Meet the talent of Ocaso Festival: Magdalena

This post was originally published on this site

Meet the talent of Ocaso Festival: MagdalenaOcaso Festival Tamarindo By Pablo Murillo 06 01 2018 0182

Tamarindo, Costa Rica will ring in the new year with another dose of underground dance music with Ocaso‘s arrival on January 2 to the coastal town. The five-day festival has grown over the years into a veritable institution within the Central American house and techno scene, with curious travelers from around the globe visiting each year. 2019’s billing is a strong mixture of veteran and new performers per usual, with notable headliners including Jamie Jones, Damian Lazarus, Loco Dice, and Guy Gerber. Ahead of the festivities, Dancing Astronaut spoke to the artists to get to know them a bit better, and hear what excites them most about Ocaso.

Dance music has been a driving force in Magdalena‘s path for many years now. Like her brother Solomun, she couldn’t deny a life filled with it, taking helm of Diynamic‘s nightclub EGO throughout its Hamburg tenure and eventually getting behind the decks and into the studio herself. Her diverse, yet refined house sets are a nice balance of grooves, melodies, and and invigorating rhythms — a mixture that has captured the attention of clubbers worldwide and her positioning on top of the house realm. It comes as no surprise, given her years spent working behind the scenes, learning how to read the floor and having easy access to the most cutting-edge music bubbling up from the underground.

Magdalena’s aesthetic will fit well into the beachy setting of Ocaso, given her experience as an Ibiza resident DJ since 2016. This past summer, she achieved an island milestone in earning her very own night at the Blue Marlin, which she named SHADOWS. The residency saw her hosting the likes of La Fleur, Nick Curly, and Anja Schneider, and has since turned into an international affair with a namesake residency just announced in Tulum. Her upcoming release on Damian Lazarus’ Rebellion imprint feels like it belongs in the tropics.

The burgeoning talent tells us about her comeup, her Costa Rican expectations, and more in our discussion.

Meet the talent of Ocaso Festival: MagdalenaPress Photo Magdalena Supplied By Team

Supplied by Magdalena’s team

Tell us about the moment/time period where you decided that a full-time music career was the only way to go.
I always loved music and wanted to pursue a career in it, but I don’t think I really realized I could make it until our club EGO was becoming super successful, and I started to get booked to DJ abroad more and more.

What’s your favorite part about the Costa Rican dance scene, if you’ve played there before? If not, what are you most curious about regarding the crowds, club culture, etc.
I’ve never been to Costa Rica but I am really excited to go. There’s so much I’m curious about; the nature, the food, the people, how the crowd will be and the party scene there!

Which of your gigs are you most proud of, and why?
Oh wow what a question… I think the Cercle live stream at the Faculté de Médecine de Montpellier was a really important gig for me, as I knew the stream would go out on their huge channels, the event had sold lots of tickets and of course they usually have huge artists play for them. I almost didn’t make it to the gig; I had multiple last minute flight cancellations so ended up taking a combination of trains and buses, and arrived with just 10 minutes to spare before I was due to start! I had to change super quickly and do my makeup in this small toilet with all my make up all over the floor, before I literally ran to the stage to start playing. It was also a bit of a difficult sound situation at this beautiful and historic venue… but fortunately the gig was a success and I am proud that I was able to keep a calm head through all the stress 😉

What’s in your crate right now that is knocking the dancefloor off its feet?
I am really enjoying playing the tracks off my new EP, “Wildlife,” that’s due to come out on Damian Lazarus’ label Rebellion in December. I made them over the course of a year and have tested them out on a lot of dance floors to make sure I had got them just right. When I got a great reaction at our Diynamic off Sonar showcase I knew it was time to release them!

What are you looking forward to most about Ocaso festival?
Everything: good friends, good people, beautiful nature, exciting food, and I’m expecting good vibes with great music at the festival. These are all the things that make me really happy in life.

Which artists do you recommend most from the lineup, aside from yourself?
Of course Damian Lazarus, as I have him to thank for supporting my new release, as well as my good friend HOSH, who always kills it. There’s lots of upcoming artists on the lineup that I haven’t played with before, so I’ll be looking to check out the new talent as well.

Tell us a fun fact about yourself that audiences might not know.
I am a great Balkan dialect imitator!

 

Photo credit: Pablo Murillo

Jean-Michel Jarre embodies his mythical ‘Watchers,’ discusses the human relationship with AI and new album, ‘Equinoxe Infinity’ [Interview]

This post was originally published on this site

Jean-Michel Jarre embodies his mythical ‘Watchers,’ discusses the human relationship with AI and new album, ‘Equinoxe Infinity’ [Interview]Jean Michel Jarre Synth

Jean-Michel Jarre has released Equinoxe Infinity, 40 years after his fourth studio album, Equinoxe. Both albums are about “The Watchers,” creatures that look towards the future, speculating on what they might find. As an influence to Daft Punk, Gesaffelstein, and many more, Jarre is known as a pioneer in the electronic, ambient, and new-age genres. Amid the release of his lauded Equinoxe Infinity LP, the French luminary sat down with Dancing Astronaut to talk about the about the album, his technological ventures, and Jarre’s hypotheses about the future of music and life as we know it.

Jarre has just arrived in New York — we settle in discussing the city and the ongoing press junket for the newly released record. The Grammy nominated composer describes the city’s hectic nature, though he seems at home with New York’s hustle and bustle.

What are you doing in New York?

I’m here promoting my new album, Equinoxe Infinity. I’m also involved in a virtual reality performance for the album on Saturday Dec 8 at [10:00 p.m. with Sutu from Australia who was involved in the special effects of the last Steven Spielberg movie, Ready Player One.

December 12, I have a Q+A in the VR world. Going back to Europe to prepare for that.

Tell us more about the virtual reality performance. How does VR play into the album?

I’m very involved and interested by the possibilities of VR. It’s like Dancing Astronaut was drawn up as a concept for VR because that’s exactly who we are in the VR space. We’re inviting all these DJs to go into the virtual world and do their own remixes of the album. I wanted to explore all different technologies from virtual 3D, to VR, to 3D environments, and being spied on by artificial intelligence, one of the themes of the album.

