Martin Garrix & Carl Cox’s dance music documentary ‘What We Started’ gets it’s red carpet premiere [WATCH]

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Who better to tell the story of dance music’s seemingly overnight ascension into global prominence than the industry’s most famed veteran and youngest superstar. Martin Garrix and Carl Cox have been working over the past two years to star in the upcoming documentary, What We Started, which delves deep into dance music history over the last 30 years to examine exactly the scene came to dominate the musical landscape today. The new feature-length project, co-directed by Bert Marcus and Cyrus Saidi, offers in-depth interviews with industry pioneers like TiëstoMoby, and Pete Tong, juxtaposed by bright new torch-carriers like Garrix and discussions with frequent pop/dance music crossover artists like Ed Sheeran and Usher.

Now the film gets it’s long-anticipated red carpet premiere at Miami’s The Regal Sound Beach on March 22, 2018, the night before the sold-out twentieth anniversary of Ultra Music Festival. Directly after the film, a Q&A will be hosted inside the theatre with Garrix, Cox, Tiësto, David Guetta, and more for fans and media.

In anticipation of the film’s worldwide digital release, which is available for pre-order now on iTunes, the producers of What We Started have released a never-before-seen clip from the documentary set to Garrix’s critically acclaimed single, “Animals,” and how the track ignited his monumental career. As the track nears it’s benchmark 5-year anniversary, Garrix has feasibly surpassed his title as an international superstar to household name with his closing ceremony performance at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics.

What We Started is available for pre-order here.

Pop idol or mainstage act? DallasK combines divergent directions [Interview + Spring Break Playlist]

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DallasK Press

Orlando native Dallas Koehlke might not have been able to legally drink at 19, but that didn’t stop him from booking club sets across the country thanks to his infectious beats and mounting popularity within the electronic dance music scene. The young producer, better known as DallasK, followed his momentum and moved to Los Angeles with a plan to become the next big electronic music producer. If someone had told him that this move would lead to his production skills being the glue behind one of America’s hottest girl groups, and that his singing would be the one aspect holding his diverse roster of releases together, he probably would have found the idea outlandish.

Since Dallas’s move, now six years ago, the 27-year-old has continued to prove that his artistry can hardly be confined to a box. His diverse range of skills have opened doors for him to produce for pop’s biggest acts, release under his own moniker, and perform live as a vocalist. While his past is littered with heavy hitting electronic music collaborations with names such as Tiesto, KSHMR, and Hardwell, his future includes releasing a series of diverse singles that will singularly be held together with his vocals. Some will skew pop, others electronic, and his most recent release “Self Control” even has hints of the punk rock he listened to as a teen.

Koehlke spoke with DA about his unexpected entrance into the pop industry and how it is impacting his future in the electronic music scene. When asked whether he would like to be America’s next pop idol or a headliner at Ultra, the producer noted that his goal is to be a hybrid of the two. His ascent from electronic into pop is reminiscent of The Chainsmokers‘ journey, and it is not one we many artists successfully navigate. Despite The Chainsmokers’ immense success, the backlash they have received along the way as they have attempted to find relevance within both the electronic and pop fan communities has been severe.

Koehlke is optimistic about his future trying to bridge the two worlds together through his music, and if anyone is able to do it, he is a likely candidate. As someone who is ingrained in both scenes, Koehlke’s insights about the differences of a producer’s role in pop versus electronic music are unique. Read the full interview below, and check out DallasK’s exclusive Spring Break x Dancing Astronaut Playlist:

So tell me a little about your background.

I’ve been making dance music and touring as a DJ since I was 19 years old. I’ve done a lot of collabs with Hardwell, Tiesto, and Martin Garrix — people like that. When I moved to LA when I was 21, I met a lot of people and got into the producing songwriting world. I’ve been doing that in tandem with touring all of the time, making club records, and over the past year, I’ve been trying to figure out how I can combine those two worlds.

When I moved to LA, I never thought I would be writing songs, singing, and making pop songs for girl bands. That’s where I found myself, and I really enjoyed it. I figured as a DJ, I wanted to incorporate that because I felt like the music I was making as an artist wasn’t necessarily indicative of me as a person? So, that’s why I’m really happy with “All My Life,” and “Self Control,” because I think they are really indicative of my life. “All My Life” has all of the electro house and the drops, and “Self Control” is kind of indicative of the emo music I listened to growing up. Beyond that, the new stuff that is coming out in a couple of months will be similar and different, and I think my voice is the glue that ties is all together.

Was singing on your tracks intimidating for you? I know for a lot of people it is.

