Factor B dishes on Dreamstate, what drives him artistically, and more [Q+A]

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Factor B dishes on Dreamstate, what drives him artistically, and more [Q+A]Factor B Credit His Facebook

Few artists can say they’ve been booked at top festivals in their genre, signed to prolific labels, and made the leap to full-time production in under half a decade after making their entrance into dance music. Factor B falls into this minority category, lighting up the trance world with his burning passion for the music and careful attention to detail in both his sets and his original works and remixes. He’s managed to do this all from scratch in his home country of Australia, which notably has a very small scene for this particular strain of dance music.

Talent and hard work are ultimately undeniable, as the burgeoning artist has proven to himself. Prior to taking up the art of creating and performing electronic music, Factor B clocked in a large number of years as an eager consumer. His love affair with trance began with Ferry Corsten‘s Trance Nation contribution from 2000, and has only continued to grow since then. After close studying of how the music was made and performed, he soon worked up the courage to try his own hand behind the decks, which proved a natural fit for the young fan. He soon found himself taken under Solarstone‘s wing with a signing of “Sacrosanct” to Pure Trance — an uplifting anthem that established him as a force to be reckoned with. But this was only the beginning for Factor B. His clear skill and dedication to his craft landed him on other prolific imprints, like FSOE and Armada’s WAO138?! branch, with constant plays from the likes of Armin Van Buuren, Super8 & Tab, Aly & Fila, and even his role model Ferry Corsten. Such widespread adoration led to his move to Amsterdam in 2017, where since then, Factor B has seen an even bigger explosion in success that has allowed him to make a living off his music.

Ahead of his return to Dreamstate — Insomniac’s beloved trance brand whose flagship Southern California festival has become the genre’s prime destination stateside — we talked to this legend-in-the-making about his drive, influences, recent developments, and what to expect for his second time at the festival.


How would you describe the “Factor B sound?
Uplifting, cinematic, energetic, emotional & my own

What are the most influential trance songs or mixes of your past that have helped guide what you make today?
I loved a lot of the early work from Lange, Airbase, Super8, Nitrous Oxide, Nu NRG, Ferry Corsten, Above & Beyond to name a few. In terms of compilations, The Global Underground series along with Gatecrasher, Slinky & Clubbers Guides were frequently in my CD players.

On that note, you’ve become known for your huge, multilayered uplifting pieces. What draws you to uplifting as opposed to say, psy trance or tech trance?
Even though I don’t mind a bit of Psy & tech, I don’t get the emotional connection to those styles the way I do with melodic trance.
When I write a record, it always has a storyline or a feeling behind it and I love translating that to an audience via sound.

You’ve been living in Amsterdam for a bit over a year now. What are some key career growth moments that have come to you as a result of moving to a trance hub?
I think just simply being closer to the action here in Europe / UK / USA has been highly beneficial for my growth. Not having to fly to & from Australia means more show opportunities and chances to showcase my music / DJing. Being on the tour circuit more often has been amazing as I’ve had the opportunity to get know more about the industry and learn from some of the really cool characters within it.

Tell us about some of the hardships you faced when taking the plunge to do music full time, and how you got over them.
I think for me it was about learning how to manage myself & my producing. Coming from a full time business background – a big challenge for me was learning to understand how to manage my creativity and not force things. I burnt out pretty quick when I first arrived in Amsterdam – I was producing non stop for 9 months, so after that happened, I learnt pretty quick to slow down, harness my inspiration and not to force it. I don’t just sit in the studio because I feel I have to now. To help the process, I have learnt to step away from music for periods of time, focus on things that help clear my mind and then approach my studio sessions nice & fresh.

How does your studio process go? Do you have a starting point you like in a track or an area you feel you have to get ‘just right’ before finishing? How do you address writer’s block?
For me it’s all about the melodies. I tend to write melodies first and once I know it’s got something special about it then I start expanding. Not all ideas make the cut. I’ve learnt to leave & come back to projects after a few days with ‘fresh ears’ so I can get a better perspective on where the track is at. If it dosent pass the goosebump test – it goes in the bin!
A good dose of exercise often helps clear the mind when things aren’t going to plan in the studio, that or a glass of whiskey!

