On Living Our Most Authentic Selves: Hippie Sabotage address the naysayers at BUKU Music + Arts Project 2018 [Interview]

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Photo cred: Christian Miller

Hippie Sabotage. It’s a name that has become associated with controversy in the dance music world. The Sacramento duo burst onto the scene in 2013 with their encapsulating, bass-bolstered remix of Tove Lo’s “Stay High” — a single which put both the artist and the kinship producing pair on the map. Following a brief tizzy with security at Electric Forest 2016, the brothers were also caught on camera assaulting security guards following a spat over malfunctioning equipment at last year’s What The Festival. Negative press abounded. Fans began wondering whether these acts of violence would be isolated incidents or routine occurrences.

Still, Hippie Sabotage’s music speaks for itself and their ability to draw large crowds has landed them bookings at Something Wicked, Moonrise, as well as this year’s editions of BUKU Music + Arts Project and Lollapalooza. Currently in the thick of their massive Path of Righteousness Tour, the brothers are choosing to focus on the positive elements of life and spreading the message of love and peace on which their musical moniker stands.

As readers might well know, however, even the hippie lifestyle isn’t always one of flowers and rainbows. Everyone has an inner darkness that confronts them every-so-often through life.  It’s how one learns to confront their demons, and balance it with their light elements, that dictates their humanity. That’s what the name Hippie Sabotage boils down to for these guys — embracing a subversive lifestyle and injecting the counter culture into their own unique little musical movement.

Dancing Astronaut sat down with brothers Kevin and Jeff Saurer at this year’s BUKU festival to discuss living their most authentic selves, along with a range of issues from their current tour, expanding their production, upcoming collaborations, and going on record over the dreaded security officer brawl that they allege was twisted by the media.

Photo cred: Isné Bobo Nuyent

Photo cred: Isné Bobo Nuyent


First question: So how did you come to be named Hippie Sabotage?
K: Well, HS are our father’s initials. When I was in the third grade, they had us make these leather lanyards with your parent’s initials, so I wrote HS on there. And then when I was 16, I was given that back by my mom and dad and I always had it on my keychain. So I think subconsciously that’s where it comes from. Then the “hippie” and the “sabotage” represent both sides of our different personalities.

DA: Who’s the hippie and who’s the sabotage?
K: [laughs] I don’t know, it changes day-to-day.

DA: The mark of a good dynamic duo.
K: Jeff smoked all the weed. He’s definitely the sabotage.

DA: We thought it was just about sabotaging hippies.
J: We’re trying to start a counter culture movement. Hippies, you know, they’re defined as lazy people. We’re about hippies and love and peace. We’re like that, but we get shit done.

DA: Yea, we work hard and we play hard.
K: Which is why I think Hippie Sabotage means subversive action.

DA: Oh, that’s awesome. What does subversive mean to you in this sense?
K: Just, uh, going left when everyone goes right.

J: We took acid for the first time years ago and we watched that documentary Samsara. It’s one of those time-lapses [where] it was a city, like New York, and it was going super fast, and everyone was going in one direction and not a single person was going out of the pack. That was our whole revelation — we just gotta go the opposite direction.

DA: And that’s works really well for dance music community, or just music in general, is that whole counter cultural embracing of your weirdness, your otherness.
K: Just trying to live our most authentic selves and make music that we feel is most authentic to us.

DA: So speaking of music, you got anything in the works? Any big collaborations that you’re excited about?
K: We got some hot fire beats.

J: We’ve got an EP with ZZ Gibson that’s about to drop. He’s a really dope rapper on a song called “—-”

K: He’s been opening with us on the Path of Righteousness tour.

J: Alex Wiley, another rapper is another rapper we’re working with.

K: The song we did with him and his producer, Mike Gaal, was on The Shining, so we’re super honored by that collab.

J: And Kaleedo came over to our crib to work on some new stuff. Yea, so it’s really whoever comes our way.

Photo cred: Christian Miller

DA: You guys use a lot of unreleased music in your sets that I haven’t heard on your albums, so how do you decide which ones to release.
K: I think it’s a combination.

J: Yea, uh, it’s a totally different mindset. One is the stuff we put out and the other is the stuff to get people hype, you know? We have a lot of beats that we play in the set but we never put out because we know that for thirty seconds it will get people to jump. It’s not the most artistic vision we want to put out there for a listening experience on Spotify or Soundcloud. So when we’re putting stuff out there, we’re more focused on the listening side.

