Exclusive: Elements Festival returns for fourth iteration, announces headliners Diplo, Bonobo, Four Tet

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Exclusive: Elements Festival returns for fourth iteration, announces headliners Diplo, Bonobo, Four TetCopy Of Copy Of Elements 5 25 19 AJRphotos 044 1S2A1704

Elements Music & Arts Festival returns to Lakewood, PA this Memorial Day weekend, dialing in the magic of an outdoor camping festival while saturating its 4 themed stages with tantalizing talent from top to bottom.

As in previous years, each of the festival’s four stages delineate a different element, with the Fire Stage truly living up to its name this time around. What at first might seem top-heavy, with acts like Bonobo and Diplo headlining, ends up fully fleshed out as you continue down the list to names like the ever-so-smooth Chris Lake, Golf Clap, and local dignitaries Walker & Royce. The other three stages (Earth, Air and Water) continue do their part in adding to Element’s pulpy, diverse lineup, hosting Four Tet, Claude VonStroke, Rusko, Emancipator, Yotto, and Bob Moses, just to give a taste.

Elements is about more than just the expansive lineup, however, as is the summer festival experience. In whatever downtime attendees find themselves with between sets, they’re encouraged to explore the festival’s sprawling scenery and multi-sensory installations and activities. 

Tickets for 2020’s Elements Music and Arts Festival are now available.

Exclusive: Elements Festival returns for fourth iteration, announces headliners Diplo, Bonobo, Four TetF K5ozeowu0

Photo credit: JB Photo

Claude VonStroke darts into 2020 with album announcement and two new tracks

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Claude VonStroke darts into 2020 with album announcement and two new tracksClaude Vonstroke Aaron Glassman

2020 is primed to be a big year for Claude VonStroke, as he’s celebrating the 15th anniversary of his beloved Dirtybird Records imprint, named Dancing Astronaut‘s Label of the Decade. Marking the occasion with an array of announcements, VonStroke is gearing up for the release of his fourth studio album Freaks & Beaks, though, he’s giving fans a quick holdover in the meantime with a short, sweet two-track EP, All My People In The House.

The EP includes “All My People In The House” and “Youngblood,” set to be the first two singles from the upcoming full-length project. The sound is just what fans would expect from the “Barrump” producer, capped by groovy beats and occasional vocal quips, unique synths, and tasty drum patterns.

The Dirtybird boss also has plans to bring back Dirtybird Campout (as head counselor) and event series Dirtybird BBQ, which traveled across major US cities in 2019. Topping things off, VonStroke launched a new Docuseries that gives viewers a glimpse of life while producing the album and touring. In episode one, he unveils plans to release a book showcasing Dirtybird’s history.

Freaks & Beaks is out in full on February 21, with an art show and listening party to precede in Los Angeles on February 18. Fans can pre-order the book and album box-set here.

Featured image: Aaron Glassman

Fresh Start San Francisco’s last-minute surprise addition: Claude VonStroke

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Fresh Start San Francisco’s last-minute surprise addition: Claude VonStrokeClaude Vonstroke Aaron Glassman

Dirtybird‘s fearless leader, Claude VonStroke (Barclay Crenshaw) has a New Year’s Day surprise for his loyal following, a day fraught with (what else?) nonsense and good fun. The patriarch of playful house is heading to the Fresh Start day party, January 1, with a full and frumptious trail of friends in tow.

Assembling at San Francisco’s expansive, indoor/outdoor The Midway venue complex, the single-day Fresh Start stampede also proffers genre staples like Claptone, Walker & Royce, Moon Boots, Elax (Boys Noize), and Dirtybird dynamo, J.Phlip. The party is primed to become a paradise for the rambunctious Bay Area folk who know New Year’s Eve shouldn’t end at the incipient stroke of midnight.

Tickets to Fresh Start are available here.

Fresh Start San Francisco’s last-minute surprise addition: Claude VonStrokeThe Midway Fresh Start 2020 Phase 4 IG Story

Featured photo credit: Aaron Glassman

Dancing Astronaut’s Top Tracks of 2019

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Dancing Astronaut’s Top Tracks of 2019Madeon Top Tracks Eoy 2019

2019 has been a remarkable year for new music.

