NMF Roundup: Hardwell and Blasterjaxx give a big room salute, FISHER takes a walk on the darkside, SNBRN gets soulful + more

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NMF Roundup: Hardwell and Blasterjaxx give a big room salute, FISHER takes a walk on the darkside, SNBRN gets soulful + moreNew Music Friday 1

The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.


Fellow Dutchmen and certified big room aficionados, Hardwell and the Blasterjaxx brethren, have released “Bigroom Never Dies,” an earth (or club)-shattering ode to their momentous musical styles.

Brothers by blood and collaborators by choice, DubVision has concocted a new, transcendently vocalized progressive house anthem, “Steal The Moon,” with lyrics and piano chords as ambitious as its title.

Far from his first run with Anjunabeats, Audien has made an auspicious return to the label with “Higher,” twinkling, atmospheric, and emblematically Anjuna, with vocal accents from Cecilia Gault.

Future house furnishings compliments of Mesto‘s “Give Me Love.”

Midnight Kids have given R3HAB‘s formerly much more buoyant “Hold On Tight” a deliciously smooth chillstep makeover.

One of the freshest and most vivacious new faces to make his way on the house spectrum, FISHER, has graced Catch & Release with “Losing It,” pitched-down, nefariously fun, and imperatively danceable.

Jamie Jones‘s tech-laden remix of Elderbrook‘s “Sleepwalking” catapults the listener into a kaleidoscopic chasm of rippling synths and subdued, echoing vocals.

Mothica has once again lent her sensuous and full-bodied musings to insectile counterpart Icarus Moth, for “Don’t,” perpetuating an already longstanding musical partnership.

DeModa’s new saxophone-infused “Her(e),” (crafty) featuring Jafé is a sundry summer salutation — equal parts chillout and funktastic.

Household EDM vocalist, KARRA, joins JayKode for “Living Out Loud,” a brimming future bass track from Trap City Records.

Male-female duo, BONNIE X CLYDE have released their five-track While We’re Young EP, with ambient, chill trap permeating throughout.

The now-one-man show of Flosstradamus has proven he has no intentions of throwing his wild antics in reverse any time soon, as he releases “GUAVA,” a glass-shattering trap offering with Rawtek.

LA’s SNBRN keeps the summer sun a’shining with his new sultry house track, “If I Can’t Have You,” featuring soulful vocals from Harloe.

Crizzly and YDG make a rowdy riddim debut on Doctor P‘s Circus Records with “Knocked Out,” a hardcore dubstep track with searing switch-ups and gear-grinding bass.

Active as ever, Arty has put his whimsical spin on FRND’s “Erase,” a heartening rendition, to say the least.

TyDi and celestial songstress, London Thor, offer some downtempo serenity to help listeners unwind for the weekend with “Please Stay.”

Purple Disco Machine, as the name states, deliver a funky-fresh, guitar-friendly rendition of blossoming newcomer, SOFI TUKKER‘s “Batshit.”

NMF Roundup: Gryffin pairs up with Iselin, Hardwell ‘shines a light,’ Two Friends ramp up for summer, and many more

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NMF Roundup: Gryffin pairs up with Iselin, Hardwell 'shines a light,' Two Friends ramp up for summer, and many more

The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.


Gryffin pairs up with the lovely Iselin, and takes listeners on an emotional journey through “Just For A Moment.”

Hardwell combines moving piano, Wildstylez and hardstyle on his latest, “Shine A Light.”

Dutch producer Maurice West brings everyone to the dance floor with this big room heater.

Guitar riffs swirl as clocks tick, and then piano is introduced as powerful sweeps take you into Nicky Romero‘s epic synth-filled drop.

Bouncy synths, poppy percussion and catchy vocals dazzle Two Friends‘ track, “Bandaid.”

Said The Sky, Dabin and Linn pull on the heartstrings as they transcend listeners into a musical wonderland.

