Watch: Charli XCX – “White Mercedes”

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          |______EARTH ARTIFACTS MUSEUM________|
        ___________________
       / /~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  |
   () / /_________________ |()           ___________
   /---------------------------         //          
  / /======|=D=O=D=G=E=|======      []//____________[]
  _____________________________/     /------------------
      _______ 1970  _______   /      |[==] MERCEDES [==]|
   |_/|__|__|_____/|__|__|_/|      |_______2019_______|
   |      |`V` `---' 'V'|      |       | |    """" o  | |
   |______|             |______|       |_|            |_|

"As you kids can see, Charli XCX created the Mercedes-Benz® automobile 80 years ago with her song 'White Mercedes.' Our lives were changed forever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and evr and ernaf ande evekljadfnerlkaj lkds;jfoewu!!!!!!!!"
   _/   
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♫ Listen: Charli XCX – “Blame It On Your Love” [ft. Lizzo]

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One of the best tracks off Charli’s Pop 2 mixtape (our fourth favorite release of 2018) is its tasty closer, “Track 10.” But HEY LISTEN: did you know it was actually a remix of a then-unreleased song, “Blame It On Your Love”? Well, ya do now if you didn’t, because today sees the release of the “original” song, with Charli once again hooking up with production team Stargate (+ additional help from A. G. Cook and EASYFUN) and Lizzo for a verse. Don’t you just wanna drink ‘em up?

♥ ❤ ❣ ❥
♥ ❤ ❣ ❥
♥ ❤ ❣ ❥

Listen to “Blame It On Your Love” below, and believe in something:

Galantis team up with Sofia Carson on infectious new collaboration, ‘San Francisco’ [WATCH]

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Galantis team up with Sofia Carson on infectious new collaboration, ‘San Francisco’ [WATCH]Galantis Sofia Cason

Galantis released a new track and accompanying music video, “San Francisco” featuring Sofia Carson — an electro pop sparkler with harmonized vocal-led verses, a glittering piano chord progression, and a hook with a mesmerizing brass melody.

The track celebrates the Swedish production duo’s sold out return to San Francisco’s Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in November 2018.  Paired with Carson’s powerful topline, “San Francisco” harmonizes flawlessly with its minimal instrumentation and strong melodies. The music video was shot in a Galantis-themed karaoke dive bar, putting Carson front-and-center on the karaoke stage. Carson is known for her singing and acting prowess, staring in the upcoming Freeform television series, Pretty Little Liars: The Perfectionists, as well as the finale of the popular Descendants series, Descendants 3.

Christian Karlsson and Linus Eklöw will be reigning in the New Year December 30 and 31 at Aragon Ballroom in Chicago.

♫ Listen: Charli XCX – “1999”

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We at the Tapes would rather be the big brothers and sisters of music, turning you on to sugar-coated pop and kerosene-soaked drone noise alike. But sometimes it becomes necessary for us to be the bearer of somewhat bad news. It’s true; since 2019 is right around the corner, 1999 is now officially (gulp) 20 years ago.

Two decades ago, we were witnessing Keanu Reeves gliding in bullet time, watching some square cartoon character named SpongeBob on basic cable, and listening to a young, innocent singer named Britney Spears. If you could get a good enough connection on dialup, you could maybe frag a friend or two in Quake. It was a time when you’d still call your friends because T9 Word just took too damned long.

Charli XCX is reminiscing on those (simpler?) times too. Taking inspiration from Real McCoy, Aqua, Ace of Bass, and the Robin S. track with the unforgettable bloopy synthline, the popstar has emerged with a tongue-in-cheek portrait of 90s nostalgia with her latest, fittingly titled “1999.” The track is a collaboration with Troye Sivan, who contributes vox.

Timewarp below:

Young Thug delays Slime Language until tonight (boo!), clarifies that it’s a compilation (wtf!!)

