Madeon details his Good Faith Live premiere at Lollapalooza, plans for sophomore LP, and the genesis of ‘Pop Culture’ [Interview]

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Madeon details his Good Faith Live premiere at Lollapalooza, plans for sophomore LP, and the genesis of ‘Pop Culture’ [Interview]EBZ6loMYAMaEY

Excluding his immortal collaborative effort alongside Porter Robinson, “Shelter,” in late 2016, a four-plus-year interlude reverberated without any original material from the Madeon headquarters.

Nonetheless, the French native had already inscribed his indelible earmark on the wall of electronic music eminence long before he had (by most standards) reached adulthood. At the ripe age of 17, Madeon curated what many would consider the magnum opus of mashups in electronic music, “Pop Culture,” wherein he fused 39 of his favorite charting tracks via his Launchpad controller. The amalgamation’s live rendition, as of today, sits at a staggering 50 million YouTube hits; though it accrued viral status in mere days.

Following back-to-back EP releases in the subsequent years, Madeon formally demonstrated that he could not be further removed from one-hit-wonder discourse, as he put forth his accolade-abundant freshman project, Adventure. Not long after it reached shelves, Madeon’s debut LP has been widely regarded as one of electronic music’s signature releases. The album left his globally dispersed fan base to at a loss as to how such an endeavor could be eclipsed.

But this past March, all suspicion of what Madeon had been plotting during his absence from solo work reached long overdue fruition, when he announced that he would be unveiling a never-before-seen live experience at Lollapalooza 2019. Following months of well-warranted speculation following the cryptic teaser, Madeon began to inch back the curtain on the musical masterpiece that he was meticulously etching to perfection behind closed doors. Judiciously stamped, Good Faith, Madeon’s sophomore album proceeded to spawn back-to-back, contrasting yet equally enticing, productions. The first was ushered in by a strategically surreptitious billboard in Los Angeles, in May of this year. Since, the pair of releases, “All My Friends” and “Dream Dream Dream,” have faultlessly led expectations for the remainder of the forthcoming endeavor to skyrocket, as Madeon proved he hasn’t lost his golden thumb in the studio after all.

As the Saturday of Lollapalooza’s 2019 edition promptly approached, Madeon’s finale performance at the festival’s American Eagle complex was among one of the event’s most anticipated electronic spectacles. While he had previously revealed that new music would surely appear during the show’s display, it remained to be seen just how much of Madeon’s sophomore effort would be at the downtown Chicago audience’s fingertips.

Just a few hours prior to Madeon’s taking the stage to demonstrate for patrons the importance of showing a little faith, Good Faith, that is, with the new live setup, Dancing Astronaut had the pleasure of sitting down with the 25-year-old titan of his trade, to dive into the background behind the show’s assembly, what to expect from the album, and how his “Pop Culture” mashup changed his life.

As it was assuredly futile to keep up in real time during the 60-minute performance, 1001Tracklists.com afforded the understanding that Madeon rattled out a mind-numbing ten unidentified tracks throughout his visually-enthralling ‘Good Faith Live’ phenomenon. While he maintained that no material from his Lollapalooza performance would be a candidate for his next single release, clues from a puzzle pieced together on his latest Good Faith Radio episode indicates his third single could potentially appear to be “Be Fine.” Ultimately, listeners will have to keep the faith until further notice.

You’re debuting your new show ‘Good Faith Live’ here at Lollapalooza, and it’s your first solo live show since the Adventure days. What made you decide to specifically share it here in Chicago?

I’ve been thinking about the show simultaneously with writing music so it’s been years, and the vision for the show is best expressed in larger scales. I felt like a festival was the perfect opportunity to present it in its best light from the start. So when Lolla came asking me what I was up to, it felt like the right timing and the right amount of prestige to debut a show. It was a great landmark to look forward to in the future.

It felt like the right fit and it’s nice because I get to do this show and then I have a couple of months where I’m in Europe and then a couple of months for the U.S. tour. I get to improve and learn from this show and it’s like a large scale experiment. We literally brought the largest screen we could fit so we went all in.

What are you able to tell us about your plans for the unveiling of ‘Good Faith Live’ tonight? Are there any outright differences between this and the full tour?

The tour we’re trying to bring the most we can practically but obviously we’re doing different venue sizes. When we’re doing Bill Graham, it’s going to be as big but when we’re doing smaller cities, it’s like something else. We’re making sure we bring a full and great experience to every show that we’re doing but the main difference is that we’re doing is that the tour will have a longer set because this is just under an hour.

I’m going to be able to play a lot more songs and have a lot more moments so this first show is sort of like a condensed teaser. I also decided when I was working on the setlist that I wanted to debut some new music but not all the new music. So for example, I’m currently picking my next single and all of my next single options are not songs that I’m going to be playing at this show. So there’s still going to be new things that I’ll play on tour.

Recently you touched on how you started work on Good Faith right as the Adventure era was coming to a close. How was the creative process for ‘Good Faith’ comparable to how you approached ‘Adventure’?

It was so incredibly different, nothing like it. Yesterday, I was getting emotional about this show. I was going through the e-mail I sent to my team in very early 2016 when I was kind of wrapping up what my vision was for that next era and almost everything in that is still what I’m doing now. The way I described the show then is still the show I’m doing tonight. I had such a clear idea of what I wanted to do which was quite different from Adventure, which was more a process where I was trying to figure it out.