Mako makes magic in “Murder,” with powerful bass and elegant piano that entices from beginning to end.

Tom Budin gets grimy with his remix of JaySounds & Kwame’s “Legacy.”

White Panda and Loote make a song so effortlessly playful that replaying it just once won’t be enough.

Imad Royal shows his dark side with Elliphant on their intricate and interesting track full of gun sounds and chilling whispers.

MEMBA adds another chapter to their EP with the second release, “Keep It Up.”

LMBO creates a cinematic beauty by combining experimental elements along with chill trap ones in their Bronze Whale remix.

Eptic shows up in true Eptic fashion and drops a four-track EP that’s so not for the faint of heart.

High hats dance and Nicole Dash Jones sings as KC Lights builds a groovy house tune around them, perfectly complementing every note.

Squired releases a stutter-studded track engraved with hot rap verses and arrangement from the young artist himself.

Lloyd Macey delivers a late-night house tune with a kick that leaves you coming back for seconds.

Kidswaste releases an atmospheric and instrumental beauty under his alias Beauvois.

Liveliness radiates from Cazzette and Parson James through deep plucks and excellent melodies on “Missing You.”

If life is a highway, then hit the ground running with Conro on his latest jazzy summer tune, “Fired Up,” out now on Monstercat.

Love at first sight might not be a thing, but love at first Win & Woo and Cosmos and Creature sure could be on their horn-filled collaboration, “Beam Me Up.”

Hewan stuns from her compelling voice, to the captivating music that surrounds it on “Strip For Me.”

Aylen lets loose on “Jaws,” as he slings out energetic synths and percussion so groovy everybody will be moving.

Khalid received remixes for “Love Lies,” and Rad Hatter puts a dark spin on it with rolling bass and drops so fat, one might forget for good what the original once sounded like.

Hardwell & Grammy Award-winning orchestra deliver highly anticipated Ultra 2018 intro, ‘Conquerers’

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Does Hardwell ever sleep? In addition to an endless touring schedule, the big room don has consistently delivered new music in 2018, and what’s more — now he’s dropping off his stunning intro from Ultra Music Festival. It’s become an annual tradition for the Dutch superstar to treat fans with the official version of his opening track and they somehow get better with each passing year. Dubbed “Conquerers,” Hardwell’s latest offering is divided into two distinct pieces but conjoin to create one of Hardwell’s strongest productions in recent memory.

The first half of the two-part “Conquerers” was constructed with the assistance of Grammy Award-winning Metropole Orkest who have previously lended their orchestral prowess to some of the world’s most iconic creators, including U2’s Bono, Elvis Presley, and Pete Tong among others.

Hardwell has stated that he specifically works on a fresh intro to debut at Ultra and then play out for the remainder of festival season. In this case, “Conquerers” arrives just two months following the performance so the early offering has fueled some speculation that another special intro track could be looming as the Dutch legend prepares for his return to Tomorrowland later this year following a two-year absence.

NMF Roundup: Like Mike releases a solo track, Hardwell manufactures the next mainstage hit, and more

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Like Mike goes solo with new release “Rewind” with smooth vocals and pop chords. “Rewind” is the perfect smooth summer track that is sure to grace radio stations across the world.

Todd Heller brings pac man to music with gaming synths and interesting chord combinations with cutting drops in new release “Ride It.”

Melodic chords flow through Max Styler‘s latest commercial house release with Ella Boh’s captivating vocals.

Hardwell has created an absolutely tremendous production with newest track “Earthquake” with Harrison.

Oliver Tree combines house, rap, and a commanding electronic backdrop to create unique track “Movement.”

Madnap puts a future pop spin on Win and Woo’s “Chasing Tail.”

Duo Super8 & Tab team up for a new single “Burn” featuring Hero Baldwin, which will be a part of their upcoming album Reformation Part 2.

VIRTU remixed Mark Johns and Imad Royal’s “Heart Shaped Box,” which initially slows down the tempo but falls into a bass and dubstep infused crazy drop.