Do you think a VR world is an easy next step for the entertainment arena?

Have you seen Ready Player One? The most brilliant part was when Stephen Spielberg re-enacted Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining where the main character’s virtual avatar goes into the scene of the Shinning with the twins, and opening the wrong door, and all the blood rushes by him. This is where AI and VR are quite exciting for the future.

The reason why I did the album as a soundtrack of two possible futures with two different covers: one, expressing more peaceful, green, positive mood and the other one is more dystopian because I believe we all have that choice. That’s why the album finished as a question mark, for us to decide.

What made you come out with the sequel to Equinoxe now? 

I’m not linked with the idea of it being a sequel of the first one. Both albums are about these creatures called “The Watchers.” I’ve always been intrigued by the artwork of Michel Granger, who designed the cover of Equinoxe. I’m intrigued by these creatures. What happened to them today, and what will happen to them in the future? The Watchers are whistleblowers both regarding environment and new technology. Technology is also watching us, in order to send us products that we don’t actually need, going deep into our product lives. I wanted to express a future where man and machine are closer and closer in our day-to-day life and how to cope with this. I imagine the soundtrack hitting two distinct futures represented on the album. This is why you have sunny, dynamic-pop moments and darker moments within the same piece of music.

The human voice and vocoder enters into the fifth movement and lasts through the seventh. Was this intentional? What was the idea behind “If The Winds Could Speak?”

We will be able to survive in 21st century only if we can evolve in good intelligence and good faith both within environment and new technology. These two factors are much more interdependent than we think. On “If The Winds Could Speak” my idea was to start with the human voice and processing them with granular synthesis, which is one of the most advanced synthesis we have. I wanted to create sounds that had elements of man and machine, begging the question of their differences.

I love the comment Dancing Astronaut did on “Robots Don’t Cry” because I could have called this track “Robots Don’t Cry, So Far” because I’m quite convinced that in the near future, artificial intelligence will be able to create original content, movies, music, stories, and this is not something we should worry about. Maybe we will re-position ourselves, as the creative person, to use these new parameters in different ways. So this idea of using the granularly synthesized human voice and creating it into something quite human is exactly the idea behind “If The Wind Could Speak,” “Infinity,” and “Machines Are Learning.” These songs are using human vocals, transforming it into granular synthesis, and then using the harmonic content of the sounds while still having that human touch.

You present an optimistic and pessimistic view on the album. Do you think human creativity is no more than just mechanics, or will human creativity be difficult to translate to AI?

Humans are just using 10% of our brains. AI can help us use the 90% left, which could open doors to creativity that we’ve never seen. This doesn’t necessarily have to be frightening. It can also be positive and very interesting. Maybe our brain, in the future, the education system will be different and act like a hard drive to simply access information. Maybe it gets stored in the cloud, using this information to react and making informed decisions. I don’t think AI will stop creation or creators at all, I think it will position us in a totally different context.

It sounds like we’re working in harmony with AI. This is an optimistic view of the future.

We should be optimistic by subversion. It’s very easy to be dark. We could go together in the studio, and in two hours, we could do a dark song. It’s much more difficult not to be dark. To try and be bright, and funny, and positive without being cheesy.

If you look around, the news channels get their views by exploring and exploiting the dark side of the world, where the positive side is not sexy for a lot of us and it’s quite challenging. That is one of the ideas for the project, to try and mix the dark and light side. It’s quite exciting in music when you can have happier positive moments hiding melancholy or the reverse.

Is there a movement on the album that describes your attitude towards technology and the future?

I would say that I think positively as a reaction to the darkness around. I’m not necessarily optimistic about the future, I’m just saying ‘I don’t know.’ It’s not necessarily going to be a Terminator dystopian type of world, but I think it’s interesting from an artistic project to explore that theme. “Robots Don’t Cry,” in one sense, is interesting because I used the Nanotron, one of the first electronic virtual studio technology instruments. I need to make the statement about technology that robots don’t cry so far.

The “If The Winds Could Speak” vocals have you question the sound’s humanity, and through the wind means going throughout time into the future. “Equinox Infinity” the final track, is an illustration about the idea of the journey towards the future with a lot of human sounds, nature sounds, machine sound, but it ends as a mystery. I took quite some time to create this track, which is mostly harmonious with elements that are not necessarily harmonious, and that can be quite disturbing and noisy at the same time.

You’ve been pioneer of new sounds your entire career. What do you think is sonic creation’s next frontier?

My next wish and project would be to establish a collaboration with AI. I wanted to create the “Equinoxe Infinity” track with AI, but it was not ready yet. The collaboration should be ready within the next few months, for my next project. The kind of AI collaboration I experimented with was an algorithm able to imitate a Michael Jackson track or Beatles track, which is not what I was expecting, or to fill the AI with a melody and it returns with variations of that melody, which ends up being quite straight and fairly boring.

Mathematicians love Bach because he had a very mathematical approach to music, so it’s the best for artificial intelligent recreation and variation. Today, in 2018, there are far more concepts that musicians have to add, like a groove to the rhythm. The right software is not there yet, but it’s coming soon. I’d like for us to challenge ourselves to help improve AI and not be scared of it for those reasons.

On the VR side, I very excited by developing alternative possibilities for creators.

Space has been a prominent motif in your work for half a century. Are there space themes in the album that relate to the connection between human and technology?

I’m a big fan of the Dancing Astronaut name. I was jealous because it’s a fantastic title for an album or a movie. At the beginning of my career, NASA asked me to integrate the 25th anniversary of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center into my Houston show celebrating Texas’s 150th anniversary on April 5, 1986. I worked with many Houston-based astronauts, including Ronald McNair, who was suppose to have played the saxophone on “Rendez-Vous VI,” recorded from space into the concert.

McNair unfortunately passed in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, but I was urged to proceed in memory of the shuttle’s crew. It was a turning point of exploration as the world all of a sudden stopped exploring space.

Next year we’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first man on the moon, and it will be broadcasted on the German French channel, ARTE, to be the guideline of a quite trendy shows called “Winter Moon” that will link everything from people to the moon, and associations with the moon.

