Lunar Lunes: Vincent and Yetep get on the ‘Same Page,’ Will Clarke and Nick Monaco thrill with new original, Jai Wolf delivers two new tracks + more

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Lunar Lunes: Vincent and Yetep get on the ‘Same Page,’ Will Clarke and Nick Monaco thrill with new original, Jai Wolf delivers two new tracks + moreLunar Lunes E1540831560592

Each week, New Music Friday sweeps through with torrential force, showering streaming platforms with immeasurable amounts of new tunes. Just like Dancing Astronaut rounds up 25 of the biggest songs of the week for the Hot 25 Spotify playlist each New Music Friday, Lunar Lunes serves as a landing pad for SoundCloud users who want a whole new dose of tunes to kick off the work week.

In his latest, Vincent has teamed up with Yetep and Brooke Daye to deliver the lighthearted “Same Page.” Will Clarke and Nick Monaco concoct some techno madness with their new collaboration, “Like A Girl,” on Dirtybird. In a seven-minute Steyoyoke Recordings venture, Rinzen has created “Forms,” an ethereal techno odyssey. Jai Wolf released two tracks from his forthcoming debut album, The Cure To Loneliness, “Lose My Mind” and “Telepathy.” Those who’ve seen a k?d performance can finally enjoy his show edit of “Find Paradise,” which he released via SoundCloud. KUURO have covered Post Malone‘s “Better Now,” and Sam Void‘s released “Feel The Low” on Protocol Recordings. HERO has revealed a “VHS pop” Fool’s Gold EP, containing disco-influenced tracks like “Nightcrawler.” Rainer + Grimm deliver their rendition of R3HAB‘s “Radio Silence,” and Syn Cole puts his spin on Nina Nesbitt’s “Colder.”

The selection is updated every Lunes (Monday).

Rinzen lands on iconic German label Steyoyoke in fine ‘Forms’

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Rinzen lands on iconic German label Steyoyoke in fine ‘Forms’Rinzen Shoot 3 Trona Pinnacles Michael Drummond 0564

One of mau5trap‘s prominent rising stars, Rinzen, has spread his influence across the pond as of late. It began with an emotive “Tragedia” on the UK-based Chapter 24 records. Afterward, he packed his USB crate and traveled alongside deadmau5 on his Euro tour, further solidifying his fanbase overseas. To top off his 2018, he and Evan Casey paired up for the creepingily satisfying “Fractal” on prominent Solée-led imprint Parquet.

This wasn’t the only Berlin card Rinzen had to play; for he’s started his year out on a strong note with a release on none other than the “ethereal techno” institution, Steyoyoke. “Forms” is a piece that feels right at home on the label. It’s rife with eerie and mysterious moog melodies, taking listeners on a journey deep down the rabbit hole that explodes into hellfire at the end. Not to mention, the sound design on “Forms” is on-point; with tight mixing and just the right balance of spaciness and grit. One might even argue it’s one of his finest tracks to date, and that’s a big thing to say considering his entire library is of high caliber.

It’s safe to say that 2019 is looking to be the year of the Rinzen.

#Rinzenrepeat here 

Photo credit: Michael Drummond

Dancing Astronaut’s Top Tracks of 2018

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Dancing Astronaut’s Top Tracks of 2018Skrille 1

Paring down an entire year’s worth of songs is no easy feat.

2018 saw the explosion of songs like ZEDD‘s “The Middle” and Calvin Harris and Dua Lipa‘s “One Kiss,” dominating both the dance music charts and the radio airwaves. Ear-catching tracks like these, along with fan favorites like FISHER‘s persuasive “Losing It” and Anti Up‘s entertaining “Pizza” wiggled their way into festival sets around the world and — love them or hate them — stood out as notable tracks that do their part in immortalizing this whirlwind of a year.

We also saw a creative collective of remixes surface in 2018, including Rinzen‘s compelling take on deadmau5 and Rob Swire‘s hit “Monophobia” and Skrillex‘s intoxicating rendition of Travis Scott‘s “Sicko Mode.” We celebrated the return of Gesaffelstein with “Reset” and welcomed new projects from Diplo in LSD and Silk City. We welcomed collaborations from Ekali, Medasin, and Elohim in “Forever,” Tiësto, Dzeko, Post Malone, and Preme in platinum smash hit “Jackie Chan,” and ZHU and Tame Impala in “My Life.”