Xan Griffin is doing a Zodiac series where he releases a song based upon each sign. He has released “Taurus” featuring Tedy for the grounded and practical Taurus’s out there.

Gorgon City has created the next dance floor sensation with new release “Go Deep.”

Mike Williams tries his hand at Commercial House and succeeds in new track “Give It Up” with its catchy drop and compelling vocals.

Shaun Frank and Krewella make a formidable production trio given the quality of new release “Gold Wings.”

In an unlikely remix, Steve Aoki tries his hand at remixing Matoma‘s “Lonely.” His remix of the track adds a bouncy chord progression that is hard to get out of the listener’s head.

Ravell teams up with Jack Trades and BAER for house tune “Feelin’ You.”

Slushii proves his tracks will never lose their bounce in new song”Through the Night” featuring Hatsune Miku with its gaming synths and high pitched chords.

Dubstep fans can get their fix with KAI WACHI‘s new two track ICHOR EP.

Lost Kings go full on pop as they continue to experiment with genres in new song “When We Were Young.”

Photo Credit: Love This Pic

Hardwell talks performance prep, Tomorrowland, and his plans for 2018 [Q&A]

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At this point, Hardwell is virtually a household name. With millions of fans and no shortage of global airtime, the producer has leveraged his niche in this industry into a full fledged cult of personality. From his flagship charity concert to his United Nations initiatives to his perfume line (seriously), the producer does it all.

The superstar also, of course, finds time to make music.

At the end of any given festival weekend, the king of bigroom is always among the conversation of the top performances — he has long been known to melt the mainstage crowd with his unbelievably high energy sets that keep hands up high for hours. Loaded with some of the most massive IDs of the summer and edits that have fans’ mouths agape in awe, Hardwell’s performances seem to somehow take it up a notch each and every year.

Considering the producer’s unique status as a festival mainstay and EDM icon, we spoke with Hardwell about how he preps and what’s up next.

 


 

Your festival sets are always one of the most highly anticipated events of the EDM calendar year. How do you go about your preparation for these big shows and determining your tracklists?

The biggest struggle for me is to finish up the collabs and solo tracks just in time. I’m always changing up my intro so I have to prepare that as well and come up with new edits and mashups. I prepare these sets for months in advance.

You are finally returning to Tomorrowland this year after a few years of not playing. How did that come about and did your reunion with Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike play any sort of role in your comeback?

Tomorrowland didn’t book me for a couple years after the small Twitter thing. We’re all good though and I’m really excited to be back at Tomorrowland. I also have that collab now with Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike. There’s no name for the song though and it’s not even finished yet, we just premiered it at their show.

Since last summer you dropped 3 EPs, what are your plans for 2018? Are you looking to make a follow up album or to just continue to release more EPs and singles?

I’m not really into an album anymore. I don’t think it’s really relevant for an EDM artists to actually release an album but today during my set you can expect a couple of songs from the Hardwell & Friends EP, Vol. 4. Some great collabs and not even with upcoming guys but bigger guys plus a couple of solo tracks and the new intro obviously. I’m really proud of my closing track too, which is a new hardstyle collab with Wildstylez.

Who is one person that you would love to collab with this year that you haven’t in the past?

If I had to pick one person, my dream collab would definitely be Pharrell Williams. I admire him as a producer, as a person and as a singer/songwriter. Everything he does, I am just a really big fan of him.

How do you feel about the current EDM and pop crossover that’s happening with artists like Zedd and The Chainsmokers? Do you think it’s here to last?

With EDM, it’s getting bigger and bigger. Don’t forget that dance music was an underground movement. People always say that dance music became mainstream but it’s the other way around. The mainstream got more into dance music so it was just a matter of time before the pop culture influenced dance music and the other way around. I like it though, it creates diversity and makes it more accessible for everybody, which makes dance music more interesting. If you’re a young kid and hear a dance record on the radio, it could automatically get you into techno and that’s great for dance music. As long as there is a proper underground and a proper mainstream, they will both benefit from each other.

