Lunar Lunes: Golf Clap remix BROODS, Chime takes on Super Smash Bros, Volac return to Night Bass + more

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Lunar Lunes: Golf Clap remix BROODS, Chime takes on Super Smash Bros, Volac return to Night Bass + moreGolf Clap Press Photo

Each week, New Music Friday sweeps through with torrential force, showering streaming platforms with immeasurable amounts of new tunes. Just like Dancing Astronaut rounds up 25 of the biggest songs of the week for the Hot 25 Spotify playlist each New Music Friday, Lunar Lunes serves as a landing pad for SoundCloud users who want a whole new dose of tunes to kick off the work week.

In this week’s installment, Golf Clap put a groovy spin on BROODS‘ “Peach.” Nicky Romero re-imagines Martin Garrix‘s “Dreamer” with Mike Yung as a melody-centric big room track, and Moscow duo Volac return to AC Slater‘s Night Bass with their Funky EP. Chime holds nothing back on an creative dubstep remake of the Super Smash Bros Ultimate “Main Theme / Lifelight.” Prince Fox continues his string of remixes with a take on Travis Scott‘s chart-topping “Sicko Mode,” and QUIX puts his own spin on GASHI‘s “Creep On Me.” KUURO deliver a formidable Monstercat release, “What U Wanna Do” with Spencer Ludwig, and Alvin Risk reveals his latest as HA with Hodgy, “O.P.E.N.” Culture Code and Rabinik tug at the heartstrings with “Love Somebody,” and Trivecta pounds out a powerful trance beat on his remix of Myon and Late Night Alumni‘s “Hearts & Silence.”

The selection is updated every Lunes (Monday).

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 68

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 68Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


It’s been more than two years since StayLoose released his twinkling original, “Let Go,” with Andrew Paley. Today, he blesses fans with an extended vocal cut of the original track, noting that Paley “added some additional vocals to this one to make it extra special.” The inclusion of addition vocals makes this new version particularly dynamic, as Paley’s emotive voice bounces off StayLoose’s timeless future bass stylings.

Laszlo‘s time on Monstercat dates back more than four years, and in that time, he’s delivered a multitude of innovative originals, many playing off an outer space theme. He’s now revealed a full LP on the Canadian label: Liftoff. Laszlo has been building to this 10-track collection for years, with songs like “Airglow” and “Sphere” dating back to 2016. The versatile album sees Laszlo flex a full range of production talents, from drum & bass to trap and everything in between. I instantly gravitated toward “Rendezvous,” a gorgeous piece of work that takes off quietly and builds into a feel-good drum & bass track with a beautiful melody.

SevenDoors makes a bold reappearance on the mau5trap roster with his latest offering, Rising Sun. The EP’s latter half, “Spirit,” is an intricate, seven-minute piece of work that showcases the minimalist techno style he’s been debuting on the label in past releases. “Spirit” is a pensive piece, highlighted by the haunting chants of solemn choirs woven in between its dark, pulsating beat. A variety of airy synth melodies float in and out as well, setting a tranquil tone for the song surrounding them.

Following a mellow remix of TS Graye‘s “Take Notes” in September, Philly’s Instupendo is back with a new rework. This time, he’s taken on sakehands’ “GOODBYE FOREVER.” This rendition is more subdued than the original’s pop-leaning elements, as Instupendo walks the remix along with elements of percussion sakehands’ version lacked. Subtle bass and an easygoing beat make this take on “GOODBYE FOREVER” a fresh listening experience and open it up to the world of dance music a bit more.

“Darkness comes before the dawn,” red. teases to introduce his new original, “Dispatch.” While the minute-long introduction appears to lead into a bright, sunny soundscape, the artist proves to have deceived his listeners by quickly dipping into a deep, resounding bass pattern. While red. appears to have delved into a dark soundscape, he continuously leads listeners back up into the light by introducing glowing melodies. “Dispatch” is a true journey of a song and exudes a vibrantly colored aura from start to finish.

China’s Electric Jungle festival co-founder, Boyi Zhou, talks dance music culture, obstacles, and the wild time yet to come [Q&A]

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China’s Electric Jungle festival co-founder, Boyi Zhou, talks dance music culture, obstacles, and the wild time yet to come [Q&A]9 1 1

For the past few years, Boyi Zhou and his Jungle Events team have been toiling away, trying to carve out a vivacious, unfettered space in the Chinese event circuit for electronic dance music. While Zhou, the event brand’s marketing manager, and his team have tried to emulate a lot of the underground dance music culture they were indoctrinated into while studying abroad in LA, there is much about their nook of the EDM continuum that is inherently Chinese.

