Ascend to an alternate dimension with Tycho’s uber chill two-hour Burning Man sunrise set

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Each and every artistic endeavor from the San Francisco-based designer and producer Scott Hansen is an effervescent effort, each more nuanced and meticulously crafted than the artist’s previous pursual. As Tycho, Hansen’s built a curatorial empire. From carefully curated sun-drenched captures on Instagram, to his design work, let alone his renowned and spiritually renewing sets at festivals around the world, Hansen’s artistic outpouring is a celebration of minimalistic beauty at its finest. For the artist, to live to is create.

Tens of thousands of Burners poured into the Black Rock Desert this year in a celebration of art, music, creativity, and community where Tycho set forth to delve into one of his most soothing sets to date. On the fifth day of Burning Man, Aug. 31, he took The Dusty Rhino for a dreamy ride into the sunrise, gliding from one track to the next in his seemingly effortless, archetypal approach.

Tycho’s set allows its listener to ascend to an alternate dimension within its two hour playtime. While it’s filled with Hansen’s own work, including “Awake” and “Epoch,” as well as many other tracks off the LPs, Hansen seamlessly weaves chillwave outliers throughout.

Listeners can hear artists like Caribou, Kidnap Kid, or The Bamboos all weaved into a cohesive two-hour stream. It’s clear Tycho and his audience ascended to alternate spaces this burn, in a culmination of tunes like these, it’s also likely this set will live high in a register of memorable life experiences among all who experienced it.

Even Tycho went so far as to call it his, “absolute favorite morning of all time” on SoundCloud.

Tracklist:

Sensations’ Fix – Acudreaming
Tycho – Sunrise Projector
Tycho – Ascension
Home – Resonance
Tycho – Continuum
Boards Of Canada – Kaini Industries
Dorisburg – Votiv
Rival Consoles – Ghostin
Boards Of Canada – Wildlife Analysis
Jonny L – Tychonic Cycle
Luke Abbott – Modern Driveway
George Fitzgerald – Your Two Faces
16 Bit Lolitas – Peninsula
Weval – I Don’t Need It
Kidnap Kid – Birds That Fly
Jimpster – Porchlight And Rocking Chairs (KiNK Remix)
Weval – You Made It
Tycho – Epoch
Tycho – Dye
Boards Of Canada – Corsair
<<< Sunrise (Cloud Obscured) >>>
Tycho – Awake
Home – Above All
Tycho – Horizon
<<< Sun Visible >>>
Caribou – Can’t Do Without You (Tale Of Us & Mano Le Tough Remix)
16 Bit Lolitas – Not The Only One
Robert Babicz – Where Are You (Aparde Remix)
Tycho – Slack
Joon Moon – Chess
Tycho – Daydream
The Bamboos – The Wilhelm Scream

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See Run The Jewels, Tycho live from Primavera Sound

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Primavera Sound festival is in full swing with a packed, eclectic lineup including names like The Black Angels, Descendents, Mac DeMarco, Broken Social Scene and scores more. For those not soaking up the Barcelona sun, Red Bull in conjunction with us here at Dancing Astronaut are bringing viewers a taste of the fun.

Tune in to the Primavera Sound channel starting at 6:55 PM ET to see what is sure to be a kinetic performance from Run The Jewels. Together Killer Mike and El-P will ride the wave of a year packed with heater releases and incredible live appearances. Stay tuned after the duo’s set closes at 7:50 PM ET to see the blissfully ambient, sun drenched sounds of chillwave master Tycho.

We promise, you won’t want to miss this.

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James Blake stuns, Thundercat electrifies and Hundred Waters shine as FORM Arcosanti 2017 draws to a close

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The culmination of FORM‘s fourth installment this past weekend in the Arizona desert was a testament to the masterwork of this small, hand-powered experimental festival alternative. An incredible amount of logistical planning clearly goes into the event’s production, though FORM continues to maintain a distinguished DIY ethos, even with its impeccably curated, substantially stacked talent billing set for the final evening.

Tycho4_Maria Govea

Photo: Maria Govea

As important to FORM’s appeal as its lineup, however, is the event’s focus on artistry and open discourse outside of musical confines. The Hundred Waters-founded gathering made definitive statements this year in its commitment to purveying thought-provoking content across a number of disciplines, even inviting Planned Parenthood to make their first appearance at an art festival of this nature. Pathways to Paris, a collective of innovative activists, artists, and musicians dedicated to combating climate change also hosted a panel, ahead of the evening’s programming.

FORM’s final evening included Thundercat‘s return to the event for a second year in a row. The Brainfeeder affiliate provided one of the most entertaining performances of the weekend, filling the main amphitheater with soulful, funky bass licks from his recently released Drunk LP. Meanwhile, Tycho‘s energetic band-backed live performance fit the FORM aesthetic flawlessly.

Ultimately, the final night’s stage was set for equally brilliant back to back performances from James Blake and Hundred Waters. Blake made his solo piano performance debut, timidly, albeit masterfully holding the entire attendance in silent awe from behind the ivory and ebony keys. The British prodigy’s unaccompanied cover of Frank Ocean‘s “Godspeed” easily made for one of the weekend’s most memorable highlights, paving the way for his participation in the event’s after hours programming while DJing in his 1-800-Dinosaur cabal.

James Blake_MG_7325_Credit_Jacqueline_Verdugo

Photo: Jacqueline Verdugo

Hundred Waters kicked off the weekend with a surprise release, delivering Currency, a five-track preamble to their upcoming third studio album. In what has become a FORM tradition of sorts, the band debuted their new material live at the festival before a captivated crowd, which endowed their set with an element of fitting novelty. The group’s performance was altogether emotionally charged and cheerful all at once, with their most popular release, “Show Me Love”, invoking a lively, impassioned response from the audience.

Hundred Waters_Credit_Jasmine_Safaeian_3847-web

Photo: Jasmine Safaeian

Closing a fourth year that showcased significant growth, from TIDAL sponsorships to the largest number of participants the festival has ever hosted, FORM met expected growing pains effectively and and efficiently. In terms of talent curation, programming, and ambiance, Hundred Waters, with the help of Moses Sumney, nailed FORM’s execution with impressive poise. As a lasting memento from the event, fans can revisit this year’s lineup with a free mixtape courtesy of FORM that includes contributions from Skrillex, Father John Misty, Tycho, How To Dress well and more. Pushing the festival model forward, FORM Arcosanti continues to have a powerful impact with each growing iteration of the event.

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Listen to the best Burning Man sets of 2016

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Burning Man’s open-minded culture, mixed with the loving energy of Black Rock City, inevitably catalyzes some of the top sets of the year in the dance world.

2016 was no exception; as per usual, an immense amount of talent from across the electronic spectrum — from Skrillex, to Tycho, to Lee Burridge — showed up to provide a soundtrack to the gathering at various theme camps and art cars throughout the week.

Below are some of our highlights from Burning Man 2016 (in no particular order):

1) Lee Burridge at Robot Heart

2) Hernan Cattaneo at White Ocean

3) Luca Bacchetti at Robot Heart

4) Tycho at The Dusty Rhino

5) Guy Gerber at Robot Heart

6) Brian Cid at Robot Heart

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Dancing Astronaut’s Top 10 Performers of 2016

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In the reigning electronic music era, the term “DJ” has become extraordinarily convoluted. Many electronic artists are judged and ranked as DJs based on their production prowess, rather than their skills behind the decks. Furthermore, as music technologies continue to develop, the lines between the actual tools which electronic artists use onstage have become increasingly blurred. Many of dance music’s most important figures don’t use anything resembling turntables or CDJs during their shows.

This list celebrates the ten electronic artists that we believe provided the most evocative performances in 2016. While many of the names below have released spectacular music within the past year, the artists’ production skills were not used as criteria while compiling these rankings. Rather, the aim of this list is to highlight the acts who most formidably astounded their audiences in their concerts; the artists whose tour announcements sent a hush throughout the electronic music realm; the musicians who put on shows so spectacular that the moments they cultivated have achieved legendary status in the year’s canon.

These are Dancing Astronaut’s Top 10 Performers of 2016.

rukes-skrillex-mothership

10. Skrillex

Year after year, Sonny Moore remains one of dance music’s preeminent influencers, and to his credit, one of its most energetic performers. In addition to heading up his OWSLA imprint and continually providing a platform for new talents, Skrillex held down a breakneck performance calendar in 2016. Among Skrillex’s international touring itinerary this year were noteworthy performances at ComplexCon, Chance The Rapper’s debut Magnificent Coloring Day Festival, and his Boiler Room debut in Shanghai. Moore also returned to Burning Man and Coachella, to accompany Snails.

What long-time fans may consider treasonous is actually the key ingredient to Skrillex’s ubiquity — nothing is too dissimilar from his current work to touch. He brings the same earnest and genuine energy to his performances. Dubstep fan or not, its one of the most inclusive environments in the mainstream scene.