What’s inspiring you to create the most these days?
I think it’s still just the love of the music, it’s thrilling to land a great melody and then see it grow. I love the process – the challenge, the rollercoaster that’s associated with writing music. When it all comes together – it’s difficult to find a better feeling.

Are there any specific goals you’re looking to achieve musically, like starting a new label of your own, experimenting with a new sound, playing a certain place, etc?
Of course there are always aspirations and goals, but for me traveling the world and playing my music is still fresh and exciting. I don’t want to try to do too much too soon. I love trance, I love performing – so for now I’m just focusing on keeping my music fresh and staying optimistic about whatever the future brings!

Sort of related, but since your international explosion, what have been some of your favorite places to play or prized trance memories?
No doubt Luminosity on the Beach is one of my favorite shows each year, along with any tour back home to Australia. The recent Subculture show in my home town of Melbourne in front of 7.5k people was probably one of the greatest moments of my life! The USA as a whole has been incredible for me this year. I’ve never really travelled the USA so to get to see so much of it in the last 12 months has been really exciting. Dreamstate is definitely one of the shows that launched my name in the USA so that’s one in the calendar each year I get really excited for!

You’re coming back to Dreamstate! With last year’s set erring toward the ‘producer’s set’ side, what do you have in store for us this year?
As dreamstate showcases so many great acts I think most artists sets tend to lean towards producer sets nowadays anyway but I have what I feel is some of my best work to date to playout / debut at DS this year so I really can’t wait for it!

What are your thoughts in general on the American trance scene and Dreamstate?
As mentioned previously, it’s been fantastic for me, I’m very grateful to have played so many shows around the states and for Dreamstate this year. The crowds are all great and seemingly really enjoy my uplifting style as I’m fairly fresh to the USA tour circuit. I can’t compare it to anything prior but from my experience thus far it’s healthy and growing!

Finally, what’s next in the Factor B pipeline?

Well, firstly I have an abundance of new music to release in 2019 – First and foremost that’s what excites me the most. On the show front, I have some very exciting announcements to make in the coming weeks, some big debuts and some big tours. Keep an eye on the socials! 🙂

 

It’s not to late to pick up Dreamstate tickets; make sure to purchase them here.

 

 

Photo credit: facebook/FactorBmusic

Dirty South shows his dark side on brooding ‘darko’ LP [Album Review]

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Dirty South shows his dark side on brooding ‘darko’ LP [Album Review]Dirty South Darko Album Review

Dirty South is a man of his word. He promised fans two albums before the year was out, and suddenly darko arrived right in the nick of time. Just a month after releasing the stunning XVthe cinematic house titan submitted yet another chapter to his long player history – and it’s unlike any project the producer has helmed to date.

For some, it may have made sense to release both fall albums as a double LP. Yet Dirty South’s decision to separate the two projects makes perfect sense when listening. Both are worlds apart in feeling, tone, and flow. XV was brilliantly bouncy, often bursting with waves of elation; darko, on the other hand, is something different with a more anxious mindset all its own. The mournful synth swells of “Temps” announce the project’s ethos immediately, and the feeling of unrest permeates throughout the rest of the journey. On “Cassetta,” the intro burns slowly before ascending chords spread the tension on thick. “Piksi” follows directly behind, which is shaping up to be one of the darkest tracks in Dirty South’s repertoire.

Despite the unity of darko‘s world, trademark Dirty South touches abound. While the beaming brightness of past hits like “If It All Stops” is nowhere to be found, the “Kino” shuffles and grooves as undeniably as any of the artist’s dance floor weapons. “Lava” is a rhythmic tour-de-force, despite snarling horn-like synth blasts tethering it firmly into the album’s aesthetic. But despite Dirty South’s mastery of vocal-infused efforts show in past releases on labels like Anjunabeats, darko remains starkly instrumental. The move feels calculated as the arrangements ebb and flow freely, leaving the listener to wonder if any lyrics could speak single-handedly for the soul of the record.

The producer admitting the record is his favorite to date could indicate this new sonic direction — also showcased in songs like his recent remix of Lane 8’s “No Captain” — is settling in to stay awhile. The relentless cohesion of darko is something Dirty South had yet to do at this level. As “Corda” looms into sight to cap off the album, it sets the mind on fire. There’s a sense that the gravity of the sum of its parts has seeped in, and the effect after listening to the LP’s entirety is vivid. It’s gripped in an atmosphere of anxious and electric yearning, soundtracking a feeling of introspection and raw hunger. Beautiful but stark, dark but restrained, mournful but energized; whether or not these tracks invade the same playlists and dance floors Dirty South has presided over all these years is irrelevant. For a statement as nuanced and unified as darko is a triumphant highlight in and of itself.