The past twelve months brought with them a collection of highly anticipated LPs: Madeon‘s Good Faith, Avicii‘s posthumous Tim, Gesaffelstein‘s Hyperion, Illenium‘s ASCEND, along with a Flume mixtape. Notable collaborations like REZZ and Malaa‘s “Criminals,” Seven Lions, Wooli, Trivecta, and Nevve‘s “Island,” and GRiZ and Subtronics‘ “Griztronics” hit the airwaves in blazes of glory. Supergroups like Dog Blood (Skrillex and Boys Noize) and Get Real (Claude VonStroke and Green Velvet) showcased the power of doubling up on brainpower. And, of course, countless singles had us hitting repeat more times than were calculable: Dillon Francis‘ “Still Not Butter,” i_o‘s “House of God,” Habstrakt‘s “De la Street,” Alesso‘s “Progresso,” and so many more.

In no particular order, we present a 30-track collection of our favorite songs of the year, chosen by DA writers and editors.

Fabric London releases exalted Saturday roster for first quarter of 2020

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Fabric London releases exalted Saturday roster for first quarter of 2020Fabric Nightclub London 2016 Billboard 1548

The revered London nightclub, Fabric, has announced its schedule for Saturdays within the first quarter of 2020 (January through March). As usual, the Farringdon institution has curated a series of evenings that properly honor the city’s undeniable influence on the world of dance music.

In the realm of house and techno, worldwide favorites like Jeff Mills and Riccardo Villalobos will be back behind the decks. Luigi Madonna and Enzo Siragusa are just two of the artists scheduled for open-to-close sets. American artists like Claude VonStroke and Lee Burridge will make appearances, too.

Of course, London’s dance-music history books contain chapters in bass-heavy genres as well and those genres always have a place at Fabric. Four separate outings of Fabric Live are already scheduled with three rooms filled with notable drum and bass purveyors alongside MC’s ready to rip the mic.

There are even some exciting unconventional dates planned including two early evening performances from none other than La Roux, who after a five-year hiatus is releasing new music.

Few the full roster of Fabric Saturdays below, and for specific dates head to their official website.

Fabric London releases exalted Saturday roster for first quarter of 2020Fabric January February March 2020

Photo credit: Sarah Ginn/PYMCA/REX/Shutterstock

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica Spinelli

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Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE AUG 21 WESC 95 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 154 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 141 Min

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliElectric Island Finale 2019 DAY 02 217 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 94 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE AUG 21 WESC 116 1Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 133 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 97

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE AUG 21 WESC 95 1

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliEI FINALE Aug 31 KURTHOOP 100

Electric Island closed 2019 season finale with striking performances from headliners Boris Brechja and Claude VonStroke – photos by KURTHOOP, Wes C and Domenica SpinelliElectric Island Finale 2019 DAY 02 189 1

Photo credit:

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]

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RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 44

House music is currently going through a third Renaissance. The first took place in the late ’70s when the distinction between disco and house became clear. The four-on-the-floor beat diverged from the glossy strings and sequin outfits.

The second, around 1997 when the styles of Chicago that Frankie Knuckles and company pioneered became worldwide, with Daft Punk releasing their watershed debut album, Homework. By then, house music was a permanent fixture in the standard music vernacular.

The third wave is still in progress. As house music becomes more than just club music. As house artists begin to rival rock stars and mega-rappers in their global omnipresence in pop culture. Those who lived through the first or the second arm might look upon this association with mainstream culture and scoff—longing for the days when house was the sound of the outcast, the counterculture.

Jake Lubell, Ryan Bohnet, and Wyatt Eichhorn are three of those people centralized on preserving the housestoric legacy. To their fans, they’re known as Lubelski, RYBO, and Wyatt Marshall, and they’re giving back to house music through their record label, Percomaniacs.

Just recently, the trio hosted their very first label showcase. In addition to the three of them playing side-by-side for an extended set to a sold-out crowd, Dirtybird boss Claude VonStroke and Desert Hearts‘ own Mikey Lion and Porky showed up to support their good friends and colleagues in their mission that can only be dubbed, “addicted to drums.”

That’s right. These three house thanes all share an austere affinity for drums alongside an unequivocal chemistry as musicians and as human beings. Dancing Astronaut spoke to them just minutes before they took the decks at their branded first party to get an inside look at what “addicted to drums” really means, as well as how the three of them manifest that vision through sound.

