Minimal Effort’s All Hallow’s Eve lays down noteworthy phase one lineup: Boys Noize, Kill Frenzy, Tim Engelhardt, and more

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Minimal Effort’s All Hallow’s Eve lays down noteworthy phase one lineup: Boys Noize, Kill Frenzy, Tim Engelhardt, and moreBoys Noize Shane Lopes 5

Minimal Effort has announced it will resurrect All Hallow’s Eve this year on October 28 at its newly confirmed venue, New York City’s Belasco Theatre. With a top-notch phase one lineup now underway, including Dirtybird‘s Christian Martin, German techno/house sensation, Tim Engelhardt, Worthy, Boys Noize, and many more, All Hallow’s Eve is poised to be among NYC’s premiere Halloween hotspots.

The 100+ year-old Belasco is the ideal setting for a spooky affair, and an distinguished, antique backdrop for the event’s new installments, such as a live candlelit performance from Rodriguez Jr. in the Mobilee Basement. The venue will be sectioned into several deliciously wicked dance spaces and lounges, each housing a specifically spine-chilling theme. Minimal Effort has exerted anything but their ironic namesake — permeating throughout the North American underground dance scene, booking clandestinely cool acts like, Dusky, Lee Burridge, and Damian Lazarus, to name a few. View the full All Hallow’s Eve lineup below.

Minimal Effort’s All Hallow’s Eve lays down noteworthy phase one lineup: Boys Noize, Kill Frenzy, Tim Engelhardt, and moreMinimal Effort Halloween 2018 Lineup

 

Dancing Astro tours Disco Fries’ favorite NYC eateries

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“What’s more reckless than eating a half a pound of pastrami in the middle of the day?”

Find out as DA teams up with funk masters Disco Fries on a journey through New York City. The hilarious duo take us to some of their favorite spots in The Big Apple, including Third Rail Coffee, Vinny Vincenz Pizza, Double Down Saloon, and more — all while talking about their EP, DF.

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Eminem, Jack White, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and Travis Scott top Governor’s Ball 2018 lineup

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New York’s Governor’s Ball Music Festival will commemorate its eighth edition with a diverse lineup headed by Eminem, Jack White, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and Travis Scott. The festival returns to its Randall’s Island stomping grounds June 1–3, characteristically representing a myriad of different musical genres, ranging from rock to reggae. The expansive 2018 lineup also enlists Third Eye Blind, Damian ‘Jr. Gong’ Marley, Post Malone, Halsey, KhalidLil Uzi Vert, and more to perform at the three-day affair.

Governor's Ball 2018

Plunging beyond mere variation, Governor’s Ball will additionally feature special performances from Diplo and Mark Ronson, the duo slated to debut their new joint project, Silk City, at the festival. The crowd assembled at Randall’s Island can also expect N.E.R.D. to make their return to the New York City performance circuit — the hip hop and rock hybrid band’s Gov Ball booking will be the group’s first performance in the Big Apple since 2010.

Three-day GA and VIP passes to the festival are currently available for purchase at a discounted “announce day” price. Tickets to Governor’s Ball will return to their regular price tiers at midnight on January 4. Those interested in attending Governor’s Ball’s eighth iteration can purchase the specially priced passes here.

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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio to sign bill repealing the Cabaret Law today

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91 years later, New York City dance floors have been liberated.

November 27, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio will sign the bill that will repeal the city’s Cabaret Law, instituted in 1926.

An archaic remnant of a previous, more restrictive era, the Cabaret Law made it illegal for New York City public spaces to host “musical entertainment, singing, dancing or other forms of amusement” without a cabaret license. Performers and employees of cabarets alike were fingerprinted and forced to carry “cabaret cards” as proof of their licensure under the law from 1940 to 1967. The city reserved the ability to refuse the grant of such a license to applicants with police records, creating limitations for performers like Billie Holiday and Ray Charles. Holiday and Charles were both unable to book a club date for several years due to their respective narcotics records. Frank Sinatra notably avoided the New York City performance platform for several years, refusing to complete the fingerprinting that would serve as the prerequisite for the cabaret license.