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Young Thug turns 28 years old today. And you know what that means, right? Yep, it means that he is OLD. AS. SHIT. Seriously, that’s so fucking old! My god!! But hey, with age comes maturity, so rather than asking for a present, Atlanta’s Thuggiest has decided to give a present this year, and it just so happens to be the greatest present of all: a new project titled Slime Language, jam-packed with features from the likes of Gunna, Jacquees, Lil Uzi Vert, Tracy T, Duke, and many more. Unfortunately, it’s not the “studio debut” that many were reporting. A representative speaking to The FADER has clarified that it’s a “compilation project.”

Slime Language was expected at midnight, but as per usual, we got fucked over once again it didn’t pan out that way, leaving many fans waiting up until the wee hours of the morning making jokes on Twitter. It’s kind of a ritual at this point. Anyway, gotta treat our senior citizens right, so why don’t you mosey on down them internet tubes and “pre-save” or “pre-add” the project here. Happy birthday, Young Thug!


Slime Language tracklist:

01. Tsunami
02. U Ain’t Slime Enough Ft. Karlae & Duke
03. Gain Clout
04. Oh Yeah Ft. Hidoraah
05. Audemar Ft. Tracy T
06. Chanel (Go Get It) Ft. Gunna & Lil Baby
07. Dirty Shoes Ft. Gunna
08. It’s A Slime Ft. Lil Uzi Vert
09. Goin Up Ft. Lil Keed
10. January 1st Ft. Jacquees & Trapboy Freddy
11. Chains Choking Me Ft. Gunna
12. STS Ft. Strick
13. Expensive Ft. Hidoraah & Dolly
14. Slimed In Ft. Nechie

David Guetta debuts new single ‘Don’t Leave Me Alone’ with Anne-Marie, doubles down with Lenny Kravitz remix

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David Guetta debuts new single ‘Don’t Leave Me Alone’ with Anne-Marie, doubles down with Lenny Kravitz remix10247257 759687800742841 612124808 N

David Guetta has pulled out all of the stops this week. First, the French dance veteran remixed a seasoned talent from the rock spectrum, Lenny Kravitz, taking on “Low” from Kravitz’ eleventh studio LP, Raise Vibration. A matter of hours later, Guetta then followed up with a new collaborative piece alongside one of 2018’s most sought after new pop artists, Anne-Marie. “Low” is Lenny Kravitz’ entire brand in a song — alluring, groovy, and physical. It’s a track that might not an obvious candidate for a Grammy-winning dance music artist to remix, but when Guetta works his magic, it manages to complement Kravitz’ style exceptionally well.

David Guetta’s work of course is not done there. Coming through with one of the biggest electronic releases of the week, the “Flames” producer delivers a new original work titled, “Don’t Leave Me Alone,” anchored to Anne-Marie’s love struck vocals. The track sees both artists lend their understanding of pop music to an upbeat, electro-pop summer treat. “Don’t Leave Me Alone’ is bound for deserved radio play, and Anne-Marie, coming fresh off of collaborations with Rudimental and Major Lazer and Marshmello, absolutely delivers in top form.

Music Review: Janelle Monaé – Dirty Computer

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Janelle Monaé

Dirty Computer

[Bad Boy/Atlantic; 2018]

Rating: 3.5/5

The boundary between science fiction and social reality is an optical illusion.
– Donna Haraway, “A Cyborg Manifesto” (1984)

If a system is but a collection of functions, and a function is a normative, predictable operation, then the ability of computer systems to produce useful, predictable outputs (i.e., to function) is guaranteed by sterile, predictable inputs. We speak, too, of non-normative operation sets that corrupt computer functions as “viruses,” because we know the analogous relationship between computers and living creatures: viruses corrupt cells’ genetic makeup to render them non-functional vessels for the reproduction of deviant nucleotide sequences — ditto sequences of computer code.