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 43

How did the three of you come together, and how did you resolve to start something like Percomaniacs?

Lubelski – Rybo and I met at The Standard in Hollywood like five years ago. I was still in college at the time.

Wyatt Marshall – I’m the late add to the group. Met both of them a little later.

L – But we all just felt like we could talk shit to each other [laughs].

WM – That’s a big part of the dynamic.

RYBO – We had another record label going before [Percomaniacs].

WM – With like five of us right?

R – No there was like six of us, and there were too many cooks in the kitchen.

So it was a blessing in disguise kind of thing?

R – Yeah definitely

WM – But it was more of a natural thing because [Room Temp] kind of disbanded.

L – It fizzled off on its own. There were so many people trying to do it at the same time. It was too many decisions. Too many egos. So it just kind of dispersed.

WM– Things were going way slower and it just wasn’t serious.

L – It was too bureaucratic. So [ RYBO and I] decided to do it with just the two of us at first, but then we were like “Nah we have to have Wyatt as part of the crew. He’s too sick.”

And so as soon as the three of you started working together you knew things were different?

R – Yeah we had a full-on schedule. We were booked out five months in advance.

L – We decided we wanted to be at least half a year ahead before we even got started. We knew we had to do it with a plan.

What do the three of you do for the label individually?

R – I don’t do anything. It’s all Jake [laughs]

WM – I’m part of the label, but I just help out with random shit. 

L – Wyatt’s just a cool factor.

L – To be serious, Rybo and I do most of the A&R and scheduling together. Wyatt does a lot of A&R for us. Finds cool artists —

R – And just releases a shitload.

L – Yeah he releases a shit ton of music. He’s our main resident.

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 48

This is one for all three of you individually. Percomaniac’s tagline is “Addicted to Drums” so I’m wondering what that means to each of you?

R – For me it’s all about the groove of the track. I’m really into percussion, bongos,  and to me, the drums are what really get you moving and get people dancing.

WM – If you’ve noticed the progression of our productions throughout the years, we’ve all gone so far away from big buildups and drops and it’s just one groove all the way through. You take out a few elements and come back, and it’s all about the drums.

L – Less is more. Bongos not bangers. We’re not here to just fist bump.

WM – Say no to party-tech.

L – Yeah Say no to party tech. Stay addicted to drums. We love the old school stuff because it was never really about the massive manufactured buildups. It’s all got to be groove-driven. If the groove isn’t there it’s not a good track.

R – I could play on a drum machine for days.

Percomaniacs’ catalog is very diverse, including everything from Fleetwood Mac edits to minimal tech-house to more upbeat stuff. Given this wide range of sounds, what do you look for when signing a track to the label?

R – Really it just needs to make the people move.

L – Yeah and if it doesn’t feel manufactured, and it feels like it comes from the heart; if it feels a bit more real.

R – We’re open to any genre as long as it works and sounds cool.

L – Yeah we don’t need a bunch of big ass snare rolls. You can do something that is classically cheesy, but you can still do cheesy tastefully.

You say you’re open to any genre, do you see any hard-hitting 135 bpm techno having a place on the label?

R – Ghostea already released a track at 132 with us.

WM – Shit’s just getting faster in general. Even the groovier tech-house shit is getting faster. I just got a track from my homie Steady Rock that’s at 131 but you wouldn’t even know.

 R – 125 seems slow now.

WM – 125 seems like 120 in the club.

L – I’m at 129 these days.

WM – I can’t even get under 127.

L – 126 used to be our shit. Now it’s way too slow. But Ghostea has a track coming on our next compilation that’s at 135.

Is it heavy or more groovy?

L – It’s deep and fast.

RYBO, Lubelski, and Wyatt Marshall talk giving back to house music with Percomaniacs [Interview]Image From IOS 45

The three of you all have very strong ties to huge brands in dance music. Wyatt Marshall works at Dirtybird. RYBO works at Hot Creations. Of course all of you have ties to Desert Hearts. How did you take those influences and turn them into something unique like Percomaniacs?