The Cabaret Law has long fettered New York City’s nightlife arenas, despite the city’s claim to be a “nightlife capital.” Only 97 out of approximately 25,000 eating and drinking establishments currently hold a cabaret license, the sparseness of the licenses duly the product of the license’s expense, and venues’ limited eligibility. Only those businesses placed in areas zoned for commercial manufacturing are able to obtain a license. Yet even if a business is able to apply for a license based on its geographical position, acquiring the license can be a time consuming venture, as approval of the license for the given establishment must be submitted by numerous agencies.

While many public and political figures have campaigned to repeal the Cabaret Law, it is Rafael Espinal’s bill that de Blasio will sign into effect today. A Brooklyn councilman and advocate for New York City nightlife, Espinal has also passed a bill to create a New York based nightlife office that will serve as a point of contact for the city’s government and owners of nightlife establishments.

“For almost a century, the Cabaret Law has targeted specific groups, kept businesses and performers in fear, and stifled the expression of NYC’s vital culture. I am proud to champion this historic repeal, which will support our nightlife businesses while maintaining the much-needed safety measures we already have in place,” Espinal says of the groundbreaking stride towards a freer New York City nightlife network. New Yorkers can accordingly be expected to get ‘footloose’ this weekend in celebration of the momentous victory for the metropolitan nightlife scene.

H/T: Resident Advisor

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91 years later, New York City looks to abolish its Cabaret Law

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If all goes according to plan, New York City venues will no longer be subject to the Cabaret Law.

A bill that seeks to repeal the Cabaret Law, established 91 years ago in 1926, will be presented to the City Council on Tuesday by Rafael Espinal, a councilman from Brooklyn. Made possible only through the passing of Espinal’s new bill, the corresponding repeal of the Cabaret Law requires a total of 26 votes, but Espinal has already declared that he has the necessary number of votes needed to pass the new bill. “It’s over,” Espinal has said of the Cabaret Law.

An archaic remnant of a previous, more restrictive era, the Cabaret Law made it illegal for New York City public spaces to host “musical entertainment, singing, dancing or other forms of amusement” without a cabaret license. Performers and employees of cabarets alike were fingerprinted and forced to carry “cabaret cards” as proof of their licensure under the law from 1940 to 1967. The city reserved the ability to refuse the grant of such a license to applicants with police records, creating limitations for performers like Billie Holiday and Ray Charles. Holiday and Charles were both unable to book a club date for several years due to their respective narcotics records. Frank Sinatra notably avoided the New York City performance platform for several years, refusing to complete the fingerprinting that would serve as the prerequisite for the cabaret license.

The Cabaret Law has continued to fetter New York City’s nightlife arenas, despite the city’s claim to be a “nightlife capital.” Only 97 out of approximately 25,000 eating and drinking establishments currently hold a cabaret license, the sparseness of the licenses duly the product of the license’s expense, and venues’ limited eligibility. Only those businesses placed in areas zoned for commercial manufacturing are able to obtain a license. Yet even if a business is able to apply for a license based on its geographical position, acquiring the license can be a time consuming venture, as approval of the license for the given establishment must be submitted by numerous agencies.

While the law has not been enforced with the ardency that it had been prior to the Guiliani administration, the Cabaret Law has witnessed several failed attempts to repeal the law. Despite the Guiliani administration’s comparatively relaxed reception of the law, the Cabaret Law continues to be a point of concern for bar and club owners, who will continue to “[live] in fear,” so long as the law remains in place, as Espinal notes. If caught in violation with the Cabaret Law, owners can face large fines or complete closure.

Espinal emphasizes that the Cabaret Law is responsible not only for the installation of such fear in bar and club owners, but also for the increase in the popularity of underground or warehouse based dance spaces. Espinal views the restrictions imposed by the Cabaret Law as the catalysts for dancers’ departure from “safe, regulated spaces” into potentially unregulated or less regulated areas. “When we stop people from dancing, they go straight to these warehouses,” Mr. Barclay has stated, referencing Oakland, California’s Ghost Ship warehouse fire that would claim the lives of 36 people. “People haven’t stopped dancing,” Barclay continued, “they’re just dancing in these extremely unsafe, unregulated environments.”

The former director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, Norman Siegel has applauded Espinal’s drive to strike down the near century-old law. “Halleujah to that, it [the law] was used periodically to be very repressive on free expression.” Siegel is memorable for his effort to dethrone the Cabaret Law about a decade ago, on the grounds that the law violated dancers’ First Amendment rights.