– Lucy Davidson

bob moses live facebook

9. Bob Moses

Bob Moses hit the nail on the head with their 2015 debut album, Days Gone By, entering the dance music realm at the exact right time for the industry to welcome them with open arms. With the rise in popularity of indie-electronica crossover acts over the last few years, listeners were ready for something different, and the Canadian partnership of Tom Howie and Jimmy Vallance proved perfect to provide that difference.The duo’s multifaceted style yields a stellar live show, but impressively isn’t compromised by their DJ performances. Rather, the two divergent live formats allow Howie and Vallance to explore different facets of their tastes and talents.

2016 has seen Bob Moses play sets at some of the biggest festivals in the world, including Lollapalooza, Coachella, Bonnaroo. Howie and Vallance have also garnered mainstream attention, receiving a great wealth of airtime on BBC Radio 1 and earning the chance to perform on The Ellen Show. Conversely, the duo fit right in with house and techno legend Lee Burridge on his “All Day I Dream” tour, easily catering to the more underground side of the spectrum. With their enthralling live performance, unique combination of influences, and ubiquitous appeal, it’s glaringly apparent that Bob Moses have established a firm, yet still blossoming legacy.

Toby Reaper

Tycho live molly gale

8. Tycho

Amid the rigorous clamor that defines much of the dance music scene, there is the beautiful sound of Tycho, which continuously reaffirms the notion that there is much more to composing music than simply putting sounds together. A true artist in every aspect, Scott Hansen, the leading force behind the project, creates breathtaking, organic soundscapes wherever he goes. Whether performing at the Dusty Rhino art car for his Burning Man sunrise set, or headlining Red Rocks, Hansen’s performances are always inventive and tranquil. Tycho’s music breathes with life, brimming with meaningful depth in both its composition and its performance. Artists with such capabilities have become increasingly rare, as technological advances make production — and performance — more accessible, but arguably less personal.

– Toby Reaper

claude-vonstroke-djing-dirtybird-campout

7. Claude VonStroke

Dirtybird label boss Claude VonStroke has been transitioning from an underground hero to a household name over the last decade. In 2016, a number of mainstream accolades began rolling in for the DJ as well. In September, Claude was named America’s Best DJ (via fan votes in Pioneer DJ and DJ Times’ annual poll), and his uniquely nostalgic festival, Dirtybird Campout, drew an enthusiastic international crowd for its second iteration. At Campout, the DJ performed both as himself and under his real name as his hip hop alter-ego, Barclay Crenshaw, demonstrating that his breadth as a performer is continually expanding, even at this stage in his career.

The house and techno scene is alive and well in the United States, but VonStroke possesses a unique quality among his cohorts — a sense of humor about his craft. In 2016, VonStroke stepped his game up by incorporating elements from his side projects, Get Real and Barclay Crenshaw, without losing the heart of his performance: the tangible irreverence of a Claude VonStroke set.

– Lucy Davidson

GRiZ live sax facebook

6. GRiZ

Ambitious producer, live musician, and All Good Records owner, Grant Kwiecinski, better known as GRiZ, had yet another year of exponential growth in 2016 — and for good reason. GRiZ is an innovator, and it’s easy to see that he enjoys setting the bar ever higher as he builds his style of futuristic funk into something of a movement. Kwiecinski’s world-class musicianship shines brightly at each and every show he plays, big or small. The energy at a GRiZ show is a spectacle to behold, due to his formidable skills as a saxophonist and Ableton live controller.

From his groundbreaking sold-out Red Rocks show to playing sets all over the Playa at Burning Man, GRiZ can, and will, do it all. The dedicated performer appears at practically every major festival amidst his rigorous touring schedule. Furthermore, the multi-instrumental talent never shies away from a unique collaboration, which perhaps manifested most notably this year during his Big Grizmatik set at Summer Camp, where Kwiecinski partnered with like-minded influencers Big Gigantic and Gramatik to purvey a legendary performance. GRiZ’s most astounding trait, however, is his unbreakable authenticity — both as a musician and a person — which has fostered a devoted cult following (known as “The Liberators”) that few artists can achieve.

– Toby Reaper

Pretty Lights Episodic 2

5. Pretty Lights

As a performer, Pretty Lights has constantly evolved. Following a musical reawakening in late February, Derek Vincent Smith premiered his Episodic Festival tour. In their new live performance, Smith and his band have finally achieved the perfect balance between their electronic and instrumental components. Pretty Lights has always been revered for his live edits during shows, but in 2016, he inverted his performative process entirely. In the new era of Pretty Lights, Smith implements his improvisations within Ableton impeccably with those of his bandmates.

Overall, the well-tuned musical experience provided during the Episodic Festival is the ideal marriage of Pretty Lights’ contrasting elements; the yin and yang innovate, rather than collide. Greg Ellis’ subtler lighting choices melded masterfully with Pretty Lights’ new performance. In the accompanying visual production, Ellis favored psychedelic laser displays over frenetic rave patterns and reintroduced the sepia-toned cityscapes which were definitive of Smith’s earlier tours.

To create an inimitable live experience that combines free form jam band music, calculated electronic music, and hip hop is an ambitious feat. Setting this divergent combination to an ever-changing, astounding, and harmonious visual spectacle adds a further layer of difficulty.

In 2016, Pretty Lights achieved this feat with resounding success.

– Will McCarthy

boys noize ajr photo

4. Boys Noize

Fans were unsure of what to expect when Boys Noize premiered his Mayday performance at Barcelona’s Sónar festival in June. Alex Ridha hadn’t crafted a new live experience since the haunting skull booth which accompanied his electro-heavy Out of the Black tour following his 2012 album of the same name.

In 2016, Boys Noize’s live show manifested the essence and theme of his Mayday album impeccably. Rather than revisit the sinister occultism which pervaded his Out of the Black tour, Ridha masterfully recreated the apocalyptic pandemonium which defined his fourth album. Standing behind an elaborate industrial rig, designed with towering iron bars and glaring alarm lights, Ridha wove his dystopian scores through an array of equipment complex enough to make deadmau5 uneasy.

In order to ensure that the Orwellian sensibilities of his Mayday show were properly executed, Boys Noize took a step that very few performers possess the dedication to take. While seamlessly integrating live edits into his performance, Ridha additionally controlled a significant portion of his own visual production.

As the German visionary crafted an apocalyptic masterpiece from behind his industrial imprisonment, chaotic visuals designed by Sus Boy and LIL INTERNET completed the experience, culminating in a showcase which simultaneously evoked visceral energy and airs of totalitarian oppression.

Independently, Boys Noize’s live shows of the past year were a staggering artistic feat. Given the pre-apocalyptic despair that many people are feeling as 2016 draws to a close, one might say that Alex Ridha’s most recent tour was a conceptual embodiment of the year itself.

– Will McCarthy

Eric Prydz EPIC 4.0 ftd img wm

3. Eric Prydz

Eric Prydz is a veritable juggernaut of a performer. The multi-talented, multi-monikered DJ excels onstage regardless of which identity he chooses to don for any given show. As Cirez D, he purveys a selection of techno which is harrowing and recondite, yet also energizing — often playing warehouse sets for hours on end.

However, Prydz’s shows under his given name are his crowning achievement as a performer. The veteran DJ’s live shows have become so legendary that they have spurred a revered series of their own: Eric Prydz in Concert – appropriately abbreviated as EPIC. Its 2016 edition, EPIC 4.0, is the zenith of a DJ career which spans more than a decade. Eric Prydz in concert is, funnily enough, less of a concert and more of an audio/visual journey.

The technical prowess of Eric Prydz’s EPIC stage production is unparalleled. Prydz shrouds himself within a colossal LED encasement, upon which a vibrant, ever-shifting phantasmagoria enthralls his audience. As thousands of lasers project from his inventively lit fortress, Prydz carefully selects music from his extensive oeuvre to score his inimitable sensory experience, taking spectators on a journey with his uniquely immersive visual platform.The energy of the experience undulates as the multifaceted musician shifts between segments highlighting his various alter-egos.

Each year of Eric Prydz’s storied career has been momentous, but in 2016, Prydz raised his own bar substantially as a performer and producer. Given the artist’s innovative leaps in the past year, the degree to which he’ll shake the dance music world when he premieres EPIC 5.0 in May 2017 is unfathomable.

– Will McCarthy

carlcox-space

2. Carl Cox

Carl Cox needs no introduction — the legendary artist’s residency at Space Ibiza concluded its 15 year-run in September with an epic ten-hour, all-vinyl set. While a packed room ushered in the closing of Space, millions of viewers tuned in online to watch Cox’s dazzling final performance. The set further marked the end of a 27-year era, as Ushuaïa will take control of the site next Ibiza season, but the king of dance music isn’t hanging up his crown just yet.

Infectious energy and an ear-to-ear grin are only some of the trademark elements of a Carl Cox DJ set. Over the course of his career which spans more than three decades, Cox has become a master curator with an inexhaustible archive, and a masterful technician to boot. Simply put, there is no superior DJ anywhere, and Cox proved in 2016 that he’s not going anywhere anytime soon.