But there’s a level between these two “systems” — neither biology nor software, but wetware — that’s similarly defined by normativity and predictability. Our psychology is mediated by culture, a collection of functional customs that maintains and reproduces the social system. We are not born with it, but into it: indoctrination is a wetware virus, and Janelle Monaé is a hacker.

Judith Butler famously describes gender as “a stylized repetition of acts,” a function within a system but itself a system of operations that produce masculine/feminine subjects. By strategically reproducing sets of “feminine” acts, Monaé disrupts this program from within. Dirty Computer is a feat of interpellation: rather than subverting expectations of femininity per se, it finds Monaé retaliating against misogynistic discourse by frequently assuming the subject standpoint of “woman” in order to reclaim that identity. Just as — to use the famous example — turning to a police officer who shouts “hey, you!” makes “you” the subject of ideologies of democracy and law, the track “Pynk” and its music video responds to the performative experience of “woman” as a subject to normative ideologies of gender, which begins as early as the announcement that “it’s a girl.”

In a sense, then, Monaé appears to harmonize with hegemonic gender discourse by signaling “feminine” motifs throughout Dirty Computer. Monaé’s ulterior motive, however, is to subvert the way in which femininity is read — as negative. Compare, for example, the positive connotations of “manly” (confident, firm) with the negative connotations of “girly” (frivolous, vain); if nothing else, “Pynk” stresses that “girly” can mean assertive, serious, powerful. But that’s only the most rudimentary implication in question. Crucially, Monaé enunciates the physiological fact of the vagina throughout the record, most obviously to subvert the culture of disgust around women’s physiology in popular discourse and to reclaim women’s sexual agency. In this sense, Monaé’s “I Got the Juice” is functionally similar to sexually effervescent Nicki Minaj tracks like “Anaconda.”

However, the vagina’s most important consequence in these types of works follows its symbolic relationship to humankind’s intrinsic animality, as Simone de Beauvoir writes. Building upon de Beauvoir’s work, anthropologist Sherry Ortner sought to explain the universal subordination of women across human societies by arguing that, since sacrificially self-effacing elements of women’s physiology and its functions (e.g., menstruation) serve no other function than reproduction and caregiving, they socially affix women to roles that fulfill “merely” survival functions, which are thereby devalued as not contributing to the culture process. Because women’s physiology renders their animality more explicit, in other words, their contribution to the development of culture is often obscured; meanwhile, men’s physiology “frees [them] to take up the projects of culture” (Ortner 1974). No wonder textbooks continue to credit the evolution of the species to men with hunting spears and never women with, say, gathering baskets.

Although a recent wave of mainstream women artists — including Minaj, for instance — is working against this discourse to reclaim women’s sexuality and physiology, Monaé’s association of “woman” subjects with cybernetic bodies is particularly effective and inclusive. Just take Monaé’s cyborg motifs throughout her Metropolis suites, which obscure the boundaries between the artist’s own physiology and futuristic technology to exchange women’s animality for their centrality within the culture process. In fact, these cyberculture themes allow Monaé to decenter physiology in her construction of femininity altogether, particularly on Dirty Computer. Ultimately, Monaé employs the symbolic vagina as a pragmatic reply from the subject standpoint of “woman” as it emerges from gender discourse; as a mere pivot of sociopolitical mobilization, this symbolic use makes space for the representation of transgender women as in, for example, the women not wearing the genitalia-shaped unitards on “Pynk.”

At the same time, however, the threatening hybridity of the cyborg woman’s physiology mimics the threat of women’s animality. In Haraway’s cyborg feminist theory, the “monster” that pollutes our identities (e.g., Centaurs in Ancient Greece, hermaphrodites in early modern France) plays a decisive role in defining the outer limits of community. And just as women’s animality pollutes the boundaries between humankind and its past (i.e., our primate origins), so cyborgs’ hybridity breaches the narrowing limits between humankind and its future (i.e., singularity, AI takeover). Both exist outside the community of humankind — daresay mankind — that, ultimately, is strictly, necessarily, and even semantically male. Fittingly, this discursive opposition between women and technology drove the cyberfeminism movement to reimagine women’s bodies as subversive matrices at the center of modernity in the 90s; Monaé’s oeuvre is only a further step in this direction.

