Premiere: AFFKT – True Power

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Premiere: AFFKT – True PowerAffkt True Power

Sincopat welcomes back one of its brightest stars, AFFKT, for a piece that oozes ‘True Power.’ It’s a deep, melodic groover, and one of the Spanish talent’s most progressive to date — almost in the vein of Guy J and other purveyors of this sound. AFFKT uses a slow build in “True Power,” starting off with driving pings of synth and a prominent bassline before slowly adding in analog melodies and underlying arpeggios. By the time it reaches its peak, the tune already has the listener completely locked in and stuck in a welcome trance.

“True Power” is the first original release we’ve heard from the dance stalwart in half a year; prior to his return to Sincopat, AFFKT explored the heavier side of his artistry on Octopus with “Tempus Fugit.” As he continues to capture the eardrums and hearts of the melodic and techno communities at large, we suspect he’s in for quite a powerful 2019.

 

 

Pre-order ‘True Power,’ out on December 14, here

 

Techno Tuesday: Namito on growing up and ‘Letting Go’

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Techno Tuesday: Namito on growing up and ‘Letting Go’Techno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Namito is a humble success story. The artist went through a lot in his youth; an Iran torn by a coup and general warfare led to fleeing to Germany as a child, where he proceeded to watch the tumultuous end to the Soviet Union unfold right before his eyes.

One thing remained constant to the young creative, though, and that thing was art. Dance music in particular was a guiding force in his life, and by 1992, Namito was on his way toward making it into a career. He’s since become a regular at some of the world’s most treasured clubs, including Tresor, Fabric, and more, while also wearing the hat of label owner to help cultivate the next generation of underground greats. Success aside, Namito has never been one to brag about his work or talk big on social media. Instead, the reserved talent keeps his head down in the studio, focused solely on evolving himself and being the best musician he could possibly be. This is the mark of a true creative.

His endeavors eventually led him to embark upon the most extensive project of his career: a double LP called Letting Go, a multimedia autobiographical album. It traces his growth, hardships, and triumphs as an immigrant adolescent who found his way into dance music — not just in song, but also through visual aids. A painter as well, Namito has paired each track with a unique image that drives in their meaning. Then, he tops it all off is a story alongside each.

In honor of the release, we invited Namito to the Dancing Astronaut offices to tell his story in a more succinct form that offers a taste of what we might hear come its December 7 release. We’ll leave it to him to tell the tale…

Techno Tuesday: Namito on growing up and ‘Letting Go’Namtio
When I was 13, I had seen a bloody revolution [in my home country of Iran] that took a huge toll on our family due to the tragic death of my uncle. I witnessed the war and Saddam Hussein’s bombs dropping over Tehran, but was not ready to live without my parents, my sisters and my friends. A week before my departure I was given it straight that it was best for me to leave, yet as a teen you take this very personally — almost as a punishment or rejection.

My parents put me in an Iran Air flight to West-Berlin via Frankfurt and my carer abandon and there I was taken care of by my uncle and his wife. I was under 14 years old and back then at this age Germany didn’t ask for a visa. What was extremely traumatic, though, was the fact that nobody asked my opinion about whether I am up for leaving everything behind and immigrating to another country, another culture without my parents or not.

So, the idea of telling my story [in album form] came back in 2003. After leaving Iran and seeking asylum in Germany, I could not go back for 17 years. The problem was that I could not apply for the German citizenship without getting released from the Iranian one, and the Iranian embassy refused to even answer any requests regarding that subject. It was only after the victory of Chancellor Gerhard Schröder 1998 that Germany allowed Iranians to have the dual nationality. I applied for it right away and 2001 almost got it but then 9/11 happened and now the authorities insisted on double checking my past again!

After finally receiving the German Passport in 2002, I went back to visit my family in Iran and also started to write a little blog. My Berlin friends liked my way of writing and encouraged me to start writing a book about my journey. Even though I had already finished 80 pretty well written pages in the past years, I realized that I am not a writer. I express myself more with music and paintings. The idea of telling my story [in album form] was first born came in 2003, and over the years the idea of telling my ongoing story in a different way became more and more clear. Ultimately it developed to be a hybrid trinity of music, painting and writing.

The concept of my album “Letting Go” is that every single track tells a story about a peak or special moment of my life from childhood till 1993. Each tune has its own individual painting portraying the situation and additional to that a story that I wrote to explain what happened.