– Lucy Davidson

Madeon Porter Shelter Live Madeon Twitter

1. Porter Robinson & Madeon

“One single song, one single tour, and then it’s over.”

There’s a bittersweet beauty in the nature of transience. Diamonds are coveted for their rarity. Gesaffelstein’s announcement that his Coachella performance would be his “last live show” made its experience that more exciting. The same principle applies to the “Shelter” phenomenon.

In 2016, no other artists managed to engender widespread fervor for their live shows to the degree which Porter Robinson and Madeon did with Shelter. When Porter Robinson and Madeon abruptly partnered in the studio and onstage, both artists’ respective fan bases were ecstatic. Based upon their sudden ubiquity and undeniable compatibility, many hopefully assumed that the pair of prodigies would continue to work together extensively for years to come. 

When Robinson and Madeon announced that their dual tour would mark the end of their partnership, a sizable faction of their followers were devastated — and understandably so. However, while the retirement of their partnership is a disappointing loss, it’s important to note that its impact is inextricable from its ephemerality. Live edits from the show, such as Madeon’s revision of Robinson’s “Flicker,” are evocative not only because of their intrinsic qualities, but because they only exist within the context of the Shelter performance. Robinson and Madeon’s tour is formidable largely because it is fleeting.

The Shelter tour was simultaneously a perfect reflection of both artists’ unique live aesthetics and an expert fusion of their compositional styles. Bookended with renditions of their sole collaboration, Porter Robinson and Madeon transformed each other’s original works throughout their joint performance, both individually and in conjunction. As the pair alternated vocal and instrumental duties behind separate altars, the accompanying visual production was a dazzling combination of both artists’ signature live spectacles.

We were astounded by Porter Robinson and Madeon’s collaborative live endeavors in 2016, and we are excited to see what both artists individually have in store for 2017.

– Will McCarthy

 

Photos by Rukes, Molly Gale, AJRPhotography, and courtesy of artists. 

Dancing Astronaut’s Top 10 Albums of 2016

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2016 has incurred a renaissance of full-length albums. As dance music becomes further commercialized and single-driven in certain sectors, numerous skilled producers put forth thoughtfully-crafted LPs that prove dance music hasn’t sacrificed substance for the sake of style. This year, veterans and rising stars alike dedicated precious time in the studio to deliver extraordinary albums. Baauer and Zhu graced their devoted followers with debut albums, while Flume and Rufus Du Sol put out masterfully-woven sophomore efforts.

Due to the wealth of superb albums released in 2016, narrowing down the year’s best albums was a painstakingly difficult task. There were a number of stellar albums which did not make this list, but deserve recognition, such as Eric Prydz’s magnificent Opus and Mr. Oizo’s delightfully bizarre All Wet.

Below, we’ve compiled the ten innovative, stylistically diverse, and viscerally evocative albums that we believe shone most brightly amidst a formidable pool of contenders.

Sasha Scene Delete

10. Sasha – Scene Delete

Sasha’s latest 21-track LP, entitled Scene Delete, is a project that truly wears its heart on its sleeve. Taking pause from his signature progressive and techno-laden club tracks, the legendary Welsh producer leveraged the blissfully introspective Scene Delete to showcase his longtime-subdued ambient and downtempo production proclivities.

Using the compilation series Late Night Tales, Sasha’s post-minimalist modern classical-influenced album features emotive piano and string sequences that evoke feelings of relatable melancholia in tracks such as “Shelter” and “Cassette Sessions D.” “Warewolf” is another standout single, as the track carefully layers tender, ethereal soundscapes over infectious breakbeats. Sasha drew upon a seemingly uncharacteristic stylistic vision while compiling Scene Delete, and the end result proves the risk of doing something different was well worth taking.

– Anna Laurash

Standout Tracks: “Pontiac,” “View2,” “Rooms”

Tycho Epoch

9. Tycho – Epoch

Few releases this year displayed as much command over the album as a form than Tycho’s fifth full length effort, Epoch. Too often producers put out LP’s that come off more as a collection of singles than a complete unit, but Tycho is not most producers. The ambient master crafted an intricate, detailed, and masterful work that, when taken as a whole, becomes vastly more than the sum of its parts.

Though the album’s forté is its entirety, that is not to say that the songs on Epoch cannot stand on their own. On the contrary, each of the album’s 11 songs is almost bafflingly well written, with catchy, moving melodies; rich, luxurious sound design; and deft, assured arraignments that crystalize into one of the best albums of the year.

– Patrick Hooks

Standout Tracks: “Epoch,” “Horizon,” “Division”

baauer-aa-new-album

8. Baauer – Aa

With the “Harlem Shake” meme and resulting popularity now far from relevancy, the viral hit’s creator rises from the earworm’s ashes to immortalize his prowess in bass music. Enter Aa, Baauer’s debut album that encompasses his culmination as an electronic trap trailblazer, and his crossover journey thereafter.

Aa blasts off with an instrumental intro, led by the junglelike “GoGo!” and sprinting at full speed until the hip-hop inspired “Sow” switches it up. Collaborations take hold of the latter half, with M.I.A tapped for the ferocious “Temple,” and Pusha T and Future serving up a dope connection on “Kung Fu.” Though the producer’s debut album comes after trap’s heyday, Aa serves as the electronic branch of the genre’s most essential full-length feature to date, proving that musical fluidity yields great finesse.

– Kim Reyes

Standout Tracks: “Sow,” “Temple,” “Kung Fu”

Griz Good Will Prevail

7. GRiZ – Good Will Prevail

Who knew that all it would take to put soul back into electronic music was a little live instrumentation? GRiZ’s fifth studio album arrived in September like a shot in the arm, full of raucous bass, ebullient horns, and more irresistible funk than any other release this year. Every moment of ‘Good Will Prevail is bursting at the seams with an infectious, seemingly limitless energy, and each song seems like an attempt to outdo the last in danceability and exuberance.

It is no accident that every cut on the album, aside from “Feelin’ Fine,” is a collaboration. To help his album prevail to its greatest potential, GRiZ called upon a strong cast of contributors, including Big Gigantic, Cherub, and Sunsquabi. While some releases may have been more conceptually ambitious or boundary breaking, with Good Will Prevail, GRiZ and company did exactly what their figurehead intended – they threw the year’s best party.

– Patrick Hooks

Standout Tracks: “Wicked,” “PS GFY,” “Good Times Roll”

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6. Zhu – Generationwhy

After the immense success of Zhu’s EPs The Nightday (2014) and Genesis Series (2015), the once-mysterious producer has finally lifted the veil on his identity with his most multi-faceted release to date, Generationwhy. Zhu’s debut studio album marks a departure from his signature underground sound, ditching heavy house for catchy melodies like the jazzy “Cold Blooded” and the sultry “In the Morning.” The producer chronicles his first exploration of a new spectrum of dance and pop music, as seen the upbeat “Numb” and fresh-faced “Hometown Girl.”

At first listen, fans of his previous work wouldn’t categorize this as classically Zhu, especially in the album‘s closer, its eponymous single. Ultimately, Generationwhy highlights his growth from experimental beginnings to full-scale musical artistry, confirming Zhu’s right to remain in the spotlight, still cloaked in enigma yet front-and-center, once again commanding and receiving our full attention.

– Kim Reyes 

Standout Tracks: “In the Morning,” “Palm of My Hand,” “Generation Why”

RUFUS Bloom

5. Rüfüs Du Sol – Bloom

While the first studio album from Aussie trio Rüfüs Du Sol debuted at number 1 in Australia back in 2013, it was their 2016 sophomore album, Bloom, that catapulted the group to global esteem. The 11-track LP, released on Odesza’s Foreign Family Collective, features a brilliant balance of live instrumentation and electronic music. Drawing upon the trio’s nu-disco influences, some of the LP’s biggest successes, such as “Brighter,” “Like An Animal,” and “Say A Prayer,” encapsulate the trio’s penchant for seamlessly combining soulful vocals, melodious synth chords, and entrancing beats that work together to wholeheartedly pull listeners into the album.

From one track to the next, Bloom takes listeners on a journey filled with with genuine human emotion and airy production sequences. This auditory-driven emotion is perhaps best represented with the album’s wistful hit “Innerbloom” – a single that not only stands as a work of melancholic perfection on its own, but also received numerous revered remixes from the likes of Sasha, Lane 8, and What So Not.

– Anna Laurash

Standout Tracks: “Like An Animal,” “Innerbloom,” “You Were Right”

Boys Noize Mayday Artwork 2500x2500

4. Boys Noize – Mayday

Boys Noize’s Mayday is a veritable techno masterpiece. As its title suggests, much of the album is thematically cataclysmic. The dystopian lyrics and caustic production of the titular track echo the tumult which pervades the world’s political climate. Indeed, Oliver Stone selected “Mayday” as part of the official soundtrack for his non-fictional Orwellian film Snowden because of its sonic relevance. More important than the album’s social relevance, however, is the music itself.