This month (Dec 8-9), Zhou and the Jungle Events team will return with another installment of what is now the largest dance music festival in all of China, Electric Jungle, projected to attract over 60,000 attendees. The team is combining its Goliath headliners, Skrillex and Martin Garrix, with a sundry of international, nuanced talent, like REZZ, Drezo, TroyBoi, and Illenium–just to name a few.

Like many electronic fests in the US, the Foshan Chuanlord Tourism & Leisure EXPO resort-residing Electric Jungle will be broken off into meticulously curated stages, including a Berlin-nightclub-themed techno stage, a bass stage, which will receive a one-day Monstercat makeover, and of course, a main stage. Zhou says, that while the nature of the festival may be unorthodox, especially within its respective culture, organizers want to preserve authentic Chinese tradition while on their home turf, wielding ancient Chinese monsters as a motif throughout festival grounds.

Also quite like in the US, festival organizers must fiercely delegate with local authorities to gain the privileges necessary for throwing an event of this scale–though, for Zhou and co., this is a much weightier burden. Standing on the precipice of, what is for the Chinese, still such an underground culture, the local government still doesn’t fully fathom Jungle Events and their counterparts’ intentions; though, Zhou says, that’s beginning to change. Zhou sat down with Dancing Astronaut to talk about not only how he’s mediating these profound obstacles, but also his initial infatuation with the LA “rave” scene, launching one of the first Chinese-language dance music blogs, and his observations of the Chinese electronic festival circuit at large.

Tickets to Electric Jungle as well as additional festival info can be found here.

How did the idea for the festival come about?

I was attending college in the US living in LA for six years and I went to a lot of raves. So I started a blog, Jungle EDM, one of the first all-Chinese electronic music blogs. Soon I had over 10,000 followers. Back then there were no blogs about electronic dance music in China. And there were no Chinese materials for translation. So I was the first one to translate all of the English dance music materials to Chinese. When I graduated, I came back to China and started my own festivals.

Can you compare the underground dance music scene you were indoctrinated into in LA to that of China?

I wouldn’t say it’s the same at all, but it’s growing really fast. In America basically, dance culture is the pop culture. But in China it’s a sub-genre or subculture of all other music genres.

Who are some of the biggest influencers in growing China’s dance music scene?

I would say the newer festivals, and the nightclubs. The nightclubs are doing really well. They’re hosting a lot of foreign artists bringing the culture to China.

Tell me about your Jungle team?

So the original founders are all from California. We all went to the same school. We met there. We all went to the community college first in Santa Monica and we transferred to different schools, but when we all came back to China, we decided to make the festival.

What do you predict your greatest challenge to be in executing a successful Electric Jungle this year?

Probably getting certain permits. It’s really strict in China. You can not go ’til after 10 pm, the curfew time. And the production is limited. You can not use certain effects like fireworks, or any variation of fire. Also, the audience capacity limits are very strict.

How are you guys working to mediate those issues?

Well, when we first came here to do this in China, the government didn’t really understand us. It’s getting better now. We are taking special precautions and working with the government to try to clear up the discord. They are trying to work with us and are working on giving us a little more room, so that we can ensure the production and safety are up to our standards.

Can you tell me about what your intentions were with lineup curation?

A lot of them fit the marketing needs. We selected a lot of the artists from the data analysis, from the stream players. In addition to them and the artists the founders selected for personal preference, there is also a lot of local talent. We are trying very hard to promote them. Those artists have a great advantage with the local demographic because of the language. A lot of the local artists are using Chinese language to make their songs, and they have their own fans.

Can you tell me about the theme and location of the festival?

It’s right next to Guangzhou. It’s the center of the Guangdong area: just one province in China. The benefits would be that it’s not the biggest city, so the restrictions are less. It’s close to the two biggest cities in China. Transportation and hospitality are a disadvantage, less hotels and trains, etc. It’s a small city to us, but would be relatively big in the US. I would say it’s something like Seattle. The festival will be held at a resort, complete with a theme park, mini zoo, and a hotel with a restaurant. We’re doing the festival in the parking, given its considerable size.