On Dirty Computer, similarly, the woman is at the center of modernity. However, Monaé is mobilized further by her intersecting identities as a queer Black woman to develop her earlier cyborg symbolism to include the many other “deviant” identities — “monstrous,” indeed — that similarly exist on the margins, upsetting the delicate equilibrium between the past and the future in which the United States is presently suspended: While the Black body, for example, has been marked as “primitive” (i.e., too close to nature) via stereotypes about physical strength and sexual endowment, the queer body — the same-sex relationship in particular — has been marked as “unnatural” (i.e., too far from nature) for transcending the species’ reproductive functions and necessities.

By polluting these boundaries, it’s no surprise that, in the “emotion picture” that accompanies Dirty Computer, the free-spirited Monaé and co. are targets of the hegemonic White securocracy; their conduct is a set of tainted operations that disrupts — infects, indeed, as a virus — the prescribed social program of state apparatuses that conduct conduct. Consequently, when captured, Monaé must verbalize her deviance by repeating that she is a “dirty computer” — her deviant programming must be wiped away in order to decontaminate the boundaries of community itself.

Ironically, her indoctrination is itself a form of contamination, a “modding” of the brain whose imminent analogues include everything from conversion therapy to “talking white.” For Monaé, that’s key. Because those modifications — whether imposed or adopted — are premised upon the alienation of the “monster” Other; it’s precisely the system against which she works. In fact, although Monaé is one such “monster” that must become “human” in the film, in the record she asserts her humanity with celebratory lyricism that, more broadly, asserts the centrality of these “monsters” in the contemporary social imagination: “I’m not America’s nightmare,” she sings on “Crazy, Classic, Life.” “I’m the American Dream… I’m the American cool.”

And, really, after navigating complex matrices of identity under an indulgent, accessible veneer, Dirty Computer is ultimately — even “simply” — a cathartic assertion of self in a hostile system. In the film’s final scene, Monaé and co. successfully escape their imprisonment as the record’s closing track, “Americans,” flares over the credits. Nearly brainwashed, these once-monsters escape over the lines, “I’m not crazy, baby/ I’m American.” In a system that emphasizes the unity and equality of its members while assiduously delimiting the bounds between members and non-members, Monaé’s closing statement mobilizes patriotism in self-defense. But it’s patriotism nonetheless: We belong here, she sings in joy.

Death Cab for Cutie cease their tease and announce their ninth studio album Thank You For Today

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Remember last month when beloved band Death Cab for Cutie — you know, the band — teased a new album for an August 2018 release? Remember how there’s been absolutely zero news about it to report on since? Well, after many sleepless nights spent re-watching The O.C for all the Death Cab references, realizing that Seth Cohen is indeed a tool*, wondering when we would get an album title — let alone a tracklisting! — let alone a single! — here we are.

Call it Chrismukkah in June, because Death Cab for Cutie have officially announced their new album Thank You for Today, revealed its full tracklisting, and shared its first single.

Thank You for Today will be Death Cab’s ninth studio album, out August 18 via Atlantic Records (pre-order ithere). And in case you didn’t read, or worse, forgot our previous post about the band, this will be the first Death Cab album to feature Dave Depper and Zac Rae as full members, spicing up the usual Ben Gibbard-Nick Harmer-Jason McGerr recipe. The first single is called “Gold Rush” and… confirmed: I’ve checked with all my sources and yep, it sure sounds like a Death Cab for Cutie song.

You can watch the music video for “Gold Rush” down below. If music videos aren’t your thing, feel free to experience the song on its own terms by clicking play before navigating away to that tab you’ve got open about radishes. Make sure to also check out the artwork and full tracklisting for Thank You for Today, as well as all of Death Cab for Cutie’s upcoming tour dates, down below. One dollar from every ticket purchased through the band’s website will go to benefit of The Aurora Commons, a Seattle non-profit.