We know you had a massive collab with Martin Garrix that had the entire world talking. Is that officially scrapped and do you have plans to work on something in the future?

It’s always great to collaborate with an artist like Martin, he’s a fellow Dutchman and we always have great fun bouncing ideas off each other – I don’t wanna say it’s scrapped as it may see the light of day yet. You know, we’re both very busy touring with shows non-stop and our own labels but we have a lot of creative fun together. We for sure hope to have something out in the future.

Who are some of your favorite upcoming producers at the moment?

SWACQ is a really cool producer from France, I played an ID of his in my ULTRA Miami set so I wonder if anyone can spot it! Harrison is a UK vocalist that I’ve also worked with before on my United We Are album and he’s producing his own music now with a future-bass kinda sound, different for him but it works – we also have a new track ‘Earthquake’ dropping together soon. Trobi is also a super-new artist who I’ve got some exciting music from in my inbox, a really fresh sound and It would be amazing to release something from him on my label Revealed, who knows!

NMF Roundup: Hardwell and Steve Aoki go hard, Cheat Codes reworks Tom Walker, Xan Griffin shreds + more

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The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.


Take a serendipitous end-of-week drive with Youngr through his newest syrupy indie pop number, “Drive.”

Ulterior Motive lends the robustly voiced Thandi Phoenix’s formerly cheerful and heavily remixed “My Way” a foreboding, ominous drum & bass fervor.

EDM eminences, Hardwell and Steve Aoki, team up with Kris Kiss for, “Anthem,” a hype-heavy track that packs the punch of a high-speed bus.

Austin, Texas’ big-room virtuosos, Tritonal, have released a radiant club mix of their recent “Out Of My Mind,” featuring lustrously warm vocals from Riley Clemmons.

LA-based Paris Blohm says, “All aboard the big-room bus,” with his newest heart-pumping, fist-pump-preferred “Save Us,” featuring ENOK.

Cheat Codes breathes some progressive house heat into Tom Walker’s “Leave A Light On,” with simultaneously atmospheric and playful synths/guitar plucks and ample bass.

Nomad’s newest “The Machines” is, as the name implies, a highly tech-oriented, dizzying drum & bass depiction of “the war between machine and human.”

Xan Griffin has resolved to shred unworthy speakers to bits with his Asian-inspired, guitar-sampling trap tune, “Aries.”

The always-colorful Carmada duo has released another bounce-infused future bass beauty, featuring the velvety-voiced tribes.

Robby East wields melody and instrumentation galore in his whimsical new house track, “Burning In My Soul,” which is practically begging for a play just before a Friday night on the town.

Sullivan King pushes pedal to the metal with “Step Back,” a screeching, dubstep/electro hybrid that should be avoided by the delicately eared.

Faithful to its title, Seasoned Souls’ technicolor, piano piece, “Ripple,” flutters and flickers like an enchanted body of sweet-sounding water.

Sober rob unleashes some liquid trap for “Supermoon,” which features sweet soprano, Karra, and a heady serving of astral-themed sampling, fit to be heard under the Friday night sky.

Hardwell’s Ultra 20 set get the ‘drops only’ treatment [Watch]

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Those who want to bypass builds and just enjoy a series of nonstop drops can now seamlessly do so via a “drops only” oriented reboot of Hardwell’s Ultra 20 set.

An amalgamation of Hardwell’s early electronic classics and new IDs alike, Hardwell’s original Ultra 20 set generates a near palpable anticipation leading up to each drop, but when removed, the builds give way to a high powered procession of the EDM titan’s thunderous descents.

H/T: EDM Sauce

Insomniac fills out robust 2018 EDC week with over 25 artists and 14 new shows

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Insomniac added over 25 new artists and 14 events to the fifth annual EDC week in Las Vegas, coinciding with the festival’s 22nd annual installment. 