*This interview has been edited for clarity and readability.

Sunday Morning Medicine Vol 155 with Sylvan Esso, Chet Faker, Liquid Stranger, + more

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Sunday Morning Medicine Vol 155 with Sylvan Esso, Chet Faker, Liquid Stranger, + moreSMM 2400

Even NPR was able to “get up / get down” with Sylvan Esso‘s 2014 indie sensation, “Coffee,” featuring the track on their Songs We Love list that June; now, four years later, it’s topping DA’s Sunday Morning Medicine chart. The mellifluous melding of Amelia Meath’s Norah Jones-esque, light Soprano intonations with Nick Sanborn’s twinkling xylophone and bell chimes is the ideal backdrop for a comfy-cozy Sunday spent reading or wiggling one’s toes under the covers.

While Nick Murphy may have laid his Chet Faker alias to rest a few years back, his lengthy catalog of soulful downtempo and trip-hop remains. Let the long-winded, jazzy saxophone and languid vocal harmonies executed by Murphy himself on “Talk Is Cheap,” carry you to distant domains, away from workday woes.

Longtime Monstercat maven, Mr FijiWiji has since toned down his formerly fervent style, a departure exemplified on his most recent album, Lost Lost Lost, from which “Reality Is More Beautiful” arrives. While the song may tout arrestingly plaintive piano chords and somber strings, likely mirroring your end-of-weekend sentiments, the lyrics, embodied in the track’s title, introduce the promise of a halcyon love capable of brightening the dreariest quotidian weekdays.

It’s no difficult feat to fall sweet victim the ambient allure of a Liquid Stranger production. Pour a cup of cocoa in your favorite cat-themed mug and just “Dissolve.”

Madeaux flexed his profound sonic range and narrative predilection this year with his LIMBO EP, the vessel through which he dropped off “HIGHER.” A blissful exodus from his shadowy subterfuge, the track, with its rectifying progression and lush instrumentals, emulates eclipsing emotional mountain peaks—quite apropos for combatting those nagging Sunday scaries.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 67

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 67Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


Electronic music’s favorite bickering best friends are at it again. After teaming up for a powerful remix of Knife Party‘s “Sleaze” last month, contending colleagues No Mana and i_o have returned for a collaborative original, “Bad Things.” They’ve enlisted vocalist Fay to give their bass-pounding venture an even more sultry vibe and unleashed it to the world via mau5trap. In the track, they’ve managed to blend a variety of genres, making “Bad Things” pleasing to fans of techno, house, trance, and everything in between.

With Skrillex now releasing music on a more regular basis, his latest endeavors are, of course, being remixed into the ground. His mega-collab with JOYRYDE, “AGEN WIDA,” has been flipped, revamped and recycled countless times since its release in late October. One of the latest to take on the fiery track is FREAK ON, a Venice Beach producer whose catalog only contains this track and one other (a remix of Spice Girls). This intense tech house rework of “AGEN WIDA” provides an awesome new perspective on the track, leaning into its house elements for a groovy rendition.

After sitting on the track for a while, Monstercat‘s Grant found that “Castaway” made for a perfect addition to the label’s reoccurring partnership with video game phenomenon Rocket League. “It’s a song about starting over, and the desire to escape from your current life or whatever it is that’s holding you back,” he says of the track. He enlisted vocalist Jessi Mason as a complement to the serene, easygoing soundscape he’d created and built a song that’s simultaneously complex and smooth.

graves can do no wrong. Just weeks after contributing a massive rendition of “If Only You Knew” to What So Not‘s Not All The Beautiful Things Remixes album, he’s back with a new original piece of work. Tapping the talents of singer EZI, graves uses her breezy vocals to set the tone for the meticulously produced pop/trap synthesis he’s created. His versatile ways of production shine no matter what he’s making, and it’s such a refreshing thing to witness and hear.

“i was lost but i was amazed at what i had discovered,” reads dull machine’s description of “the beauty in the hatred.” I, too, am amazed at what I’ve discovered in this track. This carefully designed song ascends with a minute-long introduction, its delicate melody building up to a theme of full-bodied instrumentation and crashing percussion. There’s a unique, endearing quality here — one that’s hard to put a finger on. Fans of Porter Robinson: pay attention.