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]

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Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Press Shot 2 Morgan Page

Being a touring DJ for over ten years is like being a professional football player at the age of 40. Most people can’t sustain the career for more than a few years, so for those who hit the 10, 15, and 20-year marks, they are often revered as the anomalies of the industry. The DJs and producers who have successfully it through the commercialization of the field are few in number, though Morgan Page is certainly among that class, building a decorated career on the key ingredient that dozens of others have failed to master — consistency. His journey has seen fair ups and downs, but since his breakthrough release “The Longest Road,” in 2008, the Vermont-native EDM mainstay has managed to remain relevant amid electronic music’s rapid global boom. He continues to release a steady output, and as a result, manages a brimming itinerary of shows at some of the top venues and festivals around the world year over year. Morgan Page recently sat down with Dancing Astronaut to look back on the last decade of non-stop touring action.

A Grammy-nominated producer, Page is the first to admit his career has not been free of strains. Page says he recognizes he is where he is today because he has not been afraid to reach for that he most desires. In fact, he attributes his Grammy nomination to his own self-cultivated initiative, explaining,

“I got [myself] my Grammy nomination. I submitted it myself; the label did not submit it. You have to take things into your own hands.”

While a Grammy nomination is no small feat, it is his personal life that has brought what he considers “his greatest collaboration yet,” to fruition. Not a song or sold-out tour, but his now-four-month-old daughter, Bea. Page spent years persevering his way to the innermost holdings of the industry, and countless more working to steady that spotlight — to stay relevant. However, Page says having a daughter has reconfigured his entire outlook.

Page says all the toiling and tumult behind him are most gratifying in that they have laid out immeasurable opportunity for his daughter. While he has resolved not to be a “stage dad,” he is optimistic that raising her in a musical environment will prove worthwhile.

“I’m going to do a lot to encourage her to do music. She can do whatever she wants, but I am going to encourage her not to settle for a realistic job. I’m definitely going to raise her my style. I just think it’s a very unique situation to have a kid in these times. There is this great studio right downstairs. Why not use it?”

Unsurprisingly, Page says his memories of walking his daughter down to his private studio are among his fondest to date, rivaled only by the experience of introducing her to his own music. In addition to growing up with state-of-the-art equipment just a stone’s throw from her bedroom, Bea will also have access to her father: a model of resolve and improbable success, as well as a wealth of industry knowledge.

Page speaks about his path to becoming an artist in a revelatory lens, bringing a formerly untapped dimension to his career retrospection. It’s both hope and hindsight that had yet to surface when Dancing Astronaut sat down with him a year ago. At that time Page did not know he would soon become a father. His reflections now posit his own efforts to secure success beside hypothetical musings of his daughter’s chances at a similar undertaking.

“It’s such an unlikely career, but I want to make sure it is possible. I never expected to make a living. I was never the resident DJ, and I was never given those opportunities. No one was like, ‘hey do you want to play in Avalon in Boston and see how it goes?’ No one gave me the time of day,” reflects the “Against the World” producer.

As an artist who has amassed a fiercely loyal following over the last decade, signed to an international label, that has managed to deliver a continuous output of music, Page is among an elite breed of industry players who have learned to navigate the circuitous industry staircase. He is not reluctant in the least to speak on the near impossible feat of attempting to make a living in this space without help from the record labels and management companies. Page asserted that of all the dizzying idiosyncrasies at work in the music business, the most complicated mechanisms at work here are humans. “I think human dynamics are harder than anything,” admits Page — an interesting acknowledgement from a career entertainer.

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Morgan Page Live

Human dynamics are the most challenging part of collaborations, Page shares. Two well-known artists co-producing music isn’t always (or even frequently) born out of a happenstance encounter or coming to an agreement upon one party’s first inquiry; there are often other forces at work. Creating the music itself together, he says, can be the easiest part of the entire process. Management usually has their own ideas about how collaborations will come to life.

