Getter returns to dubstep with ‘Represent’

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Getter returns to dubstep with ‘Represent’39883150 1956368227719768 94768457681207296 N

Getter has released his first track of 2020, “Represent.” The track serves as a venture back into dubstep after a rocky 2019 marred by criticism from his original fanbase for exploring genres outside the 140-or-bust realm. The Shred Collective label boss did drop “Krylon” with Eliozie last month, though on behalf of his Terror Reid hip-hop alter-ego.

“Represent” is a slow burner with a laid-back bounce led by a gritty bass line and high-pitched ad libs for contrast. The siren sounds in the background juxtapose the relaxed bass atmosphere to keep listeners on high alert, creating a dual high and low energy to the work.

After releasing his debut Visceral LP, Getter cancelled his supporting tour amidst backlash from fans of his departure from the heavy dubstep that brought him to this point. In speaking with Dancing Astronaut, Getter established his desire to create, “all kinds of music and mix it up.” It seems he’s back in a dubstep jive, at least for now.

Photo: Getter/Facebook

The role of critics: Getter breaks his silence after Visceral Tour cancellation [Op-Ed/Interview]

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The role of critics: Getter breaks his silence after Visceral Tour cancellation [Op-Ed/Interview]Getter

Artists are people, too.

It may not seem like it through the lens of an Instagram filtered helicopter ride, but that doesn’t negate the fact. Artists require honest feedback on their work for the sake of progress. But they equally require encouragement from peers, critics, and consumers. When they’re receiving both, the music scene is at its healthiest.

The union of encouragement and appraisement invoke a sense of balance under the critical microscope. Honest feedback is well-rounded and multi-pronged: pointing out well-founded shortcomings, areas of oversight, regression, or misguided efforts, while real encouragement resides in helping the artist make use of critiques. Too much of either and the scene stalls. 

Power like this, on both ends of the artistic experience, is frequently abused, often unknowingly—with people wielding words like weapons, either unaware or irreverent of their impact. Apathy, in this particular regard, in both fan response and critical exegesis is starkly embodied in Getter, who months after being abused about the shift in sound on his latest album Visceral  is once again playing shows, producing music, and contributing to social media.

“No matter what you think, we are all humans with the same emotions and thoughts,” Getter tells Dancing Astronaut. “You have to remember that musicians aren’t here to serve you music sculpted by fans on a platter. There’s shit you’ll like, and shit you’ll hate, with every artist.”

An excess of encouragement means lackluster music permeates through the helm of the industry unchecked. On the inverse, too much criticism can stifle an artist’s creativity, curbing their hunger to try new things.

This illusive balance puts artists, critics, and fans in a precarious position. Unfortunately baseless detractors are often the loudest. And critics and fans, now equipped with the ubiquitous social media mouthpiece, have to be conscious of the power of their input.

Those familiar with Getter know that Visceral is a glaring shift in both sound and style from the jarring dubstep upon which he carved out an indelible niche. The album came out on deadmau5’s mau5trap label housing—known for its ghostly and symphonic approach to dance music. 

“I’ll always be proud of Visceral,” Getter says. “Moving forward, I want to put out all kinds of music and mix it up. That way everyone’s happy.”

Getter was admirably trying to expand his musical range with Visceral; yet the most pervasive feedback he received from listeners on his album and tour was vile, hurtful, and downright destructive. So much so to the point that he eventually cancelled the remainder of his tour dates.

In an emotional address to his social media, Getter said,

Consider the gravity of Getter’s statement. Visceral long stood as the focal point of his life, albeit a luxurious life that’s coveted by many and shared by few. However, the razor-tongued naysayers who opted to use this fact to excuse their myopic comments are egregiously misguided. Money and VIP vacations don’t assuage robbing someone of their professional resolve.

Those who have spent a minimal amount of time on the internet know that its inherent separation from face-to-face interaction invites cruelty to run rampant. Because the chances of tangible retaliation are practically non-existent, it’s an open door to proceed without caution.

“At the end of the day, social media is enabling a part of your mind that you wouldn’t normally notice,” Getter says. “It inflates your insecurity.”

