Gift Guide: 10 artist merch items perfect for holiday gifting

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10 Artist Merch Items perfect for Holiday Gifting

 

Each year hundreds of artists go above and beyond in their merch releases, putting in creative efforts that offer their fans the opportunity to show their love in a vast variety of ways.

This gift guide celebrates the unmissable, unique merch of 2017. From ‘Tweeter paper’ to a limited-run comic book, this complete collection of product prowess is the perfect place to finish out the Holiday gifting. And while there’s sadly no longer an opportunity to “Have Dillion Francis Babysit Your Kid” or buy Diplo‘s limited-run “Cowboy” shirt, we’ve gathered an impressive merch array sure to bring plenty Holiday cheer.

Words by Grace Fleisher

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Daft Punk Robot Helmet Ring

 

Robot rock? No — but a robot ring might do. The GM08 Helmet Ring is the only ring left in stock, but be sure to snag this sterling silver keepsake sure to withstand the most alive of raves.

Purchase here

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Malaa Mask

 

Who is Malaa? With this signature balaclava, it could be you.

Purchase here

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OWSLA No. 2 Mystery Gift Box

 

With three t-shirts, one fleece, two hats, and one accessory, OWSLA’s No. 2 mystery gift box — or the other two available options — is surely the No. 1 gift for the OWSLA lover in your life.

Purchase here

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Lane 8 Long Sleeve

 

2018 will be Lane 8’s year. Daniel Goldstein’s releasing his second studio album in mid-January and this delightful floral graphic arrives just in time for the highly-anticipated release.

Purchase here

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Mija’s FK A GENRE RIP GENRE TEE

 

Mija’s ‘FK A GENRE’ ethos has taken the EDM world by storm. She’s got a DIY-punk-rock mentality and the sick merch to match.

Purchase here

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Claude VonStroke Jenny Necklace

 

We really can’t think of a better way to rep the Dirtybird daddy than this VonStroke ‘Jenny’ necklace.

Purchase here

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Kill The Noise Tweeter Paper

 

Freshin’ up AND read some tweets with your very own Kill The Noise ‘Tweeter Paper.’

Purchase here

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Frank Ocean Endless Vinyl

 

Our love for Frank Ocean is Endless. Celebrate this year’s slew of satisfying surprises with this exclusive vinyl.

Purchase here

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(All of) Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN. Merch

 

Kung Fu Kenny undebatably dropped the hottest tour merch of 2017. It’s had us saying DAMN. all year… so get it before it’s too late.

Purchase here

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REZZ’s Mass Manipulation Comic Book

 

REZZ’s 60-page psychedelic comic book is the most artistically sound, unique merch release of 2017. Not only is it true to her vision, it cements both her poised takeover of music and Planet Earth alike.

Purchase here

Good Morning Mix: Kickstart your morning with Heidi’s timeless ENTER.Terrace mix at Space Ibiza

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Take a trip back in time this morning. Explore, discover, and enter the sonic soundscapes of Space Ibiza on July 10, 2014.

Screen Shot 2017-11-06 at 6.17.09 PM

Three years ago, Richie Hawtin took his ENTER. performance to Space Ibiza. In his quintessential curatorial culmination of music, sake, and technology, senses were heightened and experience amplified. Exemplifying the soaring, calculated ethos of said event was Heidi, largely known as the label head of the spearheading Jackathon Jams and a late pioneer in today’s house and techno realm. At ENTER., Heidi took the crowd on a contemplative journey of house and techno.

Having launched her illustrious career over a decade ago and since hosted her own radio show on BBC Radio 1, “In New DJs We Trust,” she’s certainly solidified her status as a global tastemaker. From there, she scored a permanent residency on the network and has partied across the globe via Jackathon Jams.

Read More:

Meet the underground talent of Sónar: Heidi

Heidi to relaunch Jackathon label

Launchpad: Wind down with this emotive post-club playlist

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Launchpad is a playlist series showcasing music we love, hand selected by our staff. The tracks come from both emerging and mainstream artists; it’s all about the quality and the unexpected. If you’d like your music featured in Launchpad, submit it for consideration here

The weekend is upon us. Hopefully, you can finally set aside some downtime to relax and reflect. Whether you’re staying in this weekend or are on the cusp of a big night out, we’ve crafted the perfect post-club playlist. Our latest Launchpad playlist is an emotive arch of deep house, techno, and electronica.  It’s a deliverance that’s drowning in introspection, perfect for the after-after party and easy listening alike.