The 23 tracks are divided in two parts, one Electronica part about the time in Iran (which will be released a bit later), one mirroring the events that happened in Berlin. The later part is obviously infused by club sounds of all sort. The memories are probably a bit different to the majority of the Western world kids usual recollections. The revolution of 1979 in Iran, war, cold war, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the explosion of electronic music in Berlin shaped who I am today and are part of the narration.

I’ve been reinventing my sound the past two decades again and again but one thing is for sure: I always try to tell a story within track and my favorite tool for that has usually been the melody and the bass. For example, the track “Culture Shock” in my album is about my very first encounter with a German upon arrival in Frankfurt as a boy at 13. I was waiting for my caretaker at the luggage belt as a stranger approached me and handed me a rolled up magazine. I didn’t speak any German and almost no English. I had no clue what he wanted but out of politeness I took the magazine and opened it. It was a PLAYBOY magazine and for the first time in my life I saw a fully naked woman. It literally was a shock, which I expressed through the surprise synth roar in the middle!

I am pretty happy with the acoustic translation of the situation into music, big thanks to my friend Luna Semara for helping me with that. Or the wild tune “Blank Check” that is about the anarchic situation in East-Berlin after fall of the Berlin wall, a situation that is probably not gonna occur ever again in that weird constellation. “Letting Go Prequel” was designed to reflect the melancholic nature of my birth place Iran. Slow beats and almost sad strings that always carry hope reflect the situation there. Especially the tracks with my dear friends Manaa and Hubert Watt add that special mood to the album that I had in mind. The complete story will unfold over the next weeks on my Instagram account,  and the whole album should make a lot more sense once people understand the story.

Order a copy of ‘Letting Go,’ out on Namito’s imprint Ubersee, here

Premiere: Brian Cid – Ascenso

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Premiere: Brian Cid – AscensoMeteorite Man Cover

A lifetime of musical evolution has led Brian Cid into the next milestone of his career: penning an album. Meteorite Man implies exploration, and it’s safe to say he’s traveled deep within himself and his influences to create an embodiment of his vision. Ten tracks work in tandem to create a sentimental adventure for the listener that charts a path through arpy melodies and lush percussion.

“Ascenso” is an adventure in itself; set at a higher pace and packing multiple chapters into its ten minute duration, Cid has created a meditative record that calls for closed eyes and carnal expression. It’s built in a way to make the listener feel like they’re sailing into the cosmos, with celestial soundscapes made out of stark orchestration and drawn-out synth notes that cut through its tribal drum patterns. It’s progressive at its finest, showing just how good of a fit Balance is as a label home for the LP as a whole.

Those curious to see Brian’s album translated to a club setting can see him in New York at this year’s Cityfox New Year’s gathering. He’ll be joined by the likes of Lee Burridge, Tale Of Us, Honey Dijon, and more to help ring in 2019. Get tickets now before it’s too late.

 

Pre-order a copy of ‘Meteorite Man,’ due on December 7, here 

Premiere: Yulia Niko – Acid Meow

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Premiere: Yulia Niko – Acid MeowAcid Meow Yulia Niko

Get Physical has recruited one of its new stars for a pre-holiday season EP. Acid Meow is a playful EP by Yulia Niko, an artist who’s been on the radar of deep house aficionados for quite some time. In addition to numerous releases under Get Physical, the globe-trotting talent has also been taken up by Jamie Jones’ Hot Trax, Crosstown Rebels, and beyond. Her sultry house cuts manage are versatile and well-balanced, making them favored additions to DJ crates.

For her EP’s eponymous A-side, “Acid Meow” pulls out the classic elements its name implies, and places them in a base of complementary, tribal drum patterns and subtle vocal clips. Though simplistic, the hits of acidic synth and a tight handle on its percussion make the track plenty impactful. Listeners might find it difficult not to lose themselves in its deep grooves when it’s rinsed on the dancefloor.

Pick up a copy of ‘Acid Meow’ here

Premiere: Jay Blakk – When I Think Of You

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Premiere: Jay Blakk – When I Think Of YouJay Blakk When I Think Of You

Formerly known under his Climbers moniker, Jay Blakk has re-risen into an inspiring deep house talent. He’s gone personal for his newest release, out on Music Is 4 Lovers, tapping to past tragedies to create an emotive, yet subtle EP titled No Formula. “When I Think Of You” is a particular standout to us, and it is truly the epitome of its genre. A Paul McCartney sample and gently pulsating synths open the track on a nostalgic note, with Blakk slowly introducing percussive bits and high-pitched harmonies to create a loungey feel. The climax gathers all these elements together with an extra punch, making for an enduring piece that fits well in the after hours.