For the most part, it’s not against the law to type hateful things. If Getter was someone’s dubstep idol, and that person spent money to watch his Visceral tour only to discover that he wasn’t going to play any dubstep, that person has a right to be disappointed in the show.

That person does not, under any circumstances have the right to attack Getter personally. That pushes the needle nowhere and incites progress for no one. Not Getter. Not the person posting. Not the dance music community as a whole. 

Getter’s a professional, though, and he audibly attempted to hear the concerns from his detractors and act on them. He understands that he needs to take feedback seriously if he’s going to succeed as an artist, and he tried his best to do so:

“Been thinking about the criticism of the visceral tour so far and have started to adjust a lot of shit in the performance,” Getter wrote to Twitter. “It doesn’t make sense for me to expect everyone from previous shows to be 100% down w the new stuff. Ima make this super special thanks for the pointers”

He acted professionally. Made adjustments to his set. But the trolls whittled his patience thin. 

When he canceled his tour, he emphasized the importance of honest criticism:

“Criticism is healthy. My friends and I frequently critique each other’s work and it helps the final product. However, the constant hate and the disgusting attitudes I’m faced with are destroying me.”

As Getter noted, artists are not hired guns, paid to deliver a singular product to an eager, esoteric fanbase. Art is too often reduced to a commodity, and the state of music suffers.

The only reason to be so upset with an artist’s performance that it merits condemnation is if they’re too intoxicated to perform, show up late, or bail on the show. Other than that, it’s mutually understood that they’re doing their best to deliver for the crowd and themselves.

“I think that sometimes people forget what a concert, or a live performance is. For a lot of musicians, you go in, do the job, and leave. It’s a paycheck, it doesn’t have to be a well thought-out performance. But… you should remember that you are going to see them… if you truly appreciate an artist, you’ll know if its done for money or for the art. And if you’re going see your favorite artist or any artist for that matter, rather than thinking about how much it sucks or if they are selling out cuz of a new style, think about what they are giving the crowd. Maybe you don’t like it, but maybe someone around you is really attached to it.”

Again, there is a balance to consider here between criticism and encouragement. If negative comments can have such a staunch and lasting effect on him, then positive comments would theoretically do the opposite to a similar degree. It’s possible to share a negative review while praising an artist’s will to experiment in a single stroke of communication.

If every artist were condemned when they wanted to try something new with their music, the scene would go nowhere. Everyone would be stuck making the same songs over and over again, and dance music would die. Consumers need to understand this fact. But this is also why critics also have a necessary place in music, as Diplo recently articulated.

Among critics, Visceral was a modest success. Some reviews were more critical than others based on the more concrete musical merits of the album (which is commonplace given their subjective nature). But most of them were complimentary based on Getter’s willingness to expand his sound and express his emotions through his music. 

Being a frequent habitué of digital critique in music, most critics are inclined to praise artists who try to expand their sound with verve. They often understand that is how the scene moves forward; how new sounds come about. This level of praise for Getter was probably one of the reasons he threw himself into his Visceral tour with as much vigor as he did, and in that sense, the critics did a good job. They encouraged Getter to continue on his musical journey.

“Critics stir shit up. They tell you what they think. And that’s fine, the world needs people to be real sometimes. I always appreciate constructive criticism, or if someone calls something ‘trash’ that’s fine too. But the understanding of why is a little more satisfying. There’s no comfort point you get to as a musician, you always want to move forward, good or bad, movement is key. Trying new things, innovating.”

Unfortunately, critics can often be too encouraging, as represented across every genre of music in the modern scene. When critics stop doing their jobs properly, commercialism has its way with music, and that’s exactly what’s happening right now. 

This is why Instagram personalities are signing record deals. The general public has meshed the ideas of what sells and what’s good which is a result of critics cowering to offer honest and well-founded opinion.

Believe or not, people still listen to critics. People hear about albums that are widely praised like To Pimp a Butterfly and Lemonade because those albums deserve every bit of admiration they receive. So when critics let cookie-cutter party tracks pass unchecked, it devalues authentically brilliant music, it inflates the egos of the artists, and it erodes the role of critics themselves thus opening the door for the debate Lizzo started recently.

