Louis The Child talk tour life, Rick & Morty, and

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Freddy Kennett and Robby Hauldren aren’t your average producers. Already conquering a large portion of the world on a number of tours, collaborations with multiple artists and a fanbase that grows exponentially, the two have experienced enormous growth over their years in music. Rising from bedroom producers to international success didn’t come overnight, but these two made it look easy.

Better known by their stage name, Louis The Child, the boys demonstrate their own unique workings of future bass and continuously find ways to transcend their positivity and love for life into their music — a remarkable feat that not many can achieve. They draw inspiration from some of the leading names in dance music, like Flume and Madeon to forge their own unique sound, undergoing exceptional growth throughout the past two years as a result. From performing on stages at some of the biggest festivals across the world to their colorful touch on their remixes of Miike Snow’s “Genghis Khan” and Ty Dolla $ign’s hip-hop anthem “Blasé“, global musical domination is not far from their reach.

Their nation-wide ‘Last To Leave’ tour is considered by many as Louis The Child’s most successful tour yet, with the duo having brought out a multitude of friends and rising artists to open for them. Ashe, Joey Purp, Lauv, Point Point, Louis Futon, Prince Fox, Party Pupils, and Win & Woo offer different musical styles as they join Hauldren and Kennett for the ride. Currently traveling across North America in the midst of this tour, they took some time to chat with Dancing Astronaut after their Toronto show, where they dig into the depths of their past tours, ways to stay inspired and connecting with their fans, and more to reveal the personalities beyond the happy-go-lucky Chi-town boys that one sees on stage.

From the multiple tours you two have embarked on over the past few years, what has changed about your shows, and your stage presence?

Freddy: We’ve gotten a lot more comfortable and a lot more clear with what we wanted to present to the people at the show. I think also we switched from CDJs to Ableton Live recently, and that’s been a big change in helping us grow the set in a way. We have a lot more possibilities now, and I think in general our connection with the crowd has grown every single night that we play a show. We’re always looking to improve something with the show every single time that we play a show, and it feels like every show just keeps getting better.

 

Robby: I think also our stage production has gotten a lot bigger and crazier. Now that we’re playing in bigger rooms and stuff, there’s kind of an expectation to bring more production and to put on a much bigger show with lights and video, and I think we definitely stepped up to the challenge and really brought it up another notch with this tour.

 

Freddy: Also, we’ve kind of gone from at the start of thinking of about being DJs, to now where we really just want to put on the best show we can rather than solely a DJ performance or a musical performance.

ltc crowd

Besides having your photographer document your shows, we learned that you also have given out disposable cameras at shows to collect shots from your fans perspectives. Where did this idea come from, and how have the results turned out?

Robby: I want to say it was around last fall when we toured — I believe like someone brought it up to us that they heard of someone else doing it a while back, and we thought, “Damn, that’s a really interesting idea.” Give people in the crowd a disposable and see what they capture and what it’s like to be in the crowd at one of our shows. Obviously, we’ll never know what it’s like to be in our own crowd, so I think it’s really cool to give the people attending the show a camera and say, “Hey, take a photo and pass it to someone else.” It’s really cool to see what people capture. We posted a bunch of the photos we got from past tours, and it’s just cool to see what moments people want to capture and what about the show connects with them. Whether it’s a funny selfie, or if it’s a picture of one of us getting real close to someone in the crowd, or whatever it is, it’s nice to see the perspective of someone attending the show and we continue to do it. We don’t really always get the cameras back, but when we do, we love developing them and checking ’em out.

Have you guys had any photo that specifically stood out to you?

Robby: One was of someone’s middle finger. Nothing crazy, it’s all just the vibe we’re looking for in the crowd.

 

Freddy: A lot of people just being happy, that’s the one thing I noticed. A lot of people just smiling and looking like they’re really enjoying themselves, which is exactly what we want from our shows is for people to be together and enjoy themselves, and enjoy the company around them.

Speaking of photos, Robby, you also have your own Instagram account for your photography. Do you have any specific inspiration when you’re out shooting?

Robby: Capturing whatever’s around us, really. I think we live an interesting life and this stuff’s really only gonna happen once, so I think it’s really important to capture it. I’m a big fan of rock memorabilia, so I always love taking cool photos, seeing old merch from my favorite rock bands, for example. The only way to really keep that going is to take it upon yourself sometimes, and go out and capture what’s happening aroundyou.

Tell us about life on a tour bus. What have you both learned about each other, after being stuck on the bus for hours at a time?