In doing so, the festival welcomes 14 signature party experiences during the week of May 16–23, including the hardstyle focused Basscon Pool Party and two dubstep-fueled Bassrush parties, along with a variety of diverse headliners throughout the week. New programming includes a vast array of parties across the cities hottest nightclubs, including Elephante, Porter Robinson, NGHTMRE, Gryffin, Hot Since 82, Illenium, Yellow Claw, and many more.

Full programming details, more information, and tickets are available here.

Hardwell: a Swedish House Mafia reunion at Ultra ‘has to happen’ [Watch]

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Hardwell

Netherlands radio station,SLAM! recently got Hardwell on the phone to talk Miami Music Week, his upcoming Main Stage slot at Ultra Music Festival‘s opening day on Friday, March 23, and, of course, speculation that Swedish House Mafia will reconvene for a special anniversary performance.

“Most of the DJs have some free time in January and February, and that results in new music,” Hardwell said when asked if he would debut unreleased material in Ultra tradition during his headlining set. “I made lots of new music and I’m going to play [it] on Friday,” Hardwell added.

And like many ticket holders, Hardwell is holding out for an SHM reunion. “I think it’s going to happen,” Hardwell stated in response to the question as to whether he believed the Swedish super group would indeed appear at Ultra 20. “There are a lot of rumors, the deciding factor for me was that Steve Angello, one of the three members of SHM, cancelled his Asia tour out of the blue, suddenly doesn’t have any shows planned, and is now in Miami. For me, this means that it has to happen.”

Those attending Miami Music Week can peruse the best parties of the biggest week in electronic music as curated by Dancing Astronaut, here.

Pop idol or mainstage act? DallasK combines divergent directions [Interview + Spring Break Playlist]

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DallasK Press

Orlando native Dallas Koehlke might not have been able to legally drink at 19, but that didn’t stop him from booking club sets across the country thanks to his infectious beats and mounting popularity within the electronic dance music scene. The young producer, better known as DallasK, followed his momentum and moved to Los Angeles with a plan to become the next big electronic music producer. If someone had told him that this move would lead to his production skills being the glue behind one of America’s hottest girl groups, and that his singing would be the one aspect holding his diverse roster of releases together, he probably would have found the idea outlandish.

Since Dallas’s move, now six years ago, the 27-year-old has continued to prove that his artistry can hardly be confined to a box. His diverse range of skills have opened doors for him to produce for pop’s biggest acts, release under his own moniker, and perform live as a vocalist. While his past is littered with heavy hitting electronic music collaborations with names such as Tiesto, KSHMR, and Hardwell, his future includes releasing a series of diverse singles that will singularly be held together with his vocals. Some will skew pop, others electronic, and his most recent release “Self Control” even has hints of the punk rock he listened to as a teen.

Koehlke spoke with DA about his unexpected entrance into the pop industry and how it is impacting his future in the electronic music scene. When asked whether he would like to be America’s next pop idol or a headliner at Ultra, the producer noted that his goal is to be a hybrid of the two. His ascent from electronic into pop is reminiscent of The Chainsmokers‘ journey, and it is not one we many artists successfully navigate. Despite The Chainsmokers’ immense success, the backlash they have received along the way as they have attempted to find relevance within both the electronic and pop fan communities has been severe.

Koehlke is optimistic about his future trying to bridge the two worlds together through his music, and if anyone is able to do it, he is a likely candidate. As someone who is ingrained in both scenes, Koehlke’s insights about the differences of a producer’s role in pop versus electronic music are unique. Read the full interview below, and check out DallasK’s exclusive Spring Break x Dancing Astronaut Playlist:


So tell me a little about your background.