I took a lot of time because I was mostly concerned that I was taking care of myself, taking time off when I needed it, taking the time to learn certain things I didn’t know and not rushing into things. There are some songs like “Dream Dream Dream” that were ready very early on and just because they are ready doesn’t mean they need to be out right now. Let me figure the whole vision out first, so I had to be patient. With Adventure, I made it while I was still touring a lot and it was more so start and stop and more interrupted where I could be less introspective with it. I love that album so much but that process felt vastly different for sure.

So far your sophomore album has given us two singles with “All My Friends” and “Dream Dream Dream,” which possess clear stylistic differences. Is Good Faith going to lean specifically towards either of these styles or towards something completely unexpected?

You’ll find there’s a really clear sonic theme to the album. I think both singles touch on elements of the recurring palette, like one big thing is humans, choirs and chants which is obviously very prominent in “Dream Dream Dream.” That’s the thing throughout the show and throughout the album. That will be seen in the visuals and that’s manifested in the audio of almost every song, so those singles are good representation of that. The palette of emotion does get a little bit broader than those two songs. I do think they’re a good intro, though. I think they hopefully set the tone quite well but there’s more secrets and fun moments to come. 

You had acknowledged that “All My Friends” was probably the most pop-leaning production on the album

Yeah so I really like the idea of making music that I didn’t even think of as necessarily living within the format of dance music. The songs I was referencing or thinking about when I made that one felt very free. I didn’t feel like I needed to make it relate to any particular format so in my head so I was just writing a straight up pop song, but in the best and most sincere way possible. Pop music is a really respectable genre. The Beatles are great and they’re a pop band, so deciding you want to write a pop song isn’t necessarily a bad intention, it’s a beautiful intention. I was trying to express my love for that genre and obviously anything I do is still informed by my background in dance music, so it comes through and ends up being dance music, but it’s nice to free your process and clutter of genres.

Through the creation of Good Faith, were there any musical inspirations that helped you along the way?

I was listening to a lot of more hip-hop when I was making Good Faith. I got into Pink Floyd too and you’ll hear some influences maybe on the album. I rediscovered my love for The Beatles, which I do every so often. I got really into Tyler the Creator and stuff like Kraftwerk. All of the bands and acts I was destined to eventually love that I hadn’t found by that point, I found now. My musical taste had expanded in the most enriching way and I’ve never loved music more than the past couple of years.

Earlier this summer, your legendary “Pop Culture” Launchpad mashup celebrated its 8th birthday. What has that song meant to you personally as you look back and see how far you’ve come?

It’s so hard to say. It’s mostly a beautiful, beautiful memory. It’s something that I’m so thankful and grateful for. I felt very lucky to have that idea at a time where it had the room to connect and it found an audience. It felt like the stars aligned in my life for me because I needed that to happen. I was just out of school and everything was uncertain, so it made my future more precise.

It was a big relief because it felt like my take on music was maybe going to connect with some people. It changed my life and I still really enjoying it, listening back to it and performing it in sets. It was so spontaneous because it was literally the first thing I did when I got a launchpad. I just had that idea, I went to the store and then shot it that night. I just saved it and didn’t put it out right away because I wasn’t that secure about it I guess. Then I got more confident like, “You know what? This will probably do 10,000 or 100,000 views.” So I put it up and went on vacation. It blew up and I didn’t even see it so my manager called me and was like “Hey, so here’s what’s going on.” I was on vacation in somewhere with no internet so I could only go to the cafe every few days. Between the time I arrived and the first time I went to the cafe, it had several million views which was so cool.

**This transcript has been slightly edited for clarity and readability

Featured image: Dan Franco

ORBIT Playlist: Whipped Cream compiles 20 raucous selects, reflects on her sonic rise [Q&A]

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ORBIT Playlist: Whipped Cream compiles 20 raucous selects, reflects on her sonic rise [Q&A]Whipped Cream Hard Summer 2017

A veritable force to be reckoned with in electronic circles, Whipped Cream has brought her blistering brand of bass from one United States city to the next in an explosive exposition of her high-octane sound. The Canadian-born producer’s festival season agenda included Baltimore’s Moonrise Festival, where she commandeered the event’s Stellar Stage. Whipped Cream’s edgy, dubstep-flecked style of bass music blared from the speakers as the rapidly rising artist delivered a ground-shaking set, which included several sonic sneak peeks of unreleased material soon to come.

Dancing Astronaut caught up with Whipped Cream for a rapid fire Q&A session, complemented by an ORBIT Playlist. Although Moonrise Festival 2019 has concluded, the intense, low-end technics of Whipped Cream’s set expand on her ORBIT Playlist, which arrives as a speaker worthy collection of cuts featuring Bassnectar, Excision, Tory Lanez, ATLiens, and more.

What catalyzed you to want to make electronic music specifically, as opposed to any other genre of music? Did you always want to become an artist and producer?

Honestly when you’re making music on a computer you can make any type of music. I wouldn’t say my project is mainly electronic music–my tastes are always evolving and there will be more records to come in the next few months that will show you what I mean by that.

I believe that I’ve been an artist since I was a young child. When I was a competitive figure skater I would express myself through music on the ice.

Do you recall the first electronic song that had an impact on you? If you do, what was it and what about the track got your attention?

