. Minor arpeggios in 8-bit tones flow over crisp percussion and a grooving foundation, while his girlfriend’s voice adds a haunting layer to the finished product. It’s a far cry from what one normally hears in a DIRTYBIRD release these days, and a marker of Ardalan’s creative evolution. The album will also be followed by a 36-stop tour, which sees the artist taking over his favorite intimate dance spaces across North American for special edition extended sets. He’ll also be at Dirtybird Campout West in October, where fans can expect to hear “I Can’t Wait” live. Tickets for that here. An all-star support lineup awaits.

Ardalan announces inaugural LP on DIRTYBIRD, tour to followCorrect Tour Art Ardalan

Photo credit: Grady Brannan