Freddy: It’s kind of like summer camp for us. I kind of learned that this last tour when we were on the bus with Imad Royal and our photographer Collin Miller — just all of us together waking up at the same time, and making music. Because we have speakers on the bus, we can make music ’till whatever time we want; sometimes it’s 4:00am, sometimes it’s 9:00am. The bunks are all pitch black so you can just sleep until whenever and just play the show, then make more music the next night. That’s really fun for me cause I stay productive and creative, and work on making new, fun music while on the road. Touring has been really fun and the show aspect of things just gets cooler every night. After like 4-5 shows in a row, you get tired and it’s just normal now. You get a little tired, you get the rest stage, then you’re excited to get back to doing shows.

 

Robby: Like a cycle almost! You do 4-5 shows in a row, and you feel tired as fuck after that and then you have like two days off, and by the second day off you’re like “I wanna do a show again”. It’s nice to kinda always be on and always be doing something.

That’s great! Have you guys learned anything about each other, like particular habits, that you wouldn’t have known before, from being on the bus?

Freddy: I mean we’re all growing and adding on new habits and trying to be the best selves we can be, and be the most creative so we’re all kinda just inspiring each other. We all went out and got practice pads to practice drums and a bass guitar, so Robby’s practicing bass and we’re all constantly writing and freestyling together, trying to improve on all fronts musically. Also, I’ve just been meditating and reading a lot of books and trying to stay active in all ways.

 

Robby: I don’t know, there aren’t really specific habits for this tour that I’ve learned about Freddy or anyone. It’s almost the same — we’ve been doing this for so long together that we have a very good understanding of each other, and it’s nice to have that.

 

Freddy: Also with everyone on tour is very loving. No matter who you are, we can get along with you very well. Who cares about your habits? As long as everyone’s in a good mood and loving each other, we can provide the best tour and have the best time all together.

We saw that you guys had dressed up as Rick and Morty for your set at Voodoo Fest – did you guys get up to any shenanigans this Halloween?

Freddy: We were in New Orleans!

 

Robby: Yeah, we were in New Orleans for that. We went to a cool warehouse rave that Fatboy Slim was playing at, after we played in New York. That was definitely a shenanigan.

 

Freddy: The Rick and Morty costumes are really funny though, we all have some inside jokes now from the voices and we did some interviews in character. But yeah, it was just really fun. I like Halloween a lot.

Was this your first year being on tour for Halloween?

Robby: This wasn’t our first tour on Halloween.

 

Freddy: We played Something Wicked last year.

 

Robby: Yeah we did. We’ve definitely done our fair share of Halloween shows and played on Halloween.

 

Freddy: I’d say we’ve only played like one or two years of Halloween shows, but they get better every year especially as we grow.

 

rick n morty ltc

You both update your Soundcloud daily with tunes from your friends and other artists, but tell us about both of your current, go-to songs when you guys have time to chill out.

Freddy: I know we both love Knox Fortune, “Lil Thing”  and that it’s one of our favorites from this year. I have a playlist of about 300 of my classic songs from all across time that I’ve always been shuffling through to stay inspired, but I love modern indie, electro-pop, kinda more indie like Polish Girl, Neon Indian, Passion Pit, stuff like that.

 

Robby: I’ve definitely been listening to Billy Island lately, their song “Ocean Eyes” fucking kills me. In a good way. Patient 99 by Blaise Railey is also a jam and a half, I love that track.

 

Freddy: Oliver Tree is always killing it, “Enemy” is really cool.

 

Robby: RAYE is super cool too.

 

Freddy: Yeah RAYE, the singer is awesome.

 

Robby: The new Odesza album is great.

 

Freddy: But Knox Fortune is one of our favorites lately.

Speaking of songs, in your “Candy” mix you guys put out, you have an endless goldmine of unreleased tracks. Will any of those officially come to light in the future?

Freddy: I’d say maybe a few of them might come out with some of the artists we’ve worked with. I think we’re constantly working on new stuff, but we’ll probably put out new Candy tapes, or maybe call it a different name. We’ll probably be putting out a good amount of beat tapes every so often. I really like that we put out Candy and it has the visual companion, it kinda separated stuff that we’ve released on Spotify and iTunes from these ideas and these cool ear-candy that you can listen to elsewhere, so there’s a bunch of different types of things that you can get from Louis The Child. I like having songs on Spotify that are real songs, but also having separate releases that might be things that please or excite you for the next release.

You said that you were looking to release more Candy mixes in the future?

Freddy: Yeah, I dunno if we’ll call them Candy but we’ll definitely put out new installments of some beat tapes.

 

Robby: Yeah, we definitely haven’t slowed down on our music-making so I’m sure that if you give it some time, we’ll probably regroup and be like “Shit, we have all these lil things, let’s make another one.”

