YouTube seeks to debut a new paid streaming service by March

This post was originally published on this site

YouTube will look to launch its own music streaming service come March. Tentatively titled “Remix,” the paid service will offer video clips directly sourced from YouTube, as well as on-demand music streaming.

Remix represents Google’s third attempt to introduce a music streaming platform that can contend with the likes of Apple Music and Spotify. Google released its audio-only streaming service, Google Play Music, in 2011. 2014 would see the development of YouTube Music Key, a subscription based service that coupled ad-free music streaming and music video viewing on YouTube for a ten-dollar monthly fee. In 2015, YouTube Music Key became YouTube Red. YouTube Red maintained all of YouTube Music Key’s original features, adding offline video viewing. YouTube Red also enabled subscribers to listen to videos even when their phone screens were turned off.

Warner Music Group has already signed a licensing deal with YouTube in support of Remix. YouTube currently remains in talks with Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group. The inception of Remix is said to hinge on YouTube’s ability to negotiate agreements with major music publishers.

YouTube will remain on the offensive as its contract with Vevo becomes subject to renewal in early 2018. Jointly owned by Sony and Universal, Vevo holds a “majority share” of music video rights. YouTube, however, might find some of its industry relationships to be tenuous given the record industry’s general distaste for YouTube’s reportedly thin payouts to labels and artists. The third time might indeed be the ‘charm’ for Google, but only time will tell if Remix can emerge as a formidable contender in the music streaming market.

H/T: The Verge

Read More:

YouTube and Ticketmaster launch inaugural ticketing partnership

Popular YouTube audio ripping website youtube-mp3 has been shut down

YouTube play counts will soon count towards Billboard’s Top 200 albums chart

Spotify breaks down your listening habits over the last year

This post was originally published on this site

Spotify has officially released its Your 2017 Wrapped feature. By tracking listening habits over the year, the Swedish streaming giant provides users with a year in review to sum up their most listened to artists and genres throughout the year.

The feature farms data throughout the year to generate a list of listener’s top 100 streamed songs, and also provides a convenient virtual infographic detailing genre preferences, minutes listened, demographics, and even the amount of times listeners skipped tracks. Spotify also gives users a short quiz based on listening preferences to determine musical self awareness: Did you know that Bassnectar was your top streamed artist of 2017? How many minutes did you listen to music throughout the year? What is your most listened to genre? If you know the answers to these questions, you might be considered musically self aware.

All of these features can be accessed by visiting the service here and logging in with your Spotify account.

Read More:

Spotify is testing a ‘like/dislike’ feature for its Discover Weekly playlists

deadmau5 unleashes complete track collection from BBC Radio 1 residency on Spotify

New Spotify data shows sharp increase in listening time, artist diversity

deadmau5 unleashes complete track collection from BBC Radio 1 residency on Spotify

This post was originally published on this site

Deadmau5‘s struck an underground gold mine, and luckily, he’s happy to share the wealth.

After an exciting string of announcements amidst the mau5’s final BBC Radio 1 residency show, the big cheese has thrilled fans with a more immediate gift. Fans of deadmau5’s radio show can relish in a complete collection of the music the artist slung out over the course of the last year thanks to the amusingly-named Spotify playlist “for a lack of a better playlist.”

From the music of Pryda, Gallya, ATTLAS, No Mana, Josh Butler, Rinzen, and many more, Mau5trap‘s gathered together the show’s complete 207-track long list that’s plenty easy to get lost in for 22 hours and 42 minutes if one feels so inclined.

Mau5trap’s looking towards an eventful new year. With fresh music from Joel Zimmerman, a new show, new signees, and more, it’s a good time to be a fan of the label, indeed.