It’s very interesting talking about dancing astronauts. Because dancing astronauts is very relevant to what pop culture is about. Astronauts and the explosion of pop culture started at the same time. In the 1960s and 70s we were obsessed by space in music, in passion, in architecture. We were all kind of dancing astronauts, and it seems like that identity was lost a bit, but I think it’s coming back with movies such as Gravity, Interstellar, and all these Mars colonizing talks, so the future belongs to Dancing Astronaut.

Well, shucks. That’s quite the compliment. Thank you, Mr. Jarre. 

With all this new technology making creation easier, it sounds like we have room for more exploration.

So true! Exploring space is not only exploring outer space, but it’s also exploring the virtual space. VR is exactly that. We are like astronauts exploring a virtual world. By the end of the day, putting your foot on another planet is not the same as going into the virtual world. Say hello to all the dancing astronauts.

*This interview has been edited for clarity and readability.

 

Travis Scott and Skrillex reveal more collaborations are underway

This post was originally published on this site

Travis Scott and Skrillex reveal more collaborations are underwayTravis Scott Live 2

While Skrillex‘s “SICKO MODE” remix is still hot off the press, it appears the OWSLA boss and La Flame are already plotting additional co-ventures together. Travis Scott‘s smash hit is a strong contender for Song of the Year, and with Skrillex stepping in to extend the original’s shelf life with one of his most refreshing remix efforts in years, the chemistry between the two powerhouse artists is undeniable — and the pair are primed to capitalize on it.

In a recent interview with BillboardSkrillex and Scott both reveal that during the process of finalizing the remix together new beats were inevitably shared, and the idea of future original collaborations seemed to develop organically before the “SICKO MODE” remix even landed. Says Skrillex,

“We were kind of hanging out in the studio and I ended up playing him a ton more beats. I like taking in everything organic and making everything natural. Doing something together in the future is definitely on the horizon, you know? It’s a vibe for sure.”

Skrillex has a long history of rap and hip-hop collaborations, including Rick Ross, Ty Dolla $ign, and Vic Mensa — now it seems Astroworld‘s ringleader is set to join those ranks soon too.

Read Skrillex and Travis Scott’s full interview with Billboard here.

Elderbrook continues to build momentum after Grammy nomination with ‘Old Friend’ EP [Q+A]

This post was originally published on this site

Elderbrook continues to build momentum after Grammy nomination with ‘Old Friend’ EP [Q+A]ELDERBROOK Credit FIONA GARDEN

As the year comes to a close, London’s Alexander Kotz tops the list of artists who continue to prove their worth by cementing a unique sound and a distinctive voice in today’s oversaturated electronic music scene. Kotz, more popularly known as Elderbrook, had a meteoric ascension into popularity after his breakout collaboration with CamelPhat, “Cola,” scored both of the artists a Grammy nomination. The producer is taking this newfound popularity in stride and capitalizing on it with a new four-track EP titled Old Friend. The EP proves that Kotz is a far cry from a one-hit wonder, with each track seemingly strong enough to be its own standalone hit.

Kotz spoke with DA about Old Friend, and revealed that the EP shows his more electronic, upbeat side. “I wanted to release these songs as a body of work to show where I’ve been musically over the last year since the success of ‘Cola,’ ahead of next year when I plan to release my album.” While he did not divulge more details on his forthcoming album, he did give insight into how he measures his own success and how that relates to his future bodies of work. Kotz notes that although “Cola” scored him a Grammy nomination, his measurement of his own future success is going to be based on whether he releases music that he loves.

The EP contains four tracks, and each has its own distinctive flair. Title track “Old Friend,” which the producer cited as his proudest creation of the EP, has an eerily similar effect on the listener as the infectious “Cola.” With its enthralling vocals paired with an upbeat synth progression, it is seemingly impossible to not replay the song over and over again. Kotz has figured out the formula to create catchy releases, and “Old Friend” has the capacity to take over the radio airwaves like past hit releases. Another track of note is “Capricorn,” with its groovy backdrop set against vocal chants that keep the track moving.

Old Friend undoubtedly has the ability to appeal to everyone from techno fans to pop fans, which is consistent with the producer’s own description of his musical style. He comments that, “because I love all genres of music; country, electronic, indie rock to name a few – I like to think that my music takes a little bit from each. Obviously the sounds I make are predominantly electronic, but the vocals and vocal melodies are definitely more down the indie route.” Old Friend is a big end to an important year for Kotz, and the EP is out now via Big Beat Records.


Your recent collaboration with Camelphat scored a Grammy nomination. Is this now a bar that you are aspiring for with new releases and perhaps a release on this EP? Or are you happy using that momentum to continue to build?

The collaboration with Camelphat did better than I could ever have expected, and I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t want that kind of success again in the future. However, since the release of “Cola,” I found myself considering where my music was going to end up as a result. After a while, though, I realized that when putting music out there again, all that matters is releasing music that I truly love. Music that represents where I am as an artist right now. As long as I love the music, reaching certain heights or comparing myself to anything or anyone else seems irrelevant.

Do you have a favorite track off of the EP?

I love them all, but I’m really proud of “Old Friend.” It’s different to what I’ve done in the past and that’s exciting! “Bird Song” is another one I love. It was amazing to work with TEED on that one because I’m a big fan and have been for years. For us to have written a song together definitely means a lot to me personally.

This year was your first tour of the US. What did you think?

It was amazing. When I was younger I always pictured where my music career would take me. I had always imagined myself in the US, touring and driving across the country. To think that I’ve now done that is surreal, and I can’t wait to get back out there again.

How would you characterize your musical style?

This is a difficult one for me because I love all genres of music; country, electronic, indie rock to name a few. I like to think that my music takes a little bit from each. Obviously the sounds I make are predominantly electronic, but the vocals and vocal melodies are definitely more down the indie route.

What were some of your influences for this EP?

I’ve always been really influenced by people like Bonobo, Hot Chip, Jungle, music like that. With this EP I definitely wanted to show my more electronic side. However, I’ve spent a lot of time in the last year finding new sounds that I’ll be exploring next year with my album.

