Destructo releases ‘All Nite’ remixes from Getter, Motez and more

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Industry mainstay and G-House legend Destructo has been known to bring out the best talent for his many events, including EDC, Hard Summer, Holy Ship!, and more. This EP is no different, featuring five remixes of “All Nite,” a track from his recent Renegade project.

The blend of house and hip hop in Destructo’s original track, which features Bay Area icons E-40 and Too $hort, allows for a versatile and engaging range of remixes. Noise Frenzy leads off the EP, dropping a dark house remix with a growling bassline fit for any dance floor.

Thereafter, Getter‘s remix follows, in which he channels his inner Herobust for a crisp yet grimy trap and dubstep output. The second half of the EP features both Motez and Brohug’s house offerings along with Parker’s energetic festival trap chaos. This diverse and refreshing remix EP means “All Nite” is here to stay and may be a staple of this festival season.

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Meet the underground talent of HARD Summer: Kittens

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In the course of a decade, HARD has become one of dance music’s most globally recognized event producers. This August marks a major milestone for the brand: the 10-year anniversary of its flagship festival, HARD Summer. To celebrate the momentous occasion, Gary Richards and co. have pulled out all the stops for their LA institution with prestigious headliners such as Dog Blood, Justice, Bassnectar, and Snoop Dogg. However, the festival’s enviable lineup extends far beyond its closing slots. Delving further into the lineup, we’ve tapped some of our favorite acts on the bill for an interview series leading up to the festival.

Those unfamiliar with LA’s Kittens, may want to check their cute and cuddly expectations at the door. A tenacious tastemaker, skilled operator behind the console, and vetted Fool’s Gold affiliate, Kittens is coming up behind dance and pop’s most venerated forces as she sinks her claws into the game. Following quite literally in the footsteps of another certain selector who got his start spinning beats for Kanye West on the road some time ago, while learning the industry ropes from her mentor, Usher, Kittens is on the rise, fine-tuning a sound that’s a spirited blend of her genre-blurring inspirations. What else would one expect from A-Trak and the Prince of Pop’s collective brainchild though?

But support from some of the industry giants and the endless count of “top female DJ lists” aren’t Kittens’ highest interests. She’s out to make a name for herself as a cultural influencer, and DJing is just the vehicle that’s getting her there. Dabbling in trap, hip-hop, club and house genres, Kittens isn’t contained by one sound, making her a crafty wild card behind the decks. She’s even coined her own splinter-genre term, “LA Club” alongside Hoodboi, Falcons, and Promenite as a member of the Athletixx collective.

Since Kittens’ emergence in 2013, she’s proven to be a captivating, vivacious talent who’s steady upward trajectory has been entertaining to watch, and hear, although it’s still very clearly just the beginning for this burgeoning soon-to-be jet setter. With a number of high profile bookings under her belt, including Fool’s Gold’s Day Off series, Coachella’s Heineken House, and HARD’s Holy Ship and Day of the Dead, Kittens is no stranger to the booming LA dance circuit, though this summer, she’s taking on LA’s biggest dance event of the year for one of the biggest outings of her career.

Read our interview with Kittens below.

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What has been the biggest breakthrough of your career?

DJ’ing for Kid Cudi. I was going to college at the time and working a marketing job at a nightclub (where sometimes I was able to DJ). I happened to be playing the right stuff at the right time apparently, because one thing led to another and next thing I knew — I was touring with Kid Cudi. I went from playing small local parties to full on stadiums and festivals plus, was able to meet some incredible people who have been huge supporters throughout my career. That was really one of those “meant to be” fate-type of moments in my life.

What are you looking forward to most about HARD Summer?

I’m really excited to be playing alongside so many artists I really love and look up to. HARD Summer has always been a big deal for me because I started attending many years ago and Gary just always gets really cool people booked who you don’t get to see too often.

What is different about your experience performing at festivals now as opposed to the beginning of your career?

Definitely playing at better times has been a huge difference. It’s nice playing to a crowd that already had a minute to get settled in and warmed up for the day but more than that, I think just being much more comfortable with myself has made a huge difference. I was always so nervous to the point where I couldn’t just really let go while I played. I was more focused on not messing anything up, lol. Now it’s just really fun and exciting.

If you could be another artist for a day, who would you pick?

Diplo probably. He really gets to do it all from the traveling to crazy places, to working with the best artists…playing and attending really dope events in general. His life seems pretty fire.

If you could recommend three artists to catch from the lineup, who would you pick?

Uniiqu3 (she’s got the most amazing energy and is just such a goddess), Skepta (you don’t wanna miss out on the heaviest UK turn up vibe of the century), & Mike WiLL Made-It (we all know he’s gonna be bringing out all your favorite rappers for this one).

If you were recruited to provide an Essential Mix in 2017, what’s the one song you couldn’t leave out?

Anything by Future lol. I’ve been the biggest Stan for Future since his first mixtapes and my love for him just grows. It’s become an obnoxious joke amongst my friends at this point.

Prepare for Kittens’ HARD Summer set with her HARD Day of the Dead 2015 mixtape:

Information and tickets for HARD Summer are available here.

