Lane 8 showcases serene soundscapes in new winter mixtape

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Lane 8 showcases serene soundscapes in new winter mixtapeDSC 0085 Copy

Lane 8 has squared away 2018 with the release of his winter mixtape. He’s gracefully arranged four lengthy mixes over the course of 2018 that uniquely embody the not just the nature of their respective seasons, but the transformative essence of those seasons changing.

Through his fall 2018 mixtape, Lane 8 sonically thread warm and bright vibrations together with the moods evoked of changing colors and longer nights. His summer mix set the scene for waves crashing on beaches and warm breezes. The spring mixtape took listeners into this year with grace, through a soundscape that pollen could dance on. With each mix Lane 8 has accomplished the personal, trying, and unique feat of giving a portion of time — and the change that happens during that time — a sonic stamp.

The winter 2018 mixtape is no exception. Through four hours of fluid mixing and careful, hand-picked arrangement, Lane 8 has given this winter his stamp. Starting in with his own remix of Virtual Self‘s “Ghost Voices,” Lane 8 starts guiding his listeners into the mix, gliding over the icy inhibitions and harsh winds of the season. By an hour and a half into the mix, he hits listeners with the Yotto edit of Fatima Yamaha’s haunting “What’s a Girl to Do.” Through the acts of Jon Hopkins, Rampa, Eelke Kleijn, Black Coffee, Dirty South, the crews of Anjunadeep, All Day I Dream, and many more, Lane 8 finds an enjoyable, quintessential feeling that unifies the chill of winter with the warmth within people who not only withstand the cold it but love it.

Lane 8 has been putting these seasonal mixes for a few years now, and with each passing year, they’ve become more refined and more needed, bringing out the best of each season. This winter mix evokes visions of fur rugs, fireplaces, and snow falling softly outside wooden-frame windows — cozy spots where one would hope to be posted for a quick four hours in the upcoming months. Now, thanks to Lane 8, those moments have a perfect soundtrack.

Lee Burridge to return to LA for annual All Day I Dream New Year’s weekend celebration

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Lee Burridge to return to LA for annual All Day I Dream New Year’s weekend celebrationADID NYC 06172018 Selects W DanielLeinweber RazberryPhotography 06

All Day I Dream has officially created a Los Angeles tradition. As with the past few consecutive New Year’s weekends, the Lee Burridge-led brand touches down in the city to cap off the 2018 — and bringing a couple close friends with it. Sebastien Légér, a star in the progressive realm, will be exploring his deep house side come December 29. The producer had a fair amount of his work signed to the label this year, with his Underwater Rocket EP being a notable addition.

Gab Rhome will also be joining in the festivities. An expert in sentimentality, his records have found their way onto Anjunadeep, Henry Saiz’ Natura Sonoris, and beyond, the Canadian maestro will be a welcome new face at the Sunday afternoon gathering. Per usual, it will be held at Chinatown’s historic Gin Ling way, an intimate and fitting location for the All Day I Dream ambiance.

 

Lee Burridge to return to LA for annual All Day I Dream New Year’s weekend celebrationAll Day I Dream LA New Year

 

Purchase tickets here 

Photo Credit: Daniel Leinweber | Razberry Photography

Techno Tuesday: Facundo Mohrr on his love affair with melodic dance music and embracing imperfection

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Techno Tuesday: Facundo Mohrr on his love affair with melodic dance music and embracing imperfectionTechno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Another star rises out of Argentina to make his mark in the deep, melodic realm of dance music. Facundo Mohrr‘s affair with electronica has been instilled in him from birth; his mother, a raver herself, passed on the tradition and continued to attend events as she was raising a young Mohrr. It was only natural that, upon reaching adolescence, he would eventually take his own step behind the decks and begin to create house music.

Mohrr’s path to stardom seemed destined to happen. By 2008, he’d already made it onto Frisky with a release that was remixed by Cid Inc. Shortly after, he’d caught the ears and support by the likes of John Digweed, Sasha, Nick Warren. and of course, his own compatriot Hernan Cattaneo. A decade-plus after his break and Mohrr is just starting to climb toward his peak; in 2017, he found his way onto Henry Saiz‘ Natura Sonoris with a widely-rinsed Bleed EP. He and his longtime friend and collaborator Valdovinos made it onto Get Physical’s Kindisch arm shortly thereafter. Meanwhile, demand was starting to grow for Facundo’s live presence, taking him to the US, Tunisia, Mexico, England, and beyond.