“If artists actually worked with one another it would be so much more simple. [With] management, it’s all a block because they are like, well my artist is worth ‘x,’ and then it’s a counter of what the other manager is saying their artist is worth. I think the hard part about collaborating is usually who stands in the way when two artists genuinely want to work together because the management will get into an over-protective ego war.”

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Morgan Page Strut

The dance music industry may flaunt a lustrous exterior, but the behind the scenes, interactions are not always so resplendent. According to Page, artists often find themselves at a standstill while their teams go to war about what point font he or she is on a lineup. When it comes to a collaboration itself, the collaborators don’t even always get to sit in a studio and work together. Co-productions are also susceptible to dizzying artist schedules and personal preference.

“My collaboration with Swanky Tunes was fine, for example, because there was only one person I was dealing with. But it’s difficult. Everyone is touring. You don’t hear back for a month, and if you don’t hear back, either someone doesn’t like [the music] or they are busy,” recalls Page.

Page’s recent song with Swanky Tunes is a diversion from Page’s typically melodic style, and showcases how working with new producers can push an artist’s personal boundaries. The collaboration is an example of the shift of his personal interests when it comes to what satiates him sonically. He has been focusing on outreach with fellow producers, mentoring younger artists, and even returning to remixes, which Page admits he distanced himself from for a while.

“Some of the remixes are so off the mark, and from good producers too. The dynamic has changed a lot now where I think people don’t want to do remixes because stuff gets denied or things are done on speck. People will hire emerging names, and many are like, well unless it’s Rihanna and I’m getting $10 grand, people are so finicky. I’m like, it doesn’t matter, and I will go find an emerging name while I’m playing my radio show.

Not only is Page taking on remixes of his own again, like his reboot of Elephante’s “Come Back for You” featuring Matluck, but he will be releasing a remix package for “The Longest Road” in honor of the iconic track’s tenth anniversary. The first The Longest Road EP features three remixes: a brand new take from Steff Da Campo, the 2012 bootleg remix from Vicetone now receiving its debut official release, and the song’s most famous edition, deadmau5‘ unforgettable 2008 remix.

Morgan Page reflects on his artistic evolution, fatherhood, and collaboration as he marks ten years in the dance music industry [Interview]Screen Shot 2018 11 14 At 6.29.35 PM

While Page’s life remains in a constant state of flux both personally and professionally, he was immediately able to peg the catalytic record that catapulted him out of unnamed monotony, the fittingly named, “The Longest Road.” He stands firm that his daughter is by and large his greatest collaborative effort, but ascribes “The Longest Road” a close second. Like the electronic arena he knows and loves, Page’s priorities shift. His interests broaden. Yet, Page remains an unpredictable and immovable force in this inconstant arena.

Photo Credit: Morgan Page Instagram

Premiere: Sian soundtracks dystopia on relentless new track, ‘Breathe’

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Premiere: Sian soundtracks dystopia on relentless new track, ‘Breathe’Sian Breathe Premiere Single

As the commander-in-techno of genre guardian Octopus Recordings, Sian has been busy helping a fresh crop of up-and-comers like Shelley Johannson and Hidden Empire tear down clubs and warehouses across the world . In case any in the underground needed their memories jogged, the legend continues his recent release streak with ‘Breathe”–a lethal reminder of his studio prowess.

In true Sian fashion, the track is a relentless exercise in aural hypnotism, riding a pounding kick and warehouse-ready percussion as the song title is chanted rhythmically in the background. As the breakdown approaches, inhalations and exhalations mirror the listener’s brief, anticipated break from the mayhem–but a piercing arp keeps the energy twisting and turning long after the drums subside. The second beat section layers the hissing analog top line over Sian’s full dose of bass, creating a unique mid-track crescendo that’s sure to demolish unsuspecting crowds. Sian’s latest is equal parts raw power and mind-warping experiment, and projects to be mainstay for savvy techno selectors as the year draws to a close.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 65

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 65Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


I first heard i_o‘s “Low” in the early months of 2018 when he sprinkled the track in a mau5trap mix. Its thumping bass and sultry vocals immediately caught my attention, and in the months since, I’ve replayed that snippet of the mix more times than I’d care to mention. This is i_o in his finest form: churning out preposterously filthy beats with a catchy vocal loop that lures the listener from the get-go. “Low” makes up the first half of his latest EP, which is out now on mau5trap.