I think the song that had the biggest impact on me was Active Child’s “Hanging On.” I saw it performed live the first time [I attended] a music festival and it completely blew me away.

What was your vision [for the music that you wanted to create] when you first began producing. Has that vision changed at all in the years that have followed your initial entry into the music industry?

My vision was to make exactly what I wanted from the start. Music has always given me purpose. That has not changed since day one.

You overhear a group of festival goers talking about the set you just played. How do you hope that they describe it?

My only hope is that people connect with my music and feed off the energy at my shows, [that] my music is their own experience.

What has been the biggest music industry learning experience to date for you since you’ve been active in the scene?

The biggest thing I have learned is to follow my intuition and always be open to listening and learning. I want to live like a child and create like a child.

What’s next for Whipped Cream as 2019 winds down? Do you have any other projects currently in the pipeline before year’s end?

[I shared] lot of new music [shared at] Moonrise Festival this weekend, and I absolutely can’t wait to debut some [other] new stuff. I’m also looking forward to some time off the road this fall to work on more new music.

Looking ahead, do you have one particular musical goal that you’d like to accomplish in 2020? If so, what might it be?

My goal for 2020 is to be fully at peace and share my art to the fullest [extent] I can.

Photo credit: HARD Summer

Gryffin details ‘Gravity, Pt. 2,’ securing Carly Rae Jepsen for ‘OMG,’ and reinstating his remix roots

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Gryffin details ‘Gravity, Pt. 2,’ securing Carly Rae Jepsen for ‘OMG,’ and reinstating his remix rootsEBGI5bjYAEscj4

In just a handful of years, San Francisco native Gryffin has asserted himself into headliner-status prestige, aside some of dance music’s most critically acclaimed acts. To formally discover himself atop the electronic apex, Gryffin shaped out a formerly untrodden pathway early on in his career by establishing an exhaustive record of hungrily streamed indie SoundCloud-hosted reworks, for Grammy-associated talents such as Ellie Goulding, Tove Lo and the late Whitney Houston. After formally anchoring down with a batch of original productions, including his debut release “Heading Home” in addition to “Whole Heart” featuring Bipolar Sunshine, Gryffin was properly equipped to roll out the first segment of his freshman effort, Gravity beginning in late 2017.

Meticulously stamped with Gryffin’s rhapsodic acoustic arrangements, Gravity, Pt. 1 surfaced nearly one year thereafter, having spawned six imaginative productions including “Nobody Compares to You,” “Remember,” “Just For A Moment,” and perhaps Gryffin’s most famed original thus far, “Tie Me Down.” After a mild interlude following the album series’ first arm of releases, the producer sought to conclude what he started with another scattering of singles during 2019’s first half. Four tracks have been credited to Gryffin’s name since the year commenced, including numerous high-profile collaborations alongside Slander, Aloe Blacc, and most recently, Carly Rae Jepsen. Surprisingly enough, the fourth output from Gryffin in 2019 was something that his core audience had been longing for as he re-entered the aural avenue that helped jump-start his career with an official remix for Shawn Mendes’ hit single, “If I Can’t Have You” this past July.

As Gryffin set his eyes on the premiere of “OMG” just days before he was bound to appear at Chicago’s Lollapalooza, he noted to his fans that the album was still slated for an early fall release, though he was still fine-tuning the project’s final tracklist. During the Saturday afternoon preceding Gryffin’s sensational GRAVITY LIVE spectacle during Lollapalooza Perry’s Stage sunset slot, Dancing Astronaut took the chance to down with him to learn more about his plans for Gravity, Pt. 2, readying its coinciding GRAVITY II LIVE show at The Brooklyn Mirage, honoring Avicii alongside Aloe Blacc at Coachella, and more.

During your Coachella set this past April, you treated fans to not just one, but two unreleased originals, including an early version of your ‪Carly Rae Jepsen collaboration, which is officially out now. How did “OMG” actually come together?

I basically had been working on that one for a while and the end of last year was when I really started finishing it. Ali Tamposi was the vocalist. She’s an incredible writer along with Andrew Wyatt, who are a lethal team that’s made so many smashes together. She was an amazing part of the song and she wrote an amazing record so once I finished the production on it, I was just sitting on it for a while. I was just trying to figure out what was missing in terms of who could cut it and some of the production elements weren’t quite there. I then played it at Coachella and as a Hail Mary. I messaged Carly’s team and said “You know what would be sick for this record is if Carly Rae Jepsen sung it.” Through some channels we got to her management and they were like “Hey so we actually really do like it and we’re going to play it for her. She’s super selective on this stuff.” Within the next day, they said that Carly loved it and wanted to cut it next week in LA. The next week I met her in the studio for the first time and we were cutting it and within the first five minutes of her singing the hook, I just had crazy chills. It felt really strong and I was so excited about it so it took me a couple weeks to finish it all up.

Towards the end of 2018, you released the former half of your debut album, Gravity and now you’re officially three singles deep for the latter portion of it with “All You Need To Know,” “Hurt People,” and now “OMG.” What can we expect from the remainder of the project and can you disclose any other collaborations you have in the works?

I’m basically finishing it up right now but I honestly can’t say anything about who’s on it. There’s some big things coming though and I’m trying to put it out in September because my tour starts in October. It’s just a matter of how fast I can finish up these records in the next few weeks.