Photo credit: Fiona Garden

Elderbrook continues to build momentum after Grammy nomination with ‘Old Friend’ EP [Q+A]

This post was originally published on this site

Elderbrook continues to build momentum after Grammy nomination with ‘Old Friend’ EP [Q+A]ELDERBROOK Credit FIONA GARDEN

As the year comes to a close, London’s Alexander Kotz tops the list of artists who continue to prove their worth by cementing a unique sound and a distinctive voice in today’s oversaturated electronic music scene. Kotz, more popularly known as Elderbrook, had a meteoric ascension into popularity after his breakout collaboration with CamelPhat, “Cola,” scored both of the artists a Grammy nomination. The producer is taking this newfound popularity in stride and capitalizing on it with a new four-track EP titled Old Friend. The EP proves that Kotz is a far cry from a one-hit wonder, with each track seemingly strong enough to be its own standalone hit.

Kotz spoke with DA about Old Friend, and revealed that the EP shows his more electronic, upbeat side. “I wanted to release these songs as a body of work to show where I’ve been musically over the last year since the success of ‘Cola,’ ahead of next year when I plan to release my album.” While he did not divulge more details on his forthcoming album, he did give insight into how he measures his own success and how that relates to his future bodies of work. Kotz notes that although “Cola” scored him a Grammy nomination, his measurement of his own future success is going to be based on whether he releases music that he loves.

The EP contains four tracks, and each has its own distinctive flair. Title track “Old Friend,” which the producer cited as his proudest creation of the EP, has an eerily similar effect on the listener as the infectious “Cola.” With its enthralling vocals paired with an upbeat synth progression, it is seemingly impossible to not replay the song over and over again. Kotz has figured out the formula to create catchy releases, and “Old Friend” has the capacity to take over the radio airwaves like past hit releases. Another track of note is “Capricorn,” with its groovy backdrop set against vocal chants that keep the track moving.

Old Friend undoubtedly has the ability to appeal to everyone from techno fans to pop fans, which is consistent with the producer’s own description of his musical style. He comments that, “because I love all genres of music; country, electronic, indie rock to name a few – I like to think that my music takes a little bit from each. Obviously the sounds I make are predominantly electronic, but the vocals and vocal melodies are definitely more down the indie route.” Old Friend is a big end to an important year for Kotz, and the EP is out now via Big Beat Records.


Your recent collaboration with Camelphat scored a Grammy nomination. Is this now a bar that you are aspiring for with new releases and perhaps a release on this EP? Or are you happy using that momentum to continue to build?

The collaboration with Camelphat did better than I could ever have expected, and I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t want that kind of success again in the future. However, since the release of “Cola,” I found myself considering where my music was going to end up as a result. After a while, though, I realized that when putting music out there again, all that matters is releasing music that I truly love. Music that represents where I am as an artist right now. As long as I love the music, reaching certain heights or comparing myself to anything or anyone else seems irrelevant.

Do you have a favorite track off of the EP?

I love them all, but I’m really proud of “Old Friend.” It’s different to what I’ve done in the past and that’s exciting! “Bird Song” is another one I love. It was amazing to work with TEED on that one because I’m a big fan and have been for years. For us to have written a song together definitely means a lot to me personally.

This year was your first tour of the US. What did you think?

It was amazing. When I was younger I always pictured where my music career would take me. I had always imagined myself in the US, touring and driving across the country. To think that I’ve now done that is surreal, and I can’t wait to get back out there again.

How would you characterize your musical style?

This is a difficult one for me because I love all genres of music; country, electronic, indie rock to name a few. I like to think that my music takes a little bit from each. Obviously the sounds I make are predominantly electronic, but the vocals and vocal melodies are definitely more down the indie route.

What were some of your influences for this EP?

I’ve always been really influenced by people like Bonobo, Hot Chip, Jungle, music like that. With this EP I definitely wanted to show my more electronic side. However, I’ve spent a lot of time in the last year finding new sounds that I’ll be exploring next year with my album.

Photo credit: Fiona Garden

Elderbrook continues to build momentum after Grammy nomination with ‘Old Friend’ EP [Q+A]

This post was originally published on this site

Elderbrook continues to build momentum after Grammy nomination with ‘Old Friend’ EP [Q+A]ELDERBROOK Credit FIONA GARDEN

As the year comes to a close, London’s Alexander Kotz tops the list of artists who continue to prove their worth by cementing a unique sound and a distinctive voice in today’s oversaturated electronic music scene. Kotz, more popularly known as Elderbrook, had a meteoric ascension into popularity after his breakout collaboration with CamelPhat, “Cola,” scored both of the artists a Grammy nomination. The producer is taking this newfound popularity in stride and capitalizing on it with a new four-track EP titled Old Friend. The EP proves that Kotz is a far cry from a one-hit wonder, with each track seemingly strong enough to be its own standalone hit.

Kotz spoke with DA about Old Friend, and revealed that the EP shows his more electronic, upbeat side. “I wanted to release these songs as a body of work to show where I’ve been musically over the last year since the success of ‘Cola,’ ahead of next year when I plan to release my album.” While he did not divulge more details on his forthcoming album, he did give insight into how he measures his own success and how that relates to his future bodies of work. Kotz notes that although “Cola” scored him a Grammy nomination, his measurement of his own future success is going to be based on whether he releases music that he loves.

The EP contains four tracks, and each has its own distinctive flair. Title track “Old Friend,” which the producer cited as his proudest creation of the EP, has an eerily similar effect on the listener as the infectious “Cola.” With its enthralling vocals paired with an upbeat synth progression, it is seemingly impossible to not replay the song over and over again. Kotz has figured out the formula to create catchy releases, and “Old Friend” has the capacity to take over the radio airwaves like past hit releases. Another track of note is “Capricorn,” with its groovy backdrop set against vocal chants that keep the track moving.

Old Friend undoubtedly has the ability to appeal to everyone from techno fans to pop fans, which is consistent with the producer’s own description of his musical style. He comments that, “because I love all genres of music; country, electronic, indie rock to name a few – I like to think that my music takes a little bit from each. Obviously the sounds I make are predominantly electronic, but the vocals and vocal melodies are definitely more down the indie route.” Old Friend is a big end to an important year for Kotz, and the EP is out now via Big Beat Records.


