NMF Roundup: Diplo remixes Kaskade, Spencer Brown takes on deadmau5 + more

This post was originally published on this site

NMF Roundup: Diplo remixes Kaskade, Spencer Brown takes on deadmau5 + moreSpencer Brown Press 3 E1568995205752

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Diplo leads the charge this NMF with a sultry remix of Kaskade, Felix Cartal and Jenn Blosil’s “More,” and Spencer Brown previews deadmau5’s forthcoming here’s the drop! remix LP with his take on “fn pig (ov).” Cashmere Cat’s sophomore album makes its debut on Sept. 20, featuring song like the Christina Aguilera-sampled “WATERGIRL,” and Chris Lorenzo takes on Boombox Cartel and MadeinTYO’s “NEW WIP.” M83’s much-anticipated 15-song DSVII is out now, featuring songs like “Feelings,” and Kill Paris puts an even groovier spin on Haywyre’s already-funky “Storyteller.” Opiuo and Lafa Taylor shine in “Send It,” and Muzzy tackles Knife Party’s “Ghost Train” with a sinister rendition of his own. Billy Kenny and Huxley take to the dance floor on “SWEAT,” and Feenixpawl and Marcus Santoro bring the feels with “Forever Young.” Cristoph puts his own spin on The Temper Trap’s “Sweet Disposition,” and Dom Dolla plays with words on “San Frandisco.” David Guetta remixes himself as Jack Back in a new remix of “Thing For You,” and Luttrell paints a serene soundscape with his remix of Jai Wolf and Mr Gabriel’s “Lose My Mind.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Luttrell and Ben Böhmer’s ‘Gibberish’ raises the bar for Anjunadeep collaborations to come

This post was originally published on this site

Luttrell and Ben Böhmer’s ‘Gibberish’ raises the bar for Anjunadeep collaborations to comeLuttrell

Luttrell and Ben Böhmer’s debut co-production, “Gibberish,” is a sensational melodic track, flush with texture. The Anjunadeep regulars both have distinctly nuanced discographies. As impressive as they are individually, “Gibberish” showcases their approaches to producing in blissful synchronicity.

Ben Böhmer keeps the progression smooth as silk cascading skyward, while Luttrell infuses the track with glittering synths and rolling basslines, while he morphs vocals with finesse. While these creative fragments are apparent, it arrives blended and whole: two heads with one body and one soul.

The quality of mixing and give and take showcased through this track gives the listener a subconscious feeling of unity that could only be the result of genuine collaboration and mutual respect; a respect that was undoubtedly fostered over Luttrell and Ben Böhmer’s appearances at Anjunadeep Explorations earlier this summer. “Gibberish,” seems something of a misnomer; as the concise, unsullied offering sets the bar for Anjuna collaborations in the cosmos.

NMF Roundup: Ferry Corsten and BT deliver ‘1997,’ Galantis and Yellow Claw team up + more

This post was originally published on this site

NMF Roundup: Ferry Corsten and BT deliver ‘1997,’ Galantis and Yellow Claw team up + moreFerry Corsten Photo Credit Getty

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Ferry Corsten and BT kick off this week’s hottest songs with the release of their hefty new collaboration, “1997,” and Gorgon City take on Local Dialect in a slow-burning remix of “Poseidon.” Sub Focus thrills on a drum ‘n’ bass take on Bring Me The Horizon’s “mother tongue,” and Kaskade and Meghan Trainor join forces on “With You.” Luttrell returns to Anjunadeep for “Need You Now,” and Yellow Claw and Galantis keep things light and breezy on “We Can Get High.” Tiësto has remixed the late Avicii’s “Tough Love,” and Ducky makes a Deadbeats appearance with “Addicted to Your Distance.” Jason Ross brings an even more emotive atmosphere to Gryffin and SLANDER’s “All You Need To Know,” and Gareth Emery and Ashley Wallbridge follow their recent LP with “Never Before.” Kygo teams up with Store P and Lars Vaular on “Kem Kan Eg Ringe,” and Fox Stevenson continues his slew of 2019 releases with “Killjoy.” Gallant serenades smoothly on “Sharpest Edges,” and Matoma links with MNEK and Kiana Ledé on “Bruised Not Broken.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Getty Images