SLANDER deliver their final track from ‘Headbangers Ball’ EP

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SLANDER deliver their final track from ‘Headbangers Ball’ EPSLANDER C Koury Angelo Min

SLANDER have delivered the final track from their Headbangers Ball EP: “Hate Being Alone,” featuring Dylan Matthew, on Monstercat. This marks the duo’s third collaboration with the R&B vocalist, having previously worked with him on “Without You” with Kayzo and “First Time” with Seven Lions and Dabin. The “heaven trap” maestros up the contrast ante, combining Matthew’s sultry vocals amidst glittering guitar melodies with hard-hitting, headbanging bass.

“This song started as a drop we made last February,” the duo says of the track. “Since then, we shelved the project for a bit to finish a few more urgent works in progress, but finishing the song was always on our mind. Then this fall we finally got the missing piece: Dylan Matthew’s incredible vocal line! This vocal took the track into a completely different place and we were thrilled that it was given this new life. We went in and re-arranged and re-structured the entire song to fit his vocal and we couldn’t be happier with the result. This is our first solo original dubstep song and we are so excited to finally give to you guys! We hope you enjoy this final piece to the Headbangers Ball EP!”

The EP culminates with stark contrasts of light and heavy, hot and cold, life and death, etc. Each track places fluffy vocals and lush melodies at the helm of harder-hitting electronic elements, from dubstep and future bass, with featured artists such as Spag Heddy and Elle Vee on “Running To You” and RIOT on “You Don’t Even Know Me.”

After launching their Gud Vibrations label with frequent collaborator, NGHTMRE, the duo continues to pump out their own projects while supporting up-and-coming artists such as WAVEDASH and QUEST.

Photo credit: Koury Angelo

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 66

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 66Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


How many flips of ZHU‘s “Faded” is too many? The limit does not exist! I’m always intrigued to hear new takes on this monumental 2016 release. Tiny Elephant gathers momentum quickly in the introduction he’s built, leading up to a dramatic bass drop in the chorus. He’s filtered the original’s vocals in the chorus in a unique way, bolstering the song’s backbone with a pounding house beat. This sensational remix is perfect for those who can’t get enough of the original, as it maintain’s ZHU’s ever-present dark atmosphere.

In his most recent effort, josh pan teams up with AWAY for an eerily melancholy OWSLA release, “Mask.” This trapped-out bass collaboration is highlighted by pan’s sinister vocals, which are ushered in by a plinking piano introduction. The duo hold nothing back in this release, creating a jarring environment that yanks the listener back and forth between more traditional trap elements and stuttered, unpredictable vocal and beat chops.

After making his Monstercat debut earlier this summer, CloudNone has quickly proven himself to be a valuable asset to the Canadian label. His chilled-out take on modern electronic music is perfect for the winter months and is filled with lush soundscapes and subdued vocals. CloudNone has expertly captured the wistful sounds of the season with the union of instrumentals and minimalist percussion. The song is out now as a part of Monstercat’s latest Rocket League compilation.

A.M.R.’s Silver Lining EP kicks off with a gorgeous intro mix of the collection’s title track. This six-and-a-half-minute venture is built around a subtle house beat, but A.M.R.’s introduction of elements like piano and children singing tucks the bass into the background and allows for the melody to shine through. Strings, too, many an appearance, elevating the “Silver Lining” intro mix to a whole new level.

As we settle into colder months, songs like Steve Brian‘s latest are perfect for brightening up a dreary winter day. “Playa de Santiago,” out as part of Enhanced Chill Vol. 5, brings blissful beats and a cheery piano melody that’ll light up any room. Brian has painted a vivid soundscape of rich, resounding synths, layered to perfection. The breaks and variation in percussion keep this song alive throughout its seven-minute entirety.

Infected Mushroom and Bliss make psychedelic fireworks on new single, ‘Bliss on Mushrooms’

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Infected Mushroom and Bliss make psychedelic fireworks on new single, ‘Bliss on Mushrooms’Infected Mushrooms Bliss On Mushrooms

Infected Mushroom and Bliss collaborating on a track titled “Bliss on Mushrooms” feels like it was destined to happen – but the tough part was always going to be creating something worthy of the song’s name. The two artists absolutely own the challenge with a nine-and-a-half minute epic arriving via Monstercat.