So much respect for American drum & bass producers who are pushing the scene here in the States! One of my current favorites is BoxPlot, a Boston-based artist who’s been building a following through releases like “Sunroad” with Flite (who’s also American!) on Liquicity. His latest is a rework of Mint Royale’s 2002 “Blue Song.” BoxPlot has modernized the track and brought it swiftly into 2018, switching up the pace considerably by adding a truly intimidating drum & bass backbone to the song.

Following his “Mirage” release in July, Monstercat mastermind Rogue has returned to deliver “Badlands.” This track is a breath of fresh air in a genre where there’s often little variety in sound: future bass. Badlands is beautifully complex, lush with airy melodies and an overall ferociousness that’s apparent from the first few seconds. This intense atmosphere makes it perfect the compilation its a part of: the latest Monstercat x Rocket League compilation.

After building anticipation through singles like “Just Life” and “Behind Those Clothes,” Jaguar Dreams have at last unveiled their debut self-titled EP. The seven-track collection of songs leads the listener on a somewhat nostalgic journey, dwindling down with the last song, “Tapts.” This one’s a bit darker than its predecessors but is equally beautiful. “This first EP is a collection of songs that came about somewhat effortlessly in a shack in the middle of the jungle using basic instruments,” they tell their listeners in the EP’s description. “We produced and arranged everything back in our studio in NYC and the collection became a true culmination of our collective pasts embodied in a new shape that felt right.”

While I can’t understand a word of this song, its beauty is so utterly apparent. “Hislerim” manages to build a bridge between what many would consider a “heater” and a more melodic, ethereal piece. It ebbs and flows from bass-filled choruses to verses of gorgeous vocals backed by minimalist instrumental elements. This song has it all: twinkling piano melodies, heavenly vocals, a hefty dose of bass — and still comes together in a neatly packaged, comprehensive way. Good music truly transcends language barriers.

Good Morning Mix: The Stickmen mash-up every crowd-pleaser in this Radar mix

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Good Morning Mix: The Stickmen mash-up every crowd-pleaser in this Radar mixTHE STICKMEN PRESS SHOT

It’s about time to hop on The Stickmen wagon, for those who are not so aware of the name. The mysterious duo just performed sorcery on their latest “Radar” mix. Hailing from the UK, this pair is one of a kind in that their live performance fuses together digital drum kits and DJing. They utilize said drum machines as sample pads, allowing for well-timed live mash-ups and remixes of popular party tracks.

Created exclusively for Dancing Astronaut‘s “Radar” mix series, The Stickmen painted an hour-long sonic masterpiece, primed for any setting in need of an energy boost — or for anyone who’s been handed the aux but has clue what to play. The mix is chock full of powerful goodies that take listeners everywhere from a remix of Tiesto‘s “Jackie Chan” to Drake‘s “God’s Plan,” later finding themselves diverging through a mash-up of Fisher‘s “Losing It” and the Oliver Heldens classic “Gecko.”

The duo recently performed a Pre-Game set for Australia’s Hyundai A-League Grand Final and will be touring through the UK to finish up 2018.

 

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Good Morning Mix: The Stickmen mash-up every crowd-pleaser in this Radar mix

This post was originally published on this site

Good Morning Mix: The Stickmen mash-up every crowd-pleaser in this Radar mixTHE STICKMEN PRESS SHOT

It’s about time to hop on The Stickmen wagon, for those who are not so aware of the name. The mysterious duo just performed sorcery on their latest “Radar” mix. Hailing from the UK, this pair is one of a kind in that their live performance fuses together digital drum kits and DJing. They utilize said drum machines as sample pads, allowing for well-timed live mash-ups and remixes of popular party tracks.

Created exclusively for Dancing Astronaut‘s “Radar” mix series, The Stickmen painted an hour-long sonic masterpiece, primed for any setting in need of an energy boost — or for anyone who’s been handed the aux but has clue what to play. The mix is chock full of powerful goodies that take listeners everywhere from a remix of Tiesto‘s “Jackie Chan” to Drake‘s “God’s Plan,” later finding themselves diverging through a mash-up of Fisher‘s “Losing It” and the Oliver Heldens classic “Gecko.”

The duo recently performed a Pre-Game set for Australia’s Hyundai A-League Grand Final and will be touring through the UK to finish up 2018.