I’ve been making dance music and touring as a DJ since I was 19 years old. I’ve done a lot of collabs with Hardwell, Tiesto, and Martin Garrix — people like that. When I moved to LA when I was 21, I met a lot of people and got into the producing songwriting world. I’ve been doing that in tandem with touring all of the time, making club records, and over the past year, I’ve been trying to figure out how I can combine those two worlds.

When I moved to LA, I never thought I would be writing songs, singing, and making pop songs for girl bands. That’s where I found myself, and I really enjoyed it. I figured as a DJ, I wanted to incorporate that because I felt like the music I was making as an artist wasn’t necessarily indicative of me as a person? So, that’s why I’m really happy with “All My Life,” and “Self Control,” because I think they are really indicative of my life. “All My Life” has all of the electro house and the drops, and “Self Control” is kind of indicative of the emo music I listened to growing up. Beyond that, the new stuff that is coming out in a couple of months will be similar and different, and I think my voice is the glue that ties is all together.

Was singing on your tracks intimidating for you? I know for a lot of people it is.

I think the thing that gave me the courage to do it is that my publishing company had an event where they wanted me to perform some of the songs I had written for other people. They were like, ‘you know you can accompany someone on guitar, or you can sing it, or someone else can sing it.’ I was of the mentality at the time that I wanted to challenge myself, and although playing guitar with someone else singing would have been cool,  I realized the way for this to be the most challenging was getting up there and singing. I had never done that before.

Even when I was in a band when I was younger, I would play guitar and bass. I was never a vocalist. So I kind of agreed haphazardly without really knowing whether I could do it or not. I practiced a bit, and then I performed “Work from Home” by Fifth Harmony, which I wrote the year before, and a Justin Bieber “What do you mean?” cover. It was pretty well received, and everyone on my team was like, “why don’t you sing- you should sing.” Then I backtracked and had all of this music coming out, and I was like, “well hey, why don’t I record these, and see if I like how I sound.” I’ve been producing for other artists, and all I’ve been doing is cutting people’s voices onto songs, so I have the knowledge of what to do. So I did it, and I was happy with the result. Everyone else was as well, so I figured that was the best way forward. It was still very nerve wracking with the live performance thing, and we are still developing the live show. Putting them out and seeing how people react is also very stressful, but it’s been good so far.

You’re career kind of began and was rooted in the electronic music world. Then you branched into pop production, and now you are even the vocalist on your tracks. In your ideal world, what does the future hold? Are you America’s next pop boy or are you headlining Ultra?

Um, that’s a really good question, and I think it’s some kind of hybrid that doesn’t really exist yet, but I’m working on it. I really do love djing, and I love the dance music community. The fans are so passionate. They always come to the shows, and they always come to the events. What I find with other kinds of music is that it is a more passive fan experience. There are alot of people online and around the world, and obviously everyone can’t be everywhere at every festival, but (with electronic music) I feel like it’s a real community, and I love that as like a live blueprint for where I see my show.

10 years from now, I hope I’m just still making dope music. I don’t know what the style will be. It’s hard to tell. If you told Kanye West when he made The College Dropout that he was going to make Yeezus 10 years after, and it was going to be all of this crazy production, and Daft Punk would be on it- he probably wouldn’t have been able to guess that. But yeah, I definitely see myself as some kind of a hybrid between a vocalist and electronic music producer. I think what I always really love about electronic music, especially with the live performance, is that it is just so powerful. Kind of like, it outperforms any other kind of music for me. I mean, if you’re at Coachella, and Arcade Fire is playing mainstage, and Skrillex is at the Sahara Tent — Arcade Fire is cool, but there is no contest. There is not going to be more energy at that stage than there is for Skrillex.

As electronic music becomes more mainstream and poppy, there has been real backlash from electronic music fans who claim that producer’s are selling out and the music is becoming formulaic. As someone who floats between both worlds, what are your thoughts on this?