DA: Yea, so do you kind of just play your sets impromptu kind of feeling your audience? Or do you have a planned pathway?
K: We’ve got like 55 of our beats that we’ve made and we present it. Sometimes, you know, like, we have a structure for how we want to do it and then just depending on how we feel the crowds going depends on how we pace it. If they want bang, bang, bang, super drops, then we’ll do it. But sometimes we’ll draw it out, talk a little bit, maybe explain it a little bit, like what the song means to us

DA: Do you guys communicate telepathically during sets?
J: We yell at each other [laughs] He’ll hit me in the back of the head or something. Nah, but it’s real easy because we’re both on the same page 100% of the time. If the crowd’s going crazy, we just keep amping them up. If they’re more vibey, I’ll get out there with the guitar and start going solo.

DA: So how’s the tour been going?
K: Amazing. Beyond our wildest expectations, honestly. Year after year more people have been showing up for our shows and it’s been getting bigger year after year. We’re super humbled. This is like show 29 or 30 at BUKU so it’s absolutely just like an amazing year to start 2018 for us, just to get to talk to the fans. It also gives us some sort of creative framework to see our way forward.

DA: So we’ve got to ask this question. There’s something that went down in a set. We don’t really know the full extent of the story, and behalf of everyone else wondering, we want to hear what happened from your perspective.

Photo cred: Christian MillerK: Uh, here’s what I’ll say… I am bummed out that there were people there, especially Hippie fans, that felt disappointed by our performance. That bums be out. I never want to go on stage to disappoint people who have spent their hard earned dollars to come see us, so regardless of how I feel about how the situation went down, this way or that way, I do acknowledge responsibility there. It wasn’t a good show, you know? [shrugs] And that’s not what we’re about. We’re about bringing the energy for the fans, making sure everybody had fun, and, just, you know, like I said, being positive. Our shows bring joy to people and that’s one thing that I feel like is missed. Regardless, I just want to bring that joy.

J: We come amped up for our our shows. We put our lives…

K: We’re putting our lives on the line every time we go out there so…

J: The internet is completely wrong on what happened, but I don’t want to throw anyone under the bus.

DA: I think fans sometimes have an expectation for their favorite artists, especially, and they don’t take into consideration that you’re humans too, and that everybody has an off day.
J: Yea, exactly. We did have an off day and I’m sorry that I disappointed the people that paid to come see us. Regardless of what happened behind the scenes, that bums me out. That’s not what we’re about. We try as hard as we possibly can to show that to people. We’re about positivity and joy and respect.

DA: Alright well thanks for taking the time to talk with us today.

K: Go crazy in the comments, internet!

DA: Good luck with your set.
J: Hey, thank you so much.

Photo cred: Dianna Shelley


All photos by Christian Miller and Dianna Marie Shelley, unless otherwise noted.

BUKU Music + Arts Project – photos by Christian Miller and Dianna Shelley

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Photo credit: aLive Coverage

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Two Fans Show Rezz Some Insane Love During Her Set at Buku

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This past weekend, The hypnotic queen, Rezz, performed an incredible set at the Buku Music + Art Project in New Orleans. Apparently, the set was so incredible that two fans climbed the pillars of stage structure to show Rezz some love. The pillars seemed easily climbable due to its similarity of a usable ladder. Insane

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5 artists not to miss at BUKU Music + Arts Project 2018

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Attendees will encounter live musical acts from all along the electronic, indie rock, and hip-hop/R&B spectrum upon entrance to the urban playground, which is set against the backdrop of an abandoned early 20th Century power plant and a warehouse featuring the city’s most iconic Mardi Gras floats. It’s a difficult feat to single out a mere five must-see artists, given the plethora of incredible talent slated to perform for this year’s sixth edition. Indeed, while there are innumerable exceptional artists which are not on this list, here are five artists Dancing Astronaut recommends making a point to see.

Tickets for BUKU are available here.


Walker & Royce

Photo courtesy of Walker & Royce.

With releases on Relief, This Ain’t Bristol, Pets Recordings, and many more, Walker & Royce join the BUKU line-up after the recent release of their genre-defying debut album Self Help, out on Dirtybird Records. Their iconic live DJ sets invite listeners on an out-there trip through the quirks and quips of an act on the tip of modern house music’s tongue. The result is a journey whose stops are as fit for introspection as it is for peak club moments. Head to BUKU’a new riverside stage, The Wharf, and arrive ready to be lured into deep contemplation with club-ready grooves on top.


 Jade Cicada 

After developing tendonitis in his arm from years of viola playing, underground bass producer Jade Cicada took it as a sign to put down the strings and pick up the laptop. His music is a reflection of a few spiritually-attuned ideals, as well as a constant homage to those who have inspired him.  Jade Cicada’s name implies virtues like wisdom, peace, and rebirth, and he brings these to his experimental sound design that utilizes break beat, lo-fi synth work, and low tempo bass lines. He’ll be providing an immersive bass experience to fans at BUKU’s iconic Float Den.