After receiving a few lukewarm reviews (alongside an influx of exceedingly positive ones) on her album Cuz I Love You, the steadily ascending pop artist tweeted: 

“PEOPLE WHO ‘REVIEW’ ALBUMS AND DONT MAKE MUSIC THEMSELVES SHOULD BE UNEMPLOYED.”

The fact is, it’s better for non-musicians to review music. That way they focus on the product itself rather than the process. When critics review an album, they aren’t reviewing the effort the artist put into the album. They’re reviewing the album itself. If an artist were to do that job they would be inherently biased simply because they understand how hard it is to produce an album. 

Critics understand the effort in the abstract, but their job isn’t to pat the artist on the back for trying. Their job is to explain the merits of the final work. In a perfect world, every album would be the best of the best, and the artists who made the best music would be the most successful. Of course, the world isn’t perfect and the music business will never work that way, but the critics are obliged to do their best to make it that way. 

That includes being truthful when a piece of music isn’t up to par. Think about it. Just like when critics universally praise album, if critics universally denounce an album there’s a considerable chance that the album simply isn’t good. This is how inspired artists are separated from the contrived. A true artist will take that criticism and work harder as Getter did. Untrue artists will point fingers and find fault in critics.

It’s not right for any artist to have to cancel a tour, as Getter had to, after receiving endless vitriolic pelting for taking a chance. That is not the dynamic this industry needs. The artistic reward system for thoughtful risk is, frankly, off-kilter as it is now.

Music is, of course, subjective. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and no piece of music is loved by literally every human being in the ear-having macrocosm. But objective elements of quality are inseparable from music as well. That’s how songs like “Imagine” by John Lennon can actually change the world. Regardless of whether one or two people (including your humble author) don’t like the song, it is expertly written, exquisitely performed, and culturally galvanizing to the point that it helped inspire a generation to do the just thing.  

This may come as a surprise, but talented artists are making music of that caliber every day, and with the right support system from fans and critics that music will come to light and change the world all the same. We here at Dancing Astronaut are fans and critics alike, and we do our best to support artists like Getter in this way because they are people, too.

Photo Credit: Jared Stossel

Getter cancels the rest of his ‘Visceral’ tour, speaks out on fan backlash

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Getter cancels the rest of his ‘Visceral’ tour, speaks out on fan backlashIMG 9873

Getter has cancelled the rest of his Visceral album tour.

The producer released his debut album—which fused hip-hop, rock, and electronic into an expressive story on life’s rawest moments and emotions—during fall of 2018 as a way to “not only move forward with my career, but my mental state,” he began in the Twitter statement breaking the news. Visceral was a far cry from the party friendly sounds that brought him fame, and ended up facing immense audience backlash as a result. There were even reports of people throwing things at him from stage in anger, which he confirmed in his post.

“I need to make myself happy,” Getter concluded about his decision to cancel the tour. He’s since received an outpouring of support and encouragement from fellow DJs and fans.

Photo credit: Christina Boemio

Getter addresses negative fan reactions on ‘Visceral’ tour

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Getter addresses negative fan reactions on ‘Visceral’ tourGetter Viseral Mau5trap

“I used to make music for the wrong reasons,” began Getter on Twitter following reports of booing and generally bad fan reactions to his Visceral tour stop in Houston, Texas on March 15. Even after the former dubstep/EDM artist made edits to his live sound so that it’d be “more appealing” to his currently split fanbase, audience members were evidently still displeased at his overall change in direction both in the studio and on tour. Getter, sticking to his guns, continued his statement addressing this on Twitter by asserting he’d “found something [he] could chase that’s far more complex than the trendy bullshit.” The only thing that matters to him, is that he’s spent his time and money on a project that he truly loves and is proud of, and his staunchness is quite refreshing.

Getter will continue to break his own boundaries musically and do what he feels is right creatively regardless of fan reactions. They’ll catch up eventually. In the meantime, the artist has a steady run of tour dates ahead stretching through April that continues to take him across all corners of the US.