I think the thing that gave me the courage to do it is that my publishing company had an event where they wanted me to perform some of the songs I had written for other people. They were like, ‘you know you can accompany someone on guitar, or you can sing it, or someone else can sing it.’ I was of the mentality at the time that I wanted to challenge myself, and although playing guitar with someone else singing would have been cool,  I realized the way for this to be the most challenging was getting up there and singing. I had never done that before.

Even when I was in a band when I was younger, I would play guitar and bass. I was never a vocalist. So I kind of agreed haphazardly without really knowing whether I could do it or not. I practiced a bit, and then I performed “Work from Home” by Fifth Harmony, which I wrote the year before, and a Justin Bieber “What do you mean?” cover. It was pretty well received, and everyone on my team was like, “why don’t you sing- you should sing.” Then I backtracked and had all of this music coming out, and I was like, “well hey, why don’t I record these, and see if I like how I sound.” I’ve been producing for other artists, and all I’ve been doing is cutting people’s voices onto songs, so I have the knowledge of what to do. So I did it, and I was happy with the result. Everyone else was as well, so I figured that was the best way forward. It was still very nerve wracking with the live performance thing, and we are still developing the live show. Putting them out and seeing how people react is also very stressful, but it’s been good so far.

You’re career kind of began and was rooted in the electronic music world. Then you branched into pop production, and now you are even the vocalist on your tracks. In your ideal world, what does the future hold? Are you America’s next pop boy or are you headlining Ultra?

Um, that’s a really good question, and I think it’s some kind of hybrid that doesn’t really exist yet, but I’m working on it. I really do love djing, and I love the dance music community. The fans are so passionate. They always come to the shows, and they always come to the events. What I find with other kinds of music is that it is a more passive fan experience. There are alot of people online and around the world, and obviously everyone can’t be everywhere at every festival, but (with electronic music) I feel like it’s a real community, and I love that as like a live blueprint for where I see my show.

10 years from now, I hope I’m just still making dope music. I don’t know what the style will be. It’s hard to tell. If you told Kanye West when he made The College Dropout that he was going to make Yeezus 10 years after, and it was going to be all of this crazy production, and Daft Punk would be on it- he probably wouldn’t have been able to guess that. But yeah, I definitely see myself as some kind of a hybrid between a vocalist and electronic music producer. I think what I always really love about electronic music, especially with the live performance, is that it is just so powerful. Kind of like, it outperforms any other kind of music for me. I mean, if you’re at Coachella, and Arcade Fire is playing mainstage, and Skrillex is at the Sahara Tent — Arcade Fire is cool, but there is no contest. There is not going to be more energy at that stage than there is for Skrillex.

As electronic music becomes more mainstream and poppy, there has been real backlash from electronic music fans who claim that producer’s are selling out and the music is becoming formulaic. As someone who floats between both worlds, what are your thoughts on this?

I’m a fan of lots of different types of music. I see people who float between the two worlds because they are fans of music, and they don’t get caught up in a genre determining if they can like something or not. I see both sides, where people are like, ‘What is this- why are you making Revealed Records music?’ Then I’ve seen people be like, “Holy Shit, I love your old stuff, and this is really good too. I would have never expected you to make this and keep going with it.” But yeah, there are definitely people who are fans of one specific sound or one genre and want to be superiorist with that. I think with streaming platforms and people having access to so much music, genres are becoming a little less important, and that’s what makes it more feasible for someone like me to just make anything I want.

Is the creative process different for you when it comes to producing music for hip pop and pop artists versus creating your own releases? Or is it all the same creative energy for you?

It definitely has different energies, and I think in some ways making music for other people is more freeing because you aren’t restricted. If you’re the voice of something, it all comes back to you, and you are essentially responsible for that. But, if you are making a song for somebody else, and it has a sound you may not have as an artist, but it’s something you think is cool, it gives you the freedom to do that. I will say it is definitely more fulfilling releasing music as an artist, and that’s why I took this time to build my artistry as a singer and songwriter. When you give a song to someone else it becomes their song, and if you really do feel connected to it, but then it is theirs, it’s a weird kind of gray area where it can be very rewarding and very disenchanting in the same way, so making music as an artist is definitely more fulfilling for me. It does come with more challenges with what do I want my message to be, and what do I want to say. It is my voice and my songwriting on top of just making crazy productions and bangers. They are both fun. I enjoy both, and they both have their challenges, but I think being an artist is my favorite thing, and my way forward. If I write a song, and it’s pretty dope, but it’s not right for me, then that is pretty freeing because I have a million outlets to send it to. That gives me the ability to take more risks as an artist.

You’re also in a unique position when it comes to your perspective on the electronic music industry because you’re a part of the electronic music and pop music industries. Do you have observations on how these industries function differently or similarly to one another, and what that looks like?