Your recent collaboration with Camelphat scored a Grammy nomination. Is this now a bar that you are aspiring for with new releases and perhaps a release on this EP? Or are you happy using that momentum to continue to build?

The collaboration with Camelphat did better than I could ever have expected, and I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t want that kind of success again in the future. However, since the release of “Cola,” I found myself considering where my music was going to end up as a result. After a while, though, I realized that when putting music out there again, all that matters is releasing music that I truly love. Music that represents where I am as an artist right now. As long as I love the music, reaching certain heights or comparing myself to anything or anyone else seems irrelevant.

Do you have a favorite track off of the EP?

I love them all, but I’m really proud of “Old Friend.” It’s different to what I’ve done in the past and that’s exciting! “Bird Song” is another one I love. It was amazing to work with TEED on that one because I’m a big fan and have been for years. For us to have written a song together definitely means a lot to me personally.

This year was your first tour of the US. What did you think?

It was amazing. When I was younger I always pictured where my music career would take me. I had always imagined myself in the US, touring and driving across the country. To think that I’ve now done that is surreal, and I can’t wait to get back out there again.

How would you characterize your musical style?

This is a difficult one for me because I love all genres of music; country, electronic, indie rock to name a few. I like to think that my music takes a little bit from each. Obviously the sounds I make are predominantly electronic, but the vocals and vocal melodies are definitely more down the indie route.

What were some of your influences for this EP?

I’ve always been really influenced by people like Bonobo, Hot Chip, Jungle, music like that. With this EP I definitely wanted to show my more electronic side. However, I’ve spent a lot of time in the last year finding new sounds that I’ll be exploring next year with my album.

Photo credit: Fiona Garden

Techno Tuesday: Facundo Mohrr on his love affair with melodic dance music and embracing imperfection

This post was originally published on this site

Techno Tuesday: Facundo Mohrr on his love affair with melodic dance music and embracing imperfectionTechno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Another star rises out of Argentina to make his mark in the deep, melodic realm of dance music. Facundo Mohrr‘s affair with electronica has been instilled in him from birth; his mother, a raver herself, passed on the tradition and continued to attend events as she was raising a young Mohrr. It was only natural that, upon reaching adolescence, he would eventually take his own step behind the decks and begin to create house music.

Mohrr’s path to stardom seemed destined to happen. By 2008, he’d already made it onto Frisky with a release that was remixed by Cid Inc. Shortly after, he’d caught the ears and support by the likes of John Digweed, Sasha, Nick Warren. and of course, his own compatriot Hernan Cattaneo. A decade-plus after his break and Mohrr is just starting to climb toward his peak; in 2017, he found his way onto Henry Saiz‘ Natura Sonoris with a widely-rinsed Bleed EP. He and his longtime friend and collaborator Valdovinos made it onto Get Physical’s Kindisch arm shortly thereafter. Meanwhile, demand was starting to grow for Facundo’s live presence, taking him to the US, Tunisia, Mexico, England, and beyond.

Come 2018, a new friendship was born with Lee Burridge. Their musical visions quickly aligned, and by March, the Argentinian talent had made it onto both Burridge’s imprints of All Day I Dream, and the Hoj co-owned Tale + Tone. It feels fitting that as the year comes to a close, Mohrr’s first extended player on All Day I Dream arrives. La Espere fits perfectly in with the label’s aesthetic: profound, emotive deep house, but with a more energized and rhythmic touch courtesy of Mohrr.

Dancing Astronaut had the pleasure of premiering “Blue Bird” prior to release, but we remained curious as to who this mysterious artist was at his core. So, the only move was to

Techno Tuesday: Facundo Mohrr on his love affair with melodic dance music and embracing imperfectionMohrr 1

Credit: Julian Farina

Describe growing up in Argentina and how you came to fall in love with dance music.
I fell in love with electronic music thanks to my mother. She used to listen to this style. I remember being 13 years old back in 1998 … we lived in a flat which was in the top floor of a building. That flat overlooked Sarmiento Park, where the first raves were held in our country. My mum would go to those parties and I remained at home looking at the lights flashing in the park, from my balcony. Everything was very intriguing to me. So, I started to look up information about the DJs who played at those raves. I investigated in every way I could, because internet had just begun so it was extremely difficult. Some years later, in the last years of my secondary school, a classmate and I discovered FRUITYLOOPS (now known as FL Studio), and since then I have never stopped making music. Today, 15 years after that first contact I still sit in front of a project with the same emotion and adrenaline that I started with.

How did you arrive at your current sound?
Talking about my sound is a bit difficult. I’d say that I always stress the rhythm a lot. I don’t like having energy in my tracks without any sense or pattern. I like deep melodies in my productions, as well as in my sets. I really try to transmit *something* at all times. I like stuff to be happening constantly in my work, and I don’t worry about what others say about going eclectic at times; I see the good side in everything and take advantage of it. Ultimately, I stick to the saying, “there is no good music or bad music; either you like it or not.” I try to evolve and always look for the diversity, and fully accept the risk of upsetting the public in adding surprises into my music.

There’s a huge melodic/progressive movement in Argentina. What do you think draws the people to this kind of music as opposed to other types of dance music?
One name: Hernan Cattaneo, a model in this genre, and he is Argentinian. I think everything is related to this fact. Nowadays, however, other genres are growing up enormously, and all of them have massive festivals monthly. The Argentinian scene is having a great moment. People have access to all kind of information, and thus, they are discovering things constantly.

Now let’s talk about Burning Man. How did you get introduced to this culture, and how has it influenced you since your first time?
My first experience with Burning Man was extraordinary. I truly thought my first year would be 2019, but it seems that when things are meant to happen, nothing can stop them. While on a Central American tour weeks before, a series of events happened that made the event unavoidable this year — from the way I obtained an entrance ticket, to getting there from Buenos Aires, the with my trip back manifesting just two days after Burning Man ended. Everything settled in such a perfect way that if I had planned it beforehand, it wouldn’t have resulted how it did.