Come 2018, a new friendship was born with Lee Burridge. Their musical visions quickly aligned, and by March, the Argentinian talent had made it onto both Burridge’s imprints of All Day I Dream, and the Hoj co-owned Tale + Tone. It feels fitting that as the year comes to a close, Mohrr’s first extended player on All Day I Dream arrives. La Espere fits perfectly in with the label’s aesthetic: profound, emotive deep house, but with a more energized and rhythmic touch courtesy of Mohrr.

Dancing Astronaut had the pleasure of premiering “Blue Bird” prior to release, but we remained curious as to who this mysterious artist was at his core. So, the only move was to

Techno Tuesday: Facundo Mohrr on his love affair with melodic dance music and embracing imperfectionMohrr 1

Credit: Julian Farina

Describe growing up in Argentina and how you came to fall in love with dance music.
I fell in love with electronic music thanks to my mother. She used to listen to this style. I remember being 13 years old back in 1998 … we lived in a flat which was in the top floor of a building. That flat overlooked Sarmiento Park, where the first raves were held in our country. My mum would go to those parties and I remained at home looking at the lights flashing in the park, from my balcony. Everything was very intriguing to me. So, I started to look up information about the DJs who played at those raves. I investigated in every way I could, because internet had just begun so it was extremely difficult. Some years later, in the last years of my secondary school, a classmate and I discovered FRUITYLOOPS (now known as FL Studio), and since then I have never stopped making music. Today, 15 years after that first contact I still sit in front of a project with the same emotion and adrenaline that I started with.

How did you arrive at your current sound?
Talking about my sound is a bit difficult. I’d say that I always stress the rhythm a lot. I don’t like having energy in my tracks without any sense or pattern. I like deep melodies in my productions, as well as in my sets. I really try to transmit *something* at all times. I like stuff to be happening constantly in my work, and I don’t worry about what others say about going eclectic at times; I see the good side in everything and take advantage of it. Ultimately, I stick to the saying, “there is no good music or bad music; either you like it or not.” I try to evolve and always look for the diversity, and fully accept the risk of upsetting the public in adding surprises into my music.

There’s a huge melodic/progressive movement in Argentina. What do you think draws the people to this kind of music as opposed to other types of dance music?
One name: Hernan Cattaneo, a model in this genre, and he is Argentinian. I think everything is related to this fact. Nowadays, however, other genres are growing up enormously, and all of them have massive festivals monthly. The Argentinian scene is having a great moment. People have access to all kind of information, and thus, they are discovering things constantly.

Now let’s talk about Burning Man. How did you get introduced to this culture, and how has it influenced you since your first time?
My first experience with Burning Man was extraordinary. I truly thought my first year would be 2019, but it seems that when things are meant to happen, nothing can stop them. While on a Central American tour weeks before, a series of events happened that made the event unavoidable this year — from the way I obtained an entrance ticket, to getting there from Buenos Aires, the with my trip back manifesting just two days after Burning Man ended. Everything settled in such a perfect way that if I had planned it beforehand, it wouldn’t have resulted how it did.

Many things are said about Burning Man; I also asked a lot about what it was like and when I finally went, but the only real answer is, “I can not tell you, you must go.” I’ve never experience anything like this in my whole life! The Playa is a magical place that is always wowing you. I met extraordinary people and felt as if all us were a big family. Many profound things happened there and what one can see through the social networks doesn’t represent even 10% of what’s really lived. I was lucky to be able to play music there, and it was awesome. Everything was felt differently. It was as though in the air connects you directly and naturally with the people on the dance floor. Something weirdly awesome? Going cycling around the city and high-fiving with everyone!

You’ve partnered with Valdovinos a lot, including on this EP. What makes you two a good collaboration pair?
Simplicity, ease, and similar methods allow us to get on very well with each other in the studio. We don’t like going ’round and ’round over the same situations; instead, we always choose to go one step forward, and if we get stuck, we delete and start again without thinking too much. This is something I like and makes work fluid — a thing I always look for. I like to go forward fast and I can do it with him. Rodrigo is a great artist and I admire him a lot.