If Espinal is successful in collecting the 26 votes needed to pass the new bill that will accordingly rescind the Cabaret Law, the context of New York City’s dance culture will be forever altered, the city receiving another opportunity to shed a law it outgrew long ago.

H/T: The New York Times

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Troyboi opens up about his debut album Left Is Right playing Webster Hall and his musical inspirations

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UK native Troyboi was often labeled as a trap artist back when he first broke into the scene. As his hard-hitting, bass-heavy beats crossed the Atlantic and spread throughout the American underground, it quickly became obvious that the exploding talent could not be pigeon-holed so easily. Troyboi has amassed a global following of fans who have fallen in love with his unique brand of music appropriately known as “mystyle,” which draws inspiration from a variety of genres and sounds.

Earlier this month, Troyboi came back to New York City and brought his ultra-stacked Left Is Right tour to Brooklyn Steel. The dynamic event and the lineup that came with it brought the same incredible energy and immersive atmosphere that propelled the bass explorer to super-stardom. He sat down with Dancing Astronaut ahead of his show for an interview about his musical inspirations, his hometown of London and creating a multi-sensory experience for his fans to dive into.

Welcome back to New York! How many times have you performed here now?

It’s a pleasure as always to be in New York — thank you for having me. I came to New York twice actually once in 2015 for my first ever show. Then, I came back last year when I did the Mantra tour, which was my first all-original set that I played that at Webster Hall.

RIP to Webster Hall!

I know! Absolutely legendary venue. I’m so glad I got to play it and manage to sell it out, which is just amazing. Being able to come back again, and to a venue like Brooklyn Steel, is next level. We’ve got a bigger show planned as well, so it’s actually perfect.

It’s quite interesting that the last time you were here, you performed at one of the oldest venues in the city. Now, you’re at a brand new spot in Brooklyn steel. What’s that like for you?

For me, I like to be a pioneer in my own right. Even though this venue is brand-new, I’m happy to be here and christen it in my own way. It’s still history regardless of whether you’re at the beginning or the end, at the end of the day we’re still making history no matter where we go. It’s amazing to be here and to create my own history in this building.

Awesome! On an unrelated topic, we’re curious about your feelings on New York as a city vs your hometown of London. Do you feel like there are any similarities between New York and where you are originally from?

Completely —  I was literally just having a conversation with my friend, who’s also here from London, about the exact same thing. Every time we come to New York I feel like I’m at home. It’s so diverse, and I love the “rough around the edges vibe” to New York because London is very much that way as well.  Life isn’t always so pretty, and even though both cities are beautiful, at the same time they truly capture the realness of life. You know what I mean? The people and the fact that it’s completely multi-cultural means there are a lot of quirky places to find. It’s very like London to in that way.

Keeping with that theme, what is it like when you come to perform in the states or in North America as opposed to in London and Europe?

There is definitely a huge difference because in my opinion in Europe the alternative music, especially the type of music that I make, there is a scene for it. However, it’s not as prominent there as it is in the States. I feel like the States are a bit more open-minded, whenever I come here it’s truly crazy even though in Europe is also wild, but in a different way and not really to the same degree. In America/New York, it seems like the crowd gets it more…

In your new album Left Is Right, you’re able to fit so many different sonic textures and genres together. How are you able to do it so seamlessly?

It’s very hard to explain but I just do. Whenever I make music I’m just inspired to make good music that people can relate to. I always start off with my drums because that’s my favorite part to build on, and the rest all comes naturally. Melodies and ideas just start to pop into my head. But as the great mentor Michael Jackson always says, never concentrate on the music and let it write itself. When I heard that ideology at a young age, that just stuck with me. I always felt like that I could relate to those words.

You always describe your music as “mystyle.” It seems electronic in general is moving away from concrete genres. Do you feel like this move away from genre categorization is better overall?

I do think it is good for electronic music because it allows people to grow and be more daring. It’s really going to highlight a lot of the people who are one-trick ponies, you know what I mean? I’m very happy and blessed to do what I want because for me, music is my expression. If someone told me I couldn’t make a certain type of beat I’d say, “what?” So for me being able to explore different types of music different types of genres, it’s key for any type of growth individually and for the scene..

Your album has a lot of features on it, from Ice Cube, to Icekream. In your opinion, what makes the perfect collaborator?