Ultimately, though, we’ve narrowed 2018 down to 30 tracks that stole our hearts and smashed streaming records.

Good Morning Mix: Rinzen tears down Printworks London with atmospheric set

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Good Morning Mix: Rinzen tears down Printworks London with atmospheric set46819839 1956783644417385 1481648088010457088 N E1545335800376

Rinzen has had a monumental 2018. From deepening his ties to the mau5trap community with his “Monophobia” remix and Exoplanet EP, to touring some of the UK’s finest underground venues, the LA-based artist has shown serious development. To cap off his year, Rinzen has now shared his set from Printworks London back in November.

Cycling through his own tracks (released and unreleased) and killer cuts from Maceo Plex, Stephan Bodzin, Tale of Us, and more, Rinzen offers up some prime techno that packs both hard-hitting beats and ambient textures. Reflecting on the night, Rinzen notes that Printworks “was hands down the coolest venue [he’s] ever played, and one of [his] favorite set’s [he’s] performed as well.” With one of London’s craziest venues under his belt, we can only expect bigger and better things coming from Rinzen in 2019.

Rinzen and Evan Casey land on Parquet with a magical, ‘Fractal’

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Rinzen and Evan Casey land on Parquet with a magical, ‘Fractal’Rinzen Evan Casey Fractal

It was obvious from his start that Rinzen is primed to lead the next generation of underground greats. He already earned a co-sign from Giorgio Moroder on his very first release, and since being picked up by the mau5trap crew, has been able to spread his musical vision across the states and more recently, Europe. Leaning toward the melodic side of house and techno, it comes as no surprise that leaders in this realm are beginning to recognize the burgeoning talent. Thus, his follow-up to an exploratory, tribal-inspired “Temple” on Chapter 24 records is a signing onto Solée’s iconic imprint, Parquet.

“Fractal” is a combination of Rinzen’s talents, and that of of his friend and colleague Evan Casey, resident of the famed Desert Hearts brand. It comes packaged in shadowy overtones, with sinister melodies and bursts of cunning arpeggios creating a feeling of angst in the listeners. Consistency is clearly the collaborator’s modus operandi in this production; rather than including a larger-than-life drop, “Fractal” drives the floor forward at a steady pace, finding impact in its Recondite-esque minimalism. The record is truly class — a standard we’ve come to expect from anything with Rinzen’s name on it.

 

 

Order a copy of ‘Fractal’ here

Rinzen releases cinematic new single, ‘Temple’

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Rinzen releases cinematic new single, ‘Temple’Rinzen Press Shot 2017 1

Mau5trap veteran and Chapter 24 signee Rinzen is known for pairing his heavy sound with touches of cinematic beauty, from his dark collaboration with Monstergetdown to his indie leaning remix of Kidnap‘s “Skin.” Back with a single for Chapter 24’s new compilation, Rinzen has now released “Temple.”

Pairing with violinist Allesandra Veger, the LA-based producer adds a gentle, analog feel to the track while maintaining a solid groove. An ever-present vocal sample creates a steady pace as engaging melodies work their way into the track, breaking only for a vivid solo on the violin. Building tension as the calm before the storm, the song moves right back into it’s textured soundscape. Reminiscent of artists like Yotto, Rinzen once again shows his finesse for combining big sounds with gentle touches, and he’s only moving forward from there.

deadmau5 announces new mau5trap radio series on SiriusXM

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deadmau5 announces new mau5trap radio series on SiriusXMUnnamed 1

The mau5trap maven himself, Joel Zimmerman (deadmau5), has now vamped his very own weekly radio show, mau5trap radio, through SiriusXM. The first edition aired late last week, September 28, featuring a fitting, hot-button guest mix from Getter, who just recently released his mau5trap-certified concept album, Visceral.

The internationally-aired series is set to feature a sundry of other mau5trap talent, with debuts lined up from the label’s most auspicious acts, including REZZ, ATTLAS, No Mana, Rinzen, and more. The show has found a home on SiriusXM’s BPM (channel 51): a sacred staple in the electronic airwaves. This landmark achievement for Zimmerman and the esteemed imprint comes just one year after mau5trap’s momentous 10-year anniversary.