DA Launchpad Selects:
FromDropTillDawn – “Deja Vu”

You’ve still got one dance in you, so this track’s got you covered. Deja Vu. It’s as if you’re back on the dancefloor. The This Ain’t Bristol mainstay FromDropTillDawn serves up a sultry deep house number in this undertaking, and it’s an insatiably moving deliverance.

Nils Frahm – “Says (Echo 6 Remix)”

Echo 6, better known as Charly Martin, works his down-tempo magic on the seminal Berlin-based composer Nils Frahm’s track “Says” and we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to include it in this arched playlist. Originally recorded on Frahm’s Spaces album, Echo 6 reworks the emotive number in an incredibly endearing fashion. The newly minted tune is perfect for ending an evening out in its near eight minutes of sheer sonic bliss.

 

 

 

Tracklist:
FromDropTillDawn – “Deja Vu”
Luckless – “So Talk (Ducks! Spinning Circles Remix)”
TJ Lawton & Dan Wainwright  – “Easy Come, Easy Go”
Nils Frahm – “Says (Echo 6 Remix)”
CRi – “Keep It Real (ft Jesse Mac Cormack)”

 

 

Read More:

Launchpad: This is the remix

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Launchpad 45: Light up the night with the ultimate house party playlist

 

The Hot 25: December 8, 2017

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The Hot 25 is the definitive playlist series running through dance music culture and hand­-delivering you the essential tracks of the week. Whether it’s the hottest or quickest trending tracks, brand new music from your favorite artists, or songs from the unknown that should be landing on your radar, Dancing Astronaut brings you 25 carefully selected records that reflect what’s happening in our world.

This week’s playlist comes in strong with impressively creative remixes from Mura MasaTchami, and Kaskade. Next, Lost Kings head for chiller pastures with their new single “Don’t Call.” Axwell / Ingrosso emerge with an end-of-the-year track, “Dreaming,” to cap off the year.  Additionally, underground maven Amtrac mesmerizes with “Companions,” while on the exact opposite end of the spectrum, Marshmello & Migos team up for a hip-hop/trap collaboration “Danger.”

The Heat of the Week: HAIM – Walking Away (Mura Masa Remix)

Now Grammy-nominated, Mura Masa returns after his monumental debut album for a brisk, refreshing take on HAIM’s “Walking Away.”

The Breakout Select: MK – 17 (Tchami Remix)

House veteran, MK, receives a bass-pumping flip from Parisian mainstay, Tchami, for his more radio-friendly single, “17.”

Read More:

The Hot 25: September 15, 2017

The Hot 25: September 8, 2017

The Hot 25: September 1, 2017

How Superfly’s inaugural Lost Lake Festival put Phoenix on the map as the next big festival spot in the U.S.

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How Superfly’s inaugural Lost Lake Festival put Phoenix on the map as the next big festival spot in the U.S.

This fall, Superfly Presents, the masterminds behind North American festival giants Outside Lands and Bonnaroo set their scopes on a new, emerging entertainment market that they were banking on being the next big festival-hosting city in the United States: Phoenix, Arizona. While most picture Phoenix with a skewed vision of the “wild west,” Superfly was planting its flag in a burgeoning hub of vibrant art, food, local music, and tourism marketability as the home for their newest concept, Lost Lake Festival. The result was not only another overwhelmingly successful event for the organizers, but in turn, positioned Phoenix to strongly attract additional large scale events in coming years to coincide with the city’s exciting, growing social scene. If Phoenix wasn’t on the festival map before, Lost Lake unquestionably changed that notion. The inaugural Lost Lake didn’t just bring in an enticing lineup and top-tier liquor sponsors, the event was a masterfully curated three-day experience, from logistics to programming, that used the host city’s aesthetic as an intrinsic factor in the festival’s appeal.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

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Stellar inaugural lineup

Led by top-notch headliners that included Chance The Rapper, The Killers, and Major Lazer, Lost Lake delivered a well-rounded blend of talent that paired top electronic acts like Odesza and Big Gigantic with satisfying, multi-generational tastes of hip-hop from Lil Yachty to Ludacris. Folk rockettes HAIM performed one of the highlight sets of the weekend, along with a raucous showcase from Run The Jewels and a lesson in R&B excellence from The Roots. The lineup curation was designed to span the spectrum, from Huey Lewis and the News to A Tribe Called Red with so many genre-hopping performances in between. What’s more, local Phoenicians and Phoenix-bred acts like Playboy Manbaby, Kongos, and Bogan Via shared the stage with nationally touring acts including Tritonal, Danny Brown, and Crystal Castles, celebrating the city’s animated music and arts scenes, hopefully encouraging other large-scale festivals across the country to adopt similar programming practices.