 

Freddy: But no plans on it.

 

Robby: No plans, but if it happens naturally, that’s the best way.

On that note, your Last to Leave tour has been wildly successful and it seems that your fanbase only grows at an exponential rate. Besides some new music, what do you guys hope to accomplish in 2018?

Robby: We definitely have a couple more releases planned for 2017 that we’re really excited about. In 2018, we’re going to do a lot more touring too and get to a lot of places that we haven’t been to before, which is really exciting for us. We’re slowly but surely working towards an album, and I think the goal is definitely to put out an album in 2018. It’s still very much in the beginning phases, and we’re still really figuring out everything about it, but we definitely want to.

 

Freddy: It’s in the beginning phases in terms of adding things, we’re still working on the arranging of the album, but it’s not in the beginning phases in terms of like, we have like 30 ideas in a folder that we’re thinking for it and we’ve already tried to take a few out of it to try and put it together, and we still have a good amount. It’s coming though.

 

Robby: For sure 2018 an album, and venturing to a lot of new places to perform.

ltc more crowd

ITtowards the end of your shows lately, when you guys play “It’s Strange,” you both take a moment to sit down on the stage. Why is that?

  Freddy: It’s a mixture of the idea naturally coming to Robby. Originally he would do it but after a few shows, I ended up sitting down with him and it kinda created a really cool moment. When she starts talking about “letting down your walls” we’d do it, and I feel like it’s a really close moment where I end up looking straight at the front-row and everyone in the crowd. You can kinda see them react to it, and it feels really close between the crowd and us.

 

Robby: I think another thing too is that it’s the last song of the show, and at that point there’s nothing really left that we have to do. We don’t have a next song that we have to think about transitioning in, it’s kind of a moment where we can sit down and be like “Alright, these are the last few minutes of the show, we want to spend it as close to you. We want to give you our full attention, ’cause after these last couple of minutes, this whole thing is done.” It’s nice to do that, and a way to really give our full attention to the people our in the crowd.

 

Freddy: And a good final moment; a good send off.

Lastly, Robby, why exactly do you take your shoes off when you guys perform? Is it that much comfier?

Robby: Yeah it’s a comfort thing. I used to DJ in my room and I wouldn’t wear shoes then. I just started doing it on stage a bit, and it started to turn into a thing where people noticed and we’re like “Whoa, Robby doesn’t wear shoes!”, and I was like “Well, guess I’ll keep doing it!”

 

Freddy: It’s a funny thing cause ever since we first started playing shows and there was no one there, he’s always done it.

 

Robby: It’s also one of Fatboy Slim’s rules of DJing, I guess you can say I try to follow.

 

 

Tickets for the rest of their Last To Leave tour are available online.

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Whethan talks tour life, waffles and Good Nights

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Touring across North America with close friends and having full control each set is not a feat that many people can say they’ve accomplished, let alone by the age of 18. Proudly hailing from Chicago, Ethan Snoreck started off like many other aspiring producers, putting together beats and remixing songs, then uploading them to his SoundCloud account. Fast forward two years later and known better by his stage-name, Whethan, the Chi-town native has tackled his dreams and turned them into his reality.

Snoreck’s break into the scene was aided by his Skrillex, who invited out to open for his idol during the record OWSLA pool party in 2017, and quickly garnered attention to his name. With the support from one of the largest names in the dubstep scene and an already quirky quirky to wheat crackers, it’s no surprise his name was instantly recognizable, and talent indisputably apparent.

The blooming talent is currently in the midst of his headlining “Good Nights” tour, where he has already performed in cities across the East Coast while being supported by friends like SAINT WKND, and Ashe. With the recent releases of some brand new music, and the announcement of his NYE set at Dillon Francis‘ Ultra VIP NYE Experience, we caught up with Whethan to talk about how he’s adjusting to tour life, and his immense success over the last year. 

Throughout 2017, you’ve gained a ton of success with your music, and a fanbase that extends around the world. Is there a specific moment from this year that rings true to your success?

 

Red Rocks was the one that really did it for me. The fact that I got to play on the same stage as some of the most iconic musicians of all time was absolutely surreal! It was also one of my favorite sets I’ve ever put together so while Lollapalooza and Coachella were ridiculous, Red Rocks was definitely my favorite show so far. 

 

Five singles and a handful of remixes later, you’ve put out a lot of new music this year. Is there any thought of an EP or album in the near future? Even if not, can we expect any upcoming collaborations after the tour has concluded?