*Seth Cohen being a tool is in no way a reflection or judgement on Death Cab for Cutie, their music, their fans, the first and fourth seasons of The O.C., Atlantic Records, or those UPS commercials with that one Postal Service song in them.

Thank You for Today

01. I Dreamt We Spoke Again
02. Summer Years
03. Gold Rush
04. Your Hurricane
05. When We Drive
06. Autumn Love
07. Northern Lights
08. You Moved Away
09. Near/Far
10. 60 & Punk

Death Cab tour dates

06.16.18 — Amstelveen, NL — Amsterdamse Bos Theater
06.18.18 — London, UK — Robert Smith’s Meltdown at the Southbank Centre
06.19.18 — London, UK — Scala
06.23.18 — Seattle, WA — Paramount 90th Anniversary Celebration
08.02.18 — Salt Lake City, UT — Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre
08.03.18 — Boise, ID — Summerfield at Memorial Stadium
08.04-05.18 — Missoula, MT — Travelers’ Rest
08.11.18 — San Diego, CA — 91X X-Fest 2018
08.12.18 — Long Beach, CA — ALT 98.7 Summer Camp 2018
09.21.18 — Las Vegas, NV — Life is Beautiful Music & Art Festival
09.24.18 — Eugene, OR — Hult Center for the Performing Arts *
09.25.18 — Portland, OR — Keller Auditorium *
09.27.18 — Berkeley, CA — Greek Theatre Berkeley †
09.29.18 — Phoenix, AZ — Van Buren
10.01.18 — Dallas, TX — Bomb Factory *
10.02.18 — Kansas City, MO — Arvest Bank Theatre at The Midland *
10.03.18 — Madison, WI — The Sylvee *
10.05.18 — St. Paul, MN — Palace Theatre *
10.07.18 — Chicago, IL — Auditorium Theatre *
10.09.18 — Upper Darby, PA — Tower Theatre *
10.12.18 — Brooklyn, NY — Kings Theatre *
10.13.18 — Brooklyn, NY — Kings Theatre *
10.14.18 — Boston, MA — Boch Wang Theatre *
10.15.18 — Boston, MA — Boch Wang Theatre *
10.17.18 — Washington, DC — The Anthem *
10.18.18 — Charlottesville, VA — Sprint Pavilion *
10.19.18 — Atlanta, GA — Coca Cola Roxy Theater *
10.20.18 — St. Augustine, FL — St. Augustine Amphitheatre *
10.22.18 — Miami, FL — The Fillmore Miami Beach *
10.23.18 — Orlando, FL — Hard Rock Live *
11.10.18 — Santiago, CH — Fauna Primavera
11.11.18 — Buenos Aires, AR — Personal Fest 2018
11.15.18 — São Paulo, BR — Popload Festival
11.18.18 — Mexico City, MX — Corona Capital

* Charly Bliss
† Cold War Kids

Death Cab for Cutie — the band — have a new album and a fresh set of tour dates

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Last we heard from Death Cab for Cutie — the acclaimed indie rock band, not the award-winning artisan hot dog cart — they had just released an audio recording of their first-ever live show, circa 1997. And while that was a fun, interesting look at how far Death Cab has come, this celebrated amateur detective agency is done with living in the past.

Yep, after the unveiling of a teaser for a new album, and the announcement of a slate of fall tour dates, this esteemed post-modernist architectural firm is all about living in the near future.

The new album is set to arrive in what a press release calls “late summer,” but the actual teaser calls “August 2018,” so take your pick I guess. It will be the first album from the respected baby glasses manufacturer to feature not only the usual suspects of Ben Gibbard, Nick Harmer, and Jason McGerr — but also Dave Depper and Zac Rae, who had previously only been on-board as touring members.