This is set to be your first Lollapalooza appearance since 2017 and it wasn’t explicitly labeled on the lineup poster, so are we experiencing a ‘GRAVITY LIVE’ show or a Gryffin DJ set? Either way, what do you have in store for it? Any surprises we can prepare for?

So it’s going to be the live Gravity show. I’m going to have Quinn XCII for an edit of “Winnebago” and Elley Duhé is coming out for “Tie Me Down” so I’m really excited for that. For these multi-genre festivals, I try to always do it live and even though I’m on the Perry’s Stage, I felt it’s a better representation of my music.

Earlier this summer, you re-entered the remix game with your very first since 2017 with a spin of ‪Shawn Mendes‬’ “If I Can’t Have You.” What was the driving force behind the decision to release another remix and do you have a particular preference between doing those versus creating original music?

Nowadays I’m definitely a lot more focused on my originals with the album. I always like to do a remix because it’s fun and that’s how everything got started for me anyway… but I just haven’t prioritized it for a while. Shawn hit me up, asked me to remix it and we were communicating back and forth on feedback. It was a cool process working with him that closely and I just felt like it was a cool opportunity because I really liked the original. I immediately had an idea of what I wanted to do with it so it just worked out that way and I’m going to do remixes again for sure but right now it’s just total album mode.

Throughout the length of your career, you’ve obviously worked alongside a list of some impressive names. If you could narrow it down to just one, who was your favorite artist you’ve worked with?

That’s so tough because they’re all so different and awesome in their own ways. For a producer collab, working with Illenium was really cool because we just vibe on a personal level really well. We’re both from the Bay Area and we’re both chill people so it was a really fun process working on that record. On the vocal side, probably one of my best friends out of all them was Bipolar Sunshine. He’s one of my favorite human beings and he’s one of the coolest dudes ever. The Carly track was honestly really cool too because I had never really worked with an artist that was that big in the pop level so that was a cool experience. Even working with Aloe Blacc too.

That Avicii tribute at Coachella on the first anniversary of his passing was seriously nothing short of unbelievable...

Thanks man and it was Aloe’s idea too. I didn’t even put that on him at all. We were just planning to do “Hurt People” and he said to me “Hey, what do you think about this tribute?” So he was the one who pitched the idea and I had thought of it but I definitely wasn’t going to make Aloe do that. If he wanted to do it, I was down.

If you could pick just one release that you’re most proud of between all of your remixes, originals and collaborations, which would it be?

My personal favorite is “Nobody Compares To You.” That’s one of my favorite tracks that I’ve ever done because that was just a really meaningful record to me personally and I was really proud of that production. On the songwriter side, “Feel Good” and “Whole Heart” were both really fun to do. Honestly some of these upcoming ones too are big ones for me so I just really feel fortunate because lately I’ve been able to work with a lot of really cool artists on both the production side and singer/songwriter side so it’s been a good ride and I’m excited for the new music.

You’re set to premiere the official first performance of your GRAVITY II LIVE show at The Brooklyn Mirage just a couple of weeks following Lollapalooza. What do you have in store that we may not be able to experience here in Chicago?

It’s basically going to be the most Gravity II show of the tour. I’m not going to play the full album because it won’t be out by then but I am going to sneak in three or four new records that people haven’t heard yet so I’m really hyped about that. I haven’t even been able to go there yet but my team wanted me to play there so I’m really looking forward to it. I’ve got a lot a prep to do before then but everyone tells me that it’s the spot to watch music in the summer.

Featured image: Lollapalooza

Disclosure have ‘over 100 new tracks’ in the cannon

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Disclosure have ‘over 100 new tracks’ in the cannon32840285 1949614435072139 129299633963794432 O

Disclosure? Is that you?

Coming off an approximate year-long hiatus, the British duo is stepping back on the scene, locked and loaded for a series of voraciously anticipated releases, as well as a full-length album not far down the horizon, according to a recent interview.

The brothers’ absence was reportedly constructive, it seems, as they revealed to ABC’s triple j that they’ve written over 100 new songs in the past few years, describing their satisfaction with their production pipeline as “almost there.” In the interview, Disclosure mention they’d love to get an album out either at the end of this year or the beginning of 2020: ultimately a short distance away in the span of the time the duo’s devoted fans have already waited.

With buckets of tracks to sift through and perfect, Disclosure has their work cut out in the coming months, but this third album holds great promise. The duo’s work with Khalid on his single “Talk” earlier this year shows diversity in their production talent. While there is no way to anticipate what to expect next musically from the artists, fans are chomping at the bit to listen to new Disclosure.

via: ABC/triple j

Martin Garrix and Drake rumored to have a collaboration in the chamber

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Martin Garrix and Drake rumored to have a collaboration in the chamberMartin Garri Dryo

If the rumor is to be believed, then the sonic worlds of Martin Garrix and Drake will soon collide—likely resulting in an explosive new collaboration. A leaked screenshot of DM exchanges with a photographer affiliated with producer Murda Beatz sparked speculation that the Canadian hip-hop royal and the “Summer Days” producer were at work together on a forthcoming tune. “Nah, it’s crazy the world will shake,” says the Murda Beatz affiliate in the private message exchange as “Mr. from the 6” is revealed to be the collaborator Garrix is currently linked with.