Image: Quinsey Sablan

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Big on local programming

Beyond a phenomenal three-day lineup, Lost Lake applied heavy emphasis to balancing the inherent corporate sponsorships that come with a large-scale music event with locally sourced arts, attractions, and businesses tucked into their FOUND Marketplace. Lost Lake also incorporated interactive art installations across the festival grounds at Steele Indian School Park located in central downtown Phoenix. From pyrotechnic lilypads floating across the venue’s serene lake to paintings created by some of Phoenix’s top muralists sprinkled throughout the grounds, Lost Lake was a sight to behold. When fans weren’t busy enjoying life-sized LED playground equipment and backyard games, attendees could peruse local bar and restaurant options that lined the event’s concession areas, pushing Phoenix’s developing culinary culture to the masses.  Lost Lake honed in on the city’s local charm with complementary programming that immediately established Phoenix’s character as a major element to the new festival brand’s identity.

Image: Jeff Kravitz

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Perfect location, aced logisitics

Most large-scale festival events struggle with logistics planning, even beyond their infancy. None are immune to all production issues, however Lost Lake’s inaugural run proved to be incredibly calculated and organized, even as it ran directly anchored in the heart of Phoenix’s downtown district. No training wheels necessary. Public transit access ran without a hitch, and on-the-ground festival operations were aced. Attendees were well-informed and considerately directed by festival staff, and local infrastructure was more than adequately prepared to accommodate Superfly’s Arizona debut. On-site logistics were matched by a pristine venue, and Arizona’s mid-80’s autumn season proved to be a perfectly pleasant festival backdrop. Other events that have tried to stake their claim in Phoenix have suffered from incredibly poor planning, unsavory venue selections, and even worse weather, though Lost Lake managed to navigate Phoenix’s stereotypical “drawbacks” with near perfection. Trash and recycling receptacles dotted every free space at the festival, again encouraging similarly scaled events to take similar measures not only for the attendance experience, but also out of respect for the city and the venue alike. The result made a profound difference.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

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Keep your eyes on Phoenix

Superfly Presents has already established itself as one of the top names in the business, putting on some of the most sought-after events of the year in North America. Expanding their vision to include a largely untapped market in Phoenix proved to be a significantly successful move, and likely put Phoenix on the map in a major way. And while other dance-centric festival events have sprung up in Phoenix in recent years, like Goldrush Festival, Mad Decent Block Parties, and Decadence offshoots, Lost Lake brought an entirely different vibe to Phoenix that included a heavy appreciation for the city’s narrative and identity, and likely lit the beacon for other major cross-genre multi-day events to begin flocking to the Southwest too.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

GQ got it wrong: 10 looks that prove Marshmello is EDM’s fashion trailblazer

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GQ got it wrong: 10 looks that prove Marshmello is EDM’s fashion trailblazer

GQ might have just dubbed Marshmello as the 8th ‘Worst Dressed Man of 2017,’ but we here at Dancing Astronaut beg to differ. In fact, one might argue that Marshmello is a veritable pioneer of sorts when it comes to selecting creative and coordinated outfits.

We’ve assembled a tidy collection of ten top-notch ‘Mello looks taken from across his social media pages that show off his true fashionista side.

 

Words by: Grace Fleisher, David Klemow, Mike Cooper, & Christina Hernandez

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Can we get an Encore?

Marshmello’s almost prom-esque tuxedo that he chose for his XS campaign begs for an “Encore” of the suit’s snappy appearance.

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Patent Pending

As if it wasn’t clear enough that Marshmello is a master of serving up smooth looks…this head-to-toe patent fit will surely do the trick.

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Canadian Tuxedo? No, Marshmello Tuxedo

Speaking of coordination, this cleverly-constructed white denim affair does a great job of embodying the Marshmello persona and becoming a more mod version of the “Canadian Tux” at the same time.

 

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Mighty

The masked future bass marauder makes quite the good Power Ranger, with an enhanced helmet to boot!