It’s not often one hears such undiluted, quality deep house in today’s age, and we’re pleased to hear new acts like Jay Blakk keeping the authenticity live. The EP is set for a November 23rd release; order a copy here.

 

Factor B dishes on Dreamstate, what drives him artistically, and more [Q+A]

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Factor B dishes on Dreamstate, what drives him artistically, and more [Q+A]Factor B Credit His Facebook

Few artists can say they’ve been booked at top festivals in their genre, signed to prolific labels, and made the leap to full-time production in under half a decade after making their entrance into dance music. Factor B falls into this minority category, lighting up the trance world with his burning passion for the music and careful attention to detail in both his sets and his original works and remixes. He’s managed to do this all from scratch in his home country of Australia, which notably has a very small scene for this particular strain of dance music.

Talent and hard work are ultimately undeniable, as the burgeoning artist has proven to himself. Prior to taking up the art of creating and performing electronic music, Factor B clocked in a large number of years as an eager consumer. His love affair with trance began with Ferry Corsten‘s Trance Nation contribution from 2000, and has only continued to grow since then. After close studying of how the music was made and performed, he soon worked up the courage to try his own hand behind the decks, which proved a natural fit for the young fan. He soon found himself taken under Solarstone‘s wing with a signing of “Sacrosanct” to Pure Trance — an uplifting anthem that established him as a force to be reckoned with. But this was only the beginning for Factor B. His clear skill and dedication to his craft landed him on other prolific imprints, like FSOE and Armada’s WAO138?! branch, with constant plays from the likes of Armin Van Buuren, Super8 & Tab, Aly & Fila, and even his role model Ferry Corsten. Such widespread adoration led to his move to Amsterdam in 2017, where since then, Factor B has seen an even bigger explosion in success that has allowed him to make a living off his music.

Ahead of his return to Dreamstate — Insomniac’s beloved trance brand whose flagship Southern California festival has become the genre’s prime destination stateside — we talked to this legend-in-the-making about his drive, influences, recent developments, and what to expect for his second time at the festival.


How would you describe the “Factor B sound?
Uplifting, cinematic, energetic, emotional & my own

What are the most influential trance songs or mixes of your past that have helped guide what you make today?
I loved a lot of the early work from Lange, Airbase, Super8, Nitrous Oxide, Nu NRG, Ferry Corsten, Above & Beyond to name a few. In terms of compilations, The Global Underground series along with Gatecrasher, Slinky & Clubbers Guides were frequently in my CD players.

On that note, you’ve become known for your huge, multilayered uplifting pieces. What draws you to uplifting as opposed to say, psy trance or tech trance?
Even though I don’t mind a bit of Psy & tech, I don’t get the emotional connection to those styles the way I do with melodic trance.
When I write a record, it always has a storyline or a feeling behind it and I love translating that to an audience via sound.

You’ve been living in Amsterdam for a bit over a year now. What are some key career growth moments that have come to you as a result of moving to a trance hub?
I think just simply being closer to the action here in Europe / UK / USA has been highly beneficial for my growth. Not having to fly to & from Australia means more show opportunities and chances to showcase my music / DJing. Being on the tour circuit more often has been amazing as I’ve had the opportunity to get know more about the industry and learn from some of the really cool characters within it.

Tell us about some of the hardships you faced when taking the plunge to do music full time, and how you got over them.
I think for me it was about learning how to manage myself & my producing. Coming from a full time business background – a big challenge for me was learning to understand how to manage my creativity and not force things. I burnt out pretty quick when I first arrived in Amsterdam – I was producing non stop for 9 months, so after that happened, I learnt pretty quick to slow down, harness my inspiration and not to force it. I don’t just sit in the studio because I feel I have to now. To help the process, I have learnt to step away from music for periods of time, focus on things that help clear my mind and then approach my studio sessions nice & fresh.