Martin Garrix and Drake rumored to have a collaboration in the chamberDrake Dms Garri

Martin Garrix recently gave an interview with 538 Radio at Tomorrowland in which he imparted that he has now worked with the most prominent artist of his career to date, suggesting that the photographer’s claim could in fact be credible. “I’ve been in the studio with someone, I can’t say with whom yet, but that [it] is perhaps the biggest name ever,” Garrix told 538 Radio.

Featured image: Rukes

Lee Burridge & Lost Desert speak with each other on their new album, surviving the elements, and more [Interview]

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Lee Burridge & Lost Desert speak with each other on their new album, surviving the elements, and more [Interview]Lee Burridge Lost Desert Press Shot Couresy Lees Team 1

Lee Burridge, a man with a dance music legacy pushing four decades, has already achieved a vast amount of milestones that span from cultivating the early scene in Hong Kong, to owning a record label and one of the most successful party brands in the world in All Day I Dream. With such a historic career to date, it might be hard to miss that the figurehead had never ventured into album territory. Lee’s been outspoken about his preference toward DJing over the years; however, in Lost Desert, the legend found a producer riding the same musical wavelength as he. With his studio pro collaborator serving as a conduit of expression, the two wrote out their first-ever album: Melt.

Melt is an album as whimsical and sentimental as its writers’ personalities. It was inspired by love and connection they feel with their friends, loved ones, and the world around them, and captures the blissful energy felt at each All Day I Dream party. Ambient and deep house flow effortlessly into one another, using calming basslines, lush percussion, sweeping string elements, and stripped-down synths to evoke feelings of peace and euphoria. Each piece stands completely on its own, yet simultaneously fits into the album’s overarching theme and atmosphere as a whole. Listeners are left with a smile on their faces by the end of the journey; much like they are when Lee and Lost Desert take the decks. Melt thus makes for a perfect dancefloor addition as well as a mellowed listening companion for lazier days.

While both Lee Burridge and Lost Desert are quite open themselves in person, we were curious about what lies beneath. So, we tasked these house stalwarts to have a brief, but cheekily candid chat with each other about the album, their culinary choices, All Day I Dream memories, and more. Order Melt here in the meantime.

Lost Desert to Lee Burridge:

What was the first 12 inch record you purchased?

“Chaka Kahn. “I Feel For You.” I played it relentlessly until my mum told me to stop playing it and said why is it such a long record.”

Would you rather explore the depth of the ocean or deep space?

“Deep space for sure.”

Hamburger or cheese burger?

“Actually, vegeburger.”

Best advice for DJs in five words or less?

“Wear insoles in your shoes.”

In interviews, what is the ideal amount of questions?

“Four. Question 5 is usually too difficult to answer.”

Lee Burridge to Lost Desert:

If you were able to have created the sound track to any movie what would it have been?

“I’m not a big movie watcher at all, but would have loved to have written the theme song of the original series of The Bridge.”

What’s your favourite ice cream flavour?

“Chocolate chocolate chip.”

If you were lost in a desert name three things that you would love to find in your pocket?

“Satellite phone, water, umbrella, Yes, it’s a big pocket.”

Which track on the album is your favourite?

“Seven Magic Mountains”

What’s your all-time favourite All Day I Dream moment (so far)?

Oakland 2017. An epic sunset. People on the shore applauding (good work nature). The view is amazing then the party was simply “wow!”

Featured image courtesy of Lee Burridge’s team

Lunice hints at TNGHT comeback, Diplo pairing in new interview

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Lunice hints at TNGHT comeback, Diplo pairing in new interviewTnght

In a recent interview with SR-MAG, Lunice answered questions about touring with Madonna, his production influences on his debut CCCLX LP, producing with Kanye and Diplo, where he thought the cultural shift in electronic music is going, and a tantalizing hint at TNGHT‘s reunion.

What’s more, Lunice also discussed work he’s been doing with Diplo, revealing a possible collaborative project with the Ma and has been working with his old counterpart Hudson Mohawke for a potential TNGHT comeback, as they’ve been hinting since the end of last year. Lunice and Hudson Mohawke haven’t worked together since 2013, since the release of one single “ACRYLICS,” and before that in 2012 they released their TNGHT EP via Warp and LuckyMe that featured the massively popular EDM trap hitter, “Higher Ground,” that rocked festivals stages in the hay-day of electronic trap. In 2013, the trap duo co-produced “Blood on the Leaves” with Kanye West from his critically acclaimed Yeezus album.

Lunice has produced with the likes of Angel Haze, Azealia Banks, Denzel Curry, Rick Ross, Le1f, and many more aside from the artists listed above. His music cuts through the contemporary dance music landscape through textured sounds, clear production, and experimental pairings that have made his production skills a highly sought-after commodity.

H/T: SR-MAG

Photo Credit: Ralph Arvesen

How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the pack

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How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packFriendship1

Gary Richards (widely known as Destructo) has proven time and time again he can curate a festival with uncontested competence and flair. Though he’s remained humble enough to know even he can outdo himself. From his decisive efforts in erecting the first iteration of Electric Daisy Carnival (EDC) to forging the most formidable dance music brand on the West Coast, HARD Events (HARD Summer/HOLY SHIP!), by now, Richards’ emblem is synonymous with success in the national festival circuit.