 

 

 

 

deadmau5 announces new mau5trap radio series on SiriusXM

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deadmau5 announces new mau5trap radio series on SiriusXMUnnamed 1

The mau5trap maven himself, Joel Zimmerman (deadmau5), has now vamped his very own weekly radio show, mau5trap radio, through SiriusXM. The first edition aired late last week, September 28, featuring a fitting, hot-button guest mix from Getter, who just recently released his mau5trap-certified concept album, Visceral.

The internationally-aired series is set to feature a sundry of other mau5trap talent, with debuts lined up from the label’s most auspicious acts, including REZZ, ATTLAS, No Mana, Rinzen, and more. The show has found a home on SiriusXM’s BPM (channel 51): a sacred staple in the electronic airwaves. This landmark achievement for Zimmerman and the esteemed imprint comes just one year after mau5trap’s momentous 10-year anniversary.

After a three-day period, each show will be plugged onto Mixcloud, where listeners can stream freely. Additionally, the show will air regularly across the globe, through the following mediums:

Germany – ENERGY NRJ
Turkey – Radyo S – Monday 11pm
Dubai – Dance FM – Tuesday 22:00 PM
Mexico – Beat FM
Cyprus – ENERGY NRJ (Prime time – Saturday agreed).
Bulgaria – Radio Nova (If music & Jingle only)
Thailand – Kiss FM
Russia – DFM – Saturday 23:00 Moscow Time
Sri Lanka – Fox 91.4 12pm Friday (Repeated 11am Friday afternoon, the week after)
Kiss Fm, Australia – Saturday 6.30 – 7.30pm

 

Getter’s metamorphosis comes to fruition with new ‘Visceral’ LP

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Getter’s metamorphosis comes to fruition with new ‘Visceral’ LPGetter Visceral Album Release

Since the beginning of the summer, Getter has made it clear to fans that a change was coming. In June, a full seven-minute trailer teased a more refined aesthetic, and the most diverse and melodic tracks yet from the producer. It’s clear the collection of music was meant to feel different from the start, with the producer saying each song “represents a piece of me or a part of my life.” In a world where some artists feel they’re risking being “left behind” while creating a cohesive body of work, Getter’s commitment to Visceral was immediately eye and ear catching. Now, the producer’s invigorated vision is released in full on his new label home, deadmau5‘ own mau5trap imprint.

As the spacey, rolling synth line in the opening track Purgatory drifts in and out of key and focus, it’s easy to draw a parallel to the internal discord Getter has opened up about in recent months. In an interview with Dancing Astronaut, the artist detailed his struggles with mental illness and how it’s affected the spirit of his musical output. “I got through my shit by writing music, and I wrote a song “Color Blind,” literally in tears, wrote these fucking lyrics cause I was on the edge,” explained the producer. “I felt way better, so I chased that feeling.” Visceral‘s role as a therapeutic release is apparent across its diverse set of soundscapes and arrangements. The AudioOpera-assisted “Part of Me” brings all the bombastic percussion and festival-rocking power of past Getter productions, but achieves its impact through an unexpected depth of spacious atmospherics, washing mournful over a slowed drums. The more textured approach continues across tracks like “Made for You (Alone Again),” with Getter’s own intensely personal lyrics holding court over a glitchy break beat and swirling arps.

When Visceral was announced, it understandably raised some eyebrows. What about OWSLA Getter, who eats festivals for breakfast with vicious trap hits like “Head Splitter?” How would the artist’s vision translate to sets and expectations–and to his new label’s techno and progressive-leaning horde? The honest answer is that Getter is clearly not out to please anybody, or meet any expectations with his experimental full length other than his own. The result is the most is an unexpectedly introspective evolution that feels more honest than anything the artist has done before. Getter’s knack for slapping drums and hip hop-infused arrangements is still here in spades on songs like “Best of Me” and “Numb,” but each track remains in a melodic realm previously visited only in spurts. Visceral is the result of an EDM mainstay committing to himself, his craft, and the idea that evolving in the name of expression resonates truer than any expectations.