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Hanging with fans

Marshmello, pictured left, spotted hanging out with cosplaying fans at a recent gig. The man knows how to create a cult following, that’s for sure.

 

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Marshmello on the dark side

Vampire, or fluffy, sweet EDM purveyor? It’s hard to tell with this ghoulish getup.

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Marshmello Vice

Fairest of them all, the bucketheaded producer recently caught some wind in Miami wearing stylish poolside-primed long johns like an absolute idiot.

 

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Marshmello goes red

Marshmello trying on a slightly off brand jelly bean look. Only the most forward-thinking fashion connoisseurs can pull off a candy-infused outfit, so this enigma is the perfect one to do so.

 

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He is the golden one

Marshmello is definitely not appropriating East Asian culture in this choice gold number.

 

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Edgy ‘Mello

Marshmello shows off his edgy (and ripped) side with this lit jacket, also in white per his signature aesthetic.

 

Launchpad: This is the remix

This post was originally published on this site

Launchpad is a playlist series showcasing music we love, hand selected by our staff. The tracks come from both emerging and mainstream artists; it’s all about the quality and the unexpected. If you’d like your music featured in Launchpad, submit it for consideration here

November has come to an end and with it has been some supreme new music. We’ve taken to compiling the best under the radar remixes that caught our eye over the last month. From future bass and indie dance to deep and tech house, this joyous jaunt will surely have something for everyone to dance to.

 

DA Launchpad Selects:

Post Malone – “I Fall Apart (SLANDER Remix)”

The impassioned godsend of Post Malone‘s “I Fall Apart” from Slander was re-uploaded to SoundCloud this week. Thankfully, the’s two’s bass modification of Posty’s tune has made its rightful return to listeners eardrums. And certainly, a remix playlist of our favorites over the last month would not be complete without this tear-jerker of a track.

Virtual Self – “EON Break (Nick Gunner Remix)”

November saw out the arrival of Porter Robinson‘s mysterious new alias Virtual Self. At last, Virtual Self had made his technic-utopian debut, marking both a significant departure from his seminal Worlds and a venture into unbeknownst territory for the entire EDM ecosystem. Of course, the artist’s new tunes were a glorious, refreshing bestowal, but the swiftly rising Chicago-based producer Nick Gunner has taken it upon himself to expand upon the astral grandeur of “EON Break” — and we’re certainly glad he did, as Gunner stuns on his rework. In widening the track’s beginning he’s created a captivating addition to an already cherished number, only continuing to point at his searing potential.

 

 

 

Tracklist:

Virtual Self – “EON Break” (Nick Gunner Remix)
French Montana- “Unforgettable” (FeelGoodSmalls Remix)
Noizu – “Jungle” (Hotfire Remix)
cautiousclay – “cold war” (lessismoore remix)
Post Malone- “I Fall Apart” (Slander Remix)

 

 

Read More:

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Beyond the Booth 008: Tontario talks nature photography and brooding soundscapes on new ‘From Below’ EP

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Beyond the Booth is a feature dedicated to the hidden side of artists that exists outside electronic music— a side rarely discussed with those outside their immediate circle. We venture “beyond the booth,” so to speak, and dive into their deepest passions that tie into their unique personalities. After some self-introspection, each participant then returns to the booth, providing an exclusive mix for the Dancing Astronaut audience.

Finnish producer and avid photographer Tony Lagerstrom, also known as Tontario, paints landscapes of the sonic and visual variety. The talented artist’s rapidly accumulating nature photography on his Instagram shows a brooding side to his artistry, with his latest EP From Below following suit. In both his music and his photography, Tontario favors crisp, atmospheric artistry that mirrors the seclusion of the Finish forests of his Scandinavian home. 

With releases out on Armada Music and most recently Ajunadeep, Tontario’s ethereal vein of music and equally as multi dimensional photography undoubtedly make him an artist to watch. At the root of both creative outlets, Tontario celebrates solitude and introspection in his work. Now, Tontario allows us a peek into his ethereal artistic journey with an exclusive playlist of his favorite inspirational tunes to boot.

tontario btb 2

What camera do you use to shoot and why?
That’s kind of something I don’t usually speak about because my gear is pretty old, but I have a Nikon D80. It’s like a 10 year old camera that I actually borrowed from my girlfriend’s sister. As for my lens… it’s a Tamron 70-300mm d/4-5.6. So it’s a basic setup but it works for me. I haven’t bought my own camera yet; it’s just a hobby so I haven’t put much money into it yet, but it’s something I hope I can do soon enough.