How does your studio process go? Do you have a starting point you like in a track or an area you feel you have to get ‘just right’ before finishing? How do you address writer’s block?
For me it’s all about the melodies. I tend to write melodies first and once I know it’s got something special about it then I start expanding. Not all ideas make the cut. I’ve learnt to leave & come back to projects after a few days with ‘fresh ears’ so I can get a better perspective on where the track is at. If it dosent pass the goosebump test – it goes in the bin!
A good dose of exercise often helps clear the mind when things aren’t going to plan in the studio, that or a glass of whiskey!

What’s inspiring you to create the most these days?
I think it’s still just the love of the music, it’s thrilling to land a great melody and then see it grow. I love the process – the challenge, the rollercoaster that’s associated with writing music. When it all comes together – it’s difficult to find a better feeling.

Are there any specific goals you’re looking to achieve musically, like starting a new label of your own, experimenting with a new sound, playing a certain place, etc?
Of course there are always aspirations and goals, but for me traveling the world and playing my music is still fresh and exciting. I don’t want to try to do too much too soon. I love trance, I love performing – so for now I’m just focusing on keeping my music fresh and staying optimistic about whatever the future brings!

Sort of related, but since your international explosion, what have been some of your favorite places to play or prized trance memories?
No doubt Luminosity on the Beach is one of my favorite shows each year, along with any tour back home to Australia. The recent Subculture show in my home town of Melbourne in front of 7.5k people was probably one of the greatest moments of my life! The USA as a whole has been incredible for me this year. I’ve never really travelled the USA so to get to see so much of it in the last 12 months has been really exciting. Dreamstate is definitely one of the shows that launched my name in the USA so that’s one in the calendar each year I get really excited for!

You’re coming back to Dreamstate! With last year’s set erring toward the ‘producer’s set’ side, what do you have in store for us this year?
As dreamstate showcases so many great acts I think most artists sets tend to lean towards producer sets nowadays anyway but I have what I feel is some of my best work to date to playout / debut at DS this year so I really can’t wait for it!

What are your thoughts in general on the American trance scene and Dreamstate?
As mentioned previously, it’s been fantastic for me, I’m very grateful to have played so many shows around the states and for Dreamstate this year. The crowds are all great and seemingly really enjoy my uplifting style as I’m fairly fresh to the USA tour circuit. I can’t compare it to anything prior but from my experience thus far it’s healthy and growing!

Finally, what’s next in the Factor B pipeline?

Well, firstly I have an abundance of new music to release in 2019 – First and foremost that’s what excites me the most. On the show front, I have some very exciting announcements to make in the coming weeks, some big debuts and some big tours. Keep an eye on the socials! 🙂

 

It’s not to late to pick up Dreamstate tickets; make sure to purchase them here.

 

 

Photo credit: facebook/FactorBmusic

Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]

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Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]ADID EP 038 Facundo Mohrr

If there’s anyone who knows their way around a full-bodied, melodic piece, it’s Facundo Mohrr. The burgeoning talent hails from Argentina, a hotbed for this type of sound that has birthed iconic artists like Hernan Cattaneo, Kevin Di Serna, and beyond while also serving as a mecca for clubbers enjoying the sound. Not to mention, Facundo also found his way into the musically like-minded Burner culture, which led to a natural alliance with Lee Burridge and the All Day I Dream camp.

His Valdovinos collaboration “November” was well-received, catalyzing an entire EP on the iconic imprint shortly thereafter. The four-track La Espere is thus a culmination of everything that makes Facundo a standout talent; intricate layering, soft pads, and dynamic instrumentation. Dancing Astronaut is particularly keen on “The Blue Bird,” a cinematic cut that blooms like a flower into a free-flowing piece with a sentimental climax. Each listen brings about something new to keep the listener on their toes, whether it’s noticing the twinkling piano chords in the first half of the song, or the cleverly-placed hits of pan flute toward the end. “The Blue Bird” is thus a beautifully adaptable piece, working well as a piece to be consumed at home, or on the dancefloor when needing a meditative boost.

Order a copy of La Espere, out on November 16, here.

Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]

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Premiere: Facundo Mohrr – The Blue Bird [All Day I Dream]ADID EP 038 Facundo Mohrr

If there’s anyone who knows their way around a full-bodied, melodic piece, it’s Facundo Mohrr. The burgeoning talent hails from Argentina, a hotbed for this type of sound that has birthed iconic artists like Hernan Cattaneo, Kevin Di Serna, and beyond while also serving as a mecca for clubbers enjoying the sound. Not to mention, Facundo also found his way into the musically like-minded Burner culture, which led to a natural alliance with Lee Burridge and the All Day I Dream camp.