NMF Roundup: Dog Blood make a triumphant return, Dillon Francis teams up with lovelytheband, Whethan looks to ‘Win You Over’ + more

This post was originally published on this site

NMF Roundup: Dog Blood make a triumphant return, Dillon Francis teams up with lovelytheband, Whethan looks to ‘Win You Over’ + moreDillon Francis Change Your Mind Preferred Press Shot By Lindsey Byrnes E1553870003361

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

It’s been more than five years since the music world has seen new music from Skrillex and Boys Noize‘s supergroup, Dog Blood, but that wait is finally over with “Turn Off The Lights.” Dillon Francis joins forces with lovelytheband for a, well, lovely collaboration called “Change Your Mind.” Armin van Buuren, Lucas & Steve, and Josh Cumbee deliver a feel-good number by the name of “Don’t Give Up On Me,” and Nicky Romero, DallasK, and XYLØ create a contemplative, low-key collaboration, “Sometimes.” Whethan and Bearson have crafted an effortlessly groovy “Win You Over” with SOAK, and Seven Lions and Kill The Noise take things up a notch with the formidable “The Blood.” Bassnectar reveals his Reflective Part Four EP is on its way with “Illusion,” and Kove keeps his brand of drum & bass subtle and smooth with “Echoes.” Jai Wolf and Dresage come together in “Better Apart,” and NGHTMRE and A$AP Ferg make a powerful pair in “REDLIGHT.” Sam Feldt brings summer a few months early with “One Day” with ROZES and Yves V, and Zomboy brings “The Beast” with his new single. The Chainsmokers prep for their new album with “Kills You Slowly,” and Mielo releases his Anywhere But Here EP, featuring a closing song of the same title.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Luttrell speaks on shooting off ‘Into Clouds’ [Review/Interview]

This post was originally published on this site

Luttrell speaks on shooting off ‘Into Clouds’ [Review/Interview]Luttrell 1

When San Francisco native, Eric Luttrell, (known musically by his surname) and longtime best friend/musical counterpart hybrid, Swardy, decided to put their brainchild, the OWSLA-akin The M Machine, on pause, Luttrell had no choice but to venture new sonic pathways alone.

Two years into his solo endeavor, Luttrell brought his first full-length album, the aptly titled Into Clouds, to fruition through his steadfast label housing, AnjunadeepThe project, according to Luttrell, is highly emblematic of his “dive into the unknown,” upon Swardy’s decision to move to South America to finish a solo EP, soon after, permanently settling in LA to live with Mat Zo, working in a managerial capacity for Zo’s Mad Zoo imprint.

While Into Clouds may not offer a linear, discernible narrative, the album is by no means devoid of cohesion. Though the project is inclined to experimentation, Luttrell is mindful not to stray from his free-flowing melodies and omnipresent orchestral accents. Even within these contexts, Luttrell paints the length of his inner life. From the quixotic plucks of “Quiet Even Dark” to the outro’s plaintive piano musings, Into Clouds is effusive from start to finish. Luttrell’s influx of emotion is at times turbulent, though never jarring. “Layover” for example, teases gruff techno bass in its opening moments, though a menagerie of analog light soon pours through, all the while, the track’s steady kick sews the seemingly contrasting sentiments together.

The album’s non-electronic influences, too, quietly innovate its visceral vista. Luttrell’s affinity for ’90s grunge is strategically stressed in the warbly, Smashing Pumpkins-esque vocal rendering of “Quiet Even Dark,” while the stirring cinematic progressions throughout the entirety of the work are indebted to his partiality to “movie music” particularly the mid-century composer and film score writer, Aaron Copland.