Which started first – your music or your photography? How did the latter get going?
I’ve been making music for about 5 years and photography for like 2 years. I just started taking photos with my iPhone about 2 years ago and editing them in the phone apps. Then I got to borrowing a DSLR, and I kind of took it more seriously and got Adobe Lightroom and started editing on the computer, and since then it has just grown.

What appeals to you about nature photography as opposed to city or event photography?
I think it’s much easier to bring out the emotion in a nature picture rather than a city. I was in Iceland recently and really enjoyed taking photos there. I like this kind of northern wild. I’m trying to get into city photography recently but it’s really hard to get good pictures. Its definitely something that I’m trying to do more of in the future.

How did the album art for your recent single “Northern Confessions” come about?
That cover is actually me in the photo, and a good friend of mine took the picture and then I edited it. But it was my idea and I wanted something really raw and emotional, so I got this barefoot in the forest idea. We tried a lot of ideas that day like me running in the forest but that one turned out the best. I’m really happy with that one.

tontario btb 3

Solitude seems to be a theme throughout your music and photography. What about being alone helps you create?
Solitude and being alone inspire me a lot. I’m kind of an introverted person as well so I don’t know, they just inspire me. Especially when you’ve been alone for a longer time than you should, you start thinking weird thoughts and that’s something that can come out in your music and your photography I think. I like to be like alone in the forest to take photos and just go around and look for nice places. It’s something I enjoy a lot. But it’s also nice to have a friend or a model in your pictures; it depends.

Do your photography and your music evolve in tandem? Is the music on your new EP From Below mirrored by your photography?
Yeah definitely, it’s more that my music has been inspired by the pictures I’ve taken lately. I get inspired by shows and stuff a lot, I’ve watched a lot of dark TV shows lately so this EP kind of took a dark turn, as well as in my pictures.

 

 

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Techno Tuesday: Monkey Safari on making a club album & their new chapter

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Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Monkey Safari have built quite the fabled career for themselves. With a philosophy of bringing joy to any dancefloor they touched, the German pair swept the tech house realm early on in their careers with grooving melodies and catchy rhythms. They only continued to solidify their standing within the top ranks of the underground from there, opening a club in their hometown of Halle and entering into the realm of label ownership.

However, a change is nigh for the outfit, who is beginning to enter into a new phase of their artistic evolution. The pre-cursor to this change began in 2015, where they abandoned their older labels in favor of their newest effort: Hommage. This label focused on a more melodically-centered approach to music, opening the door for working a wider variety of artists while also refining their sound.

Odyssey has since come along to solidify this new direction for Monkey Safari. What began as a quest to create a “listening” album soon turned into the development of a club-oriented venture, which saw the duo emerging from their tech house chrysalis as a new, avant-garde underground act. Eleven tracks entrance the listener with their winding developments and intense structuring, taking on a more progressive sound than ever as the duo work on creating impact through subtlety. Thus far, this new sonic direction has landed them on the likes of Bedrock and beyond.

As they’re preparing to kick off a North American tour throughout the end of 2017, Dancing Astronaut caught up with Monkey Safari on the writing process behind Odyssey, their new chapter, and beyond.

Monkey SafariCredit: Florian Kolmer
When did the “ah-hah” moment arrive when you realized you were meant to create a club-oriented album instead of a “listening” album?
I think it was around a year ago. We mostly play club shows and festivals during the year and making an listening album didn’t felt right at that moment in time. When we decided to make it more club-oriented it allowed us to be more free and to let it flow. A listening album is still an interesting thing for us to do, however, it isn’t something that we’ve had a lot of time to do.
It feels as though your music has taken a darker, more progressive turn over the past couple years or so. Most of the album listened like something I’d normally hear on the Parquet or Steyoyoke labels, for example. What factors led to a change in this direction?
The main thing for us is to make music we like and that we play in our own sets. Over the years our own musical direction has developed into the driving techno influenced sound that you may have heard in our sets for some time now. The Odyssey album was a good way to show the world how our own musical style has changed over the years.