Photo Credit: Rukes

Getter releases a unique single, ‘Made For You (Alone Again),’ from upcoming ‘Visceral’ LP on mau5trap

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Getter releases a unique single, ‘Made For You (Alone Again),’ from upcoming ‘Visceral’ LP on mau5trapGetter Viseral Mau5trap

Getter has released another track, “Made For You (Alone Again),” from his upcoming Visceral album to be released of deadmau5‘s mau5trap on September 28. The album is set to show another side of the versatile producer after shifting away from his previous EDM sounds. This shift is also prevalent in his Terror Reid hip-hop project. “Made For You (Alone Again)” is quite the unique project, with Getter’s vocals pursuing anticipation amidst sparkling synths and a punchy kick arrangement. Diving into a pool of sub bass and static high ends, this use of bass sounds reminiscent of Zeds Dead‘s “Coffee Break.” The Shred Collective founder promises a personal and inspired project, demonstrating his evolution from roots in dubstep.

So far, three singles have been released from the 12-track LP. The other two being “All Is Lost” off mau5ville: Level 1 and Colorblind (interlude). Deadmau5 and Getter hit it off at a video game conference, evolving their relationship into a working one. Fans of Getter are here for the artist, whichever way he chooses to go, as he’s been vocal about his mental health issues with anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. Read Dancing Astronaut‘s interview here, which details Getter’s artistic directions within the scope of his emotions.

Getter announces long-awaited new LP, ‘Visceral,’ on mau5trap

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Getter announces long-awaited new LP, ‘Visceral,’ on mau5trapGetter Visceral Mau5trap

Getter has been suspiciously low-key this past year – and now it’s clear the “Forget It” producer is ready to burst back on the scene with his Visceral LP, landing Sept. 28 on deadmau5’s mau5trap imprint.

Getter had been dropping teasers for the full-length album, but it wasn’t until his vocal-fueled future bass cut “All Is Lost” landed on July’s mau5ville: Level 1 that the producer’s partnership with the mau5 come into focus. The surprising pair first hit it off at at a recent video game conference and began plotting releases soon after. The brash and bombastic style fans have come to expect from Getter will take a fresh turn with his new label digs, exploring a deeper sound consistent with the legendary imprint’s offerings.

The album promises to be a personal and inspired project for the Shred Collective founder, continuing the producer’s evolution while keeping roots in the hard-hitting style fans devoured on releases from OWSLA and Rottun Recordings.

Two sides to Tanner Petulla: Getter’s battle behind the scenes

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Two sides to Tanner Petulla: Getter’s battle behind the scenesIMG 9873

It’s 4:30am at the Cosmic Grounds stage, and the crowd is at peak energy levels. Getter, the icon they’re bearing witness to, was just getting into his groove, whipping them into a bass-filled frenzy with excited headbanging, hands-in-the-air moments, and smiles all around. Their spirit is amplified by the incoming sliver of dawn, a rewarding sight as day one comes to an end. His placement at EDC 2018 was a long time coming, and he fit perfectly into the fold.

Electric Daisy Carnival has been held to the highest standards of dance music festivals worldwide, increasing in quantity of viewership and happy attendees every year. Attending the flagship festival in Las Vegas marks an achievement for many, as the preparation and execution behind the weekend requires more than just packing a bag and looking for some glitter.

Besides the festival attendees, artists too are prone to the same uncontrollable excitement leading up to this weekend. Finding themselves on the EDC lineup is considered to be a milestone occasion in an artists career; one goal they dream to achieve in their lifetime. No goal of this magnitude comes at an easy cost however, as fans can fail to see the hardships and struggles that artists face to achieve such honorable moments in their career.

Two sides to Tanner Petulla: Getter’s battle behind the scenesIMG 0439 1

Photo Credit: Christina Boemio

The lavish lifestyle behind success is easy to fall into, but easier to lose oneself to. The recent passing of Avicii reinforced this notion as an unfortunate reality, bringing artists to reflect upon their family, friends, and themselves. While artists may wait for that breakthrough moment in their career, little are prepared for the influx of distractions and vices that can come to surround them.

I have my dream job, why am I not happy. I have money, but why am I not happy?

