Miley Cyrus settles $300 million ‘We Can’t Stop’ copyright infringement lawsuit

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Miley Cyrus settles $300 million ‘We Can’t Stop’ copyright infringement lawsuitMiley Cyrus Mark Ronson Snl Dec 15 2018 Billboard 1548

Miley Cyrus has reportedly settled the $300 million copyright infringement lawsuit over her 2013 smash single, “We Can’t Stop.” Jamaican songwriter, Michael May, known by his stage name Flourgon, opened the lawsuit against Cyrus in March 2018 on the grounds that Cyrus’ song too closely resembled his 1988 song, “We Run Things.” May also sued Cyrus’ manager, Larry Rudolph, the writers and producers of “We Can’t Stop,” her label, RCA Records, and the subsidiary’s owner, Sony Music.

May’s allegations were primarily motivated by the lyrical similarity of “We Can’t Stop’s” line, “We run things/Things don’t run we,” to May’s “We run things/Things no run we.” “We Don’t Stop,” May asserted, was heavily influenced by “We Run Things.”

May, Cyrus, Sony, and other defendants, including a production team that involved producer, Mike Will Made It, moved to dismiss the lawsuit with prejudice in Manhattan federal court on January 3. A dismissal with prejudice signifies that the ruling court has made a final decision on the merits of the case and consequently prevents the plaintiff from filing another lawsuit on the same grounds in the future. In a December 12 letter, Cyrus’ legal team announced that a settlement agreement had been reached and would be filed “pending payment of the settlement proceeds,” but did not disclose the settlement terms.

H/T: Reuters

Burning Man festival sues federal government, cites overcharging fees

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Burning Man festival sues federal government, cites overcharging feesBurning Man

Since 1990, the quite literally scorching Burning Man festival has drawn droves to the deserts of Nevada to celebrate the best of music, art, and the spirit of legendary event. The festival has historically hosted on public grounds, renting space from the government. Now, Black Rock City LLC (the company behind Burning Man) is suing the Bureau of Land Management for raises in fees and “inflated and unnecessary costs on [Black Rock City] without providing adequate justification.”

According to The Hill, the BLM’s overcharging has been an issue for four years and the lawsuit is Black Rock City’s “attempt to break the cycle.” However, despite the recent suit, the event brand has filed a total of six separate appeals in attempt to overturn the average $3 million annual cost it pays towards securing Burning Man festival grounds, as well as the BLM’s aggressively increasing fee for providing law enforcement and general oversight of the land. In 2012 BRC paid the BLM $1.4 million in total expenses. The following year the fee increased to $2.9 million with only a 4% increase in Burning Man attendees.

In a public complaint regarding the lawsuit, BRC writes that the BLM and interior department are guilty of “ongoing, unlawful, and prejudicial conduct … that threatens the viability of the iconic Burning Man Event.” The complaint also states that Burning Man has paid nearly $21 million since only 2015 to use the land required for the festival.

Burning Man 2020 begins in August with the theme of multiverse.

Photo Credit: Andy Barron

H/t: Reno Gazete Journal

Spinnin’ successfully appeals ruling in Martin Garrix lawsuit, overturning 2017 decision

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Spinnin’ successfully appeals ruling in Martin Garrix lawsuit, overturning 2017 decisionMartin Garri Mike WindleGetty Images For IHeartMedia

There’s a reason we’re starting to see artists shift away from major label endorsements. The story of artists getting the short end of the stick and a label lining their pockets isn’t a new one. It’s not easy to imagine that the younger the artist, the easier it is to lock in a label-favoring contract, which is exactly what Martin Garrix sued Spinnin’ Records and his former management for back in 2015. The hit producer won back the rights to his music in 2017, namely the inescapable “Animals” that made him a star. Though now, the Higher Court of Leeuwarden has overturned the 2017 ruling against MusicAllStars and Spinnin‘, meaning Garrix could be on the hook for revenue lost by the label during the period he owned the masters.

In 2017, the court ruled that Eelko van Kooten had a conflicting interest in Garrix, being both director of MAS Management and Spinnin’ concurrently. The new ruling states that both management and label acted within the boundaries of the law, and Garrix was not adequately proven to have been coerced into signing his first contract. It remains to be seen what costs Garrix will incur as a result of the overturned appeal.

TikTok settles out of another lawsuit regarding privacy of minors

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TikTok settles out of another lawsuit regarding privacy of minorsTiktok Artwork Credit Study Breaks Magazine

TikTok’s popularity continues to soar, with recent numbers indicating over 110 million app downloads in the US alone. But legal troubles for the video sharing social network continue to mount. This week TikTok’s parent company ByteDance agreed to a settlement of 1.1 million dollars after it was alleged to have mishandled the personal data of its minor users. The million-dollar settlement comes just one day after the lawsuit was filed.