 

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Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshed

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Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshedTechno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Over a decade behind the decks and a fierce philosophy of rule-less making has placed Gary Beck atop the ranks of techno and electronica. The Glasgow native has charted a unique path in music that has seen him constantly pushing boundaries in his realm of expertise and letting his instinct guide his musical direction, leading to pickup by some of the most iconic underground imprints that include R&S, Cocoon, and beyond. Not to mention, he scored spots on both Boiler Room and BBC’s Essential Mix series not long after making his break into the scene; a feat not achieved by many in the same position.

Beck’s instinct led to the creation of his latest album, DÁL RIATA, which began as a bit of a homage to his native Scotland but soon became an almagamation of songs born out his club experiences over the years since his last LP, Bring A Friend. It shows off a new side of Beck, one that harkens back to his time learning trumpet in school and his longtime love of instrumental elements and his native culture. Yet, DÁL RIATA remains plenty futuristic in tone, with celestial melodies and off-kilter arrangements becoming an indicator of where clubland, and Beck’s head, is collectively at.

Curious about the new sound on the album, we sat Beck down to dive deep into its production and inspirations, and also picked his brains on his label, BEK Audio — which will be crossing over its milestone tenth birthday this year.

Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshedGARYBECK 4

It’s been six years since your last album. How have you evolved musically since then?
Not too much actually! I still use all the same equipment in the studio however I always have new fresh ideas going on. I don’t want to stray too far away from ‘my sound’ as it works very well on the dance floor and it has an identity. It’s important not to lose that.

In that regard, we’ve noticed that DÁL RIATA seems to see you playing a lot more with orchestral elements, and more melody in general compared to Bring A Friend. Are you able to articulate your move in this direction sonically, or how your recent experiences in clubland might have influenced this direction?
I’ve always had a real love for Orchestral music since I first discovered the music of John Barry and James Horner. I also had some experience of playing trumpet in my school orchestra which I enjoyed immensely. It was quite refreshing to add elements of this into the album, as it’s something I always wanted to do. I love Celtic traditional music in general and I wanted to inject some of this into my album.

What was the decider in you amalgamating your club experiences into an album vs creating something more conceptual?
There wasn’t really a deciding moment. I did initially plan to have a Scottish feel around the album, and I think the name and artwork reflect that. I don’t think that albums should have any rules, however I wanted to showcase everything I’m feeling right now.

Is there a particular moment where you felt like it was time to release another album, and any productions you were sitting on that nudged you into a more compilation-esque direction?
At the start of the year, I moved into my new studio after 2 years of failing to find a proper space that worked for me. It was around this time that I realised all I was doing was releasing EP’s, so I decided a fresh challenge was needed. I also felt that doing an album would be a great way to break the new studio in. It gives you a real focus, and in that time, I must have written close to 60 tracks!

Can you connect certain songs to certain cities/venues that might have inspired their creation? Expand on that if so.
The title track ‘Dàl Riata’ connects me to the west coast of Scotland. I visit this area at least 4 times a year as it’s so beautiful and inspiring for me. It’s hard to describe but this track just seems to take me there. Other tracks such as ‘Mango Circus’ and ‘Macabre’ remind me of my experiences playing in amazing dark venues such as the Sub Club in Glasgow and Berghain.

You’re a seasoned veteran in this industry. What has kept you feeling refreshed and inspired throughout the years? Any routines you practice helping foster this?
It sounds crazy being called a seasoned veteran, as I genuinely still feel like I’ve just started all this! Time goes by so fast. I guess the love of it keeps me going. Nothing beats the feeling of writing a special track and unleashing it to the audiences!

What have been some of your most treasured memories in clubland over the past half-decade?
A few years ago, I decided to take my Dad to one of my gigs in Buenos Aires, as he’s a massive football fan and wanted to see Boca Juniors. Initially, he didn’t want to come to my gig, but I finally persuaded him after a few beers! Next minute, he’s backstage at Crobar watching me play to 1,500 people. This was extremely special to me as he had never seen me play and gave him a real insight into what I was doing.

Have you seen any positive changes of late that have reaffirmed your passion for the scene?
I’ll always have a real passion for it, I can’t see that ever changing. There’s a lot of great producers coming through delivering fantastic music which is always great, however I have seen more negative than positive unfortunately, and I blame this on social media.