And speaking of touring…

Aww! Thank you, Cohen! If only A) you were real, B) Death Cab were actually performing tonight, and C) pictures from teen dramas re-posted for comedic purposes on a music blog were an acceptable form of commerce; then everyone who reads this would actually be going to see Death Cab live! Alas, you’re not, they’re not, and it’s not; so anyone itching to see this revered Aussie rules football club in concert is going to have to wait until their tour actually kicks off…

Boy, this post really went off the rails, huh? Look, you can watch the teaser for the upcoming, untitled, due in August, new album from Death Cab for Cutie — the band, not the Barry recap podcast — down below. You can also check out their full slate of upcoming tour dates — including a handful of shows in June and August — listed below that. Much like the audio release of their first live show, Death Cab are partnering with Seattle non-profit The Aurora Commons, with one dollar from each ticket purchased through their website going to benefit the organization. Lastly, to be clear: Death Cab for Cutie is a band, and they make music.

Tour dates for the popular romance novel writing collective Death Cab for Cutie:

06.16.18 — Amstelveen, NL — Amsterdamse Bos Theater
06.18.18 — London, UK — Robert Smith’s Meltdown at the Southbank Centre
08.02.18 — Salt Lake City, UT — Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre **SOLD OUT**
08.03.18 — Boise, ID — Summerfield at Memorial Stadium
08.04-05.18 — Missoula, MT — Travelers’ Rest
09.21-23.18 — Las Vegas, NV — Life is Beautiful Music & Art Festival
09.24.18 — Eugene, OR — Hult Center for the Performing Arts
09.25.18 — Portland, OR — Keller Auditorium
09.27.18 — Berkeley, CA — Greek Theatre Berkeley
09.29.18 — Phoenix, AZ — Van Buren
10.01.18 — Dallas, TX — Bomb Factory
10.02.18 — Kansas City, MO — Arvest Bank Theatre at The Midland
10.03.18 — Madison, WI — The Sylvee
10.05.18 — St. Paul, MN — Palace Theatre
10.07.18 — Chicago, IL — Auditorium Theatre
10.09.18 — Upper Darby, PA — Tower Theatre
10.12.18 — Brooklyn, NY — Kings Theatre
10.13.18 — Brooklyn, NY — Kings Theatre
10.14.18 — Boston, MA — Boch Wang Theatre
10.17.18 — Washington, DC — Anthem
10.18.18 — Charlottesville, VA — Sprint Pavilion
10.19.18 — Atlanta, GA — Coca Cola Roxy
10.20.18 — St. Augustine, FL — St. Augustine Amphitheatre
10.22.18 — Miami, FL — The Fillmore Miami Beach
10.23.18 — Orlando, FL — Hard Rock Live
11.15.18 — São Paulo, BR — Popload Festival

Charli XCX celebrates her own greatness by re-releasing Number One Angel and Pop 2 mixtapes on double-vinyl and double-cassette (f.k.a. two cassettes)

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As any competent and responsible modern citizen of the world knows, XCX is obviously Roman Numeral talk for “ten fewer than 100, plus ten.”

…Which also seems to be juuuuuuuust about exactly how many 2XLP, red+clear vinyl versions of last year’s Number 1 Angel and Pop 2 mixtapes that the AD WIZARDS over at Warner/Atlantic decided to press…because it looks like it’s already sold-out.

BUT! Seeing as how no mention has been made of this being a “limited edition” thing, it’s probably safe to assume that there’ll be more of those bad-boys available for our mindless, earth-defiling consumption soon enough; so I’d keep checking if I were you.

AND! For all you plastic+magnetic tape fans out there, there’s also a double-cassette version that’s still available AF.

Finally, in case you need any additional motivation to CONSUME-CONSUME-CONSUME these records that you might well already own copies of, check out Charli’s snazzy recent Tweet on the subject. It pretty much tells you everything I just did — only in a much more efficient, convenient, user-friendly, and direct-to-fans manner…(cough)…

Well, bye!