Infected Mushroom is a duo that shreds the expected at every turn, and across multiple movements the LA-based duo does just that. The first two minutes are a trip all on their own, treating listeners to a shuffling and jazzy drum beat, a trumpet solo, and Queen-style vocal adlibs all before its first drop. Head-nodding is practically required as a wild new off-kilter section approaches where the artists toss everything from rock guitar riffs to sliding glitch samples in the mix as the experiment morphs. Multiple breakdowns take the shape of brain-bending tempo changes, blast beat builds, while the drops frame the psychedelic cacophony in driving drums. Infected Mushroom tells Dancing Astronaut about the track’s significance, and its role on the duo’s upcoming EP:

“‘Bliss on Mushrooms’ is a massive psy-trance dance floor track from the album Head of NASA with one of our favorite trance producer Bliss, and some killer guitar riffs from Japanese super star MIYAVI. It takes you on a very psychedelic journey into what Bliss and ourselves call a “dance floor killer.” This track opens the album and sets the tone of the whole EP.”

Infected Mushroom and Bliss make psychedelic fireworks on new single, ‘Bliss on Mushrooms’

This post was originally published on this site

Infected Mushroom and Bliss make psychedelic fireworks on new single, ‘Bliss on Mushrooms’Infected Mushrooms Bliss On Mushrooms

Infected Mushroom and Bliss collaborating on a track titled “Bliss on Mushrooms” feels like it was destined to happen – but the tough part was always going to be creating something worthy of the song’s name. The two artists absolutely own the challenge with a nine-and-a-half minute epic arriving via Monstercat.

Infected Mushroom is a duo that shreds the expected at every turn, and across multiple movements the LA-based duo does just that. The first two minutes are a trip all on their own, treating listeners to a shuffling and jazzy drum beat, a trumpet solo, and Queen-style vocal adlibs all before its first drop. Head-nodding is practically required as a wild new off-kilter section approaches where the artists toss everything from rock guitar riffs to sliding glitch samples in the mix as the experiment morphs. Multiple breakdowns take the shape of brain-bending tempo changes, blast beat builds, while the drops frame the psychedelic cacophony in driving drums. Infected Mushroom tells Dancing Astronaut about the track’s significance, and its role on the duo’s upcoming EP:

“‘Bliss on Mushrooms’ is a massive psy-trance dance floor track from the album Head of NASA with one of our favorite trance producer Bliss, and some killer guitar riffs from Japanese super star MIYAVI. It takes you on a very psychedelic journey into what Bliss and ourselves call a “dance floor killer.” This track opens the album and sets the tone of the whole EP.”

World famous streamer Ninja teams up with Astralwerks to create his own album

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World famous streamer Ninja teams up with Astralwerks to create his own albumNinjawerks

The fusion of gaming and electronic music is not a new topic, but the two industries are seemingly melding in new ways every other week. Electronic music labels have released labels specific for gamers,  and others have provided streamers with free music to pair with content as long as the audio is cited. What we have not seen much of yet is a gamer creating their own album, and few people have the following and connections to make a project like that actually materialize. Tyler Blevins, ex-Halo pro-turned-streamer named Ninja, is one of the few who does.

Ninja will be releasing an album in partnership with Astralwerks, aptly titled Ninjawerks featuring tracks from acclaimed electronic music artists, who will be soundtracking Ninja’s gaming world. The streamer spoke about the new partnership, saying,

“I’m stoked about this project, first because I truly love the music, but also because I think this is another big step towards bridging the gap between music, artists, and gamers. Our worlds keep getting more and more connected, and this feels like the next step. Hopefully this can become the soundtrack to gaming. It’s also amazing to partner with Astralwerks and Capitol Music Group, because they bring so much credibility to the album. I mean. Come on. Get your ears ready.”

We have seen ESL partner with Universal Music, and Monstercat partner with Rocket League, but the idea of an individual gaming influencer coming out with their own album is new ground. Given Ninja’s documented friendship with EDM superstar Marshmello, the forthcoming Ninjawerks will likely feature his helmeted producer pal. Ninja’s partnership with Astralwerks, puts him in the company of the likes of Illenium, Jonas Blue, and Alison Wonderland in addition to pre-existing ranks with artists like Axwell Λ Ingrosso.

Photo Credit: Ryan Taylor/Red Bull Content Pool