His Valdovinos collaboration “November” was well-received, catalyzing an entire EP on the iconic imprint shortly thereafter. The four-track La Espere is thus a culmination of everything that makes Facundo a standout talent; intricate layering, soft pads, and dynamic instrumentation. Dancing Astronaut is particularly keen on “The Blue Bird,” a cinematic cut that blooms like a flower into a free-flowing piece with a sentimental climax. Each listen brings about something new to keep the listener on their toes, whether it’s noticing the twinkling piano chords in the first half of the song, or the cleverly-placed hits of pan flute toward the end. “The Blue Bird” is thus a beautifully adaptable piece, working well as a piece to be consumed at home, or on the dancefloor when needing a meditative boost.

Order a copy of La Espere, out on November 16, here.

Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshed

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Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshedTechno Tuesdays

Techno Tuesday is a feature on Dancing Astronaut documenting the culture of underground dance music. We’ll bring you exclusive interviews, tracks, and narratives from artists within the techno, tech house, and deep house world in an effort to shed light on some of the best talent outside the world of mainstream dance music.

Over a decade behind the decks and a fierce philosophy of rule-less making has placed Gary Beck atop the ranks of techno and electronica. The Glasgow native has charted a unique path in music that has seen him constantly pushing boundaries in his realm of expertise and letting his instinct guide his musical direction, leading to pickup by some of the most iconic underground imprints that include R&S, Cocoon, and beyond. Not to mention, he scored spots on both Boiler Room and BBC’s Essential Mix series not long after making his break into the scene; a feat not achieved by many in the same position.

Beck’s instinct led to the creation of his latest album, DÁL RIATA, which began as a bit of a homage to his native Scotland but soon became an almagamation of songs born out his club experiences over the years since his last LP, Bring A Friend. It shows off a new side of Beck, one that harkens back to his time learning trumpet in school and his longtime love of instrumental elements and his native culture. Yet, DÁL RIATA remains plenty futuristic in tone, with celestial melodies and off-kilter arrangements becoming an indicator of where clubland, and Beck’s head, is collectively at.

Curious about the new sound on the album, we sat Beck down to dive deep into its production and inspirations, and also picked his brains on his label, BEK Audio — which will be crossing over its milestone tenth birthday this year.

Techno Tuesday: Gary Beck speaks on making an album inspired by the dancefloor, BEK Audio’s 10th birthday, and remaining creatively refreshedGARYBECK 4

It’s been six years since your last album. How have you evolved musically since then?
Not too much actually! I still use all the same equipment in the studio however I always have new fresh ideas going on. I don’t want to stray too far away from ‘my sound’ as it works very well on the dance floor and it has an identity. It’s important not to lose that.

In that regard, we’ve noticed that DÁL RIATA seems to see you playing a lot more with orchestral elements, and more melody in general compared to Bring A Friend. Are you able to articulate your move in this direction sonically, or how your recent experiences in clubland might have influenced this direction?
I’ve always had a real love for Orchestral music since I first discovered the music of John Barry and James Horner. I also had some experience of playing trumpet in my school orchestra which I enjoyed immensely. It was quite refreshing to add elements of this into the album, as it’s something I always wanted to do. I love Celtic traditional music in general and I wanted to inject some of this into my album.

What was the decider in you amalgamating your club experiences into an album vs creating something more conceptual?
There wasn’t really a deciding moment. I did initially plan to have a Scottish feel around the album, and I think the name and artwork reflect that. I don’t think that albums should have any rules, however I wanted to showcase everything I’m feeling right now.

Is there a particular moment where you felt like it was time to release another album, and any productions you were sitting on that nudged you into a more compilation-esque direction?
At the start of the year, I moved into my new studio after 2 years of failing to find a proper space that worked for me. It was around this time that I realised all I was doing was releasing EP’s, so I decided a fresh challenge was needed. I also felt that doing an album would be a great way to break the new studio in. It gives you a real focus, and in that time, I must have written close to 60 tracks!