Many things are said about Burning Man; I also asked a lot about what it was like and when I finally went, but the only real answer is, “I can not tell you, you must go.” I’ve never experience anything like this in my whole life! The Playa is a magical place that is always wowing you. I met extraordinary people and felt as if all us were a big family. Many profound things happened there and what one can see through the social networks doesn’t represent even 10% of what’s really lived. I was lucky to be able to play music there, and it was awesome. Everything was felt differently. It was as though in the air connects you directly and naturally with the people on the dance floor. Something weirdly awesome? Going cycling around the city and high-fiving with everyone!

You’ve partnered with Valdovinos a lot, including on this EP. What makes you two a good collaboration pair?
Simplicity, ease, and similar methods allow us to get on very well with each other in the studio. We don’t like going ’round and ’round over the same situations; instead, we always choose to go one step forward, and if we get stuck, we delete and start again without thinking too much. This is something I like and makes work fluid — a thing I always look for. I like to go forward fast and I can do it with him. Rodrigo is a great artist and I admire him a lot.

How did the process go of writing ‘La Espere?’ Did you write all of the four tracks specifically for the EP? Any big inspirations in particular?
Not really. When I make music, what comes out is what I felt in that moment. The four tracks of the EP were probably the ones I thought Lee was going to choose. My process is always the same: I search for a loop of drums which I can listen for a long time without getting bored and on this base, I start the musical part, always taking the rhythm as a starting point. I never draw a specific melody or bassline; I record it directly several times, and I let the small mistakes stay. They are part of the process and if it appeals to me, I keep on with the rest. My music is full of mistakes and I love it!

What are your biggest tools for writing music so far? Like a specific plug-in, hardware, a routine you follow to boost creativity, etc…
I make music 24 hours a day, all the time. I neither follow a routine in particular nor wait for an inspiration to come. If a melody doesn’t come, I try out samples, turn them back, double their time, everything that can compensate for the lack of creativity that day. There is always a way, and is often in the most hidden folder waiting for you. If I can’t make sounds, I combine the ones I have, but I never stop.

I have a home studio which is really tiny: a MacBook Pro with a simple sound card, a pair of Adam F 5s, which I love, and a Roland JP08. Regarding software, I use Ableton Live and a few plugins. I like very much to use sampler and loops.

What do you hope to accomplish over the next few years?
What life has ready for me! I will keep on making music and letting it take me wherever I have to go. Always with and for music, expressing myself through it and hoping to transmit it to as many people as I can .

Finally, what else is coming up for Facundo Mohrr?
Music, music and more music! I have several scheduled launches, some of them before the end of the year and others at the beginning of 2019.Apart from some venues in Argentina, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama and Canada, we are also about to launch music on Kermesse with Valdominos. A hectic year is coming!

Saturday Night Session 001: DJ Pauly D takes listeners on a wild ride with custom mix and talks embarrassing tour stories [Interview]

This post was originally published on this site

Saturday Night Session 001: DJ Pauly D takes listeners on a wild ride with custom mix and talks embarrassing tour stories [Interview]DJ Pauly D Champagne

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Some fans of DJ Pauly D are already aware that the Rhode Island native truly thrives behind the DJ booth in front of a roaring crowd. Those who might only have vague memories of his penchant for expert party soundtracking from “DJ Board” cameos during his infamous Jersey Shore run ought to educate themselves. Think the best of DJ Pauly D is on TV? Think again, because few live performances captivate quite like his. The reality star knows his way around a mix, choosing the ever-traditional vinyl as his medium — a skill few current commercial DJs have the skillset to do.

DJ Pauly D, whose real name is Paul DelVecchio, is a different breed of DJ than most in that he does not claim to specialize in a certain type of electronic music. In fact, he doesn’t even box himself into any musical category at all — electronic included. Being an open-format DJ means he plays everything from hip-hop to Spanish music to electronic music, even going so far as to slip in a few punk rock songs into his sets from time to time. Though DelVecchio is known best for his DJing, he’s also released singles of his own, including hit collaboration with Jay Sean, “Back To Love.” In fact, he has a new single on the horizon, which he’s remaining mum about. Whether or not it will skew toward hip-hop as past releases have remains to be seen, but the guessing game has been a fun one thus far.

Saturday Night Session 001: DJ Pauly D takes listeners on a wild ride with custom mix and talks embarrassing tour stories [Interview]DJ Pauly D

DA enlisted DJ Pauly D to kick off Saturday Night Sessions the right way, and he spoke with us about everything from his hidden talents (he is a professional stunt bike rider) to his most embarrassing tour story in recent history. His mix takes the listener through a diverse sonic journey, venturing from Calvin Harris, to Latin grooves, to trap drops perfect for any early night shenanigans. In DJ Pauly D’s words, it is a “true mood enhancer” to kick off Saturday night on a proper note.

_________________________________________________________________________

You’re an open format DJ, and you are the first to say that your sets have something for everyone. What kind of music gets YOU going?

Good question!!! Many different types of music get me going! For instance I like dance music in the gym because it helps my workout, high BPMs to sweat it out and push that extra rep. In my car I like hip-hop and trap to channel my inner gangster…. when I feel like dancing, I listen to Spanish music like some good Reggeaton. With that music it is impossible to stay still!!! When I am DJ’ing I play to the crowd and that takes me on the nights journey, so when it is for myself I let the activity dictate what I am going to play…

Your touring schedule is one of the most packed I’ve seen. You are doing 3-4 shows in the span of 36 hours sometimes, and now you are filming Jersey Shore on top of this. How do you do all of this? How do you maintain balance?

Yes, in a weird way I’m at peace the busier I am. I truly love what I do, and being able to tour the world djing is me living my dream, and that is my fuel for it all. My music puts smiles on a lot of peoples faces and that makes me smile and drives me to keep going. The filming is cool too it puts me in front of the biggest audience I could have ever imagined…..180 countries!!!!!

Do you ever feel like you are burning out?
No, I don’t feel burnt out at all. Keeping it going is actually what keeps me going. I’ve always been driven, and now I am able to do what I love to do, so I don’t ever want to stop.