Read More:

deadmau5 will have his own podcast in 2018

deadmau5 stuns in BBC Radio 1 residency finale, confirms ‘new music, new tours, & a new show of some kind’ for 2018

deadmau5 and fans raise $15,000 for Children’s Miracle Network on Twitch stream

 

Spotify acquires cloud based collaborative DAW

This post was originally published on this site

Since its founding in 2006, Spotify has completely transformed the world of music and become a multi-billion dollar enterprise. The innovative music streaming platform has now bought Swedish online  music studio start-up Soundtrap for an undisclosed amount. Since the start of 2016, Spotify has made nine acquisitions and also attempted to purchase Soundcloud before ultimately backing out of negotiations. Now, Spotify has added yet another intriguing element to its ever-growing arsenal.

Soundtrap is a Stockholm-based company with 35 employees, valued at $ 25 million last year. The platform allows users to collaborate in real time by storing projects to the cloud which can then be accessed and edited via a number of supported devices. In a recent blog post from its website, the company touched on the new deal with Spotify and stated that: “The essence of Soundtrap is to give easy-to-use, collaborative, music-making capabilities to anyone with an electronic device and a passion for music. CEO Per Emanuelsson also spoke to Di Digital about the new merger stating: “We’ve captured creative people who don’t like the complexity in normal music software. The simplicity helped the service break through in schools.”

H/T: Resident Advisor

Read More:

New Spotify data shows sharp increase in listening time, artist diversity

Spotify cancels all current video series, goes back to drawing board

Spotify launches emerging artist-oriented RISE program

 

 

New Spotify data shows sharp increase in listening time, artist diversity

This post was originally published on this site

“The pie is getting bigger and there are more slices going around.”

In an announcement by David Erlandsson and Jomar Perezos of Spotify, the company has revealed statistics that show in an increase in hours listened and music diversity.

Average listener hours are up 25 percent, alongside a 37-percent increase in diversity. Erlandsson and Perezos credit editorial and algorithmic playlists are the center of the increase, while critics counter that the data is too general to definitely indicate the average individual listener is listening to a larger pool of artists and more often than years before.

The graphs below show the company’s analytics over the past few years.

spotify-increase-average-listener-diversity
spotify-increase-average-listener-diversity
spotify-increase-average-listener-diversity

 

Read More:

Spotify cancels all current video series, goes back to drawing board

Spotify launches emerging artist-oriented RISE program

Spotify launches app for artists

H/T: Hypebot.com

Explore Destructo’s personal record crate with this new ‘OG Underground’ playlist

This post was originally published on this site

Before Destructo became the king of west coast dance events and G-house’s popular champion, Gary Richards resumé already boasted the legwork that galvanized the 1990’s rave scene, creating and operating his own label, as well as a co-sign from Rick Rubin to lead Def American’s early electronic A&R channel. Richards is effectively a living time capsule of modern underground music’s most formative moments and at the root of his complexion is techno. He’s seen where it’s been from a firsthand perspective, so those looking for a crash course in underground dance history, tune in. Destrcuto has dropped off a new Spotify playlist curated to be a crate digger’s dream.

Stocked with cuts from OG’s including The Chemical Brothers, Daft Punk, Moby, Kraftwerk and The KLF, Destructo offers up a lesson in techno and house history, showing off 30 of his personal favorites. Lords of Acid, who Richards had even signed in a past life, 808 State, and The Prodigy make appearances all well, giving an inside look at the tracks that shaped the industry leading tastemaker Richards has become today. Tune in and take notes.

Read More:

Gary Richards to serve as the President of LiveStyle’s U.S. operations

Destructo debuts two heavy remixes of ‘Renegade’

Spotify cancels all current video series, goes back to drawing board

This post was originally published on this site

Spotify has halted the production of its current original video series, duly cancelling its unreleased shows as the music streaming platform’s foray into video proved ineffective.

Spotify has expended much energy developing an array of original video productions after deeming original video a potential source of un-infringed funds. More than 80% of Spotify’s revenue stream is paid out to record labels and other industry entities, rendering Spotify’s streaming business a particularly costly venture with a comparatively slim payout for the platform itself. Spotify has lead streaming rivals like Apple Music and Google through the existence of its free access tier, an offering subsidized by advertising that accounts for a mere 10% of the platform’s annual revenue.

