DARKO Releases New Copyright Free Single ‘Money On My Mind’

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Following the release of “One Night Heartbreak” with Mahkenna, DARKO is back with a new release on EDM Sauce’s label with the new single “Money On My Mind.” The DJ/production team based in Los Angeles has been focusing on high-quality remixes and original productions in the music world. After getting their start in 2018, the

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Lunar Lunes: Anti Up deliver ‘Concentrate,’ Destructo, DARKO, and Ice-T create ‘Hustler’ + more

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Lunar Lunes: Anti Up deliver ‘Concentrate,’ Destructo, DARKO, and Ice-T create ‘Hustler’ + moreDestructo Boom Single

Each week, New Music Friday sweeps through with torrential force, showering streaming platforms with immeasurable amounts of new tunes. Just like Dancing Astronaut rounds up 25 of the biggest songs of the week for the Hot 25 Spotify playlist each New Music Friday, Lunar Lunes serves as a landing pad for SoundCloud users who want a whole new dose of tunes to kick off the work week.

Chris Lake and Chris Lorenzo have delivered some fresh heat via their first Anti Up release of the year, “Concentrate.” Destructo, DARKO, and Ice-T have cooked up a sultry new single, “Hustler,” and RAC has released his remix of Elohim and Whethan‘s “Sleepy Eyes.” Diplo flexes his house music muscles on “Hold You Tight,” and No Mana unveils his new mau5trap single with Winnie Ford, “House of Cards.” The Knocks bring the party to Blu DeTiger‘s “Mad Love,” and Bishu reveals his full Monstercat EP, Hali 2 Cali. The latest release on Tchami‘s CONFESSION comes from Andrea Marino in the form of “The Plug,” and Freak On takes to The Prescription Records for the Feel Like This EP. Khåen brings two new tracks to Lane 8‘s This Never Happened, and Zomboy and MUST DIE! make a formidable team on “Revival.” JayKode teams up with The Zealots vocalist Micah Martin on an intense new single, “Apocalypse.” Doctor P packs plenty of bass into “Death Anxiety,” and Codeko shows off a new remix of Two Friends‘ “Take It Off.” Don Diablo and CID bring “Fever” to the former’s own Hexagon, and Tropix and LAV8 drop their debut original song, “Fallin’.”

The selection is updated every Lunes (Monday).

Photo credit: Arik McArthur

Dirty South shows his dark side on brooding ‘darko’ LP [Album Review]

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Dirty South shows his dark side on brooding ‘darko’ LP [Album Review]Dirty South Darko Album Review

Dirty South is a man of his word. He promised fans two albums before the year was out, and suddenly darko arrived right in the nick of time. Just a month after releasing the stunning XVthe cinematic house titan submitted yet another chapter to his long player history – and it’s unlike any project the producer has helmed to date.

For some, it may have made sense to release both fall albums as a double LP. Yet Dirty South’s decision to separate the two projects makes perfect sense when listening. Both are worlds apart in feeling, tone, and flow. XV was brilliantly bouncy, often bursting with waves of elation; darko, on the other hand, is something different with a more anxious mindset all its own. The mournful synth swells of “Temps” announce the project’s ethos immediately, and the feeling of unrest permeates throughout the rest of the journey. On “Cassetta,” the intro burns slowly before ascending chords spread the tension on thick. “Piksi” follows directly behind, which is shaping up to be one of the darkest tracks in Dirty South’s repertoire.

Despite the unity of darko‘s world, trademark Dirty South touches abound. While the beaming brightness of past hits like “If It All Stops” is nowhere to be found, the “Kino” shuffles and grooves as undeniably as any of the artist’s dance floor weapons. “Lava” is a rhythmic tour-de-force, despite snarling horn-like synth blasts tethering it firmly into the album’s aesthetic. But despite Dirty South’s mastery of vocal-infused efforts show in past releases on labels like Anjunabeats, darko remains starkly instrumental. The move feels calculated as the arrangements ebb and flow freely, leaving the listener to wonder if any lyrics could speak single-handedly for the soul of the record.

The producer admitting the record is his favorite to date could indicate this new sonic direction — also showcased in songs like his recent remix of Lane 8’s “No Captain” — is settling in to stay awhile. The relentless cohesion of darko is something Dirty South had yet to do at this level. As “Corda” looms into sight to cap off the album, it sets the mind on fire. There’s a sense that the gravity of the sum of its parts has seeped in, and the effect after listening to the LP’s entirety is vivid. It’s gripped in an atmosphere of anxious and electric yearning, soundtracking a feeling of introspection and raw hunger. Beautiful but stark, dark but restrained, mournful but energized; whether or not these tracks invade the same playlists and dance floors Dirty South has presided over all these years is irrelevant. For a statement as nuanced and unified as darko is a triumphant highlight in and of itself.