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Meet the underground talent of HARD Summer: Madam X

Meet the underground talent of HARD Summer: Madam X

This post was originally published on this site

In the course of a decade, HARD has become one of dance music’s most globally recognized event producers. This August marks a major milestone for the brand: the 10-year anniversary of its flagship festival, HARD Summer. To celebrate the momentous occasion, Gary Richards and co. have pulled out all the stops for their LA institution with prestigious headliners such as Dog Blood, Justice, Bassnectar, and Snoop Dogg. However, the festival’s enviable lineup extends far beyond its closing slots. Delving further into the lineup, we’ve tapped some of our favorite acts on the bill for an interview series leading up to the festival.

Call it American arrogance, but it’s always a bit of a surprise to come across an artist who has never visited the US, given the ever-expanding dance festival scene which has pervaded the country in the last decade. This year’s HARD Summer will mark the first time that Madam X steps stateside. However, a look over the British DJ’s résumé indicates how much her presence is needed across the pond.

In 2010, Madam X began her integral career in Manchester’s dance music scene as the co-founder of Big People Music (BPM), a label and producer of regular club nights in the city. In the years since, she has become a fixture in dance music broadcasting, with experience hosting programs on BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra, Channel 4, Rinse FM, and NTS Radio.

Madam X has also garnered a reputation as a key tastemaker in the UK bass scene because of her acute blending of the genre with elements of grime, techno and garage. For the last three years, she’s established herself perhaps most notably through her own KAIZEN imprint, which takes its name from the Japanese business philosophy of seeking “continual improvement.”

Since launching KAIZEN, Madam X has certainly continued to improve on her legacy, earning coveted DJ slots at Reading festival, a Bristol-set broadcast of the Boiler Room, and, most recently, Glastonbury. Indeed, HARD Summer is fortuitous to be the first American setting to become a part of the artist’s upward trajectory.

Read our interview with Madam X below.

madam x press shot

 

What was your first label release? Would you still play it in a show?

Biome’s Griddled EP. Still bang it out today!

What has been the biggest breakthrough of your career?

Hard to say. There wasn’t really a pivotal moment or catalyst but I’m most proud of getting my KAIZEN label up & running and gigging all over the world. Djing at Manana festival in Cuba was so surreal, I didn’t even know they’d be into the music I play but it was so much fun

What are you looking forward to most about HARD Summer?

I’ve never been to the US! Really excited to fly over for the first time and see how you guys get down!

What is different about your experience performing at festivals now as opposed to the beginning of your career?

My style’s definitely developed as I’ve grown into my sound. I’m starting to see familiar faces prop up at the front row which is so cool. The crowds are definitely bigger now but I still find it mental that people take time out of their day to come and watch me. It’s honestly the nicest feeling!

If you could be another artist for a day, who would you pick?

DJ Khaled – he’s so extra

If you could recommend three artists to catch from the lineup, who would you pick?

Jackmaster and my girls Nina Las Vegas & Uniiqu3

If you were recruited to provide an Essential Mix in 2017, what’s the one song you couldn’t leave out?

Fargo – Biome (it’s not out yet but coming soon to KAIZEN. Absolute belter!)

Get a sense of Madam X’s style with her March 30 mix for NTS Radio.

MTV Live to air documentary around HARD events

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Gary Richards, sometimes better known as Destructo, has grown his HARD brand over the past 10 years from a grassroots electronic movement into a behemoth institution and a pillar of American EDM culture. Known for its cutting-edge lineups, which have included the likes of Ice Cube, Justice, and deadmau5 v. Eric Prydz plus the introduction of the brand’s cult-favorite Holy Ship!, HARD indeed has a very impressive resume.

Its success over the years has attracted a partnership with MTV Live, who developed a special documentary on Richards and HARD. Titled Hard 10 – A Decade of Crashing Sound Barriers, the special will cover the the evolution of HARD over the years and feature a wide array of old and new footage, as well as interviews with some of the most prolific acts to grace the HARD stages. Famed journalist Steve Appleford was in charge of the film, indicating a quality piece of work.

“It’s incredible how much the HARD audience has grown and I’m thankful for all the fans around the globe that have come to celebrate with us at our festivals, stages and aboard HOLY SHIP! I am thankful for all the amazing artists who performed at the festival over the years,” said Richards his brainchild’s growth.  I hope this MTV piece sheds some light on the past 10 year history of HARD and my life.”

Streaming for Hard 10 begins June 10.

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Dog Blood reveal HARD Summer will be their only festival in 2017

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Perhaps the best surprise of the HARD Summer Musical Festival 10th anniversary line-up was the news that Dog Blood would be topping the bill in 2017. As the supergroup side project conceived by Skrillex and Boys Noize, the two haven’t appeared together since HARD Red Rocks nearly two years ago.

On May 18th, however, Dog Blood took to their Facebook socials to express their excitement for HSMF, but also to announce to fans that it would be their only show in 2017. The announcement most likely comes as a joy to HARD founder Gary Richards, since Dog Blood is sure to draw in a massive crowd on their own. Now that it’s been confirmed as their first and only show in nearly two years, tickets should be start flying off the decks.