How did the process go of writing ‘La Espere?’ Did you write all of the four tracks specifically for the EP? Any big inspirations in particular?
Not really. When I make music, what comes out is what I felt in that moment. The four tracks of the EP were probably the ones I thought Lee was going to choose. My process is always the same: I search for a loop of drums which I can listen for a long time without getting bored and on this base, I start the musical part, always taking the rhythm as a starting point. I never draw a specific melody or bassline; I record it directly several times, and I let the small mistakes stay. They are part of the process and if it appeals to me, I keep on with the rest. My music is full of mistakes and I love it!

What are your biggest tools for writing music so far? Like a specific plug-in, hardware, a routine you follow to boost creativity, etc…
I make music 24 hours a day, all the time. I neither follow a routine in particular nor wait for an inspiration to come. If a melody doesn’t come, I try out samples, turn them back, double their time, everything that can compensate for the lack of creativity that day. There is always a way, and is often in the most hidden folder waiting for you. If I can’t make sounds, I combine the ones I have, but I never stop.

I have a home studio which is really tiny: a MacBook Pro with a simple sound card, a pair of Adam F 5s, which I love, and a Roland JP08. Regarding software, I use Ableton Live and a few plugins. I like very much to use sampler and loops.

What do you hope to accomplish over the next few years?
What life has ready for me! I will keep on making music and letting it take me wherever I have to go. Always with and for music, expressing myself through it and hoping to transmit it to as many people as I can .

Finally, what else is coming up for Facundo Mohrr?
Music, music and more music! I have several scheduled launches, some of them before the end of the year and others at the beginning of 2019.Apart from some venues in Argentina, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama and Canada, we are also about to launch music on Kermesse with Valdominos. A hectic year is coming!

Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]

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Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]ADID EP 038 Facundo Mohrr

If there’s anyone who knows their way around a full-bodied, melodic piece, it’s Facundo Mohrr. The burgeoning talent hails from Argentina, a hotbed for this type of sound that has birthed iconic artists like Hernan Cattaneo, Kevin Di Serna, and beyond while also serving as a mecca for clubbers enjoying the sound. Not to mention, Facundo also found his way into the musically like-minded Burner culture, which led to a natural alliance with Lee Burridge and the All Day I Dream camp.

His Valdovinos collaboration “November” was well-received, catalyzing an entire EP on the iconic imprint shortly thereafter. The four-track La Espere is thus a culmination of everything that makes Facundo a standout talent; intricate layering, soft pads, and dynamic instrumentation. Dancing Astronaut is particularly keen on “The Blue Bird,” a cinematic cut that blooms like a flower into a free-flowing piece with a sentimental climax. Each listen brings about something new to keep the listener on their toes, whether it’s noticing the twinkling piano chords in the first half of the song, or the cleverly-placed hits of pan flute toward the end. “The Blue Bird” is thus a beautifully adaptable piece, working well as a piece to be consumed at home, or on the dancefloor when needing a meditative boost.

Order a copy of La Espere, out on November 16, here.

Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]

This post was originally published on this site

Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]ADID EP 038 Facundo Mohrr

If there’s anyone who knows their way around a full-bodied, melodic piece, it’s Facundo Mohrr. The burgeoning talent hails from Argentina, a hotbed for this type of sound that has birthed iconic artists like Hernan Cattaneo, Kevin Di Serna, and beyond while also serving as a mecca for clubbers enjoying the sound. Not to mention, Facundo also found his way into the musically like-minded Burner culture, which led to a natural alliance with Lee Burridge and the All Day I Dream camp.

His Valdovinos collaboration “November” was well-received, catalyzing an entire EP on the iconic imprint shortly thereafter. The four-track La Espere is thus a culmination of everything that makes Facundo a standout talent; intricate layering, soft pads, and dynamic instrumentation. Dancing Astronaut is particularly keen on “The Blue Bird,” a cinematic cut that blooms like a flower into a free-flowing piece with a sentimental climax. Each listen brings about something new to keep the listener on their toes, whether it’s noticing the twinkling piano chords in the first half of the song, or the cleverly-placed hits of pan flute toward the end. “The Blue Bird” is thus a beautifully adaptable piece, working well as a piece to be consumed at home, or on the dancefloor when needing a meditative boost.

Order a copy of La Espere, out on November 16, here.

Lee Burridge to headline HAUNTED DEEP Halloween house event in Chicago

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Lee Burridge to headline HAUNTED DEEP Halloween house event in ChicagoHaunted Deep Lee Burridge 1

Paradigm Presents has carved its way into the Chicago club scene for years now, meshing swimmingly by way of its house-driven ethos, booking deep and eclectic talent. In the past, the brand has hosted venerable names like Thugfucker, Solomun, and Dusky at its meticulously curated soirees. Now, PP prepares for a particularly ‘DEEP’ Halloween, summoning some of the Burning Man Playa’s biggest names for what’s sure to be a mystical outing.