His latest and most personal entrepreneurial endeavor yet, his All My Friends label/event series, truly comes alive through its sea-bound fixture: the FriendShip cruise. With the unsullied success of HOLY SHIP!—which bred the feverishly familial “Ship Fam,” the festival’s subsequent seafaring sense of community—under his belt, Richards has sought to bring the intimacy of his previous endeavors to newfangled heights aboard FriendShip. And the Navigator of the Seas, touching off in Miami and coursing through the Caribbean, is the vessel fit for the venture.

With fun firing on all fronts, the Navigator of the Seas is a festival-goer’s utopia. From glow-in-the-dark laser tag, to surf simulation, to its sprawling 17 on-deck bars, the ship is stocked to satiate virtually any itch that may arise aboard its four-night (January 6-10, 2020) charter. But aside from the full-scale waterparks and fully loaded culinary accommodations, music is paramount—of course.

Richards requires that each artist enlisted for the maritime mission embrace the experience as the ticket-holders do. Immersion is key. This mindset comes alive in his newly incepted “Dial a DJ” attraction, in which attendees can quite literally order a DJ to their rooms like On Demand. Plus, with two private island anchor drops at Coco Cay on the 2020 FriendShip agenda, more music and more AMF-approved nonsense aren’t just expected, they’re guaranteed.

The last installment of FriendShip saw an unorthodox, genre-traversing musical makeup, ranging from Boys Noize to Busy P, RÜFÜS DU SOL to Rico Nasty. His towering tenure both behind the decks and in the studio has equipped him with the aural awareness of an entrepreneur, an attendee, and a musician alike. Though Richards has yet to officially announce the 2020 cruise’s lineup, it’s safe to assume an all-bases-covered unveil.

With a 90% return rate for FriendShip alone, and over two decades of experience in the exceedingly competitive event arena, Richards sat down with Dancing Astronaut to expound on his vision for FriendShip, what to expect, and paramount updates he and his team secured for the affair’s upcoming voyage.

Tickets to FriendShip are still available here.

In what ways does FriendShip eclipse other festival cruises? 

The fact the we are able to use so many unique spaces on the boat to have shows really makes it special. We have a service called ‘Dial a DJ’ that was a massive hit with the fans where people can order a DJ to the room like room service. For 2020, shippers can expect a more enlarged menu to choose from. The community that we all have all built over the years with Shipfam is incredible. The bonds are strong and always continue to thrive and live on well past the events.

What do you think Navigator of the Seas and Coco Cay offers that prospective attendees should keep in mind? 

Navigator of the Seas and Coco Cay have received a combined 365 million dollars in upgrades this year. Royal Caribbean delivered something so over the top.

The improvements for FriendShip are going to be felt throughout the entire experience from better venues on board to longer hours spent at Coco Cay (private island) complete with massive water slide parks, wave pools, and swim-up bars. The Sunrise Sermon will take place on Coco Cay this year so we can all watch the sunrise together from the private island. I could not even have dreamed of something this amazing to present to the family. We get to stay at Coco Cay two days in a row and have the island all to ourselves with with longer hours and so many so many fun things to do.  I cannot wait for everyone to experience it.

What goes into curating an atmosphere for a festival cruise?

The key ingredient on the ship is amazing music and most important the people who attend the event. FriendShip family are the ones who make the party so special and are always on the same page. Last year we had zero damage to the ship. I appreciate so much that our group is so respectful. We have a plus 90% return rate so we are doing something right.

What’s your vision for the lineup?

The main key is booking artists who are going to immerse themselves in the event. People who I know are going to get involved with Shipfam and be part of the party. We want artists who are excited to DJ in peoples cabins just as much as the main stage. If they just want to hide in their room then they should just stay at home. I am also looking for a variety of styles music. Obviously the main style is always electronic, house, and, bass but this year we are going to add a little more hip-hop and even some reggae. I have been really getting into the reggae vibes lately. We are also going to expand with other types of entertainment with burlesque, comedy, and maybe even a little magic.

Would you consider FriendShip the cornerstone AMF event? How is it emblematic of your brand as a whole?

Yes it really embodies the essence of All My Friends. People meeting new & old friends through music and events. There is no better way to do that then on FriendShip.

How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packGary
How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packFriendship
How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packFriendship Island

How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the pack

This post was originally published on this site

How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packFriendship1

Gary Richards (widely known as Destructo) has proven time and time again he can curate a festival with uncontested competence and flair. Though he’s remained humble enough to know even he can outdo himself. From his decisive efforts in erecting the first iteration of Electric Daisy Carnival (EDC) to forging the most formidable dance music brand on the West Coast, HARD Events (HARD Summer/HOLY SHIP!), by now, Richards’ emblem is synonymous with success in the national festival circuit.

His latest and most personal entrepreneurial endeavor yet, his All My Friends label/event series, truly comes alive through its sea-bound fixture: the FriendShip cruise. With the unsullied success of HOLY SHIP!—which bred the feverishly familial “Ship Fam,” the festival’s subsequent seafaring sense of community—under his belt, Richards has sought to bring the intimacy of his previous endeavors to newfangled heights aboard FriendShip. And the Navigator of the Seas, touching off in Miami and coursing through the Caribbean, is the vessel fit for the venture.