According to the complaint, which was filed in the US District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, TikTok, “in a quest to generate profits, surreptitiously tracked, collected, and disclosed the personally identifiable information and/or viewing data of children under the age of 13— without parental consent.”

In addition to the questionable, if not downright illegal
handling of the personal data of minors, the lawsuit alleges that “because the
App had virtually all privacy features disabled by default, there were serious
ramifications, including reports of adults trying to contact minor children via
the App.”

Although a settlement in the millions sounds like big bucks, it’s worth noting that valuations for TikTok regularly breach the 10-billion-dollar mark, leaving many wondering if this is anything more than a slap on the wrist for the China-based app.

TikTok’s recent settlement may be their latest, but it’s far from their greatest, as the company paid out a total of 5.7 million dollars after allegedly violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) in February of this year.

Photo Credit: Study Breaks Magazine

H/T: Washington Post

Kaskade sues KAOS for cancellation of Las Vegas shows

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Kaskade sues KAOS for cancellation of Las Vegas showsKaskade 1

In the short amount of time that Las Vegas club KAOS spent operating, its run was mired by exuberant costs and rumors of artists pulling out of their residencies. Now, KAOS will face a legal battle with Kaskade for breach of contract on the grounds of cancelling his shows in light of the club’s closure.

In the lawsuit, Ryan Raddon (better known as Kaskade) reportedly entered in a two-year agreement with FP Holdings, the company behind Palms Casino Resort and KAOS, for a 60-show deal. The superstar DJ alleges he was not informed of KAOS’ impending closing at the time of his show cancellations. He fulfilled 20 of the 60 shows before the club canceled the remainder—only compensating Raddon for the three shows slated to take place in October.

“As a result, FP is unable to provide Raddon with a suitable venue for either the remaining performances to be held in 2019 or the performances in 2020, which further breach of the agreement,” the lawsuit states.

KAOS debuted in the beginning of the year as the crown jewel of Palms Casino Resort. The day and nightclub boasted both Vegas’ largest outward-facing LED screen and artist residencies from Skrillex, Cardi B, Above & Beyond, and more before suddenly folding after seven months. A class action suit was also filed two days after KAOS’ closure on behalf of the club’s workers.

H/T: EDM.com

Photo credit: Rich Fury/Invision/AP

Ja Rule officially cleared in Fyre Fest lawsuit

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Ja Rule officially cleared in Fyre Fest lawsuitCulture FyreFestival3

Ja Rule‘s name is officially cleared in the $100 million Fyre Festival lawsuit. Multiple reports confirm that the rapper will not face charges in the messy fallout from the failed festival.

The judge overseeing the case dropped Ja Rule’s name from the lawsuit because he was believed to not be unaware of the major details that led to Fyre Fest’s demise.

In a recent interview on the Wendy Williams Show, the embattled rapped admitted that he is interested in throwing another event of similar nature, with the right partners of course. He also expressed his frustration with the way he was initially implicated in the fallout, saying, “If it had went off without a hitch, everybody would have said, ‘Oh, look at this great thing that they did.’ Not, ‘Ja Rule thought of it, came to them with the great idea, and they funded it.’ … As soon as it blow up, ‘Look what Ja Rule did.’ How does that work?”

While Ja Rule walks free, Fyre’s mastermind Billy McFarland is serving six years in prison for fraud charges.

ARTY brings lawsuit against Marshmello for allegedly plagiarizing ‘Happier’

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ARTY brings lawsuit against Marshmello for allegedly plagiarizing ‘Happier’Marshmello Cred CINDY ORDGETTY IMAGES

Veteran electronic producer ARTY is suing Marshmello, claiming one of the masked producer’s biggest hits, the Bastille-assisted “Happier,” is actually plagiarized. The terms of the suit claim that Marshmello and Bastille used remixed elements of ARTY’s 2014 remix of “I Lived” by OneRepublic.

This particular lawsuit is unique, in that the legal dispute is mainly anchored to the song’s beat and other components, as opposed to the underlying composition. While ARTY’s remix was an undoubted success in 2014, “Happier” managed to claim the top spot on the dance music charts for 31 consecutive weeks in 2018, and grab a double-platinum certification as a result.

According to The Tennessean, the publication that broke the story, ARTY and Marshmello’s shared music publisher, Kobalt Music, as well as
Daniel Campbell Smith, co-founder of Bastille, are named as co-defendants in the suit. Upon inspection of the two songs, both drops share suspiciously similar arrangements, and Redditors were even quick to point out the similarity months before the lawsuit was officially brought to court.

ARTY brings lawsuit against Marshmello for allegedly plagiarizing ‘Happier’Image 1

Hear both songs below. You be the judge.