After reporting fiscal losses for the year of 2016 at approximately $637-million on a revenue of $3.4-billion, Spotify identified original video as a solution to the company’s losses. Whereas the majority of Spotify’s content requires royalties and other licensing costs to be paid in association with use of such content, original video would be license-free. Spotify’s efforts to develop original video series, however, have not been particularly fruitful, as users of the streaming service gravitate towards Spotify’s musical offerings, paying little mind to the platform’s original video innovations.

Despite the video productions’ lukewarm reception, Spotify has actively attempted to build its original video platform, striking licensing deals with networks like Comedy Central and ESPN. Spotify has also explored a documentary style approach to original video, producing series like Spotify Landmark and Flash Frame that air interviews with a variety of artists, including Blink-182 and Green Day.

While Spotify will not abandon its original video pursuits altogether, the platform will increasingly focus on developing video formats “unique” to the platform.

H/T: The Verge

Read More:

Spotify launches emerging artist-oriented RISE program

Spotify launches app for artists

Microsoft to shut down Groove Music, partner with Spotify

The Hot 25: October 27, 2017

This post was originally published on this site

The Hot 25 is the definitive playlist series running through dance music culture and hand­-delivering you the essential tracks of the week. Whether it’s the hottest or quickest trending tracks, brand new music from your favorite artists, or songs from the unknown that should be landing on your radar, Dancing Astronaut brings you 25 carefully selected records that reflect what’s happening in our world.

This week’s playlist comes in strong with radio-ready singles from Marshmello and Kygo. Next, Porter Robinson emerged for the first time since “Shelter” with a side project called Virtual Self and offers up the first song under the moniker, “EON BREAK.” Additionally, Kayzo & Slander team up for a fiery bass-driving collaboration called “Holy,” while the two legends Carl Cox and Nile Rogers provide one of the week’s most unexpected joint efforts with “Beat the Track.”

Finally, for those looking for energetic big room, Dash Berlin, Deorro, and Vigel come forth with main stage heat.

The Heat of the Week: Ghastly – I’ll Wait

While Ghastly has built his brand off 808-pounding bass house and dubstep cuts, the Arizona-bred producer has recently been stepping out into new genre spaces and continues his experimentation with new original “I’ll Wait.” Highly melodic and loaded with grandiose synths, Ghastly shines in his ability to show fans a more emotional side to his sound.

The Breakout Select: Mansionair – Astronaut

The point of The Breakout Select is to showcase one track each week that unexpectedly wows us, and Mansionair earns the honor this week with “Astronaut.” A sublime piece of indie-electronic instrumentation complemented with a pacific vocal topline, the Australian trio even channel some Daft Punk inspiration with a funk-tinged vocoder in the chorus.

Read More:

The Hot 25: September 15, 2017

The Hot 25: September 8, 2017

The Hot 25: September 1, 2017

Spotify launches emerging artist-oriented RISE program

This post was originally published on this site

Spotify has officially launched its new RISE program. 

Created in an effort to “identify and break the next wave of music superstars,” the streaming giant’s latest initiative — launched on October 20 in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. — plans to highlight four select artists every few months with a mixed-media playlist.

Essentially, Spotify will leverage its platform and reach — its current 140 million listeners — in an effort to market new talent they believe should be heard. This will include not only promoting the artists on the platform directly, but including the artists in editorially-programmed playlists, as well as through its out-of-home advertising, TV ads, and digital and social promotions.

RISE debuts with four artists spanning an array of genres: including pop artist Kim Petras, Lauv, country singer Russell Dickerson, and hip-hop artist Trippie Redd. RISE will also curate original video and audio content that will tell the story of 16 artist’s rise to fame each year through “one-of-a-kind experiential events.”