Boys Noize has proven his status as a versatile producer throughout his storied career. In Mayday, the producer reaffirms his ability to transcend the status quo across stark stylistic contrasts. Thunderous tracks such as “Overthrow” and “Dynamite” match the quality of the album’s more mellifluous songs, such as the mystifying “2 Live” and the recherché “Starchild.” Ultimately, Mayday is as clamorous as it is beautiful; it is as innovative as it is nostalgic. Alex Ridha’s fourth album is not only a tour de force — it is his magnum opus.

– Will McCarthy

Standout Tracks: “Overthrow,” “Starchild,” “Rock The Bells”

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3. Kaytranada 99.9%

Kaytranada originally found his footing by releasing music online, mostly through his SoundCloud, which currently hosts an impressively large collection of original productions and remixes. The 24-year-old has already established his career by producing for big name rap and hip-hop artists like Vic Mensa, Taleb Kweli, and Freddie Gibbs. However, Kaytranada only just released his debut album, 99.9%, this year. Comprised of mostly collaborations, 99.9% opens with two instrumentals, “Track Uno” and “Bus Ride,” before cruising into “Got It Good,” a smooth R&B stunner with famed vocalist Craig David.

Kaytranada floats through 99.9% on a foundation of funk, linking up with AlunaGeorge and GoldLink on the bewitching dance floor single “Together,” and reuniting with Anderson .Paak on the silky and syrupy “Glowed Up.” The producer closes his first full-length feature by working with Little Dragon on the captivating “Bullets,” leaving 99.9% to drift out as an ideal album to keep on repeat. Kaytranada’s debut has garnered high acclaim across the board, and the producer’s well-deserved recognition has likely only just begun.

Kim Reyes

Standout Tracks: “Got It Good,” “Together,” “Glowed Up”

flumskin

2. Flume – Skin

After making fans wait an agonizing four years from the release of his first album, Flume overcame the immense pressure of expectations which accompanies second albums to deliver Skin, an astoundingly accomplished opus that showed the Australian luminary pioneering sounds lightyears beyond his peers. Defying the legions of imitators that tried to replicate his earlier styles, Flume made Skin into such an ambitious, assured, and cohesive work of vision that it flouts any attempt at mimicry.

It is no small testament to his skill as an artist that Flume could put songs as Top-40 accessible as “Say It” on the same album as compositions as experimental and complex as “Wall Fuck,” yet have nothing seem discordant or out of place. Flume’s sophomore LP didn’t just push the envelope, it rewrote the rules and exceeded all expectations on its own turns. Skin is transcendent, utterly unique, and one of the absolute best albums of the year.

Patrick Hooks

Standout Tracks: “Say It,” “Tiny Cities,” “Never Be Like You”

Justice Woman

1. Justice – Woman

Five years after the release of Audio, Video, Disco, Justice have emerged from the studio with Woman, a revitalization of their last album‘s funky spirit, amped up to the next degree of disco. The 10-track feature grooves through a textured audible experience, commencing with the cinematic “Safe and Sound” and continuing with the roaring “Alakazam !” Vocal-heavy tracks like the crooning slow-jam “Stop” and retro-pop throwback “Randy” usher Woman into another dimension, with “Heavy Metal” sounding most reminiscent of their 2007 debut, Cross.

The album finishes with “Close Call,” a doting instrumental that extends Woman’s vigor beyond its end. In ending their hiatus that seemed like a lifetime, Justice triumphantly returned and exceeded expectations, giving fans a taste of the sweet masterpiece that has the duo breathing new life back into nu-disco, for an electronic milestone akin to man discovering fire. Needless to say, Woman was worth the wait. Because of its expert composition, unyielding fluidity, and cultural impact, we’ve selected Woman as our top album of 2016.

– Kim Reyes

Standout Tracks: “RANDY”, “Safe and Sound,” “Close Call”


deadmau5 2016 album

Honorable Mention: deadmau5 – W:/2016ALBUM/

Despite the highly self-critical deadmau5 discounting his eighth studio as being “slapped together,” W:/2016ALBUM/ was undeniably one of 2016’s most highly-anticipated albums – and rightfully so. With W:/2016ALBUM/, Zimmerman reaffirms his status as a progressive house innovator while also demonstrating his progression as an artist by experimenting with new genres.

The album’s wide-ranging tracklist features everything from Essential New Tune-earning “4Ware,” a single that demonstrates Deadmau5’s classic melodic chord progressions at their best, to the trance-influenced “Three Pound Chicken Wing,” to the glitch-hop, ‘80s inspired midtempo track “Whelk Then” – and each does its respective genre justice. Demonstrating the producer’s strive for forward-thinking originality, W:/2016ALBUM/ evokes both nostalgia and a sense of curious excitement, coupling revered vintage Deadmau5 with a retro-influenced sound that may indicate what Zimmerman has planned next.

– Anna Laurash

Standout Tracks: “No Problem,” “Three Pound Chicken Wing,” “4Ware”

The 2017 GRAMMY nominees are in — see the full list

This post was originally published on this site

The 2017 GRAMMY nominees are in, presenting multi-layered storylines from the General Field through each genre. This year’s awards introduce the inclusion of streaming-only releases, making the already deep pool of eligibilities even deeper. Announced with the anticipated Blonde void as Frank Ocean takes his Colin Kaepernick moment, the roster of nominees also draws a Super Bowl-like match-up between Adele and Beyonce in three of the four main categories.

In the Dance/Electronic space, where there’s no shortage of worthy picks, Bob Moses and Sofi Tukker highlight the Best Dance Recording category while Flume and Tycho stand out with the Best Dance/Electronic album up for grabs. Meanwhile, Kaskade makes his regular appearance among the Best Remixed Recording hopefuls. Next year, The Chainsmokers collect three nominations, including Best New Artist and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance.

See the full list of nominees for the 59th GRAMMY Awards below:


GENERAL FIELD 

Record of the Year:
“Hello”— Adele
“Formation” — Beyoncé
“7 Years” — Lukas Graham
“Work” — Rihanna Featuring Drake
“Stressed Out” — Twenty One Pilots

Album Of The Year:
25 — Adele
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Purpose — Justin Bieber
Views — Drake
A Sailor’s Guide To Earth — Sturgill Simpson

Song Of The Year:
“Formation”— Khalif Brown, Asheton Hogan, Beyoncé Knowles &amp; Michael L. Williams II, songwriters (Beyoncé)
“Hello” — Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Adele)
“I Took A Pill In Ibiza” — Mike Posner, songwriter (Mike Posner)
“Love Yourself” —Justin Bieber, Benjamin Levin &amp; Ed Sheeran, songwriters (Justin Bieber)
“7 Years” — Lukas Forchhammer, Stefan Forrest, Morten & Morten Ristorp, songwriters (Lukas Graham)

Best New Artist:
Kelsea Ballerini
The Chainsmokers
Chance The Rapper
Maren Morris
Anderson .Paak


POP FIELD 

Best Pop Solo Performance:
“Hello” — Adele
“Hold Up” — Beyoncé
“Love Yourself” — Justin Bieber
“Piece By Piece” (Idol Version) — Kelly Clarkson
“Dangerous Woman” — Ariana Grande

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance:
“Closer” —  The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey
“7 Years” — Lukas Graham
“Work” — Rihanna Featuring Drake
“Cheap Thrills” — Sia Featuring Sean Paul
“Stressed Out” — Twenty One Pilots

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album:
Cinema — Andrea Bocelli
Fallen Angels — Bob Dylan
Stages Live — Josh Groban
Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin — Willie Nelson
Encore: Movie Partners Sing Broadway

Best Pop Vocal Album:
25 — Adele
Purpose  — Justin Bieber
Dangerous Woman  — Ariana Grande
Confident — Demi Lovato
This Is Acting — Sia


DANCE/ELECTRONIC MUSIC FIELD

Best Dance Recording:
“Tearing Me Up” — Bob Moses
“Don’t Let Me Down” — The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya
“Never Be Like You” — Flume Featuring Kai
“Rinse & Repeat” — Riton Featuring Kah-Lo
“Drinkee” — Sofi Tukker

Best Dance/Electronic Album:
Skin — Flume
Electronica 1: The Time Machine — Jean-Michel Jarre
Epoch — Tycho
Barbara Barbara, We Face A Shining Future — Underworld
Louie Vega Starring…XXVIII — Louie Vega


CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL FIELD 

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album:
Human Nature — Herb Alpert
When You Wish Upon A Star — Bill Frisell
Way Back Home Live From Rochester, NY — Steve Gadd Band
Unspoken — Chuck Loeb
Culcha Vulcha — Snarky Puppy


ROCK FIELD: 

Best Rock Performance:
“Joe” (Live From Austin City Limits) — Alabama Shakes
“Don’t Hurt Yourself” — Beyoncé Featuring Jack White
“Blackstar” — David Bowie
“The Sound Of Silence” (Live On Conan) — Disturbed
“Heathens” —  Twenty One Pilots

Best Metal Performance:
“Shock Me” —  Baroness
“Silvera” — Gojira
“Rotting In Vain” — Korn
“Dystopia” — Megadeth
“The Price Is Wrong” — Periphery