All Day I Dream owner Lee Burridge will be headlining the multi-environment HAUNTED DEEP, set to spook city-goers Friday, October 26 at Mine Music Hall. Burridge will be bringing his dreamy brand of house and fluid mixing skills to the table. Among the roster of 10 total DJs booked for the affair is MR C, who runs California institution, Superfreq, and his colleague Jay Tripwire. This is Burridge’s second appearance in Chicago in under two months, as September saw him bring the second-ever, immaculately decorated ADID to the Windy City lakefront.

HAUNTED DEEP tickets can be purchased here.

Powel – Eolomea [EP Review]

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Powel – Eolomea [EP Review]Eolomea Powel

Powel’s no stranger to All Day I Dream. He first joined onto the label during its earlier years in 2014, returning a few years later alongside Hoj for their whimsical “Leap Day” that became a season favorite upon its release. The relationship between Powel and All Day I Dream has naturally culminated in his most expansive work yet for the imprint — a four-piece Eolomea —which ushers us into the fall with a hint of dreaminess.

“On A Whale Through The Desert” kicks off the EP on a breezy, almost jazzy note, enticing the ears with pleasing piano progressions and Eastern-inspired instrumentation designed to catalyze a trance-like state. Eolomea picks up pace as it flows into its title track, adding further lushness to the mix with carefully interwoven harmonies and sparkling hints of synth that call one to attention during the breakdown.

It’s here the EP reaches its plateau in the sensibly titled, “At The Waiting Room.” What feels like riding a current in “Eolomea” settles into smoothness with the penultimate track, with subtle hints of harp and ethereal notation lapping at the ears to evoke a sense beachy relaxation. Finally, Powel concludes with a slightly bittersweet “Sabeth,” which does well in tugging at the heart strings. As a whole, Eolomea captures All Day I Dream’s ethos at its core while placing Powel at the forefront of Germany’s deep, melodic house movement.

 

 

Lee Burridge, Lost Desert, and Junior return with a follow-up EP to ‘Lingala’ [EP Review]

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Lee Burridge

Everything seemed to fall perfectly into place when Lee Burridge, his longtime collaborator Lost Desert, and Broadway vocalist Junior met together in the studio for the first time. Their collective chemistry and knack for ear-catching arrangement with tasteful use of ethnocentric elements translated into an instant classic: “Lingala.” Junior’s vocals, sung in the language the title get its name from, were distinctive, while Lee Burridge and Lost Desert forged a grooving house foundation.

Naturally, the three acts remained drawn to one another, and once more met up to create new music together; this time, an entire EP titled Elongi was the result. It’s meant as a follow-up to “Lingala,” in both lyrical content and in its musical undertones. The record’s title opener entices the eardrums immediately with lush percussion and passionate verses by Junior as the track’s melodic centerpiece.

“Elongi” flows nicely “Mona Yo,” where the momentum picks up. Though it shares similar motifs to its predecessor, it stands on its own with a catchy bassline that is orbited by drawn-out synth notes. “Float On” is EP’s euphoric cut — twinkling synth riffs harmonzied by a bittersweet bassline are pierced by Junior’s yells, creating the sonic equivalent of a warm blanket. It serves as quite the touching closer as well, leaving one with an afterglow when the record finally ends.

 

‘Elongi’ was released on June 22 on All Day I Dream. Pick up a copy here

All Day I Dream 6/17 – The Brooklyn Mirage – Razzberry Photography

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All Day I Dream 6/17 – The Brooklyn Mirage – Razzberry Photography

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10 reasons to get excited for Iceland’s Secret Solstice Festival

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Photo courtesy of Secret Solstice

Iceland’s Secret Solstice joined the likes of Shambhala and, Lightning in a Bottle and DGTL as one of the most environmentally friendly festivals in the world five years ago. A longtime leader of using clean energy to power its grounds, Secret Solstice’s green ethos is just one of many qualities that makes it a standout.

This year, Secret Solstice’s fifth season will feature Slayer, Gucci Mane, Clean Bandit and The Egyptian Lover, with a breadth of electronic music acts to amplify its 2018 roster. Ahead of the festival, we’ve put together 10 reasons to get excited for Secret Solstice, which will take place in Reykjavik June 21-24, 2018.