You tweeted on October 26 that there may be a new DJ Pauly D original record… please tell us more!
Yes!! In between Touring and filming I’ve also been working on new music, and I am really excited about my next single that is about to drop very soon. I can’t wait for you all to hear it!

Do you have either a dream collaborator for a track or separately, someone you would really like to perform for who you have not gotten a chance to?
I would love to jump on a collab with Diplo because he is really talented, and I love his sound. He is also a really good dude. I think a Pauly D Diplo record could make some real noise in the club!

Is Jersey Shore Pauly D the same as DJ Pauly D? Or are these different parts of yourself and what you’re about?

I get asked this a lot, and when people meet me they can see I am just me. Whats really great about my TV stuff is it is reality, and I am not an actor. I am able to be myself on TV. My friends always say “ watching you on the show you say all the same things you say to us,” and I am like, “I know I am just me.” I love being able to DJ while filming the TV show because then people who aren’t able to make it to my shows can experience a Pauly D Show in the comfort of their own living room….so cool, and they didn’t even have to buy a ticket lol!

Do you have any particularly awkward/embarrassing tour stories?
OMG..too many to mention. One that comes to mind was about a year ago when i was dj’ing in Virginia for their Annual Beach Bash. I am outside about an hour into my set and the party was wild,  the sun was shining, and there were thousands of people partying on the beach to my music. It was epic, and then all of a sudden out of nowhere a huge cloud came in, and I turn around to check it out and see what turned off the sun, and boom a hugeee gust of wind came through, and blew my records clean off the turntables. I slammed my laptop down, and it started downpouring. Needless to say it was an abrupt ending to a great party thanks to mother nature. I do that party every year and we still talk about it…..

What is one thing your fans probably don’t know about you?
I am a professional Stunt Bike Rider, I have been riding bikes since I was very young and its another passion of mine. I have over 20 motorcycles.

Most importantly, what kind of Saturday night is your mix going to get our listeners ready for? Are we staying in and having a party? Are we going to the club? Where does this mix take us?

So my mix is the definition of positive vibes, and positive vibes you can literally take with you anywhere. This mix will help you wake up in the AM, get you through a work out, or get you in the mood to go out. It can always be played while you are out, and it is a true mood enhancer. ENJOY!

 

 

Techno Tuesday: Diving into the world of improv techno with 999999999

This post was originally published on this site

Techno Tuesday: Diving into the world of improv techno with 999999999Techno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

It’s hard to believe that 999999999 (pronounced “nine times nine”) have been around for a mere two years. They’ve turned the underground scene on its head since they broke into it with brute force, proving just how fluid techno can be with an entirely-improvised set up with each performance. Not much is known about the mysterious pair outside the fact that they come from Italy and have a penchant for hard, acid-fueled industrial sounds — that’s why Dancing Astronaut decided to wrangle them in for a deep dive into their career. They dish on their preferred hardware, their creative process, and how they’ve found their way to the top of their niche.

Techno Tuesday: Diving into the world of improv techno with 999999999999999999 Facebook Photo

You guys are quite the enigmatic duo. How did you meet and decide to begin making music/performing together?
Originally we are from the same city, Venice. We were both djs and producers in our hometown, we have similar tastes in music and one day we decided to record something together and we were happy of the result, so we decided to launch our own project.

Are any of you classically trained? If so, what instruments did you play? And what made both of you fall in love with electronic music?
No, we don’t have any musical background, first instruments we played were synths and drum machines. It was only about training a lot with what we had. We fall in love with electronic music because before playing we were also clubbers and we were fascinated by this world.

Tell us about perfecting your process; ‘live improvisation’ sounds scary to the average music consumer, or even the average DJ. What key lessons have you learned in your journey thus far?
We didn’t like to play tracks from other people all the time, we preferred playing what we create with our instruments and of course improvise with them, different patterns and doing some cool things in real time. That’s the key of our performances.

Any pieces of hardware you favor in particular, both in the studio and performing live? Why is this? What about hardware you’d like to own or try out in the future?
We are using almost all Elektron stuff (Analog Rytm, Analog Four, Octactrak), perfect machines for live. And of course, for the acid sounds, the 303, not the original one unfortunately, but good clones like Cyclone TT303, Roland Tb03 and Avalon from Abstrakt Instruments. Many effects like reverb, delay and that’s all. I think we don’t need many other stuff, we prefer to use what we have but using all functionalities.

You are also known for your hard, acid-laced techno. What draws you two to this sound as opposed to others? Does it work easier in this format, is it more inspiring to you, etc?
As we told before, we were both djs and we were inspired by the old 90’s acid techno records and that’s what we want to recreate with our releases and live. That old school techno touch, few sounds but well mixed together.

You have released a couple things in the past to supplement your live sets. Do you have any plans of making releases a more regular thing, or are you going to stay firmly in the improvisation zone for the time being? What is your overarching musical vision?
Yes, of course we worked very hard for new records to be released in 2019. So you can expect many original tracks from us on our own label, many collaborations with other labels and artists with other tracks and remixes.

We’re interested to hear about your artistic journey, which we imagine might be a bit more ‘difficult’ for someone as niche and outside the status quo. How did you find your way onto so many prolific dancefloors already, and what are some hardships you’ve overcome in your journey to be full time musicians?
We were simply not happy on being dj on our hometown, where you have the chance to play only if you know somebody and not for your mixing skills. So we felt the need to be listened outside Italy too and the first logical step was to start making tracks and invest money on a new label. We did it and it went very well and it was so fast, we didn’t expect such a great feedback in a short time, but at the same time we believed so strong in this project, working hard every single day, so we are very happy of what we reached now. If you produce good music, you can always find somebody who can give you a chance and that’s what happened to us with our first gigs, then people saw we were good in performing live too and it was easier.

Factor B dishes on Dreamstate, what drives him artistically, and more [Q+A]

This post was originally published on this site

Factor B dishes on Dreamstate, what drives him artistically, and more [Q+A]Factor B Credit His Facebook

Few artists can say they’ve been booked at top festivals in their genre, signed to prolific labels, and made the leap to full-time production in under half a decade after making their entrance into dance music. Factor B falls into this minority category, lighting up the trance world with his burning passion for the music and careful attention to detail in both his sets and his original works and remixes. He’s managed to do this all from scratch in his home country of Australia, which notably has a very small scene for this particular strain of dance music.