Best Rock Song:
“Blackstar” — David Bowie, songwriter (David Bowie)
“Burn The Witch” — Radiohead, songwriters (Radiohead)
“Hardwired” — James Hetfield & Lars Ulrich, songwriters (Metallica)
“Heathens” — Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots)
“My Name Is Human” — Rich Meyer, Ryan Meyer &amp; Johnny Stevens, songwriters (Highly Suspect)

Best Rock Album:
California —  Blink-182
Tell Me I’m Pretty — Cage The Elephant
Magma —  Gojira
Death Of A Bachelor — Panic! At The Disco
Weezer — Weezer


ALTERNATIVE FIELD

Best Alternative Music Album:
22, A Million — Bon Iver
Blackstar — David Bowie
The Hope Six Demolition Project — PJ Harvey
Post Pop Depression — Iggy Pop
A Moon Shaped Pool — Radiohead


R&B FIELD 

Best R&B Performance:
“Turnin’ Me Up” — BJ The Chicago Kid
“Permission” — Ro James
“I Do” — Musiq Soulchild
“Needed Me” — Rihanna
“Cranes In The Sky” — Solange

Best Traditional R&B Performance:
“The Three Of Me” — William Bell
“Woman’s World” — BJ The Chicago Kid
“Sleeping With The One I Love” — Fantasia
“Angel” — Lalah Hathaway
“Can’t Wait” — Jill Scott

Best R&B Song:
“Come See Me” — J. Brathwaite, Aubrey Graham & Noah Shebib, songwriters (PartyNextDoor Featuring Drake)
“Exchange” — Michael Hernandez & Bryson Tiller, songwriters (Bryson Tiller)
“Kiss It Better” — Jeff Bhasker, Robyn Fenty, John-Nathan Glass &amp; Natalia Noemi, songwriters (Rihanna)
“Lake By The Ocean” — Hod David & Musze, songwriters (Maxwell)
“Luv” — Magnus August Høiberg, Benjamin Levin &amp; Daystar Peterson, songwriters (Tory Lanez)

Best Urban Contemporary Album:
Lemonade — Beyoncé
Ology — Gallant
We Are King — KING
Malibu — Anderson .Paak
Anti — Rihanna

Best R&B Album:
In My Mind — BJ The Chicago Kid
Lalah Hathaway Live — Lalah Hathaway
Velvet Portraits — Terrace Martin
Healing Season — Mint Condition
Smoove Jones — Mya


RAP FIELD 

Best Rap/Sung Performance:
“Freedom” — Beyoncé Featuring Kendrick Lamar
“Hotline Bling” — Drake
“Broccoli” — D.R.A.M. Featuring Lil Yachty
“Ultralight Beam” — Kanye West Featuring Chance The Rapper, Kelly Price, Kirk Franklin & The-Dream
“Famous” — Kanye West Featuring Rihanna

Best Rap Song:
“All The Way Up” — Joseph Cartagena, Edward Davadi, Shandel Green, Karim Kharbouch, Andre Christopher Lyon, Reminisce Mackie &  Marcello Valenzano, songwriters (Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared)
“Famous” — Chancelor Bennett, Ross Birchard, Ernest Brown, Andrew Dawson, Kasseem Dean, Mike Dean, Noah Goldstein, Kejuan Muchita, Patrick Reynolds, Kanye West & Cydel Young, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Rihanna)
“Hotline Bling” — Aubrey Graham & Paul Jefferies, songwriters (Drake)
“No Problem” — Chancelor Bennett, Dwayne Carter & Tauheed Epps, songwriters (Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz)
“Ultralight Beam” — Chancelor Bennett, Kasseem Dean, Mike Dean, Kirk Franklin, Noah Goldstein, Samuel Griesemer, Terius Nash, Jerome Potter, Kelly Price, Nico “Donnie Trumpet” Segal, Derek Watkins, Kanye West & Cydel Young, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Chance The Rapper, Kelly Price, Kirk Franklin & The-Dream)

Best Rap Album:
Coloring Book — Chance The Rapper
And The Anonymous Nobody — De La Soul
Major Key — DJ Khaled
Views — Drake
Blank Face LP — ScHoolboy Q
The Life Of Pablo — Kanye West


COUNTRY FIELD 

Best Country Solo Performance:
“Love Can Go To Hell” — Brandy Clark
“Vice” — Miranda Lambert
“My Church” — Maren Morris
“Church Bells” — Carrie Underwood
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” — Keith Urban

Best Country Duo/Group Performance:
“Different For Girls” — Dierks Bentley Featuring Elle King
“21 Summer” — Brothers Osborne
“Setting The World On Fire” — Kenny Chesney & P!nk
“Jolene” — Pentatonix Featuring Dolly Parton
“Think Of You” — Chris Young With Cassadee Pope

Best Country Song:
“Blue Ain’t Your Color” —  Clint Lagerberg, Hillary Lindsey & Steven Lee Olsen, songwriters (Keith Urban)
“Die A Happy Man” — Sean Douglas, Thomas Rhett & Joe Spargur, songwriters (Thomas Rhett)
“Humble And Kind” — Lori McKenna, songwriter (Tim McGraw)
“My Church” — busbee & Maren Morris, songwriters (Maren Morris)
“Vice” — Miranda Lambert, Shane McAnally & Josh Osborne, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)

Best Country Album:
Big Day In A Small Town — Brandy Clark
Full Circle — Loretta Lynn
Hero — Maren Morris
A Sailor’s Guide To Earth — Sturgill Simpson
Ripcord — Keith Urban


NEW AGE FIELD

Best New Age Album:
Orogen — John Burke
Dark Sky Island — Enya
Inner Passion — Peter Kater & Tina Guo
Rosetta — Vangelis
White Sun II — White Sun


JAZZ FIELD 

Best Improvised Jazz Solo:
“Countdown” — Joey Alexander, soloist
“In Movement” — Ravi Coltrane, soloist
“We See” — Fred Hersch, soloist
“I Concentrate On You” — Brad Mehldau, soloist
“I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” — John Scofield, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album:
Sound Of Red —  René Marie
Upward Spiral — Branford Marsalis Quartet With Special Guest Kurt Elling
Take Me To The Alley — Gregory Porter
Harlem On My Mind — Catherine Russell
The Sting Variations — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Jazz Instrumental Album:
Book Of Intuition — Kenny Barron Trio
Dr. Um — Peter Erskine
Sunday Night At The Vanguard — The Fred Hersch Trio
Nearness — Joshua Redman &amp; Brad Mehldau
Country For Old Men —  John Scofield

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album:
Real Enemies — Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society
Presents Monk’estra, Vol. 1 — John Beasley
Kaleidoscope Eyes: Music Of The Beatles — John Daversa
All L.A. Band — Bob Mintzer
Presidential Suite: Eight Variations On Freedom — Ted Nash Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album
Entre Colegas — Andy González
Madera Latino: A Latin Jazz Perspective On The Music Of Woody Shaw — Brian Lynch & Various Artists
Canto América — Michael Spiro/Wayne Wallace La Orquesta Sinfonietta
30 — Trio Da Paz
Tribute To Irakere: Live In Marciac — Chucho Valdés


GOSPEL/CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC FIELD

Best Gospel Performance/Song:
“It’s Alright, It’s Ok” — Shirley Caesar Featuring Anthony Hamilton
“You’re Bigger” [Live] — Jekalyn Carr
“Made A Way” [Live] — Travis Greene
“God Provides” — Tamela Mann
“Better” — Hezekiah Walker

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
“Trust In You — Lauren Daigle
“Priceless” — For King & Country
“King Of The World” — Natalie Grant
“Thy Will” — Hillary Scott & The Scott Family
“Chain Breaker” — Zach Williams

Best Gospel Album:
Listen —  Tim Bowman Jr.
Fill This House — Shirley Caesar
A Worshipper’s Heart [Live] — Todd Dulaney
Losing My Religion — Kirk Franklin
Demonstrate [Live] — William Murphy

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album:
Poets & Saints — All Sons & Daughters
American Prodigal — Crowder
Be One — Natalie Grant
Youth Revival [Live] — Hillsong Young & Free
Love Remains — Hillary Scott &The Scott Family

Best Roots Gospel Album:
Better Together —  Gaither Vocal Band
Nature’s Symphony In 432 — The Isaacs
Hymns — Joey+Rory
Hymns And Songs Of Inspiration — Gordon Mote
God Don’t Never Change: The Songs Of Blind Willie Johnson — (Various Artists)


LATIN FIELD

Best Latin Pop Album:
Un Besito Mas —  Jesse & Joy
Ilusión — Gaby Moreno
Similares — Laura Pausini
Seguir Latiendo — Sanalejo
Buena Vida — Diego Torres

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album:
ilevitable — ile
L.H.O.N. (La Humanidad O Nosotros) — Illya Kuryaki & The Valderamas
Buenaventura — La Santa Cecilia
Los Rakas — Los Rakas
Amor Supremo — Carla Morrison