Luttrell offered Dancing Astronaut a window into his intention with the record, the range of his inspiration, and seguing into a solo career.

Q&A below:


DA: How did you and Swardy decide to go your separate ways and branch off from working together on The M Machine? 

Luttrell: It was never like a real set-in-stone decision. I was just doing both, and I had all this music I was writing on the side as we were writing the last M Machine record. I was writing more deep house and melodic-techno-inspired stuff that didn’t really work for The M Machine. 

We were down at Mat Zo’s house. He was helping us on our record to mix a couple tracks. I shared some of my solo work, and he was like ‘Oh you should send this to Anjunadeep.’ So he sent it to them and they agreed to put out a single and and EP. I started getting a couple gigs, touring as M Machine and Luttrell. We did The M Machine Glare Tour. By then it just seemed like the tides were going in that direction. Swardy was writing his own music too. We had been working on music together for 10 years and we had never tried to do something by ourselves. We’re not totally finished with The M Machine. It’s just right now, we want to focus on ourselves. 

How are you adjusting to a solo career?

It’s a very transitional part of my life, this launching off into clouds, like this dive into the unknown, but still going forward. My bandmate and best friend moved away which I 100% support, but this person you’ve been working on music with for ten years is sort of gone and now you just have to keep goin’. It’s a huge change: writing music by myself all day. I’m fully responsible for making things happen and making things work. Luckily I also have a great team. 

In what ways do you feel like Anjunadeep delivers (or doesn’t deliver) as a label? 

It just seemed to work right away. It’s sort of like a relationship, in that you know right off the bat whether or not you’ll be compatible. They liked what I was doing, and it fit, but it wasn’t too similar to everything they were working on at the time. They’ve been super supportive and given me a lot of opportunities with tours and putting me in good slots at their festivals. They have a really dedicated fan base and following. The vibe there is very unpretentious. Everyone is focused on thoughtful music. 

I’m not saying I won’t ever put out anything with another label. I would be open to that idea, but so far it has just worked so well with Anjunadeep, so I don’t see any reason to stray. 

How did you decide you were ready for an album and what were your intentions behind the project? 

I was compiling a lot of music. When I was writing the EPs, I had five or six other songs that didn’t really fit with those, but they all had a certain sound to them. My management was kind like ‘Hey you should just write a full-length album.’ Two years into Luttrell I thought it would be the next good step for the progression of the project. It seemed a little daunting. I was definitely working against a timeline; you have to get the stuff out to go on the tour that’s supporting the album. So everything was moving really fast. I probably wrote like 25-30 songs and had to whittle it down to the most cohesive 10. 

You think we’ll hear some of those songs later on?

Absolutely. Some of the album tracks are old. But I had never played them out or finished them. Old things can always come back around and turn into some of the best work. You can come back and you’re a year older and have different experiences. You come back and try to find the magic in those. 

How would you say the project varies stylistically from your past Luttrell releases?

I think most obviously the cohesiveness of the album. If you listen front to back, it feels like each song is meant to be in the place that it is. There’s not necessary a huge narrative. There’s a general theme. None of the EPs had much of a theme. They were more like ‘Here’s four songs that I feel are good enough to put out.’ So this definitely feels a little more curated. 

It’s not a departure at all from the melodic house/techno Luttrell style that people know me for. 

I heard you’ve been drawing a lot of interest lately from music outside the electronic realm. Can you tell me about how you’ve been able to incorporate those influences into your sound as Luttrell? 

A decent example would be “Quiet Even Dark.” The vocal part that I sing, the processing and style is much more of an indie or psychedelic rock-style vocal. I’ve been listening to a lot of bands like the Dandy Warhols, Yo La Tengo, Spoon, and that kind’a stuff. I grew up listening to like ’90s alternative grunge: Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins. It’s on the more pop side. Especially the vocal style. Mellotron stuff is totally Smashing Pumpkins’s staple. That’s basically like a keyboard that plays sample strings and samples vocals. There’s an old warbly antique sound to it, very old-fashioned.