After a three-day period, each show will be plugged onto Mixcloud, where listeners can stream freely. Additionally, the show will air regularly across the globe, through the following mediums:

Germany – ENERGY NRJ
Turkey – Radyo S – Monday 11pm
Dubai – Dance FM – Tuesday 22:00 PM
Mexico – Beat FM
Cyprus – ENERGY NRJ (Prime time – Saturday agreed).
Bulgaria – Radio Nova (If music & Jingle only)
Thailand – Kiss FM
Russia – DFM – Saturday 23:00 Moscow Time
Sri Lanka – Fox 91.4 12pm Friday (Repeated 11am Friday afternoon, the week after)
Kiss Fm, Australia – Saturday 6.30 – 7.30pm

 

Kidnap’s ‘Skin’ gets a heartwarming remix from Rinzen

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Kidnap’s ‘Skin’ gets a heartwarming remix from RinzenKidnap Skin Rinzen Remi Artwork

“Skin” ushered in a new beginning for Kidnap, who finally felt as though he was stepping into his own as an artist and hitting his stride. He wielded his newfound power in this track, exploring profundity with moving, cinematic arrangement and dual vocalists.

A piece this special from Kidnap seemed primed to inspire others, and that it did. LA-based artist Rinzen was one of those who felt the effects of “Skin,” and was trusted with official remix duties for the tune. What resulted was a piece made for the dancefloor that maintained the emotive integrity of the original.

“I fell in love with Kidnap’s song ‘Skin’ when I first heard it. There was an honesty and fragility to the vocals that immediately had me hooked. I wanted to take that emotion and craft an anthemic club track around it.” – Rinzen

Echoes of “Skin’s” melodic structure remain in place, but are rinsed in the producer’s choice analog synthesizers to give off a Stephan Bodzin-esque effect. Despite a more livened and complex reinvisioning, one thing remains consistent: the vocals take center stage, and carry the sentimental weight of the piece. Rinzen once more demonstrates his keen empathy and respect for the projects he takes on in his “Skin” re-work — not to mention, his own growth in the process.

Rinzen ponders new worlds to help understand & appreciate our own with bewildering interplanetary voyage, ‘Exoplanet’ [EP Review + Interview]

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Exoplanet

Rinzen is traversing through the interplanetary realm at light-speed with his latest conceptual EP Exoplanet.

Rinzen’s undergone a most sudden awakening — seen through his continual creation of compelling sonic narratives — embodying the English translation of his Japanese moniker in the process. With a visceral pursuit of progressive house and compelling techno undulations, Rinzen’s music highlights the creative powers behind storytelling.

The LA-based, Mau5trap-backed artist’s passion is echoed by few in the Earth’s atmosphere. His fascination with expansive worlds began as a young child, with blockbuster fantasy films that have their own sets of laws such as “Lord of the Rings,” “Star Wars,” and even “Harry Potter.” Now, Rinzen’s using his music to manifest his own mythical universes.

“When it came time to launch Rinzen, I spent a long time thinking about what I wanted to do with the project. The more I reflected on it, the more it became clear to me that I wanted to channel that same level of narrative and experiential depth as my favorite authors and filmmakers,” he told us. 

Similar to the stunning hero’s tale conveyed on his Forbidden City EP out late last year, which was Rinzen’s first outright step towards manifesting his artistic style, Exoplanet is too an integration of his love for storytelling and highlighting the world-building potential of music. The aural odyssey of an EP, which derives its name from the Earth-like planets beyond our solar system, voyages deep into the dueling depths of creativity and life’s wonders.

Rinzen contemplates life’s complexities on a universal scale in his newest concept release, out on mau5trap. He forays into mysterious new worlds through musical storytelling, while also diving into the feelings and uncertainties that constitute each individual’s creative universes.