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano):
Raíces — Banda El Recodo De Cruz Lizárraga
Hecho A Mano — Joss Favela
Un Azteca En El Azteca, Vol. 1 (En Vivo) — Vicente Fernández
Generación Maquinaria Est. 2006. — La Maquinaria Norteña
Tributo A Joan Sebastian Y Rigoberto Alfaro — Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea

Best Tropical Latin Album:
Conexión — Fonseca
La Fantasia Homenaje A Juan Formell — Formell Y Los Van Van
35 Aniversario — Grupo Niche
La Sonora Santanera En Su 60 Aniversario — La Sonora Santanera
Donde Están? —  Jose Lugo & Guasábara Combo


AMERICAN ROOTS FIELD 

Best American Roots Performance:
“Ain’t No Man” — The Avett Brothers
“Mother’s Children Have A Hard Time” — Blind Boys Of Alabama
“Factory Girl” — Rhiannon Giddens
“House Of Mercy” — Sarah Jarosz
“Wreck You” — Lori McKenna

Best American Roots Song:
“Alabama At Night” — Robbie Fulks
“City Lights” — Jack White
“Gulfstream” — Roddie Romero And The Hub City All-Stars
“Kid Sister” — The Time Jumpers
“Wreck You” — Lori McKenna

Best Americana Album:
True Sadness — The Avett Brothers
This Is Where I Live — William Bell
The Cedar Creek Sessions — Kris Kristofferson
The Bird & The Rifle — Lori McKenna
Kid Sister — The Time Jumpers

Best Bluegrass Album:
Original Traditional — Blue Highway
Burden Bearer — Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver
The Hazel And Alice Sessions — Laurie Lewis & The Right Hands
North By South — Claire Lynch
Coming Home — O’Connor Band With Mark O’Connor

Best Traditional Blues Album:
Can’t Shake This Feeling — Lurrie Bell
Live At The Greek Theatre — Joe Bonamassa
Blues & Ballads — Luther Dickinson
The Soul Of Jimmie Rodgers — Vasti Jackson
Porcupine Meat — Bobby Rush

Best Contemporary Blues Album:
The Last Days Of Oakland — Fantastic Negrito
Love Wins Again — Janiva Magness
Bloodline — Kenny Neal
Give It Back To You — The Record Company
Everybody Wants A Piece — Joe Louis Walker

Best Folk Album:
Silver Skies Blue — Judy Collins & Ari Hest
Upland Stories — Robbie Fulks
Factory Girl — Rhiannon Giddens
Weighted Mind — Sierra Hull
Undercurrent — Sarah Jarosz

Best Regional Roots Music Album:
Broken Promised Land — Barry Jean Ancelet & Sam Broussard
It’s A Cree Thing — Northern Cree
E Walea —  Kalani Pe’a
Gulfstream — Roddie Romero And The Hub City All-Stars
I Wanna Sing Right: Rediscovering Lomax In The Evangeline Country — (Various Artists)


REGGAE FIELD

Best Reggae Album:
Sly & Robbie Presents… Reggae For Her —  Devin Di Dakta & J.L
Rose Petals —  J Boog
Ziggy Marley —  Ziggy Marley
Everlasting —  Raging Fyah
Falling Into Place —  Rebelution
SOJA: Live In Virginia —  SOJA


WORLD MUSIC FIELD 

Best World Music Album:
Destiny — Celtic Woman
Walking In The Footsteps Of Our Fathers —  Ladysmith Black Mambazo
Sing Me Home —  Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble
Land Of Gold —  Anoushka Shankar
Dois Amigos, Um Século De Música: Multishow Live — Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil


CHILDREN’S FIELD 

Best Children’s Album:
Explorer Of The World — Frances England
Infinity Plus One — Secret Agent 23 Skidoo
Novelties — Recess Monkey
Press Play — Brady Rymer And The Little Band That Could
Saddle Up — The Okee Dokee Brothers


SPOKEN WORD FIELD 

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling):
The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo — Amy Schumer
In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox — Carol Burnett
M Train — Patti Smith
Under The Big Black Sun: A Personal History Of L.A. Punk — (John Doe With Tom Desavia) (Various Artists)
Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink — Elvis Costello


COMEDY FIELD 

Best Comedy Album:
…America…Great… — David Cross
American Myth — Margaret Cho
Boyish Girl Interrupted — Tig Notaro
Live At The Apollo — Amy Schumer
Talking For Clapping — Patton Oswalt


MUSICAL THEATER FIELD

Best Musical Theater Album:
Bright Star —  Carmen Cusack, principal soloist; Jay Alix, Peter Asher & Una mJackman, producers; Steve Martin, composer; Edie Brickell, composer & lyricist (Original Broadway Cast)
The Color Purple — Cynthia Erivo & Jennifer Hudson, principal soloists; Stephen Bray, Van Dean, Frank Filipetti, Roy Furman, Scott Sanders & Jhett Tolentino, producers (Stephen Bray, Brenda Russell &Allee Willis, composers/lyricists) (New Broadway Cast)
Fiddler On The Roof — Danny Burstein, principal soloist; Louise Gund, David Lai & Ted Sperling, producers (Jerry Bock, composer; Sheldon Harnick, lyricist) (2016 Broadway Cast)
Kinky Boots — Killian Donnelly & Matt Henry, principal soloists; Sammy James, Jr., Cyndi Lauper, Stephen Oremus & William Wittman, producers (Cyndi Lauper, composer & lyricist) (Original West End Cast)
Waitress — Jessie Mueller, principal soloist; Neal Avron, Sara Bareilles & Nadia DiGiallonardo, producers; Sara Bareilles, composer & lyricist


MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA FIELD 

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:
“Amy” — (Various Artists)
“Miles Ahead” — (Miles Davis & Various Artists)
“Straight Outta Compton” —  (Various Artists)
“Suicide Squad” (Collector’s Edition) — (Various Artists)
“Vinyl: The Essentials Season 1” —  (Various Artists)

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media:
“Bridge Of Spies” — Thomas Newman, composer
Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight” — Ennio Morricone, composer
“The Revenant” — Alva Noto & Ryuichi Sakamoto, composers
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” — John Williams, composer
“Stranger Things” Volume 1 — Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein, composers
“Stranger Things” Volume 2 — Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein, composers

Best Song Written For Visual Media:
“Can’t Stop The Feeling! — Max Martin, Shellback & Justin Timberlake, songwriters (Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Gwen Stefani, James Corden, Zooey Deschanel)
“Heathens” — Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots)
“Just Like Fire” — Oscar Holter, Max Martin, P!nk & Shellback, songwriters (P!nk)
“Purple Lamborghini” — Shamann Cooke, Sonny Moore & William Roberts, songwriters (Skrillex &Rick Ross)
“Try Everything” — Mikkel S. Eriksen, Sia Furler & Tor Erik Hermansen, songwriters (Shakira)
“The Veil” — Peter Gabriel, songwriter (Peter Gabriel)


COMPOSING/ ARRANGING FIELD: 

Best Instrumental Composition:
“Bridge Of Spies” (End Title)  — Thomas Newman, composer (Thomas Newman)
“The Expensive Train Set” (An Epic Sarahnade For Double Big Band)  — Tim Davies, composer (Tim Davies Big Band)
“Flow” — Alan Ferber, composer (Alan Ferber Nonet)
“L’Ultima Diligenza Di Red Rock – Versione Integrale”  — Ennio Morricone, composer (Ennio Morricone)
“Spoken At Midnight”  — Ted Nash, composer (Ted Nash Big Band)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella:
“Ask Me Now” — John Beasley, arranger (John Beasley)
Good “Swing” Wenceslas — Sammy Nestico, arranger (The Count Basie Orchestra)
Linus & Lucy —  Christian Jacob, arranger (The Phil Norman Tentet)
“Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” — John Daversa, arranger (John Daversa)
“We Three Kings” — Ted Nash, arranger (Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis)
“You And I” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals:
“Do You Hear What I Hear?” — Gordon Goodwin, arranger (Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band Featuring Take 6)
“Do You Want To Know A Secret”  — John Daversa, arranger (John Daversa Featuring Renee Olstead)
“Flintstones”  — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)
“I’m A Fool To Want You”  — Alan Broadbent, arranger (Kristin Chenoweth)
“Somewhere” (Dirty Blvd) (Extended Version)  — Billy Childs & Larry Klein, arrangers (Lang Lang Featuring Lisa Fischer & Jeffrey Wright)


PACKAGE FIELD 

Best Recording Package:
Anti  — Ciarra Pardo & Robyn Fenty, art directors (Rihanna)
Blackstar — Jonathan Barnbrook, art director (David Bowie)
Human Performance  — Andrew Savage, art director (Parquet Courts)
Sunset Motel — Sarah Dodds & Shauna Dodds, art directors (Reckless Kelly)
22, A Million — Eric Timothy Carlson, art director (Bon Iver)