There seems to be a whole movement around more brooding, melodic, techno/progressive-esque compositions. In your opinion, why are people seeming to gravitate toward this sound more heavily in recent years?
I think there is always a progress in electronic music. That’s a good thing because there is something new happening all of the time. At the moment it’s getting darker but in a couple of years maybe a totally different influence will change it towards a different direction once gain.

Where are some places you drew inspiration from in writing Odyssey? Did the tracks come together randomly over time, or did you write them with the vision of a cohesive club record?
Most of the inspiration came from the clubs and festivals we were playing at during the production process of the album. We tested the tracks in almost every set, then during the week we took the inspiration from our shows to develop the tracks further and we would then play them again the next weekend. I think there was a period of 6 months where the ideas came together and another 6 months to finish and mix it.

Do you see Odyssey as the opening chapter in a new era of your career/sound, in a sense?
Yes, I think so. The whole thing is more grown-up and the album is somewhat like an opening to a new chapter indeed.

Which artists, if any, have influenced your songwriting the most throughout the year?
There are a lot of artists we like, and every artist and even every record you like definitely influences both you as an artist and also your ways of producing, however, there aren’t any specific people that we could mention more than others!

Your label Hommage is now edging into a more established institution. What are some exciting plans/releases you have for it over the next year?
There are a few new releases in the pipeline. In December we will release an EP by some young talented producers from Germany called Avidus including remixes from us and Marino Canal. In the beginning of next year an EP from Kieran Apter is planned and after that we will release the remix packages for the Odyssey album in 3 steps with a lot of huge names on it!

What are some self-care habits you’ve built to help you balance being club owners, label bosses, a heavy tour schedule, and producing albums without going insane?
Honestly, we don’t have time to think about self-care! 😉 When you love what you do it doesn’t feel like work, so it’s all good! 🙂

 

 

 

Tour Dates:
08/12 Primary, Chicago
09/12 Bespoke, Toronto
13/12 Bar Smith, Phoenix
14/12 Q Nightclub, Seattle
15/12 Sound, Los Angeles
16/12 The Great Northern, San Francisco
17/12 Larry Flint Hustler Club, Las Vegas

 

Read More:

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Techno Tuesday: Jonas Rathsman

Sunday Morning Medicine: seeing extended family sucks, this playlist doesn’t

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Sunday Morning Medicine is an eclectic playlist for the chill at heart. Curated weekly, chillers of divergent tastes Alexandra Blair and Michael Cooper bring you a selection of tracks to relax to. Our editorial feature highlights the cream of the crop, but you can follow the official playlist on Spotify

This week’s opening salvo comes courtesy of vocalist Sophie Meiers. With Baltimore-based producer Vide providing an appropriately oceanic foundation, Meiers’ voice occupies “Shores’” center stage. Her breathy delivery is accompanied by meandering guitar licks, wobbling synth patches, and a rumbling bass that motivates the track without ramping up the energy too high. The end result: an indolent, swaying RnB tune.

A cut from German producer B-Side’s LP When Streets Are Empty, brings laid back vibes and makes the most of its minimal style. An electric piano pings through the audio-spatial spectrum, giving way to nocturnal horn samples. Throughout, a meandering bass line rumbles underneath while a shuffling pattern on a ride cymbal — mostly hidden — provides an element of stability to the affair.

Philadelphia’s Nick Anthony — with an assist from Still Haze — offers up this edition’s most energetic track, “Blur.” A multifaceted production that pulls from styles ranging from 80s nostalgia to the future sounds dominating the electronic music scene today, “Blur” is most impressive in its structure. With so many unique riffs and sound selections, one would expect a thumping powerhouse. However, Anthony maintains a measure of restraint and melds the disparate elements into a cohesive, mellow original.

The penultimate selection is Tajima Hal’s “Until Morning.” A clever patchwork of samples creates a dreamy, hazy atmosphere that mollifies the listener. Clocking in at just under three minutes, “Until Morning” is actually one of Hal’s longer compositions. Still, the track is never in any rush and is perfectly content to float along to its conclusion without ever pushing the energy envelope.

Finally, Pool Cosby’s “New York Band Plays New York Venue” brings this edition to a close. An extended intro of slickly produced piano chords opens into a tightly composed verse. Vocal chops weave in and out of trumpet runs while a clever drum pattern taps out the foundation. The track builds to a cathartic crescendo that never explodes but releases into a grinning, smooth outro.

Stream the official Sunday Morning Medicine playlist below and hit follow on Spotify for updates in real time.

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