Exclusive: Noisia soundtracks new Armajet update with ‘The Ascent’

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Exclusive: Noisia soundtracks new Armajet update with ‘The Ascent’Noisia Ballet 1

Since announcing their retirement at the end of 2020, Noisia have been making sure their finals months are memorable ones. The Dutch trio cited their evolution as artists over the past 20 years and their interest in pursuing other avenues after this year is up—but that doesn’t mean they’re done just yet.

Just a few days ago, Noisia revealed that they’d composed the original soundtrack for Armajet, a real-time multiplayer shooter game available for PC, Android, and iOS. The game was initially released in late 2018 and will see an update on Friday, Jan. 24 that includes Noisia’s five-piece soundtrack.

Fans have already gotten a brief taste of what to expect from the EP via UKF‘s debut of “Decloak” on Jan. 21, and a fresh track arrives Jan. 22 right here: “The Ascent,” which will serve as the game’s main theme.

“The Ascent” is a dramatic opening song, bursting with energy and intensity from its introductory notes. A dark melody makes its mark at the 30-second point, building in magnitude until it drops into a cacophony of bass and percussion. Noisia are at the top of their game on this tune and will surely thrill with the remaining tracks to be revealed.

“Armajet is a game with its roots in ’90s twitch shooters,” Noisia member Nik Roos says of the game. “Hardcore, unforgiving, instant, inhuman. The match with our music was obvious. We didn’t have to work out much about what it needed to sound like. The music we made for it isn’t purely about Armajet itself, though. A lot of other elements come through: the frustration over our breaking up, my personal attachment to ’90/’00s twitch shooter genre (UT99 specifically), the ’90s trance sound of detuned saw arps, and the developing 3D game graphics of the time: futuristic, unnatural and new.”

The full Armajet soundtrack arrives Friday, Jan. 24 via Noisia’s own Vision Recordings.

Photo credit: Rutger Prins