I like a lot of strings and orchestral stuff. I really love all sorts of movie music. Aaron Copleand. Love those big sweeping string progressions that just make you feel really good. And all that stuff that doesn’t go back to techno music. I use it as an accent. It doesn’t necessarily take the front seat. 

What would you say has been the pinnacle of your solo career? 

Closing out ABGT300 Hong Kong, with the Hong Kong skyline in the background and a sea of people. Somebody had a profile of my mustache and my sunglasses on a flag they were waving. I just thought ‘Wow this is totally bizarre and awesome.’

*This transcript has been slightly modified for readability. 

NMF Roundup: deadmau5 delivers ‘mau5ville: Level 3,’ Lane 8 returns with ‘Visions,’ Galantis and OneRepublic team up + more

This post was originally published on this site

NMF Roundup: deadmau5 delivers ‘mau5ville: Level 3,’ Lane 8 returns with ‘Visions,’ Galantis and OneRepublic team up + moreDeadmau5 Mr Bill

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

deadmau5 has returned to deliver the third installation in his thrilling mau5ville series, bringing with it a seven-minute opener called “Polyphobia.” Galantis and OneRepublic team up for the easygoing “Bones,” and SNBRN drops off slow-burning “Never Let You Go.” Lane 8 and Rbbts pump their latest, “Visions,” with emotions, as does Dabin with his brand new “Alive.” DROELOE deliver their first original of the year, “Only Be Me,” and Ephwurd cranks up the heat with his new “Hectic” collaboration with SWAGE. Alok and Timmy Trumpet bring their talents to Spinnin’ Records with “Metaphor,” and CAZZETTE take on Midnight Kids‘ “Serious” with Matthew Koma. Win & Woo tap the enticing vocals of Kaleena Zanders for their new single, and Crystal Skies exhibit their flawless melodic dubstep style in “Never Change.” Snakehips bring Rivers Cuomo aboard for their new “Gucci Rock N Rolla” with KYLE, and R3HAB tries his hand at remixing Kygo for the second time with a grooving take on “Happy Now.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: F. Scott Schafer

Sunday Morning Medicine Vol 162, with ZHU, Mat Zo, Luttrell, + more

This post was originally published on this site

Sunday Morning Medicine Vol 162, with ZHU, Mat Zo, Luttrell, + moreSMM 2400

Sunday Morning Medicine is a feature from Dancing Astronaut dedicated to the mellower side of electronic music. We bring you our favorite therapeutic selections—old and new—in attempts to alleviate the agonizing effects of a long weekend of partying.


Mat Zo is turning the key on our Sunday Morning Medicine ignition this week, with his funky, idealistic remix of a vintage Porter Robinson track, “Flicker.” Zo’s rendition, which Robinson himself dubbed one of the best remixes he’d ever heard in his life, is full of wispy percussion and swirling melodies, erecting a city of celestial sound perfect for playing hide and go seek with responsibility.

Remixing an artist as colorful and inventive as Tycho is no small undertaking. But Anjunadeep‘s Luttrell (formerly one half of The M Machine) recently struck some sonic gold with his brand new “Epoch” re-envision, lending the track one of his signature chugging beats and preserving Tycho’s reverberating synth strums. Have a dance—or maybe just an extended sit—under Luttrell’s gleaming “Epoch”-al sky.

Here we have ZHU‘s ode to every painfully cool girl with a bad habit from a club locale nearest you. She lives lavishly inside the track’s cultivated wobble and sensuous, breathy vocals.

Manatee Commune’s newest, “My Dearest Friend” is a well-warranted spoonful of quixotic chaos. Instrumental, optimistic, and bouncy in all the right places, “My Dearest Friend” is here to eviscerate the residual alcohol-induced ringing in your ears.