With fun firing on all fronts, the Navigator of the Seas is a festival-goer’s utopia. From glow-in-the-dark laser tag, to surf simulation, to its sprawling 17 on-deck bars, the ship is stocked to satiate virtually any itch that may arise aboard its four-night (January 6-10, 2020) charter. But aside from the full-scale waterparks and fully loaded culinary accommodations, music is paramount—of course.

Richards requires that each artist enlisted for the maritime mission embrace the experience as the ticket-holders do. Immersion is key. This mindset comes alive in his newly incepted “Dial a DJ” attraction, in which attendees can quite literally order a DJ to their rooms like On Demand. Plus, with two private island anchor drops at Coco Cay on the 2020 FriendShip agenda, more music and more AMF-approved nonsense aren’t just expected, they’re guaranteed.

The last installment of FriendShip saw an unorthodox, genre-traversing musical makeup, ranging from Boys Noize to Busy P, RÜFÜS DU SOL to Rico Nasty. His towering tenure both behind the decks and in the studio has equipped him with the aural awareness of an entrepreneur, an attendee, and a musician alike. Though Richards has yet to officially announce the 2020 cruise’s lineup, it’s safe to assume an all-bases-covered unveil.

With a 90% return rate for FriendShip alone, and over two decades of experience in the exceedingly competitive event arena, Richards sat down with Dancing Astronaut to expound on his vision for FriendShip, what to expect, and paramount updates he and his team secured for the affair’s upcoming voyage.

Tickets to FriendShip are still available here.

In what ways does FriendShip eclipse other festival cruises? 

The fact the we are able to use so many unique spaces on the boat to have shows really makes it special. We have a service called ‘Dial a DJ’ that was a massive hit with the fans where people can order a DJ to the room like room service. For 2020, shippers can expect a more enlarged menu to choose from. The community that we all have all built over the years with Shipfam is incredible. The bonds are strong and always continue to thrive and live on well past the events.

What do you think Navigator of the Seas and Coco Cay offers that prospective attendees should keep in mind? 

Navigator of the Seas and Coco Cay have received a combined 365 million dollars in upgrades this year. Royal Caribbean delivered something so over the top.

The improvements for FriendShip are going to be felt throughout the entire experience from better venues on board to longer hours spent at Coco Cay (private island) complete with massive water slide parks, wave pools, and swim-up bars. The Sunrise Sermon will take place on Coco Cay this year so we can all watch the sunrise together from the private island. I could not even have dreamed of something this amazing to present to the family. We get to stay at Coco Cay two days in a row and have the island all to ourselves with with longer hours and so many so many fun things to do.  I cannot wait for everyone to experience it.

What goes into curating an atmosphere for a festival cruise?

The key ingredient on the ship is amazing music and most important the people who attend the event. FriendShip family are the ones who make the party so special and are always on the same page. Last year we had zero damage to the ship. I appreciate so much that our group is so respectful. We have a plus 90% return rate so we are doing something right.

What’s your vision for the lineup?

The main key is booking artists who are going to immerse themselves in the event. People who I know are going to get involved with Shipfam and be part of the party. We want artists who are excited to DJ in peoples cabins just as much as the main stage. If they just want to hide in their room then they should just stay at home. I am also looking for a variety of styles music. Obviously the main style is always electronic, house, and, bass but this year we are going to add a little more hip-hop and even some reggae. I have been really getting into the reggae vibes lately. We are also going to expand with other types of entertainment with burlesque, comedy, and maybe even a little magic.

Would you consider FriendShip the cornerstone AMF event? How is it emblematic of your brand as a whole?

Yes it really embodies the essence of All My Friends. People meeting new & old friends through music and events. There is no better way to do that then on FriendShip.

How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packGary
How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packFriendship
How Gary Richards’ FriendShip cruise is sailing ahead of the packFriendship Island

Kiesza reflects on the meaning of ‘Sweet Love’ [Interview]

This post was originally published on this site

Kiesza reflects on the meaning of ‘Sweet Love’ [Interview]Kiesza Press Shot Credit Rasmus Luckmann

Kiesza became in instant star in 2014 when her impassioned vocal tune “Hideaway” caught America’s ear and became a smash radio hit. Marquee talents rushed to work with her, and soon we saw the rising Canadian talent’s name appearing alongside projects like Skrillex and Diplo’s Jack Ü, Duran Duran, Djemba Djemba, and Bakermat. It’s clear that she’s poised to be an enduring force within the pop and electronic arenas.

Life hasn’t been free of struggle for this singer, however. Before becoming a full-time musician, she knew a life of heavy discipline and grit via training in her home country’s military. Hardship also struck right as she hit her prime, when a terrible car crash left her with a near-career-ending brain injury and no choice to but to take a couple years off to focus on returning to full health and stability. If we know anything, however, it’s that Kiesza is an enduring character—and her unrelenting passion for her craft ultimately translated to an inevitable return to the arts.

“Sweet Love” thus serves as powerful comeback single, and a public expression of Kiesza’s shift in paradigm. Her recent struggles have given way to a different outlook on life and what’s important, and as a result, we see her taking a more stripped-down, raw, and emotive approach to her music making. “Sweet Love” is simultaneously haunting and wistful, allowing her crisp voice to take center stage while subconsciously communicating a hopeful message. It’s interpretive accompanying video is a visual manifestation of this new direction.