A moniker derived from mindless doodles on his wall, Tanner Petulla took on his stage name “Getter” with nothing more than an ambitious spirit backing it up. After signing to multiple labels and many released singles later, the California-native soon found himself within the limelight as the dance music community’s latest select.

With his latest mau5trap released single “All is Lost” and the announcement of his upcoming album, Visceral, to be released in September 2018, Petulla has poured nothing but dedication and soul into his latest work. Influenced by many of things but fueled by his change of mental state, “Visceral” is a testament towards Tanner’s story. Amidst the fame and festivities, what may have initially been a continued pursuit towards success has now morphed into a raw and unfolding journey towards the release of the album and a look inside Getter’s mind.


Describe your personal EDC experience, and how it has impacted your career.
I remember being 16 and watching videos of DJ’s I looked up to playing this festival and being like “damn, I need to be there one day.” Then I think I was 18-19 years old and 50 pounds heavier – a little secret, if you see a producer getting fat, that means they’re working, so I was working really hard. Then I got to play EDC, and it blew my mind, and I played it a couple more times and now this year, I feel like I fit in finally. It’s dope. It’s cool to fit in, in such a huge fucking project.

Who were those first artists that you would watch at EDC?
Um, I would say Datsik, but under the circumstances, Rusko, Excision, obviously Skrillex, 12th Planet, Bear Grillz (shout out Bear)… did I already say Rusko? All of the bass guys, those fools got me started. Caspa and Rusko at Fabric Live, that mix from 2013 I think was the start.

In terms of recent events and the increased efforts of shining light on the importance of mental health, have you reflected on your touring or lifestyle habits and made any changes?
Yeah, I feel like I’ve made it; when you start out, everything is so cool. You can go on the road when you’re 18 or 19 and never have done a drug or drank in your life, but you’re at the point where you want to be and it’s there, so you can do it. Your parents and school always tell you “this shit can affect you.” Everybody’s born with whatever their born with, whether it’s depression, anxiety, or bipolar disease, whatever you have you have it from the start. Certain shit triggers it, but chemicals and substances can make it worse or better. I feel like it’s good and bad to explore that kind of thing when you’re young, if you do it when you’re older it’s way worse because you’re in worse shape.

I have adjusted my life around how I feel instead of how I’m thinking because at the end of the day, your brain comes up with dope shit, but everything below your brain is where you feel shit. If you have a headache, thats from what you put below your brain. I have anxiety, depression, bipolar disease, I have a bunch of shit wrong with me and it doesn’t matter because I know how to handle it now. When I was using drugs and dealing with all this shit I didn’t understand, you turn into an asshole, or a manwhore, or someone who isn’t who you really are. When you come out of that, it’s similar to a drug dealer who becomes sober. I’m not sober, but you realize a lot of shit. I feel like with mental health to find out what’s really wrong or right, you need to go through the hard shit and know that when you’re going through it, to recognize that this is going to pass.

It’s comparable to Chipotle; you eat Chipotle and then your butt gets angry, but you just have to tell yourself that this will pass. You just have to tell yourself that whatever you’re going through mentally, emotionally, or anything will pass. Just give it time. Never, ever turn to substances. It might make it better right now, but it makes it worse in the end.

The biggest thing that helped me was going to dinner with a friend, jokes and music aside, just me and a homie. We just talked in private about problems, made eye contact, fucking cried. If you talk to one person, even if it’s your dog or your teddy bear, you just need to get it out. That’s why therapy is there. I couldn’t go to therapy because of my anxiety, but it’s so crazy from my experience when you talk about something, or in my case write about something, or going to dinner with someone, you feel so much better. Find something or someone you’re confortable with and talk to them because as lame as it sounds, it helps so much.

It seems like such a simple solution that not many people are willing to recognize or understand that it could help along the way
Exactly, you know there’s meds that are available and it’s temporary.  I’ve had a lot of friends die from meds because you do it and it feels good, and you want to feel good all the time so you start doing more. Then you have to get more because you do it more, and it turns into this big spiral where you either get off it and you feel like shit, or die. I’ve definitely taken that shit recreationally, but never been prescribed it. My personal experience at 25  – whoever’s reading or listening to this, wherever this is going – try everything else first. Write a song, paint a picture, read a book, talk to your cat, just try everything before substances.