Nothing lasts “Forever.” But tomorrow never comes for just over three minutes as Majid Jordan pulses through your speakers. You might just levitate as the duo’s illusory vocals and R&B tenderness breathe life into your tired weekend brain.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 74

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 74Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


After a massive collaboration with Netsky in December, 1991 returns with an original of his own, “Guiding Light.” The London producer asserts his energetic style of drum & bass in this emotive number. “Guiding Light” contains an impeccable balance of vocals and instrumentals, with the lyrics guiding the verses and the beats driving the chorus. While 1991 was relatively quiet in 2018, one can only hope that this early-2019 release will be the first of many this year. He’s off to a great start.

It takes a special touch to modernize and revamp a 23-year-old song for today’s dance music scene. Oliver Nelson and Tobtok are up to the task, though, as they bring Judge Jules & John Kelly’s Stix ‘N’ Stoned 1996 club anthem “Outrageous” into 2019. This sizzling house heater is ready for dance floors of any decade with its groovy beat and thumping bass. The producers ramp up the energy in the first half, dipping the tempo in the middle for a brief intermission, before building momentum back up again to finish their “Outrageous” rendition off.

After being propelled into the EDM limelight via two REZZ collaborations, 13 is having what is hopefully an extremely lengthy solo moment with a daunting original of his own. “Uppercut,” out via Mad Decent, shows the artist flexing his glitched-out production skills in full form. It’s a shadowy release right from the start, introducing filtered vocals that lead up to a bass-heavy drop, pounding listeners’ ears with the distorted sounds 13’s become known for.

Both halves of The M Machine have built captivating solo projects. Luttrell‘s made a name for himself with a unique strand of melodic techno, gaining notoriety through a variety of Anjunadeep releases over the past few years. His most recent release is a six-plus-minute adventure into the depths of Tycho‘s “Epoch,” which stemmed from their meeting at Burning Man. “It was an honor to share the stage with him that night and even more of an honor to recently be asked to remix his wonderful track, ‘Epoch,’” Luttrell said of the remix. “When I play this one out at shows recently, I always feel transported back to the playa – feeling the warmth of the sunrise over the Black Rock Desert.”

Draper has been making music since late 2010, shifting his sound from dubstep to house to drum & bass to glitch hop and everything in between over the years. He’s shown incredible versatility throughout his career, putting his Draper stamp on anything he’s making with ease. His latest, an EP called Pâro, kicks off with a serene soundscape titled “Her.” Its intro is simply beautiful, painting a vivid picture of two people in love. While the choruses are lighthearted and full of energy, it’s the spaces in between that truly make this track breathtaking.

Anjunadeep to roll out tenth anniversary compilation, mixed by James Grant and Jody Wisternoff

This post was originally published on this site

Anjunadeep to roll out tenth anniversary compilation, mixed by James Grant and Jody WisternoffPasted Image 0

Since its humble beginnings as an Anjuna appendage in 2005 in London, Anjunadeep has become one of the top purveyors of deep, textured, and melodic house music. Known for their towering catalog currently spanning over 400 releases, Anjunadeep artists and fans have come to revere the label’s compilation series since Above & Beyond released the very first in 2009. Coming in scorching yet tender as always, Anjunadeep have put together a special offering for their 10th mix in 10 years.

Due out Feb 22, the compilation features the label’s top-tier talent, new and old, like Luttrell, Yotto, and Lane 8, while pulling out deeper cuts from newcomers like BAILE, Ocula, and GRAZZE. Seamlessly mixed by Anjunadeep co-founder, James Grant, and Bristol-based DJ Jody Wisternoff, the release has been a profound source of reflection for the esteemed and aptly suited pair.

In trying to maintain a fresh and all-encompassing tone for the compilation, the DJs note that, “It’s hard to believe we’ve reached the 10th volume in the Anjunadeep compilation series. Despite Anjunadeep 10 being a bit of a milestone, we’ve resisted any temptation to go down a nostalgic route. Instead we’ve tried to keep the mix as forward-looking as possible. Our amazing family of artists have been creating far too much exciting new music for us to contemplate any other approach.”