Just as the Earth rotates around the sun, Exoplanet orbits the framework of the revered mythologist Joseph Campbell and his archetypal story pattern, the Hero’s Journey — a central element in ancient myths and modern-day adventures —  outlined in further detail in his book, The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Like Campbell’s timeless three-act structure, “the call to adventure,” “the trial,” and “the return,” Exoplanet implements a structured narrative. It kicks off with a grandiose invitation to the stars, embarks on a cosmic voyage, and ultimately, returns to Earth with a new understanding and appreciation of familiar surroundings.

“I was searching for a theme for the EP and happened to stumble upon an article from NASA detailing our discovery of seven Earth-like planets orbiting a nearby star. I became obsessed by the idea of what it would be like to visit one of these planets for the first time,” he explained, and as such, Exoplanet was born.

Beginning with its title track, which captures this yearning inherent sense of wonder in the creative pursuit through its melody and long pitch bends, Rinzen paints a picture of his exoplanetary vision. Perhaps, if what he imagined were to exist it would be void of vegetation like “Star Wars’” Tatooine, or a burnt-orange desert dystopia like the Las Vegas’ ruins of a Ridley Scott film. Ultimately, the producer’s addition of beguiling nuances transports listeners to wherever they imagine.

Exoplanet is eerily inviting, with its driving melodies and its themes of light vs dark. This emulates deep thought on the unknown itself —  the inexplicable opportunities of the unknown are as equally terrifying as they are riveting and inspiring.

As the voyage continues, a descent into the exoplanet and “Search for Life” begins. Though the track does stand at face value as the collective search for intelligent life in the universe, Rinzen also explains that it can also be interpreted for its double meaning — “each individual’s search for meaning in their own life.”

There’s also some degree of Rinzen’s own “search” on the track. As he continues to flourish and develop artistically in the musical realm, his search for new worlds will present itself outwardly in the form of these conceptual journeys he forges. But, there is still much for him to explore musically and in his own hero’s journey.

Exoplanet is already the natural progression of Rinzen’s growth as an artist, and his refusal to follow trends or be boxed into a particular category. In terms of the textural approach, he’s subconsciously chosen to step away from the orchestral elements of Forbidden City. After having purchased a Moog synthesizer, it was only logical to write his new material directly on the new instrument.

“I do think it’s important however to be able to release a wide array of textures and styles, and so in that sense, I’m glad the EP ultimately took on a different sonic identity than Forbidden City,” he said.

The final installment in the story arc, “The Great Beyond,” reflects on the sheer sense of wonder when considering the universe and the beauty of larger cosmic events, but it also seems to equally explore the feelings that accompany large-scale creative pursuits.

“It was written right after the solar eclipse back in August of last year. I went out to Wyoming and was able to experience the eclipse in totality — which was simply awe-inspiring,” he tells us.

By looking to the stars on Exoplanet, Rinzen captures the blissful wonder that exists at the outer realms of creative pursuits. By leaving the new planet’s development and existing properties open to the interpretation of the listener, despite having admitted that he’s designed his own exoplanet in detail, Rinzen’s letting creativity run wild. Listeners have free range to imagine their own universes — whether it be iterations of Westworld, varieties of Vulcan, or beyond. Finally, he also communicates “that maddening drive within us to create art that is both bold and original.” Surely, it won’t be his last call to inspiration.

Could you give some background story on the inspiration behind each song on Exoplanet? We know you’re very specific about song names, and this seems to read incredibly true on this conceptual voyage in particular.

Yes! So I originally wrote the title track, “Exoplanet,” as an ode to creativity. The melody, with its long pitch bends, was meant to capture that sense of yearning inherent in the creative pursuit — that maddening drive within us to create art that is bold and original. When it came to the EP, I felt it captured a similar sense of yearning in our quest to uncover the answers of the universe.

The second track, “Search for Life,” refers to our collective search for intelligent life in the universe. It can also serve as a double meaning for each individual’s search for meaning in their own life.

Lastly, “The Great Beyond” was written right after the solar eclipse back in August of last year. I went out to Wyoming and was able to experience the eclipse in totality — which was simply awe-inspiring. I named it “The Great Beyond” to reflect that sense of wonder I feel when I think about the sheer size of the universe and the beauty of these larger cosmic events.

When we listen to the EP and consider it conceptually, scenes from the new Blade Runner & all of Tatooine on Star Wars come to mind. We’re wondering if there are there any specific works or experiences that had inspired you in your desire to build worlds, and then more specifically the one surrounding this EP?