WM – I think one of the reasons Percomaniacs is working so well is because we have role models that have done this shit. And people that we’re so close to and mentors that have all done it so the foundation is already laid out there.

R – We just wanted to make our own thing, and now we know how.

WM – Those guys are just our homies. Just like we’re homies. It’s no different. That’s why they fuck with us. That’s why we really like all them. Cause we’re all friends; just normal guys.

We’re sitting here at the first Percomaniacs party where all three of you are going to play back-to-back, and soon you’re going to do the same thing at Dirtybird Campout. Obviously there are some differences between those two environments. How are you going to approach that set different than this set?

WM – I would honestly say we’re not going to play anything different because it’s a Dirtybird party or this is a Percomaniacs party or we’re playing a Desert Hearts party or we’re playing any fucking party. If we’re all playing we’re just going to play records.

L – Although I will say we’re going to fucking bring it. We’re going to fucking bring it to Dirtybird.

WM – My only goal is to have both of these dudes look over and be like “What track is this” so I can say “You wish you knew.”

L – It is very competitive.

Where do you think Percomaniacs fits in the larger landscape of house music given the mainstream direction that it’s going?

R – I think it can fit anywhere really. That’s our goal: to really broaden people’s horizons.

WM – Be different.

L – Yeah you could listen to it on a massive stage or in a fucking elevator.

R – Or on Sirius XM.

So whatever phase house music goes through in the future, you plan on just maintaining the vision?

WM – Things are always going to be changing. Nothing stays the same forever, but if I look into the future I just see us three making records together.

**This transcript has been edited slightly for clarity and readability.

Photo Credit: 2nd Nature Photo

Dirtybird brings Birdhouse back to Chicago Lakefront | Photos by Charles Cushman

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Dirtybird brings Birdhouse back to Chicago Lakefront | Photos by Charles CushmanBirdhouse Chicago 2019 Din Ido DIVISUALS 185011 09138

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Claude VonStroke drops his first solo release of 2019 on Dirtybird, ‘Slink’

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Claude VonStroke drops his first solo release of 2019 on Dirtybird, ‘Slink’Dirtybird Bbq Claude Vonstroke Crowd Credit Upperleft

After two top-notch collaborations on Dirtybird, Claude VonStroke has delivered his first solo EP of the year: Slink which features the title track and another original, “Oh Please Oh Please.”

VonStroke’s first release on Dirtybird in 2019 was the motion-inducing “Getting Hot” with Italy’s Eddy M. The second was the eerie-groove machine, “Comments,” which the Bird-boss made with Zombie Disco Squad and Kid Enigma. Both of these tracks are primetime house cuts, ready for when the dance floor is at its highest.

In contrast, the two tracks on Slink represent the lighter, mellower side of VonStroke’s production preferences. Those who have seen him in action know that he can play for any mood at any time of day and give the crowd exactly what they need.

Photo credit: Upperleft

NMF Roundup: ZHU and The Bloody Beetroots link for ‘Zoning,’ RÜFÜS DU SOL release new set of ‘Solace’ remixes + more

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NMF Roundup: ZHU and The Bloody Beetroots link for ‘Zoning,’ RÜFÜS DU SOL release new set of ‘Solace’ remixes + moreRUFUS PressShot LeFawnhawk 1

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

In perhaps one of the biggest collaborations to hit the airwaves on Sept. 6, The Bloody Beetroots and ZHU have teamed up for “Zoning.” RÜFÜS DU SOL have dropped off a new set of remixes for Solace, including an irresistibly groovy one by Hot Since 82. Grimes and i_o unexpectedly deliver “Violence,” and M83 returns with the dreamy “Temple of Sorrow.” Audien and Nevve bring blissful energy to “Buzzing,” and Cashmere Cat reveals “FOR YOUR EYES ONLY.” Arty is on a journey to “Find You” in his latest, and Walker & Royce team up with VNSSA for “Rave Grave.” KOAN Sound’s new EP lands pm Sept. 6, featuring sounds like “Vibrant,” and Claude VonStroke unleashes a new original, “Slink.” Sullivan King has released a two-track EP, and Armin van Buuren and David Hodges link for “Waking Up With You.” Fox Stevenson finally uncovers “Dreamland,” and 3LAU remixes San Holo’s “Lost Lately.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: LeFawnhawk