Talent and hard work are ultimately undeniable, as the burgeoning artist has proven to himself. Prior to taking up the art of creating and performing electronic music, Factor B clocked in a large number of years as an eager consumer. His love affair with trance began with Ferry Corsten‘s Trance Nation contribution from 2000, and has only continued to grow since then. After close studying of how the music was made and performed, he soon worked up the courage to try his own hand behind the decks, which proved a natural fit for the young fan. He soon found himself taken under Solarstone‘s wing with a signing of “Sacrosanct” to Pure Trance — an uplifting anthem that established him as a force to be reckoned with. But this was only the beginning for Factor B. His clear skill and dedication to his craft landed him on other prolific imprints, like FSOE and Armada’s WAO138?! branch, with constant plays from the likes of Armin Van Buuren, Super8 & Tab, Aly & Fila, and even his role model Ferry Corsten. Such widespread adoration led to his move to Amsterdam in 2017, where since then, Factor B has seen an even bigger explosion in success that has allowed him to make a living off his music.

Ahead of his return to Dreamstate — Insomniac’s beloved trance brand whose flagship Southern California festival has become the genre’s prime destination stateside — we talked to this legend-in-the-making about his drive, influences, recent developments, and what to expect for his second time at the festival.


How would you describe the “Factor B sound?
Uplifting, cinematic, energetic, emotional & my own

What are the most influential trance songs or mixes of your past that have helped guide what you make today?
I loved a lot of the early work from Lange, Airbase, Super8, Nitrous Oxide, Nu NRG, Ferry Corsten, Above & Beyond to name a few. In terms of compilations, The Global Underground series along with Gatecrasher, Slinky & Clubbers Guides were frequently in my CD players.

On that note, you’ve become known for your huge, multilayered uplifting pieces. What draws you to uplifting as opposed to say, psy trance or tech trance?
Even though I don’t mind a bit of Psy & tech, I don’t get the emotional connection to those styles the way I do with melodic trance.
When I write a record, it always has a storyline or a feeling behind it and I love translating that to an audience via sound.

You’ve been living in Amsterdam for a bit over a year now. What are some key career growth moments that have come to you as a result of moving to a trance hub?
I think just simply being closer to the action here in Europe / UK / USA has been highly beneficial for my growth. Not having to fly to & from Australia means more show opportunities and chances to showcase my music / DJing. Being on the tour circuit more often has been amazing as I’ve had the opportunity to get know more about the industry and learn from some of the really cool characters within it.

Tell us about some of the hardships you faced when taking the plunge to do music full time, and how you got over them.
I think for me it was about learning how to manage myself & my producing. Coming from a full time business background – a big challenge for me was learning to understand how to manage my creativity and not force things. I burnt out pretty quick when I first arrived in Amsterdam – I was producing non stop for 9 months, so after that happened, I learnt pretty quick to slow down, harness my inspiration and not to force it. I don’t just sit in the studio because I feel I have to now. To help the process, I have learnt to step away from music for periods of time, focus on things that help clear my mind and then approach my studio sessions nice & fresh.

How does your studio process go? Do you have a starting point you like in a track or an area you feel you have to get ‘just right’ before finishing? How do you address writer’s block?
For me it’s all about the melodies. I tend to write melodies first and once I know it’s got something special about it then I start expanding. Not all ideas make the cut. I’ve learnt to leave & come back to projects after a few days with ‘fresh ears’ so I can get a better perspective on where the track is at. If it dosent pass the goosebump test – it goes in the bin!
A good dose of exercise often helps clear the mind when things aren’t going to plan in the studio, that or a glass of whiskey!

What’s inspiring you to create the most these days?
I think it’s still just the love of the music, it’s thrilling to land a great melody and then see it grow. I love the process – the challenge, the rollercoaster that’s associated with writing music. When it all comes together – it’s difficult to find a better feeling.

Are there any specific goals you’re looking to achieve musically, like starting a new label of your own, experimenting with a new sound, playing a certain place, etc?
Of course there are always aspirations and goals, but for me traveling the world and playing my music is still fresh and exciting. I don’t want to try to do too much too soon. I love trance, I love performing – so for now I’m just focusing on keeping my music fresh and staying optimistic about whatever the future brings!

Sort of related, but since your international explosion, what have been some of your favorite places to play or prized trance memories?
No doubt Luminosity on the Beach is one of my favorite shows each year, along with any tour back home to Australia. The recent Subculture show in my home town of Melbourne in front of 7.5k people was probably one of the greatest moments of my life! The USA as a whole has been incredible for me this year. I’ve never really travelled the USA so to get to see so much of it in the last 12 months has been really exciting. Dreamstate is definitely one of the shows that launched my name in the USA so that’s one in the calendar each year I get really excited for!

You’re coming back to Dreamstate! With last year’s set erring toward the ‘producer’s set’ side, what do you have in store for us this year?
As dreamstate showcases so many great acts I think most artists sets tend to lean towards producer sets nowadays anyway but I have what I feel is some of my best work to date to playout / debut at DS this year so I really can’t wait for it!

What are your thoughts in general on the American trance scene and Dreamstate?
As mentioned previously, it’s been fantastic for me, I’m very grateful to have played so many shows around the states and for Dreamstate this year. The crowds are all great and seemingly really enjoy my uplifting style as I’m fairly fresh to the USA tour circuit. I can’t compare it to anything prior but from my experience thus far it’s healthy and growing!

Finally, what’s next in the Factor B pipeline?

Well, firstly I have an abundance of new music to release in 2019 – First and foremost that’s what excites me the most. On the show front, I have some very exciting announcements to make in the coming weeks, some big debuts and some big tours. Keep an eye on the socials! 🙂

 

It’s not to late to pick up Dreamstate tickets; make sure to purchase them here.

 

 

Photo credit: facebook/FactorBmusic