NMF Roundup: Oliver Heldens and Riton team up, No Mana remixes Kiiara + more

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NMF Roundup: Oliver Heldens and Riton team up, No Mana remixes Kiiara + moreOlivierHeldens ByPatBeaudry 012 Resize

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Oliver Heldens and Riton link with Vula for their new groovy collaboration, “Turn Me On,” and No Mana takes on Kiiara’s “Bipolar.” Kaskade takes his Meghan Trainor collab to another level with the release of a “club mix,” and The Knocks tap R&B crooner Gallant for “Exit Sign.” 3LAU caters to a wide audience on “Miss Me More,” and M83 follows up “Temple of Sorrow” with “Lune de fiel.” Armin van Buuren and Tempo Giusto take things up a notch with “Mr. Navigator,” and Sub Focus and Wilkinson prove to be a formidable drum ‘n’ bass duo on “Illuminate.” AC Slater delivers some new Night Bass heat with “Laid Off,” and DROELOE and Kalulu keep it light on “Broken Bricks.” After debuting the tune on DA earlier this week, Nora En Pure releases her remix of “Lost Souls,” and Machinedrum reveals new possibilities for San Holo’s “Lost Lately.” In another DA-debuted piece this week, Eli Brown rocks steady on “Come Together,” and Morgan Page and HAILENE tug at listeners’ heartstrings on “Footprints.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Pat Beaudry

Kaskade and Meghan Trainor share magnetic dance pop cut, ‘With You’

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Kaskade and Meghan Trainor share magnetic dance pop cut, ‘With You’Kaskade Live Credit Rukes

America’s wholesome DJ extraordinaire and ever-iridescent life force in the flourishing US house music arena, Kaskade, has rendezvoused with one of the most fiercely sought-after pop voices of the moment, Meghan Trainor. Their dance pop lovechild, “With You,” is liable to be a resounding go-to in both summer festival sets and personal playlists abound.

The “Atmosphere” artist is known for his prismatic four-on-the-floor style, an already-accessible sound as far as dance music goes. But Kaskade kicks his digestibility up a notch on his latest offering, “With You,” with the help of Trainor’s commanding set of dance-friendly pipes. The track’s ricocheting synth line and fluttering, pitched-up vocal chops ensconce the track like celebratory glitter. “With You” gets the ubiquitous go-ahead across dance floors, pool fronts, and car radios alike.

Photo Credit: Rukes

Kaskade teases new single ‘With You’ featuring Meghan Trainor

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Kaskade teases new single ‘With You’ featuring Meghan TrainorKaskade

Kaskade has teamed up with an unlikely suspect for a new single coming out this Friday, June 14. Meghan Trainor is of course “All About that Bass,” but her collaboration with the EDM giant marks her first steps into the sphere of dance music.

Coming out just in time for summer, the tease if it can be called that comes from Kaskade’s socials with nothing but a soundless gif-esque visual. It’s hard to know what to expect for the upcoming release, as Trainor is firmly rooted in pop and Kaskade rarely crosses into that arena. However, both acts have a knack for producing fun and energetic singles that remain on repeat all summer long. The full release of the anticipated track, “With You,” comes out June 14.

Preorder and pre-save the track by clicking here.

H/T: Billboard

Featured photograph: @Kaskade/Facebook

Step aside, men: Study of pop music finds rise in sadness, upward trend in female chart toppers

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I’m gunna let you finish, Kanye, but uh…

Female singers with upbeat dance songs are far more likely to top the music charts nowadays, according to new findings by researchers at the University of California, Irvine. The study also found a downward musical trend in happiness and an increase in sadness.

The study, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, examined 500,000 popular songs released in the UK over a three decade period, from 1985 and 2015, and categorized them each based on their mood.

“‘Happiness’ is going down, ‘brightness’ is going down, ‘sadness’ is going up, and at the same time, the songs are becoming more ‘danceable’ and more ‘party-like,’” co-author Natalia L. Komarova told The Associated Press.

Of course, researchers emphasize that a gradual decrease in the average “happiness” index does not mean that all successful songs in 1985 were “happy” and all successful songs in 2015 were “sad.” They were looking for average trends in the acoustic properties of music and the moods describing the sounds.

The overall mood shifts in the songs’ musical elements fall in line with past studies that have examined lyrical content changes over the years. They have found that positive emotions, on the whole, have declined; while indicators of loneliness and social isolation have increased.

“So it looks like, while the overall mood is becoming less happy, people seem to want to forget it all and dance,” says Komarova, a mathematician and evolutionary biologist who led the study. She added, “The public seems to prefer happier songs, even though more and more unhappy songs are being released each year.”

Some songs with a low happiness index in 2014 include “Stay With Me” by Sam Smith, “Whispers” by Passenger and “Unmissable” by Gorgon City. Songs from 1985 with a high happiness index include “Glory Days” by Bruce Springsteen, “Would I Lie to You?” by the Eurythmics, and “Freedom” by Wham!

Additionally, researchers found the most successful musical genres of recent are dance and pop, with a “clear downward trend” in the success of rock, beginning in the early 2000s.

The researchers also found that the “maleness” of songs — or the frequency of male singers in popular music — has decreased over the last 30 years. “Interestingly, successful songs exhibit their own distinct behavior: They tend to be happier, more party-like, less relaxed and more likely to be sung by a woman than most.”

The same trends hold true for the US market, based on a preliminary review of data by researchers. A few 2014 hits that meet the study’s qualifications for successful pop music include Clean Bandit‘s “Rather Be,” Taylor Swift‘s “Shake It Off,” and Meghan Trainor‘s “All About That Bass.”

The findings arrive at a critical time when the music industry is grappling with issues of gender inequality, where men are overwhelmingly dominating the visible ranks of artists and songwriters, despite studies such as these, which show a strong cultural/consumer yearning for female dance/pop hits in the contemporary global music climate.

Read the fully study by UC Irvine here.

H/T: Stereogum