I’m a fan of lots of different types of music. I see people who float between the two worlds because they are fans of music, and they don’t get caught up in a genre determining if they can like something or not. I see both sides, where people are like, ‘What is this- why are you making Revealed Records music?’ Then I’ve seen people be like, “Holy Shit, I love your old stuff, and this is really good too. I would have never expected you to make this and keep going with it.” But yeah, there are definitely people who are fans of one specific sound or one genre and want to be superiorist with that. I think with streaming platforms and people having access to so much music, genres are becoming a little less important, and that’s what makes it more feasible for someone like me to just make anything I want.

Is the creative process different for you when it comes to producing music for hip pop and pop artists versus creating your own releases? Or is it all the same creative energy for you?

It definitely has different energies, and I think in some ways making music for other people is more freeing because you aren’t restricted. If you’re the voice of something, it all comes back to you, and you are essentially responsible for that. But, if you are making a song for somebody else, and it has a sound you may not have as an artist, but it’s something you think is cool, it gives you the freedom to do that. I will say it is definitely more fulfilling releasing music as an artist, and that’s why I took this time to build my artistry as a singer and songwriter. When you give a song to someone else it becomes their song, and if you really do feel connected to it, but then it is theirs, it’s a weird kind of gray area where it can be very rewarding and very disenchanting in the same way, so making music as an artist is definitely more fulfilling for me. It does come with more challenges with what do I want my message to be, and what do I want to say. It is my voice and my songwriting on top of just making crazy productions and bangers. They are both fun. I enjoy both, and they both have their challenges, but I think being an artist is my favorite thing, and my way forward. If I write a song, and it’s pretty dope, but it’s not right for me, then that is pretty freeing because I have a million outlets to send it to. That gives me the ability to take more risks as an artist.

You’re also in a unique position when it comes to your perspective on the electronic music industry because you’re a part of the electronic music and pop music industries. Do you have observations on how these industries function differently or similarly to one another, and what that looks like?

I think the last few years, with streaming really becoming the way that people consume music, this has led to the music industry really getting turned on its head. Pop has always been focused on radio, right? That’s the way you would break an artist. Radio is still important, and it has plays, but streaming broke down the barriers and allows artists to reach millions of people easily and effectively. Even as an independent artist, you can do this without having a million dollar radio budget. That’s what was cool about electronic music. Because of the internet and YouTube, you’d go to a festival and hear a song, and other DJs would play it, it was kind of like this other way you’d view success instead of going down the radio path, which was like, you know how you became a mainstay in music in general.

With pop, they are more concerned with touring, radio plays, radio shows, and building fans online. That’s important to both worlds, but I think now, it’s the Wild Wild West. You just try stuff, and people connect to it, and if they don’t, you try something else. You know really quickly if it works. I think people have the freedom to do that now, which is really really important. Going back to dance music- a pop artist would make an album, and spend 6-8 months, and $400,000, and that album may not have any hits that people connected with. Then it’s going to take them 6-8 months, a year, 3 years, to do another album, and the record label probably isn’t going to want to put as much money into it because they didn’t make their initial investment back. With dance music it’s like, kids on the computer, going to shows, put something out, if it gets really big then great. If it doesn’t then great- I have another song that I am going to put out right now, and I think that’s the most exciting part of how that’s permeated to pop music now, and that level of quickness.

Is there a particular artist who, if you were to collaborate with this person, you’d be like- this is the pinnacle of my career, and I’ve made it?

Definitely Daft Punk, for sure. Kanye West probably too. But yeah, between those two and M83, that would be my big “wow, this is like as good as it gets.”

What can we expect from you in the next year?

Definitely more singles. I don’t have any plans for an EP or an album or anything like that. Like I said, I like the ability to move fast and see if things work, and I think my goal this year is to release more music than I have in all of my other years of making music combined, and just being able to like, put stuff out and feel like it has a home. Next couple of months it will be single after single, and I’m really excited about it.

In the meantime, Spring Break is upon us, and DallasK put together the perfect playlist to celebrate. Check out the playlist including his new single “All My Life.”