I think the last few years, with streaming really becoming the way that people consume music, this has led to the music industry really getting turned on its head. Pop has always been focused on radio, right? That’s the way you would break an artist. Radio is still important, and it has plays, but streaming broke down the barriers and allows artists to reach millions of people easily and effectively. Even as an independent artist, you can do this without having a million dollar radio budget. That’s what was cool about electronic music. Because of the internet and YouTube, you’d go to a festival and hear a song, and other DJs would play it, it was kind of like this other way you’d view success instead of going down the radio path, which was like, you know how you became a mainstay in music in general.

With pop, they are more concerned with touring, radio plays, radio shows, and building fans online. That’s important to both worlds, but I think now, it’s the Wild Wild West. You just try stuff, and people connect to it, and if they don’t, you try something else. You know really quickly if it works. I think people have the freedom to do that now, which is really really important. Going back to dance music- a pop artist would make an album, and spend 6-8 months, and $400,000, and that album may not have any hits that people connected with. Then it’s going to take them 6-8 months, a year, 3 years, to do another album, and the record label probably isn’t going to want to put as much money into it because they didn’t make their initial investment back. With dance music it’s like, kids on the computer, going to shows, put something out, if it gets really big then great. If it doesn’t then great- I have another song that I am going to put out right now, and I think that’s the most exciting part of how that’s permeated to pop music now, and that level of quickness.

Is there a particular artist who, if you were to collaborate with this person, you’d be like- this is the pinnacle of my career, and I’ve made it?

Definitely Daft Punk, for sure. Kanye West probably too. But yeah, between those two and M83, that would be my big “wow, this is like as good as it gets.”

What can we expect from you in the next year?

Definitely more singles. I don’t have any plans for an EP or an album or anything like that. Like I said, I like the ability to move fast and see if things work, and I think my goal this year is to release more music than I have in all of my other years of making music combined, and just being able to like, put stuff out and feel like it has a home. Next couple of months it will be single after single, and I’m really excited about it.

In the meantime, Spring Break is upon us, and DallasK put together the perfect playlist to celebrate. Check out the playlist including his new single “All My Life.”

VELD Music Festival announces 2018 lineup

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The annual Canadian dance and hip-hop music festival has announced its full 2018 lineup. Held at Downsview Park in Toronto, VELD Music Festival is run in partnership by Ink Entertainment and Live Nation, with this massive sponsors including Bud Light and Hennessy.

The event will take place August 4 and 5, with headline performances by DJ Snake, Marshmello, Martin Garrix and Migos. Supporting acts include a diverse array of sounds from the likes of Habstrakt, Jauz, A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, Benny Benassi, REZZ, NGHTMRE, Lil Xan and more. Check out the full lineup below and purchase tickets here.

Watch: Martin Garrix close the 2018 Winter Olympics

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The Winter Olympics may not have an exclusive EDM-entry point yet, but it seems the games have decidedly tapped the world’s “No. 1 DJ,”  Martin Garrix, to be 2018’s torchbearer for electronic music.

Similar to when Tiësto opened the games in 2004, Garrix’s performance at the 2018 Winter Olympics closing ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea was a sight to behold.

Understandably, playing the Closing Ceremony was a deeply personal experience for Garrix.

“I once got inspired to get started with electronic music because I saw Tiesto play the 2004 Olympics in Athens,” he explained.  Continuing, “That I got the opportunity to recreate that moment myself is such a huge honor. I can only hope and dream that my performance will inspire others like Tiesto’s inspired me.”

Garrix also performed alongside the swiftly ascending STMPD Records signee Raiden, who showcased his track “GLORY” for onlookers live around the world.

NMF Roundup: Carnage & Steve Aoki team up for ironic track, Deorro samples his son’s voice, Martin Garrix, David Guetta, and Brooks team up + more

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The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.

Carnage teamed up with Steve Aoki and Lockdown for “Plur Genocide.” The most impressive thing about this track is that it could be a contender to beat out The Chainsmoker‘s “Selfie” as electronic music’s most annoying track.

Anjunabeats released an epic remix by Cosmic Gate for Gabriel & Dresden‘s “Only Road” featuring Sub Teal.

The Funk Hunters dropped the second track off of their upcoming album with groovy “Party Rockin.”

Dash Berlin and DBSTF teamed up for catchy progressive track featuring Josie Nelson “Save Myself.”

Bailo has created the perfect radio hit and club drop with new release “Rush” featuring M.E. Swank and Sauce.

Everyone can breathe easy because that ID that Martin Garrix, David Guetta, and Brooks have been teasing for months is finally out, and it is just as good as we thought it would be.

Chris Lake infuses a surprising drop with pulsing chords in “Turn Off The Lights.”