Yes definitely. I think growing up in the time of blockbuster fantasy films like Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, even Harry Potter, left an indelible impression on my mind as a kid. The way these movies would create these expansive universes, with their own sets of laws and nuances… I was fascinated by them!

When it came time to launch Rinzen, I spent a long time thinking about what I wanted to do with the project. The more I reflected on it, the more it became clear to me that I wanted to channel that same level of narrative and experiential depth as my favorite authors and filmmakers.

How did the discovery of the exoplanets in February inform this work?

I was searching for a theme for the EP and happened to stumble upon an article from NASA detailing our discovery of seven Earth-like planets orbiting a nearby star. I became obsessed by the idea of what it would be like to visit one of these planets for the first time. I even went as far as designing my own solar system and writing out the physical properties of its planets. I find that level of specificity to be helpful when designing the concept of an EP, even if those specific details are never released.

Do you see your Exoplanet existing as a world out in a nearby solar system, and then the listener exploring what this means, or is this more so surrounding the wonder of an interplanetary voyage and the possibility of an Exoplanet?

Good question. It’s a little of both actually. On a larger sense, the EP is meant to encapsulate our collective sense of wonder at the grand scale of the universe. On a more specific level, it’s meant to capture the feeling of discovering an Earth-like planet in a nearby solar system — one that could potentially be hosting intelligent life.

What’s the evolution of the EP mean to you?

I tend to build my EPs around the framework of Joseph Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey.” It’s basically the idea that there is a universal narrative running through all our myths and stories. It’s the timeless three-act structure of “the call to adventure,” “the trial,” and “the return.”

When it came to Exoplanet, I wanted the progression of the EP to echo this structure . . . to begin with this grandiose invitation to the stars, to then embark on some sort of cosmic voyage, and ultimately return with this new understanding and appreciation of our universe.

The artwork behind each of your works also seems incredibly in sync with the concept. Is this true for Exoplanet?

Yes. I believe the artwork is nearly as important as the music itself. It’s an inherent part of the way we experience music, and I think great artwork can really take a concept or theme to the next level.

With this EP, I was fortunate to work with a talented visual artist named David Gao here in Los Angeles. He shares a similar fascination for otherworldly textures and did a spectacular job capturing the visual theme of the EP.

You dropped the orchestral elements on this EP vs Forbidden City? Was there any specific reasoning as to why? Or was this just what you felt to be the most conducive to a building this specific work?

That’s a very cogent observation! It wasn’t so much a conscious decision as it was a direct result of me purchasing a Moog synthesizer and consequently writing a bunch of songs with it.

I do think it’s important however to be able to release a wide array of textures and styles, and so in that sense, I’m glad the EP ultimately took on a different sonic identity than Forbidden City.

With my new work, however, I’ve found myself fusing these two sides of my production — combining my love of orchestral sound design with my newfound love of analog synths. Stay tuned for that…

EP Artwork Credit: David Gao

Photo Credit: Michael Drummond

 

Rinzen gives a glimpse into his personal crate with release of debut mixtape, ‘The Prologue’

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Rinzen

Deadmau5 has a proven A&R knack for spotting emerging talent, and historically, he’s equipped them to go off and take over their own corners of the ever-growing EDM empire. If the career trajectories of artists like REZZ or Skrillex serve as any indication, then we have another star on our hands with Rinzen.

The LA-based mau5trap recruit, currently riding his breakthrough wave on the recent “Prologue” tour, has now dropped off his debut mixtape of the same name, giving fans a glimpse at his crate of current personal favorites. Rinzen blends tracks from Mind Against, Adriatique, and Jeremy Olander, along with two unreleased original pieces and a handful of additionally sophisticated tech house selects.

So far, the burgeoning beatmaker has delivered exceptionally conceptual projects, and “The Prologue” mixtape is no different. There’s an underlying theme of equal parts trepedation and thrilling excitement that plays across the hour-long mix as it dips into deep house, progressive, and tribal territories. The mix reflects the process by which Rinzen continues to find his footing in this first chapter of his career as he sets out on what’s clearly going to be a momentous journey for the emerging producer.