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package:
Edith Piaf 1915-2015 — Gérard Lo Monaco, art director (Edith Piaf)
401 Days — Jonathan Dagan & Mathias Høst Normark, art directors (J.Views)
I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware Of It (Box Set) — Samuel Burgess-Johnson & Matthew Healy, art directors (The 1975)
Paper Wheels (Deluxe Limited Edition) — Matt Taylor, art director (Trey Anastasio)
Tug Of War (Deluxe Edition) — Simon Earith & James Musgrave, art directors (Paul McCartney)


NOTES FIELD 

Best Album Notes:
The Complete Monument & Columbia Albums Collection — Mikal Gilmore, album notes writer (Kris Kristofferson)
The Knoxville Sessions, 1929-1930: Knox County Stomp — Ted Olson & Tony Russell, album notes writers (Various Artists)
Ork Records: New York, New York — Rob Sevier & Ken Shipley, album notes writers (Various Artists)
Sissle And Blake Sing Shuffle Along — Ken Bloom & Richard Carlin, album notes writers (Eubie Blake & Noble Sissle)
Waxing The Gospel: Mass Evangelism & The Phonograph, 1890-1900 — Richard Martin, album notes writer (Various Artists)


HISTORICAL FIELD 

Best Historical Album:
The Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series, Vol.12 (Collector’s Edition) — Steve Berkowitz & Jeff Rosen, compilation producers; Mark Wilder, mastering engineer (Bob Dylan)
Music Of Morocco From The Library Of Congress: Recorded By Paul Bowles, 1959 — April G. Ledbetter, Steven Lance Ledbetter, Bill Nowlin &amp; Philip D. Schuyler, compilation producers; Rick Fisher &amp; Michael Graves, mastering engineers (Various Artists)
Ork Records: New York, New York — Rob Sevier & Ken Shipley, compilation producers; Jeff Lipton & Maria Rice, mastering engineers (Various Artists)
Vladimir Horowitz: The Unreleased Live Recordings 1966-1983 — Bernard Horowitz, Andreas K. Meyer & Robert Russ, compilation producers; Andreas K. Meyer & Jeanne Montalvo, mastering engineers (Vladimir Horowitz)
Waxing The Gospel: Mass Evangelism &amp; The Phonograph, 1890-1900 — Michael Devecka, Meagan Hennessey & Richard Martin, compilation producers; Michael Devecka, David Giovannoni, Michael Khanchalian & Richard Martin, mastering engineers (Various Artists)


PRODUCTION, NON-CLASSICAL FIELD

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical:
Are You Serious —  Tchad Blake & David Boucher, engineers; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Andrew Bird)
Blackstar — David Bowie, Tom Elmhirst, Kevin Killen & Tony Visconti, engineers; Joe LaPorta, mastering engineer (David Bowie)
Dig In Deep — Ryan Freeland, engineer; Kim Rosen, mastering engineer (Bonnie Raitt)
Hit N Run Phase Two — Booker T., Dylan Dresdow, Chris James, Prince & Justin Stanley, engineers; Dylan Dresdow, mastering engineer (Prince)
Undercurrent — Shani Gandhi & Gary Paczosa, engineers; Paul Blakemore, mastering engineer (Sarah Jarosz)

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical:
Benny Blanco
Greg Kurstin
Max Martin
Nineteen85
Ricky Reed

Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical:
“Cali Coast” (Psionics Remix) — Josh Williams, remixer (Soul Pacific)
“Heavy Star Movin’” (staRo Remix) — staRo, remixer (The Silver Lake Chorus)
Nineteen Hundred Eighty-Five (Timo Maas & James Teej Remix) — Timo Maas & James Teej, remixers (Paul McCartney & Wings)
Only (Kaskade x Lipless Remix) — Ryan Raddon, remixer (Ry X)
Tearing Me Up (RAC Remix) — André Allen Anjos, remixer (Bob Moses)
Wide Open (Joe Goddard Remix) — Joe Goddard, remixer (The Chemical Brothers)


SURROUND SOUND FIELD

Best Surround Sound Album:
Dutilleux: Sur Le Même Accord; Les Citations; Mystère De L’instant & Timbres, Espace, Mouvement —Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, surround mix engineers; Dmitriy Lipay, surround mastering engineer; Dmitriy Lipay, surround producer (Ludovic Morlot &amp; Seattle Symphony)
Johnson: Considering Matthew Shepard — Brad Michel, surround mix engineer; Brad Michel, surround mastering engineer; Robina G. Young, surround producer (Craig Hella Johnson & Conspirare)
Maja S.K. Ratkje: And Sing … — Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Maja S.K. Ratkje, Cikada & Oslo Sinfonietta)
Primus & The Chocolate Factory (5.1 Surround Sound Edition) — Les Claypool, surround mix engineer; Stephen Marcussen, surround mastering engineer; Les Claypool, surround producer (Primus)
Reflections — Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene)


PRODUCTION, CLASSICAL FIELD

Best Engineered Album, Classical:
Corigliano: The Ghosts Of Versailles — Mark Donahue &amp; Fred Vogler, engineers (James Conlon, Guanqun Yu, Joshua Guerrero, Patricia Racette, Christopher Maltman, Lucy Schaufer, Lucas Meachem, LA Opera Chorus & Orchestra)
Dutilleux: Sur Le Même Accord; Les Citations; Mystère De L’Instant & Timbres, Espace, Mouvement  — Alexander Lipay &amp; Dmitriy Lipay, engineers (Ludovic Morlot & Seattle Symphony)
Reflections — Morten Lindberg, engineer (Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene)
Shadow Of Sirius — Silas Brown & David Frost, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (Jerry F. Junkin & The University Of Texas Wind Ensemble)
Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow – Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9 — Shawn Murphy &amp; Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer (Andris Nelsons &amp; Boston Symphony Orchestra)

Producer Of The Year, Classical:
Blanton Alspaugh
David Frost
Marina A. Ledin, Victor Ledin
Judith Sherman
Robina G. Young

Best Orchestral Performance:
Bates: Works For Orchestra — Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony)
Ibert: Orchestral Works —Neeme Järvi, conductor (Orchestre De La Suisse Romande)
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 In B-Flat Major, Op. 100 —Mariss Jansons, conductor (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra)
Rouse: Odna Zhizn; Symphonies 3 & 4; Prospero’s Rooms — Alan Gilbert, conductor (New York Philharmonic)
Shostakovich: Under Stalin’s Shadow – Symphonies Nos. 5, 8 & 9 — Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording:
Corigliano: The Ghosts Of Versailles — James Conlon, conductor; Joshua Guerrero, Christopher Maltman, Lucas Meachem, Patricia Racette, Lucy Schaufer &amp; Guanqun Yu; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (LA Opera Orchestra; LA Opera Chorus)
Handel: Giulio Cesare — Giovanni Antonini, conductor; Cecilia Bartoli, Philippe Jaroussky, Andreas Scholl &amp; Anne-Sofie von Otter; Samuel Theis, producer (Il Giardino Armonico)
Higdon: Cold Mountain — Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor; Emily Fons, Nathan Gunn, Isabel Leonard & Jay Hunter Morris; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer (The Santa Fe Opera Orchestra; Santa Fe Opera Apprentice Program For Singers)
Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro — Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor; Thomas Hampson, Christiane Karg, Luca Pisaroni & Sonya Yoncheva; Daniel Zalay, producer (Chamber Orchestra Of Europe; Vocalensemble Rastatt)
Szymanowski: Król Roger — Antonio Pappano, conductor; Georgia Jarman, Mariusz Kwiecień & Saimir Pirgu; Jonathan Allen, producer (Orchestra Of The Royal Opera House; Royal Opera Chorus)

Best Choral Performance:
Himmelrand — Elisabeth Holte, conductor (Marianne Reidarsdatter Eriksen, Ragnfrid Lie & Matilda Sterby; Inger-Lise Ulsrud; Uranienborg Vokalensemble)
Janáček: Glagolitic Mass — Edward Gardner, conductor; Håkon Matti Skrede, chorus master (Susan Bickley, Gábor Bretz, Sara Jakubiak & Stuart Skelton; Thomas Trotter; Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra; Bergen Cathedral Choir, Bergen Philharmonic Choir, Choir Of Collegium Musicum & Edvard Grieg Kor)
Lloyd: Bonhoeffer — Donald Nally, conductor (Malavika Godbole, John Grecia, Rebecca Harris & Thomas Mesa; The Crossing)
Penderecki Conducts Penderecki, Volume 1 — Krzysztof Penderecki, conductor; Henryk Wojnarowski, choir director (Nikolay Didenko, Agnieszka Rehlis &amp; Johanna Rusanen; Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra; Warsaw Philharmonic Choir)
Steinberg: Passion Week — Steven Fox, conductor (The Clarion Choir)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance:
Fitelberg: Chamber Works — ARC Ensemble
Reflections — Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg &amp; Trondheimsolistene
Serious Business — Spektral Quartet
Steve Reich — Third Coast Percussion
Trios From Our Homelands — Lincoln Trio