The most important thing is the music. I’ve got to be able to catch a vibe but also connect with the people too. Everyone I have done a collaboration with, apart from Ice Cube, I’ve met face-to-face. Especially with my boy Icekream — we are best friends,  so the chemistry is so important. You need to be able to connect with the person as well as connect on a musical level.

What advice would you give to a young producer just starting out?

Be comfortable and confident in your music. When you do start creating and start putting it out, make sure that you’re comfortable and confident with whatever you’re doing. Own it and don’t be afraid to experiment —
everything that I’ve produced, I’ve wanted to do it. Whether it is experimental or not, I’m so proud to share it with everyone. Keep pushing keep putting out your music and eventually if you are taking it seriously the right person will hear it and that can take you to the next level. Everything will fall into place, but you have to work extremely hard and be honest in your music.

 Finally what can people expect when they come to see you on tour?

First of all you are going to see an all-original set, with 100% original music this is for the fans. I want people to come out and see the Boi and not just hear the music but see it and feel it too. This tour especially isn’t just a regular show — it’s an experience and a journey it’s a celebration of my music, and it’s a way for people to see the music as well as hear it.Overall, I want to give people an experience they never had before via my own music.

 

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TROYBOI, YEHME2, LOUIS FUTON, and SLUMBERJACK at Brooklyn Steel (NYC)- Photos by Max Hontz

TroyBoi releases extraordinarily versatile 20-track debut album, “Left Is Right

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Meet the group featured in The Chainsmokers’ Tommy Hilfiger campaign

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Though the Midnight Kids are a new act, they’ve been propelled into the spotlight with an incredible, nostalgia-inducing remix for The Chainsmokers that’s been featured in taxi cabs all across New York City.

The anonymous Midnight Kids project started just this year, and they’ve released official remixes for Lost Kings, A R I Z O N A, and Robotaki and Manila Killa. With the intention of bringing about a sense of nostalgia while surfacing a fresh sound, Midnight Kids have built a loyal fan base that anticipates each new release. Their innovative remixes draw inspiration from the 1980s, with a modern touch that resonates with today’s dance music fans.

Midnight Kids’ remix of “Young” is featured in The Chainsmokers’ Tommy Hilfiger campaign, which can be heard in taxi cabs across NYC, along with advertisements on Snapchat. They shared some thoughts with Dancing Astronaut on this milestone and what we can expect from them in the future.

How does it to have your song played for cab riders all across NYC?

Hearing that The Chainsmokers remix ended up in every NYC taxi is probably one of the craziest things that ever could have happened. The amount of attention that the Midnight Kids project has gotten over the past few months has completely surpassed expectations. It’s really exciting to see that people are latching onto it.

What do you want your music to inspire in listener?

The music is really nostalgic to the 80s, and we feel that there is a place for heavily 80s inspired electronic music in today’s industry and pop culture. The main goal of the Midnight Kids project is to create that sense of nostalgia in everyone that listens to the music, as well as bring a fresh sound to today’s electronic music scene. We want our music to be the music people play when they hang out with friends, go on night drives, and seek out adventure. It’s all about creating memories that last a lifetime.

What can fans expect from you next?

What’s next for Midnight Kids is a lot of new remixes, one of which will be coming out early next month. People can expect to hear original Midnight Kids tracks in 2018, a year that will be even bigger than this one. So much exciting stuff is in the works, and we can’t wait to watch it unfold with all of you.

 

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New York’s iconic Webster Hall set to close next month

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It is truly the end of an era in New York’s rich dance music history as Webster Hall has announced it will close its doors on August 5. The iconic club is set to be demolished, renovated, and eventually reopened after an indeterminate closure. The announcement of the legendary Manhattan venue’s shuttering comes just a few months after news broke that AEG and Brooklyn Sports Entertainment, the company that manages Barclay’s Arena, had assumed ownership of Webster Hall from former principal owner Lon Ballinger.

Webster Hall has a storied history of hosting some of the most celebrated recording artists of all time, from Frank Sinatra to Ray Charles, Prince to Eric Clapton. In recent years, Webster Hall became a landmark for New York’s flourishing electronic music scene, putting on some of the city’s most coveted dance shows. According to documents filed with the Manhattan Community Board, Webster Hall will reopen sometime between 2019 and 2020 as a new sports and entertainment venue, Spectrum Hall.

The club’s Director of Operations, Gerard McNamee Jr., expounded on the announcement via social media, detailing AEG’s plans to renovate the venue. Read the full statement below.

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