We caught up with Kiesza upon her new tune’s release, digging into her new inspirations and direction, her artistic journey, and beyond.

“Sweet Love” is a bit of a change of pace for you sonically. What led you down this direction, and how was the process in choosing a producer/collaborator that could help you realize your vision?

On this next musical chapter, I’m taking my audience on a more expansive musical journey. I came up as a songwriter on the New York music scene, so pushing boundaries with writing and dipping my toe into uncharted genres has always been second nature to me. That’s why I felt it was necessary to go independent for this next leg. I see this as a chance to evolve and expand in so many directions. But don’t worry, there is lots of dance music on the horizon! “Sweet Love” is a special song. I wrote it with the same baritone opera singer that sang with me on the first of my Halloween series, “Phantom of the Dance Floor.” His name is Philippe Sly and I asked him if he would ever be interested in writing a song together. He hesitated at first, but what I love about Phil is that he is so open-minded, and ultimately he just dove right into it with me! My friend Kid Harpoon joined us in the writing room. It was an amazing songwriting session and I have always loved this song. I struggled to put it out while in the major label system, so releasing this is so exciting. It needs to come out of hiding!

When it came to producing “Sweet Love,” it just so happened that while I was in Denmark, I showed the demo to the production duo Namafalcon, and they immediately had ideas that were aligned with my own vision for the song. I always go where the enthusiasm is strong and where the creativity starts to flow. Once we got going, it was effortless, and I love how it turned out.

The lyrical content and the dancing in the music video give off a very nostalgic, “young love” type of tone [in our subjective opinion]. Was this inspired by an early love in your life, or a profound experience where you really felt “love” for the first time?

It’s definitely painted with those emotions, both “young love” and even “forbidden love.” The feeling of already being so deep in, that you know there’s no turning back, while all-the-while trying to reconcile with the sense of underlying risk that comes with it.

Do you feel your sound evolving toward this softer, more sentimental direction or do you think you still might be involved in the dance music sphere as a vocalist in the future?

It’s about to become quite a musical rollercoaster ride, as I’ve been on a rollercoaster myself, both in life and in the industry I’m in. I think by now I’ve felt almost everything there is to feel on some degree. Extreme love, unimaginable loss, the fulfillment of dreams and the rush that comes with it, self confidence, self doubt, winning and then losing, an open road that ran straight into a brick wall, and then the sense of being derailed completely and without warning, followed by the struggle of fighting my way back. I have a lot say now. A lot to express. To vent. But also a lot to be thankful for.

Dancing has always been my medicine, and for this reason I will always continue to write dance music. But now you’re going to have a bigger window into who I am, as the songs unveil themselves. I’m sort of moving in all directions at once I guess…expanding.

You’ve definitely been stepping into your own power artistically as of late. What advice can you offer other young musicians who might be struggling to find themselves or assert themselves in this crazy industry?

True, as difficult as it is to cut through all the noise, it’s ultimately an amazing time to be an independent artist. There are so many avenues and unique pathways for new musicians to share their art with the world. The secret is to just keep at it and be willing to work harder than you ever could imagine. When you feel like giving up, you just keep going. And it’s important to be critical of your own music. That may sound harsh, but no one writes a hit song every day. I write bad ideas all the time. You just have to have the guts to throw your work away when you know it isn’t strong enough. And simplify as much as possible. There’s no getting around hard work. And be willing to adapt as the winds change. Expect the unexpected, and give it right back.

As a songwriter, do you have any particular routines or techniques that help you get the lyrics flowing when working on a project? What do you do when faced with writer’s block?

Movement in general helps stimulate ideas. Going for a walk, or riding a bike. Even taking public transportation helps me come up with ideas, believe it or not. Anything that puts you into a flow state.

Let’s poke a bit more into your past here, as we’re a dance site and we first learned about you through your numerous high profile collaborations. How did you first end up getting involved in this side of the music world, and what methods did you use to get your self out there and get noticed by the likes of Jack Ü, Bakermat, Djemba Djemba, etc?

“Hideaway” was my bridge from the realm of the unknown into the limelight. It was that song that paved the way for all the collaborations that followed. When it comes to collaborations, I just go with what feels right. I usually collaborate with people that resonate.

What is your favorite aspect of the dance music scene in general, and the crossover/pop world you’ve found yourself in more recently?

Dance music brings people together, and it makes people happy. Even if it’s just for a moment, when you’re dancing, you always feel good. You don’t have to think about the things that are weighing you down. In that moment, it’s just complete suspension. The new music I’m releasing knows no boundaries. You’ll never know what’s coming next. Sweet Love is a song that allows me to tell a story. It harkens to that familiar lure of lust becoming love. Sometimes the purpose of a song is to be heard. And some of my music in this upcoming chapter will be those songs. Songs with stories, or messages, where the lyrics matter. I try not to make my dance songs too complicated lyrically, for the simple reason that I myself prefer dance songs to be simple and light hearted, when I’m dancing to them. But I have a lot to say, and the time has come to go deeper. I want to share more of who I am with the world.

Finally, the number one question: what’s coming next down the Kiesza pipeline?

For starters, I have more songs written then I know what to do with. But once I get started, there’s no more stopping. I’m really looking forward to lots of collaborations, and expressing so many different sides of my personality through the upcoming music and performances.

Photo credit: Rasmus Luckmann