With such high precedents already in place, anticipation for the newest installment is imminent. Fans can find the trailer, tracklist, and dates for global release parties below.

Tracklist:

Disc 1
Hiatus – Relic
Lycoriscoris – Belong
Ocula – Immunity
BAILE – Soft Light
Ole Biege – All The Time (Jody Wisternoff & James Grant Rework)
Nox Vahn feat. Mimi Page – There Is Peace Beyond (Jody Wisternoff & James Grant Rework)
Tomas Barfod – Things That Matter feat. Louise Foo & Sharin Foo (Jody Wisternoff & James Grant Remix)
Luttrell – Still Dreaming
16BL – You Are High
Virtual Self – Ghost Voices (Lane 8 Remix)
CRi – Initial
Modd & Hosini – Swallow’s Nest
Spencer Brown & Qrion – Sapporo
GRAZZE – Querencia
Nuage – H.A.L.O.
boerd – Someone (Jody Wisternoff & James Grant Remix)
Modd – Ruskeala
Ben Böhmer – Little Lights

Disc 2
Aiiso – City Lights
Nox Vahn & Marsh – Prospect
Jody Wisternoff & James Grant – Dapple
Jani R – Autumn’s Feathers (Jody Wisternoff & James Grant Remix)
Savvas – Peace Of Mind
Eli & Fur – Night Blooming Jasmine (Rodriguez Jr. Remix)
Aiiso – Programmer
Nox Vahn & Marsh – Serena’s Garden
Jazz Do It – For A Moment
Joseph Ashworth – Heavy
Dosem – Stay True
Jack Lost – Walls
SØNIN vs. Yotto – Nothing Like You
Fluida – A Self And A Mind
Luttrell – Out Of Me
Ben Böhmer – In Memoriam
Lane 8 – Feld (Jody Wisternoff & James Grant Edit)
Antic & i_cann – Jura
Kidnap – Tempest

Anjunadeep 10 Release Parties

Feb 08 – Sound, Los Angeles – James Grant, Marsh
Feb 17 – Phonox, London – James Grant & Jody Wisternoff (Open To Close)
Feb 22 – The Penthouse at FIVE Palm, Dubai – James Grant, 16BL, Dom Donnelly

NMF Roundup: Gesaffelstein teams up with The Weeknd, Calvin Harris and Rag’n’Bone Man join forces, Don Diablo flips Panic! At The Disco + more

This post was originally published on this site

NMF Roundup: Gesaffelstein teams up with The Weeknd, Calvin Harris and Rag’n’Bone Man join forces, Don Diablo flips Panic! At The Disco + moreGesaffelstein Jorge Meza Photos

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

In one of the most anticipated releases already this year, Gesaffelstein and The Weeknd have teamed up for “Lost in the Fire.” deadmau5‘s “Midas Heel” and “Drama Free” have been re-released as part of Netflix’s Polar soundtrack. Calvin Harris taps Rag’n’Bone Man for the soulful “Giant,” and Don Diablo takes Panic! At The Disco‘s “High Hopes” to new heights with a spirited remix. In a powerful mega-collab, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Armin van Buuren, and W&W have delivered the catchy “Repeat After Me.” Tiësto‘s “Grapevine” sees a fun reinvention by Tujamo, and Lost Kings drop “Anti-Everything” from their new Paper Crowns collection. After months of anticipation, the UK’s Gammer has finally unveiled his notable hardcore remix of Ran-D’s “Zombie.” STANDERWICK puts his stamp on Gareth Emery and Emma Hewitt‘s December release, “Take Everything,” and Luttrell returns with an ethereal number, “Into Clouds.” Party Favor throws it back to 2012 with a release of the same name, and WAVEDASH get heavy in new track, “Whiplash.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.


Photo credit: Jorge Meza