 Virtual Self 

Photo credit: Steven Lawton/Getty Images

Virtual Self is a bright new act that needs no introduction. As the brainchild of Porter Robinson, the quirky dance music project authentically incorporates IDM, jungle-inspired drum breaks, era-accurate trance super saw sections, early hardcore and j-core elements — all morphed into something that sounds robust and thoroughly produced. Exposed, vindicated, and honest, Robinson is poised as a tastemaker to influence dance music trends. Come experience Virtual Self’s US festival debut before Robinson brings his brand new headlining act to every major festivals across the country, including Spring Awakening, Bonaroo, and many more.


 Black Gummy 

BlackGummy began as the brainchild of Los Angeles-based electronic music producer Iman Marouf, who “discovered” the entity seen in his performances during a trip to the Middle East and Asia. He spends almost all of his time locked away in his studio, crafting new productions that attempt to lend a voice to the enigmatic persona that is BlackGummy. When he’s not in his studio, he is either performing alongside “the idol” in nightclubs and venues, and second, to search the four-corners of earth for more clues into his alter ego’s vague origins. Catch BlackGummy at BUKU’s VIP Back Alley stage.


 Illenium (Awake Live) 

Illenium performs at Bonnaroo Arts And Music Festival , 2017. Photo credit: FilmMagic.

Illenium‘s prolific outpouring of captivating remixes and haunting originals has garnered him a devoted following and has seen him rise quickly in the ranks of the dance music community. He has distinguished himself from the future bass herd through his unrivaled ability to create an immersive emotional experience of highs and lows that pulls on the heart-strings and leaves listeners awestruck. Bringing his Awake Live tour to NOLA this March, Illenium’s stunning live performance will incorporate a keyboard and drum pad framed by cutting-edge lighting and visuals to immerse listeners in captivating melodic bass. Illenium headlines the Power Plant stage on Saturday, March 9th.

Lil Uzi Vert, Illenium, SNAILS among final additions to BUKU 2018 line-up

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BUKU Music + Art Project has just announced the final lineup additions for their seventh annual festival, held March 9–10, 2018 at Mardi Gras World in downtown New Orleans. Set across five unique stages, including the backdrop of an abandoned early 20th Century power plant and a warehouse featuring the city’s iconic Mardi Gras floats, the urban two-day event fuses hip-hop and electronic acts into a forward-thinking and diverse musical lineup, along with live street art, custom-made industrial graffiti installations, and dozens of surprise “pop-up” performances.

Joining 2018 headliners BassnectarMGMT, SZA, and Virtual Self on this final phase roster is chart-topping Philly rapper Lil Uzi Vert, and melodic maestro Illenium, who’ll be bringing his full “Awake” production for a special live show. Other support on the phase three bill includes “vomit-step” pioneer Snails, Florida rapper Ski Mask The Slump God, Chicago rapper Noname, Dirtybird house duo Walker & Royce, and exclusive VIP b2b performances from Eprom and Mad Zach. Also big on spotlighting local NOLA talent, Buku will showcase curated by acclaimed local artist collective Pink Room Project.

Tier four tickets are on sale now, starting at $190 for GA and $275 for VIP. More information on ticketing is available here. Buku Music + Art Project is an 18+ event.

Buku Music + Art Project announces phase two 2018 line-up, Virtual Self’s festival debut

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The city of New Orleans is preparing to host some of music’s most sought-after talents in its sixth annual Buku Music + Art Project come March 9 and 10 of 2018.

Alongside the festival’s previously announced slew of eccentricity is its phase two announcement of artists set to include REZZ, Bonobo (DJ set), Ganja White Night and Boogie T (Live + B2B), Green VelvetSnakehips, Gryffin, Jai Wolf, Spag Heddy, Elohim, The Russ Liquid Test, and more.

Additionally, Porter Robinson‘s technological-utopian alias, Virtual Self, will be making its festival circuit debut. If the festival serves as an indication of what will take place next year, this won’t be the only Virtual Self festival appearance of the year.

VIP-only performances are also confirmed from Graves, Medasin, Ducky, BlackGummy, SQUNTO, and TVBOO.

2018 is shaping up to be Buku’s most eccentric booking to date, from beloved acts like Migos to MGMT or the dark tunes of REZZ and BlackGummy, the festival is sure to be a must-attend event come next spring.

Buku’s final phase three announcement is set to come after the new year.

Tickets are on sale  December 6 at 11 a.m. CT. More information is available here.

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BUKU Finalizes 2017 Lineup With Cashmere Cat, Run The Jewels And More

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BUKU Music + Art Project tops off stacked 2017 lineup with some fresh additions.

deadmau5, Zeds Dead, Zhu, JAUZ & More Top 2017 BUKU Lineup

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