Maybe there’s a possibility for the return of Dog Blood in 2018? There’s no way to know for sure, but their HARD Summer appearance is sure to be the 2017 festival set to see. Grab tickets here to join Dog Blood August 5-6, 2017 at The Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, California.

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Check out a 360° view of Holy Ship

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The wonders of 360° photography are allowing people to have an even more immersive streaming experience when it comes to events they cannot attend. This year, a fan operating under the guise of EDM Daycare took a camera to Holy Ship’s first weekend to capture a snippet of the action for those wondering what it might be like to party with Destructo and his crew onboard a ship en route to paradise.

The clip clocks in at a brief two minutes, but images of people happily partying on the beach and on the boat decks along with crowds of people walking happily through vibrantly-lit rooms transformed into dance spaces is just enough to spark enough intrigue for potential festival-goers to try joining the party in 2018. Explore the ship’s majesty in the video player above.

H/T: EDM Daycare

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Ecstasy confirmed as cause of death in 3 Hard Summer fatalities

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Back in August, three attendees of HARD Summer — all between the ages of 20 and 22 years old — tragically passed away at the Southern California music festival. Hot weather was deemed a contributing factor, with temperatures reaching the upper-90s throughout the weekend. The primary causes of death, however, were not immediately clear.

Nearly four months later, the coroner has issued an official report, confirming ecstasy as the primary cause of death in all three cases. Mike Sutcliffe, the supervising coroner investigator, labeled the deaths as due to “acute MDMA toxicity.”

According to Fontana Herald News, who reported the coroner’s statement, the three deaths are believed to be “the most ever caused by Ecstasy at one high-profile Electronic Dance Music (EDM) festival.”

It’s troubling news for HARD Summer, who experienced two deaths the year prior, also linked to ecstasy overdose. More than that, however, it’s a sobering reminder about the inherent dangers of MDMA and the absolutely necessity for more drug safety awareness. Nothing will change until we change the culture itself.

Kaskade: ‘The war on drugs is a farce’

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Last week, HARD revealed that Day of the Dead would not take place in 2016 – marking the first year the event production company has not held a Halloween event in the Los Angeles area since establishing HARD Haunted Mansion in 2008. Dispelling rumors that DOTD had been cancelled in response to the deaths at this year’s HARD Summer, spokeswoman Alexandra Greenberg commented, “HARD decided earlier in the year not to schedule it this year for production reasons. Preparing for two festivals at two new locations (HARD SUMMER and HARD Day of the Dead) so close together would have been too much of a strain on their resources.”

Despite the truth of Greenberg’s statement, Los Angeles Times posted an article entitled, “After a summer of deaths, popular Halloween rave won’t be held,” analyzing the circumstances leading to HARD’s inability to establish a permanent venue for Los Angeles events, and quoting statistics of substance abuse-related deaths at raves.

In response to the paper’s article, Kaskade wrote an editorial on his own website, taking issue with the article’s title and the implicit characterization that raves can be considered responsible parties for individual patrons’ drug-related deaths.

“Really. A summer of deaths. Really.”

In his response, Kaskade contrasts the statistics for substance-related deaths at raves with the average number of daily deaths caused by drunk driving accidents. Kaskade writes, “So, in the past 10 years there have been 21 substance-related deaths at dance events. And EVERY DAY there are 27 substance-related deaths, which are somehow less news and attention worthy. I suppose once you reach a certain point, the news doesn’t notice anymore.”

Kaskade goes on to note that he would like to use his platform to help prevent fatalities from substance abuse, strongly emphasizing the inefficacy of prohibitive measures as solutions:

“I’m happy to tackle substance abuse. I’m happy to use my influence to encourage people to be responsible, to stay alive. But this is a world-wide problem, something that is not even close to being unique to dance music. Part of the problem is people trying to simple-size it. Raves = drugs. So close them down.

“Not going to work, and we all know it. Time to devote your column inches to some real stories. The war on drugs is a farce. There are better answers than regurgitating the same alarmist solutions that have never worked, which will NEVER work. Try this on: education, harm reduction and legalization.”

Kaskade’s argument against prohibitive solutions in many ways mirrors Pasquale Rotella’s response to LA County’s proposed rave ban in August 2015. However, Kaskade’s message carries a different weight than Rotella’s – and those of most other vocal dissenters to rave prohibition. Kaskade’s platform is influential not only because of his reach, but also because of who Kaskade is.

As a mormon, Kaskade is staunchly sober for religious reasons. His frank acknowledgment that the war on drugs is a “farce” cannot be misconstrued to be an apologist statement; his assertion that “regurgitating alarmist solutions” is an ineffective reaction to drug fatalities is an objective observation, in spite of his personal attitude toward drug use.

The degree to which Kaskade’s observations will be heeded by lawmakers and the media remains to be seen. Los Angeles Times amended their article to reference the producer’s comments after his article’s publication.

Via: Kaskade, Los Angeles Times