G-House fans can get their fix with Dustycloud’s newest release “Move.”

DJ Zinc and Chris Lorenzo fuse piercing chords with smooth beats in their VIP Mix of “Gammy Elbow.”

Mokita’s soulful new track “When I See You” is the perfect electronic pop track to unwind to after a long day at work.

There is no lack of energy in Deorro’s hardstyle release “Offspring,” which samples his own son’s voice.

Danny Avila slows it down with his remix of Marshmello and Selena Gomez’s “Wolves.”

Photo credit: Chemilon

Watch the trailer for ‘What We Started,’ starring Carl Cox, Tiësto, Martin Garrix and more

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Leads of WHAT WE STARTED, Carl Cox and Martin Garrix meet for the first time - (c) Bert Marcus Productions

Recent converts to electronic music in the last few years may not realize exactly what has transpired in the last half decade or so. The short of it is essentially a massive worldwide overhaul in dance music’s popularity — one that happened seemingly overnight. Dance music completely transformed from a historically underground network to a colossal entertainment subset that’s raking in nearly $10 billion globally every year, and growing. On a cosmic scale, it all happened in a snap, but a new documentary, What We Started, aims to dive deep into dance music history over the last 30 years and examine exactly how we got to where we are today.

What We Started is set to bow in Miami on March 22, followed by a New York premiere the next day, and finally show on March 29 in Los Angeles. The new feature, co-directed by Bert Marcus and Cyrus Saidi, offers in-depth interviews with industry pioneers including Carl CoxTiësto, Moby, and Pete Tong, juxtaposed by the trajectory of bright new torch-carriers like Martin Garrix and discussions with frequent dance music contributors like Ed Sheeran and Usher.

Stitched together by archived footage from the rave scenes of the 1980’s and 90’s, What We Started may provide an important history lesson with informed look back at where this all came from, and perhaps a hopeful look at where we might be going from here.

Watch footage of Martin Garrix DJing a high school party at age 14

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Martin Garrix x Armani

Martin Garrix and Justin Bieber have two unreleased collaborations in the works

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Two of pop music’s most world renowned artists, Martin Garrix and Justin Bieber, have pending collaborations waiting to be released. According to @themartingarrixhub, an Instagram fan account dedicated to the Dutch superstar, Garrix and Bieber have two and possibly more tracks produced. In an interview with RTL last year, Garrix shared,

“We have lots of ideas but if we want to release one, we want it to be 200%. From the scale of 1-10, we think it’s 7-8. We want to release something which is 10 otherwise we won’t release it.”

The two spent a lot of time together when Bieber brought Garrix on his Purpose tour in Australia, and a collaboration would not come as a major surprise since both artists are managed by Scooter Braun. Bieber is already familiar with the dance community due to his past collaborations with Skrillex, Diplo, and Major Lazer. Fans can only imagine about what a collaboration between the two artists would entail, but undoubtedly, such a production would be one for the books.

Martin Garrix and Carl Cox’s documentary to be released in March

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A tidbit sure to elicit an “oh yes oh yes!” from fans, Martin Garrix and Carl Cox’s dance-focused documentary, What We Started, will soon become available on the big screen. Originally premiered in Los Angeles on June 15, 2017 to a crowd of music icons including Moby and Erick Morillo, the documentary will be shown in select theaters come March 23. What We Started will additionally make its Netflix debut not long thereafter, with the production slated to appear among the video streaming service’s viewing options in June. Prominent Martin Garrix news source, @TheMartinGarrixHub was the first to break the news of the documentary’s impending release, doing so in a recent Instagram post.




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Martin Garrix honors parents’ wish for their late son

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16-year-old aspiring producer Jonas Nesse looked up to Martin Garrix. He considered Garrix his “guiding star” and wanted nothing more than to collaborate with the superstar producer.

Unfortunately, Nesse passed away unexpectedly on Jan. 1. His parents, knowing Nesse’s admiration for Garrix, wanted to find a way to honor their late son and get his music into the hands of the Dutch artist. Their social media post caught the eye of Owen Norton, an up-and-coming producer who received support from Garrix in the past. He decided to help Nesse’s parents in their quest to get Nesse’s music to Garrix and wrote to the producer.

Garrix responded to Norton’s email, leaving a beautiful and supportive message for Nesse’s parents, below.

Listen to Nesse’s final production below.

H/T: EDMSauce

Read More:

See Martin Garrix drop a voltaic new ID at Timeout72 Festival [WATCH]

See r/EDM’s highest voted electronic songs and albums of 2017 [full list]

Martin Garrix drops off sweeping ‘So Far Away’ remix EP

Featured photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images