Via: The Tennessean

Coachella prevails in radius clause lawsuit

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Coachella prevails in radius clause lawsuitCoachella Rukes2

Coachella‘s legal battle with the Oregon promoters behind Soul’d Out Festival has come to an end. The skirmish between Soul’d Out, and Coachella parent company Goldenvoice, commenced in May of 2018 when one decided to sue the other. Right in time for the 2019 edition in April, however, a judge has thrown out the lawsuit.

The source of contention in this case was Coachella’s notoriously strict radius clause, which stipulates that artists performing the fest can’t perform in surrounding states (including Oregon) or counties from December until May—among other stringent items. Lawyers for the Goldenvoice event argued that they were merely protecting the one-of-a-kind experience they give to fans, while Soul’d out argued it hurt artists and surrounding events.

2018 and 2019 have seemed to be the year that megafestivals are put to the test. On the East Coast, Ultra Miami‘s move to the Virginia Key has been a topic of contention since the idea was incepted, with the most recent update involving a case against the City of Miami itself.

 

H/T: Billboard

Photo credit: Rukes

Rapture Electronic Music Festival’s lawsuit against Ultra gets thrown out

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Rapture Electronic Music Festival’s lawsuit against Ultra gets thrown outUltra Music Key Biscayne Resident Backlash

A case of David and Goliath in the festival world has come to an end with the “big guy” on top. Rapture Electronic Music Festival‘s federal lawsuit against Ultra Music Festival (UMF) has been thrown out by a local judge, reports Your EDM. Rapture’s federal lawsuit followed the cease and desist warning that Rapture issued to Ultra in January. The official ruling in the case asserts, “‘[…] the Complaint fails on its face to plausibly allege any unlawful conspiracy or anticompetitive arrangement between Defendants. Plaintiff relies exclusively on conclusory allegations of conspiracy backed by no factual allegations whatsoever.’” Rapture may either amend or formally withdraw the complaint.

Rapture initially cited their possession of a signed, previously arranged agreement to use the Virginia Key land throughout 2020, but more specifically, from March 28-30, 2019, the very same dates that Ultra declared for its 2019 installment. Rapture referenced their application to host their own festival on Virginia Key, dated March 11, 2018. Rapture additionally paid a deposit to use the island from March 28-30. Needless to say, only one of the festivals can occupy Virginia Key.

“We have filed a federal lawsuit that will include an emergency injunction against Ultra, City of Miami and Virginia Key Beach Trust in order to return our location, claiming what is rightfully ours. At this point the future of Rapture at Virginia Key Beach Park is in the Federal judge’s hands. We have full trust in the federal system to obtain a fair judgement,” Rapture stated in a Facebook post. UMF coordinators responded to Rapture’s legal complaint in a press release that proclaims Rapture’s lawsuit to bear “no merit.”

The press release asserts that “Ultra lawfully secured its license to host its annual production on Virginia Key, including by obtaining necessary approvals from the City of Miami Commission.” “We are excited to present our fans with what will be the best and most transformative music festival that we have ever produced by way of music, artists, experience, cutting edge and technologically advanced production elements and novel art installations,” the press release concludes. Ultra’s full-length statement follows below, along with Rapture’s 19-page formal complaint:

FEBRUARY 2, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

There is no merit to yesterday’s lawsuit. To claim that Ultra has violated the law is both disappointing and misplaced. Ultra lawfully secured its license to host its annual production on Virginia Key, including by obtaining necessary approvals from the City of Miami Commission. We are excited to present our fans with what will be the best and most transformative music festival that we have ever produced by way of music, artists, experience, cutting edge and technologically advanced production elements and novel art installations. We look forward to hosting our 21st edition of the Ultra Music Festival at our new home at Miami Marine Stadium and Historic Virginia Key Beach Park on March 29, 30 and 31, 2019.

H/T: EDM Tunes + Your EDM

Paul van Dyk wins $12 million lawsuit over near-fatal stage fall

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Paul van Dyk wins $12 million lawsuit over near-fatal stage fallPaul Van Dyk Dreamstate

Trance fans watched in horror in February 2016 as longtime legend, Paul van Dyk, suddenly disappeared off the stage in what turned out to be a near-fatal fall at ASOT Utrecht. The event. produced by ALDA and Armin van Buuren’s A State Of Trance team, was immediately cancelled, with van Dyk being airlifted to a nearby hospital. Recovery was a long and arduous process, and sadly, doctors advised the DJ and producer that he’d never be fully recovered from the damage on his body he’d endured that night after falling 10 meters to the ground.

Fast-forward a few years later, and a lawsuit against ALDA has yielded a $12 million award for Paul on account of poor and unsafe stage design. The winnings also included damages for the physical and psychological pain endured since the accident.

Read our more in-depth interview with him on the fall here.

 

H/T: Mixmag