Original audio and video content have yet to really take off on Spotify, despite its various attempts to create specials, series, and podcasts. RISE is the company’s revamped attempt to re-focus on their original content while simultaneously promoting rising acts.

In addition, Spotify has made it clear the service is not going to own the copyrights associated with the artists’ works, nor will it take a cut of RISE artists’ touring and merchandise.

The debut of RISE follows in the footsteps of other artist-focused initiatives from the company as of late, as earlier this month, Spotify launched a mobile app for its artists that delivers real-time streaming data on their new releases, analytics and details about their audience’s demographics, and an artist dashboard.

H/T: Tech Crunch

Read More:

Spotify launches app for artists

Microsoft to shut down Groove Music, partner with Spotify

This minuscule music player provides Spotify streaming sans internet connection

Thanks to Stem, artists no longer have to chase after royalty payments

This post was originally published on this site

The landscape of content creation is ever-evolving. New platforms with a shared goal of content distribution continue to be developed and released — digital edifices of their own kind that market content from musicians and other innovators alike to audiences broad and diverse. Spotify, Apple Music, and SoundCloud, for instance, have revolutionized the accessibility of digital media, and there is perhaps no better time to be a creator than the present.

In spite of the developments made in the neighborhood of content creation, payment allocation had remained a historical issue. The aforementioned platforms often fail to direct payments to their rightful owners between 20-50% of the time, an issue rooted in their uncertainty as to whom to pay. Payment distribution proved an insufferable headache for content creators — until Stem moved in, that is.

Stem, founded in 2015 by Milana Rabkin, Tim Luckow, and Jovin Cronin-Wilesmith, seeks to simplify the payment process for musicians and content creators by ensuring that themselves and their collaborators get paid their fair share in a streamlined, timely manner. The financial platform unifies and manages agreements, distribution, payments, and data, allowing creators to immerse themselves in their work — where their minds should be. Creators are no longer obligated to chase payments or verify their amounts with Stem, which does the work for them.

Boasting the industry’s first Consensus-Based Payments model, the service establishes transparent and consensual royalty splits prior to payout, promoting financial fairness among creators and their collaborators. Stem holds payment until everyone logs in and accepts their split, whereas numerous other creators are engaged in one project.

But its focus is not limited to payment apportionment. The entity provides valuable insight to creators regarding the performance of their content, highlighting the platforms where such content performs best, the site of the creator’s most invested audience, and the most opportune times to release new content. In an increasingly competitive industry, Stem is a cutting-edge resource that propels creators toward their fullest financial potential.

“There is money in streaming, and with Stem, we’re aiming to eliminate the notion of the starving artist by empowering the creative class with the necessary tools and data to succeed in an increasingly competitive industry,” said Stem’s CEO, Milana Rabkin. Stem’s comparatively “well fed” artist clients include Krewella, Win and Woo, and Justin Jay, among other high profile producers and rising professionals.

Rabkin articulates the organizing principle behind her brainchild, asking, “In a world where Venmo exists, why isn’t there a Venmo for Apple and Spotify?” The question materialized in Rabkin’s mind during her time as a digital agent at United Talent Agency in 2015, a time in which YouTube in particular was elevating aspiring creators to a global view. She became attuned to the prevalent issue of payment distribution, as she sought opportunities for the agency’s signed talent to expand its digital reach. Cognizant that an automated, electronic platform did not exist to remediate the issue, Rabkin was determined to engineer a service that could solve the problem while simultaneously working across various content sharing platforms. She would find herself in the thick of Stem’s development a few months later, flanked by co-founders Luckow and Cronin-Wilesmith. It was born in full-fledged functionality shortly after that — primed to distribute to a multitude of content mediums.

A financial platform acutely aware of content creators’ needs, economic or otherwise, Stem emerges as a vanguard in the industry that is shaping the future of payment distribution.

 

Read More:

Richie Hawtin and Pioneer join forces to increase royalties for tracks played in sets

Streaming services and major labels join initiative to streamline royalties

Tidal hires its FOURTH CEO