Do you feel like this change in your life has affected you creatively, or with producing music?
100%. I will always love dubstep, and heavy shit. I was born a metal head, and I fucking love metal, and I love hip hop, so shows like this where it’s me vs. the crowd on some decks – I say versus because we’re fighting. They’re yelling at me, I’m yelling back, but like play the heavy shit for that moment in time. It’s the same shit if you listen to emo music or heavy metal/hardcore when you’re angry or sad, it’s like in the moment. I just realized that recently. I got through my shit by writing music, and I wrote a song “Color Blind“, literally in tears, wrote these fucking lyrics cause I was on the edge. I felt way better, so I chased that feeling because I’ve been writing shit from my feelings for a bit and I’ve thought “whatever, push it to the side, it won’t work.” Now it’s to the point where my career is on the line because it’s like “hey, you’ve been doing this for this long, you’re funny, you’ve been writing heavy shit, playing these big shows”. Now I think, “can I completely flip it and write a 12-track album that’s all from the past two-three years that’s come from within?” I think it’ll work but I don’t really give a fuck, because I want to chase that.

You can love music but at the end of the day, whether you’re a DJ, pilot, writer, or painter, whatever your job is will get boring, even if it’s your dream job. My shit, to me got boring, which affected my mental health. I have my dream job, why am I not happy. I have money, but why am I not happy? You just have to adjust to it. I could put out this album and it could completely kill my career, I’ll be broke as shit and move back home. At the end of the day aside from all the materialistic shit, I have everything I want right now but I don’t have a piece of work that I’m 100% proud of that will help people.

I listen to my new shit everyday. I could never walk around and listen to my old shit – not that I’m not proud of it, but this new shit’s different, and real. They’re going to hear the shit I went through in a way that other people can understand. It’s definitely affected me creatively, positively. I don’t give a fuck what the circumstances are.

There are a lot of artists who take a huge change on what they do, and what they produce. As an example, switching from one genre to another definitely has fans outraged by the change
It’s the same thing as movies. Someone makes a scary movie, like Insidious. It’s fucking dope; crazy soundtrack, the sound design is insane. All of a sudden everyone’s making shit like Insidious; it’s the same thing with music. You change trends to make money and do your job, but at what point does it turn from job to reality?

Besides the parties and overall extravagance behind the festival, what do you look forward to when you come to EDC Las Vegas?
Honestly, I’m a hermit so I never leave my house. I like to chill at home with my roommates and my dog, playing video games and music. Mostly video games – PUBG – but I love getting on stage and seeing how stoked people are. It reminds me of before all this shit, when everything was new and you were so stoked on everything. I’m definitely jaded now, I could run into Skrillex and be like “Oh Skrillex, what’s up”.

It’s seeing all those people out there, whether they’re here to see me or EDC. It’s just the fact of yelling “Yo, I’m Getter”- I came up with that name writing on my wall with a sharpie, and having people cheering for that? That is the shit I fuck with. Everything else after that is just adding to it. I can have a one minute set but as long as I give a fuck, I’m chill. It makes you feel good. When people give a fuck, it feels good.


Photo Credit: Christina Boemio

Getter shares trailer teasing highly anticipated debut album, ‘Visceral’ [Stream]

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A near seven-minute trailer preludes Getter’s forthcoming album, Visceral. The teaser vid shuffles between a series of different sounds in what is presumably a sample of clips of the different tracks that will comprise the artist’s full-length debut album.

Getter previously announced that the production would represent a departure from the comparatively more intense approach to sound that long characterized Getter’s wheelhouse. “New album is coming out mid-2018 and it’s definitely my favorite, best work” Getter told Run The Trap. “I have been working on it for two-years…Every song represents a piece of me or a part of my life.”

The difference in aesthetic approach figures in the trailer, which exhibits a range of varying tempos and melodies.

Check out Dancing Astronaut’s interview with Getter, here.

H/T: EDMSauce