Photo courtesy of Secret Solstice 

1. For a mere seven digits, one well-endowed music enthusiast seeking the crème de la crème festival experience can purchase Secret Solstice’s $1M festival ticket – arguably the most lavish festival pass on earth. The golden ticket includes a laundry list of perks, including roundtrip transportation via a private, chartered business jet for six people, as well as luxury accommodations during the festival and an exclusive, private party with one of the festival headliners. Additional amenities include: daily pampering with luxury spa access, a personalized glam sl,lquad, private meals prepared by leading Icelandic chefs, a helicopter tour of southern Iceland, horseback riding, catered World Cup viewing parties, 24/7 access to personal drivers, sledding across the Langjökull glacier and backstage access at the festival. Learn more about the $1 Million festival ticket here.

Photo courtesy of All Day I Dream

2. Lee Burridge’s storied daytime celebration, All Day I Dream, is slated to make its Icelandic debut during the 2018 edition of Secret Solstice. A pioneer of deep tech, house, and progressive, Burridge’s formula is a superlative blend of magic, color and powerful music. What makes All Day I Dream a standout in the modern-day music scene, though, is its people: bona fide music fans who capitalize on the collective experience, and are deeply ingrained in electronic music culture.

Photo courtesy of Ásgeir Helgi

3. Introduced in 2017, The Lava Tunnel debuted as a brand new side event for Secret Solstice where a select number of attendees could explore the 52,000-year-old Raufarholshellir lava tunnel system in a way that’s never been done before. This year, a series of intimate concerts will be held inside the cave system, capped at 50 guests per event.

Photo courtesy of Secret Solstice

4. In 2015, Secret Solstice made history as the first event to host a party inside a glacier. Now a staple of the annual festival, only 120 guests will have the chance to enjoy a DJ set from Dubfire inside of Langjökull, Europe’s second largest glacier.

Photo courtesy of Ross Silocks

5. To date, Secret Solstice is the only large scale music festival to take place during the peak of Iceland’s Midnight Sun. Here, fans will have the opportunity to experience one of the festival’s signature attractions: nearly 96 hours of non-stop daylight. With non-stop sunlight ahead, the celebrations will never truly end.

Photo courtesy of Vlad Solovov

6. One of Secret Solstice’s main highlights is its crossover lineup, which boasts a handful of acts including Slayer, Stormzy, Gucci Mane and Bonnie Tyler. Among the festival’s dance acts are Steve Aoki, Skream, Charlotte de Witte and Dubfire, to name a few. From hip-hop to metal to house and techno, Secret Solstice’s diverse musical offerings are sure to satisfy the needs of any music fan, while leaving ample room for discovery and sharing.

Photo courtesy of Robert Knight Archive / Redferns / Getty

7. Funk and soul trailblazer, George Clinton, has set off on his final tour with Parliament-Funkadelic before bidding farewell to touring in May 2019. Fans will be invited to take part in musical history and celebrate one of the group’s final performances together at Secret Solstice, before the band’s frontrunner bows out of live performances for good.

Photo courtesy of Secret Solstice

8. A green festival means more wholesome celebrations. Because Secret Solstice is naturally lit during nearly all hours of the day, the festival requires minimal artificial light. Any power the festival does use is sourced from Iceland’s sweeping geothermal energy and hydropower reserves. Not only does the festival site boast a plethora of trees, but it also refrains from using diesel generators and has a dedicated on-site clean-up team to ensure proper trash disposal and recycling. Straws are also not allowed, making Secret Solstice one of the most eco-friendly events of its size in the world.

Photo courtesy of Vlad Solovov

9. New to the 2018 edition of Secret Solstice are a Silent Disco hosted by Red Bull, as well as a special FIFA World Cup live viewing party on June 22 at the Main Stage as Iceland takes on Nigeria. The Silent Disco, which will take place June 22 and 23, will feature music from Carl Rose B2B Elsa, Colin Perkins, Oculas, SURA and countless others.

10. A nation brimming with culture, it’s only fitting Secret Solstice will showcase talent of its very own. Local musicians like Reykjavíkurdætur, Teitur Magnússon, JóiPé x Króli and Between Mountains, hailing from genres like hip-hop, indie-folk and indie-pop, will show off their production chops during this year’s fest. For those consistently on the lookout for new music, look no further.