BEK Audio is nearing its 10th birthday. Any special plans to celebrate that you’re at liberty to tell us about?
I’m planning it altogether in my head as we speak. It’s very hard to believe the label has been running for 10 years! One thing is for sure, there will be a super compilation on the way.

Is the label going to shift sonically in the way your sound has, or perhaps take on a more expansive palette? Or do you feel there was never really a set aesthetic to shift from in the first place?
I never have any rules with the label. If it’s good, then it’s good and I’ll release it. I’m going to be pushing out some more digital only releases moving forward. With vinyl, I was only managing about 3 releases a year and I really want to expand on that.

Any final words or big goings-on down the line that you’d like to tell readers?
Apart from BEK Audio reaching 10 and the album release, I think that’s all I can announce for now!

 

Pre-order a copy of ‘DÁL RIATA’ — out on November 20 — here

Photo credit: Gary Beck’s team

Premiere: Bob Moses gives a gritty glimpse of life on tour in ‘Back Down’ music video [Watch]

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Premiere: Bob Moses gives a gritty glimpse of life on tour in ‘Back Down’ music video [Watch]Bob Moses Back Down Video Premiere

With a brilliantly evocative new album titled Battle Lines in tow, Bob Moses have brought their latest era to cities across North America this fall. Their Battle Lines Tour is set to wrap after one final show November 16 in Los Angeles, following months of international touring. “Back Down,” a breakaway hit from the new LP, has quickly become a streaming and crowd favorite–and the genre blending duo were kind enough to premiere the song’s official music video here at Dancing Astronaut.

The music video is an intimate glimpse into the Bob Moses tour experience,  with various black-and-white scenes from the road contrasting beautifully with the bright red-orange lights of the stage. Behind-the-scenes footage ranging from hotel room jams to views from the tour bus are sprinkled between shots of Bob Moses tearing through a spirited live performance. Almost imperceptibly, black and white and full color shots converge on the stage for the track’s climax. The duo gave some insight into the music video’s documentary-esque origins:

“We spent a while thinking about what we wanted the ‘Back Down’ video to be. We wanted to be in it which inevitably ended up meaning that the video came to us. It’s a few days in our lives so that means on the road, in the bus, and onstage. No middle of the night truck stops made the final cut.  It was filmed at the very beginning of our most recent US tour so they caught us performing the song for our very first times.   We got to shoot some of this in our hometown of Vancouver too which was special.”

Sunday Morning Medicine, Vol. 152: featuring ATTLAS, Icarus, Khåen, + more

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Sunday Morning Medicine, Vol. 152: featuring ATTLAS, Icarus, Khåen, + moreSMM 2400

Sunday Morning Medicine is a feature from Dancing Astronaut dedicated to the mellower side of electronic music. We bring you our favorite therapeutic selections—old and new—in attempts to alleviate the agonizing effects of a long weekend of partying.


Bristol’s Icarus brethren avoid flying too close to the sun, with this ambient house offering, “October.” Instead, like a warm summer’s rain, they’re here to absolve you of weekend transgressions with skittering, precipitous percussion and revelatory vocal incantations.

Listeners of intention may recognize “Third Evangelist,” as well as most of Khåen’s new Solace In The Night album, from Lane 8‘s adorned seasonal mixes and live sets, as well as featured on the latter’s recently incepted This Never Happened label housing. With minimal production froth, “Third Evangelist” glows with a transcendental twinkle, intended to rescue listener’s from the icy precipice of a Sunday afternoon.

ODESZA addicts will revel inside the redemptive reverb of Satin Jackets’s “So I Heard.” The sultry track’s languorous strings and otherworldly vocal harmonies are likely to incite wakeful dreams through lustrous beaches eons from the throes of office monotony.

Sexy doesn’t even begin to chronicle the audible encounter that is mossy.’s reworking of Lido‘s “Dye.” The track experiments, unfettered, with beat-deliberate downtempo mechanisms, most notably its lush and languid harp plucks.

ATTLASmau5trap endeavor from earlier this year, “Concussion,” is an equal parts blissful and torrential odyssey that eventually lands listeners back on their feet—once its effects have abated—much like a night of heavy drinking. Its rattling percussion and stormy synth blasts are mediated by a tender, steadying melody that reminds the listener of lighter arenas, like a ghost of dance floors past.