Can you connect certain songs to certain cities/venues that might have inspired their creation? Expand on that if so.
The title track ‘Dàl Riata’ connects me to the west coast of Scotland. I visit this area at least 4 times a year as it’s so beautiful and inspiring for me. It’s hard to describe but this track just seems to take me there. Other tracks such as ‘Mango Circus’ and ‘Macabre’ remind me of my experiences playing in amazing dark venues such as the Sub Club in Glasgow and Berghain.

You’re a seasoned veteran in this industry. What has kept you feeling refreshed and inspired throughout the years? Any routines you practice helping foster this?
It sounds crazy being called a seasoned veteran, as I genuinely still feel like I’ve just started all this! Time goes by so fast. I guess the love of it keeps me going. Nothing beats the feeling of writing a special track and unleashing it to the audiences!

What have been some of your most treasured memories in clubland over the past half-decade?
A few years ago, I decided to take my Dad to one of my gigs in Buenos Aires, as he’s a massive football fan and wanted to see Boca Juniors. Initially, he didn’t want to come to my gig, but I finally persuaded him after a few beers! Next minute, he’s backstage at Crobar watching me play to 1,500 people. This was extremely special to me as he had never seen me play and gave him a real insight into what I was doing.

Have you seen any positive changes of late that have reaffirmed your passion for the scene?
I’ll always have a real passion for it, I can’t see that ever changing. There’s a lot of great producers coming through delivering fantastic music which is always great, however I have seen more negative than positive unfortunately, and I blame this on social media.

BEK Audio is nearing its 10th birthday. Any special plans to celebrate that you’re at liberty to tell us about?
I’m planning it altogether in my head as we speak. It’s very hard to believe the label has been running for 10 years! One thing is for sure, there will be a super compilation on the way.

Is the label going to shift sonically in the way your sound has, or perhaps take on a more expansive palette? Or do you feel there was never really a set aesthetic to shift from in the first place?
I never have any rules with the label. If it’s good, then it’s good and I’ll release it. I’m going to be pushing out some more digital only releases moving forward. With vinyl, I was only managing about 3 releases a year and I really want to expand on that.

Any final words or big goings-on down the line that you’d like to tell readers?
Apart from BEK Audio reaching 10 and the album release, I think that’s all I can announce for now!

 

Pre-order a copy of ‘DÁL RIATA’ — out on November 20 — here

Photo credit: Gary Beck’s team

First Listen: New ratio:state remix taps into the deeply cathartic nature of Doe Paoro’s ‘Over’

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First Listen: New ratio:state remix taps into the deeply cathartic nature of Doe Paoro’s ‘Over’Images Uploads Gallery Doe Paoro Photo Credit Rinny Riot 5

Doe Paoro poured her soul into a timely new record named Soft Power this fall. The artist, real name Sonia Kreitzer, described her songwriting process as a “reclaiming [of] parts of myself that I had lost.” It’s an immensely personal new song cycle, one which explores womanhood, misogyny, and invites its listeners to process and grieve their own experiences in an equally personal scope.

Media outlets have previously compared Paoro’s lush soul aesthetics to that of Amy Winehouse. Track titles like “Walk Through The Fire,” “Over,” and “Guilty” raise questions about harmful relationships, societal injustices, and reconciling with one’s worldly attachments. Each brings Winehouse’s truths to mind as Paoro sings the modern “what kind of fuckery is this” all throughout.

But within Paoro’s electronic departure — the new album sheds her 2015 Justin Vernon-produced After style of moody electronic soundscapes Paoro re-focuses on soulful, piano-driven pop —she gets less intentional about what the music’s achieving and more focused on what it’s saying, forsaking stylistic precision for emotional intent. It’s a move that hearkens back to her propulsive take on the Hercules & Love Affair cut “Blind,” from just a few years ago.

And it’s the same freeing embrace that channels through in ratio:state‘s new remix of the track “Over,” which Dancing Astronaut is sharing an exclusive first listen of today.

ratio:state reinterprets the song’s central question “now that I’m older / does it get easier / to get over” into a demanding, self-affirmation in its four-on-the-floor flair.

“We hit the studio, the vibes were just so natural, the result is what you hear.”

ratio:state said of the track. It’s fitting then, that the rework is a slow-burner. There’s no eruptive nature to the interpretation. There’s no bombastic EDM chorus, and there doesn’t need to be. It does get easier, but it truly is a soft kind of power.

Doe Paoro’s Soft Power is out now via ANTI- Records.

Photo Credit: Rinny Riot