Best Classical Instrumental Solo:
Adams, J.: Scheherazade.2 — Leila Josefowicz; David Robertson, conductor (Chester Englander;
St. Louis Symphony)
Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway — Zuill Bailey; Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (Nashville Symphony) Track from: Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle
Dvořák: Violin Concerto & Romance; Suk: Fantasy — Christian Tetzlaff; John Storgårds, conductor (Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra)
Mozart: Keyboard Music, Vols. 8 & 9 — Kristian Bezuidenhout
1930’s Violin Concertos, Vol. 2 — Gil Shaham; Stéphane Denève, conductor (The Knights & Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra)

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album:
Monteverdi — Magdalena Kožená; Andrea Marcon, conductor (David Feldman, Michael Feyfar, Jakob Pilgram & Luca Tittoto; La Cetra Barockorchester Basel)
Mozart: The Weber Sisters — Sabine Devieilhe; Raphaël Pichon, conductor (Pygmalion)
Schumann & Berg —Dorothea Röschmann; Mitsuko Uchida, accompanist
Shakespeare Songs — Ian Bostridge; Antonio Pappano, accompanist (Michael Collins, Elizabeth Kenny, Lawrence Power & Adam Walker)
Verismo — Anna Netrebko; Antonio Pappano, conductor (Yusif Eyvazov; Coro Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia; Orchestra Dell Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia)

Best Classical Compendium:
Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer
Gesualdo  — Tõnu Kaljuste, conductor; Manfred Eicher, producer
Vaughan Williams: Discoveries — Martyn Brabbins, conductor; Andrew Walton, producer
Wolfgang: Passing Through  — Judith Farmer &amp; Gernot Wolfgang, producers; (Various Artists)
Zappa: 200 Motels – The Suites  — Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor; Frank Filipetti & Gail Zappa, producers

Best Contemporary Classical Composition:
Bates: Anthology Of Fantastic Zoology — Mason Bates, composer (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra)
Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway — Michael Daugherty, composer (Zuill Bailey, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)
Higdon: Cold Mountain — Jennifer Higdon, composer; Gene Scheer, librettist (Miguel Harth- Bedoya, Jay Hunter Morris, Emily Fons, Isabel Leonard, Nathan Gunn & The Santa Fe Opera)
Theofanidis: Bassoon Concerto — Christopher Theofanidis, composer (Martin Kuuskmann, Barry Jekowsky & Northwest Sinfonia)
Winger: Conversations With Nijinsky — C. F. Kip Winger, composer (Martin West & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra)


MUSIC VIDEO/FILM FIELD 

Best Music Video:
Formation — Beyoncé
River — Leon Bridges
Up & Up — Coldplay
Gosh — Jamie XX
Upside Down & Inside Out — OK Go

Best Music Film:
I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead —  Steve Aoki
The Beatles: Eight Days A Week The Touring Years —  (The Beatles)
Lemonade — Beyoncé
The Music Of Strangers — Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble
American Saturday Night: Live From The Grand Ole Opry —  (Various Artists)

Tycho shares new ‘Division’ remix from Heathered Pearls and Red Rocks recap video [Exclusive]

This post was originally published on this site


Tycho’s career recently culminated in the release of Epoch, concluding the producer’s 3-part album series on Ghostly International which began in 2011 with Dive.

Epoch found Tycho at his best, taking his followers on an emotional journey by way of ambient soundscapes accented with tech elements and live instrumentals. “Division” emerged as one of the album’s more avant-garde singles, drawing attention from fans across the dance world and beyond for its 7/8 time signature and heavy emphasis on its electric guitar and bass parts.

The composition has now become the first single to receive an official remix package. Ghostly International colleague Heathered Pearls was selected for the task, reverting “Division” back to a club-oriented format of 4/4 timing. That said, Heathered Pearls ensures the piece stays as light in nature as the original, opting to maintain many of its central elements while enhancing it with light, spattered percussion.

On top of the new remix, Tycho has also shared a recap video of his recent Red Rocks performance set to the official audio of “Division.” View the video above.

Tycho has also announced a world tour. Check his full dates below:

TYCHO WORLD TOUR
01/07 – Oakland, CA – Fox Theater
01/09 – Honolulu, HI – The Republik
01/12 – Osaka, JP – Bigcat
01/13 – Tokyo, JP – Stellar Ball Shinagawa
01/14 – Seoul, KR – Understage
01/19 – Taipei, TW – Legacy
01/21 – Singapore, SP – Laneway Festival
01/25 – Melbourne, AU – 170 Russell
01/26 – Brisbane, AU – Laneway Festival
01/28 – Melbourne, AU – Laneway Festival
01/30 – Auckland, NZ – Laneway Festival
02/02 – Sydney, AU – Metro Theatre
02/03 – Adelaide, AU – Laneway Festival
02/04 – Sydney, AU – Laneway Festival
02/05 – Fremantle, AU – Laneway Festival
02/10 – Berlin, DE – Heimathafen
02/11 – Leipzig, DE – UT Connewitz
02/12 – Vienna, AT – Flex
02/14 – Budapest, HU – Akvarium Klub
02/15 – Prague, CZ – Meetfactory
02/16 – Warsaw, PL – Worldwide Festival at Niebo
02/18 – Copenhagen, DK – Pumpehuset
02/19 – Stockholm, SE – Kagelbanan
02/20 – Oslo, NO – Parkteatret
02/22 – Cologne, DE – Gloria Theatre
02/23 – Amsterdam, NL – Melkweg
02/24 – Paris, FR – La Gaite Lyrique
02/25 – Brussels, BE – Botanique – Orangerie
02/27 – London, UK – Electric Brixton
02/28 – London, UK – Electric Brixton

Read More:

Tycho’s ‘Epoch’ is a colorful, cinematic delight [Album Review]

Tycho releases 2016 Burning Man sunrise set, entitled ‘Descent’

Tycho releases mini-documentary along with new track, ‘Division’

Tycho’s ‘Epoch’ is a colorful, cinematic delight [Album Review]

This post was originally published on this site

Earlier this year, San Francisco-bred artist and designer Tycho announced a new album on the way for 2016, but gave scant details about the project, leaving fans to speculate about just what the ambient master had in store. Fans need no longer worry, as Tycho’s fifth studio album, Epoch, has arrived in grand fashion.

In the hands of a lesser artist, the formal rigidity of Epoch would likely become tiresome, but every one of the album’s eleven tracks is a testament to Tycho’s breathtaking compositional skills. The producer builds much of the record around a theme of repetition; melodies and rhythms start off simply, and Tycho adds layer upon layer of complexity as they progress. The album as a whole is itself a repetition of structures and forms of arrangement that shift from track to track. But, like all great songwriters, Tycho knows how to surprise the listener — and the surprises on Epoch are some of the producer’s best yet.

Take the opener, “Glider.” The song begins with sweeping, sweet syth arps the drift over a rolling drum beat as the space around them fills with harmonic textures. But as soon as this pattern is on the verge of becoming predictable, Tycho switches gears to a lyrical, brassy melody and kinetic bassline. He then brings the song full circle by combining the two ideas into a glimmering, crystalline climax.

The songs on Epoch are like expertly crafted puzzle pieces that interlock and fold into each other to form one complex, complete unit. The album as a whole fits in this analogy as well. Just as each song is a collection of parts that fold into a whole, so to is the album made of individual songs that add up to make something greater than the sum of its parts. The way the energy flows from track to track is hypnotic, and the album moves form uplifting, soaring choruses to mysterious and sombre bridges with confidence and ease. There’s a refreshing amount of dynamic variation throughout, and the melodic and harmonic movements of Epoch come across like narrative.

All in all, it’s hard to say what the best thing about Epoch is. Maybe it’s the funky flutes and steady shuffle of the title track, or maybe it’s the cascading keys that open up “Rings.” It might be the deliciously crisp guitar tone of “Horizon” and “Source,” but it could also be the intertwining counterpoint of the album’s closer, “Field.” The sound design is beautiful, the arrangements are subtle and nuanced, and the overall effect is triumphant, even bordering on transcendent.

Suffice it to say that Epoch sounds like the soundtrack to a science fiction film that we wish we could see, and Tycho has produced one of the most entertaining albums of the year.

Read More

Tycho releases mini-documentary along with new track, ‘Division

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Tycho releases 2016 Burning Man sunrise set, entitled ‘Descent’

This post was originally published on this site

In what is quickly becoming a cherished tradition, ambient producer Tycho has released his sunrise set from Burning Man 2016, entitled “Descent.” The San Francisco-based producer previously released his sunrise set from 2015.

As can be expected, the hour and a half mix is swirling master class of the ambient genre, perfectly at home at sunset as it is at sunrise. Tycho’s set features contributions from the likes of the Boards of Canada and Com Truise, as well as new tracks of his own. This is particularly exciting as the producer has recently closed the chapter on his 2014 album Awake and is gearing up to release a new album, for which no title or release date has yet been given. Still, his sunrise mixes are quickly becoming the stuff of legends and will be certain to tide fans over until his next LP is unveiled.

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