 

Yes, I’m currently working on my album. It’s my main goal right now and once I get off the road, I’m going to lock myself in my house, get a case of peach tea, 100 boxes of waffles, and finally finish this thing. I’ve been working on it for a while now, and it’s grown into something a lot bigger than I thought it would. There are a ton of features from artists all across the spectrum so I think everyone will have a song to connect with. 

 

You’ve travelled around with future-bass duo Louis The Child a little bit this year, tell us about your friendship with Robby & Freddy, and the success you’ve all seen since growing past Chicago’s music scene.

 

What can I say? They’re family. We came from different places in Chicago, suburb wise, and now we literally live 5 minutes away from each other. It’s a weird and wild ride that we’re all on and I’m just happy to have them in my boat. We’re always collabing and hanging out, bouncing ideas off one another, and honestly just having fun. Having true friends that you can count on is important , and I’d put those guys at the top of my list for sure. 

 

You’ve managed to accomplish a ton of things that many 18 year olds haven’t – do you ever feel like you’ve missed out on doing “teenage” things?

 

That’s a tricky one for me. It’s a little bit of both honestly. On one hand, I don’t think I missed out on too much because I graduated from high school in the normal 4 year time period and had a ton of fun the whole time. But on the other hand, yes because I’m not going to college like the rest of the people my age. That being said, being out on the road so much I sometimes feel like this is my own personal version of college. Travelling can teach you a lot about yourself and the people around you and I’m forever grateful to the experiences I’ve had so far. I wouldn’t want to live my life any other way so to worry about what I’ve “missed out” on is just something that doesn’t cross my mind. 

 

With the Good Nights’ tour going around every major city this fall, you’re on the go for the rest of the year. Besides your hometown, is there a particular city that holds a place in your heart?

 

Well first and foremost, every city we go to has a special place in my heart. How could they not? My fans are amazing and they show SO much love! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had people come up to me at the end of a show and give me something they made just for me. Pins, posters, shirts…you name it. I actually just met a fan who had my logo tattooed on him, which was wild! But if I had to pick one place besides Chicago, I would have to say Los Angeles. LA is my new hometown and I don’t have any plans to live anywhere else. It was the first show of the tour and I couldn’t have been any more nervous, but as soon as the lights went down and the curtain came up I was locked in. It was one hell of a way to start this awesome journey across the country.

 

What’s the biggest challenge you’ve found living on a tour bus, and how have you coped with said challenge?

 

I mean there’s a lot of challenges that you could run into on tour bus but I’ve got some great friends out here on the road that make all those challenges go away. It really comes down to the people you surround yourself with. I have my good days and my bad days but my tour fam is always there to remind me that we’re the luckiest people in the world.

 

You’ve also just announced your plans for New Year’s Eve, playing at Dillon Francis’ Ultra VIP NYE Experience in Los Angeles – what should fans expect from that show that’s different from your sets on tour?

 

I play new music at every show but I might break out some ultra-rare VIP sounds for that one.

 

In a past interview with Billboard, you mentioned that you ended up working with one of your idols, Skrillex, in the studio. Will that collab every officially come to light?

 

Trust me, I’ve heard that question a million times. I guess we’ll all just have to wait and see what happens. We’re both super busy and are constantly doing a million things at once so I think it’s just a matter of time. 

Buy tickets to Whethan’s tour here 

 

Dates: 

10.24 Philadelphia, PA @ Trocadero

10.25 New York, NY @ Bowery Ballroom

10.26 Brooklyn, NY @ Music Hall of Williamsburg

 

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Spring Awakening announces 2018 dates and early bird tickets

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Chicago’s own React Presents has announced the 2018 dates of the seventh annual Spring Awakening Music Festival (SAMF), which will take place June 8-10. SAMF, the largest strictly electronic music festival in the Midwest, will return to Adams/Medill Park in Chicago for the third year since its departure from its original destination, Soldier Field.

SAMF has hosted some of the most eminent names in EDM, including Skrillex, Diplo, and Dillon Francis over the years, rendering it a must-attend for Chicago’s electronic music lovers since its launch in 2012.

Discounted general admission and VIP early bird tickets are on sale Oct. 12-14 at their lowest price, available here.

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Chance the Rapper is the youngest entry on Fortune’s 40 Under 40 list

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From working with various initiatives to support the growth of education and music programs, to playing a pivotal role in saving Soundcloud from it’s demise, Chance the Rapper has captured the hearts of many and easily taken the unofficial title as Chicago’s sweetheart.

All accomplished by the age of 24, the Chi-town native has maintained a high-profile and respectfully cashed in on his success this year. Described as an “annual ranking of the most influential young people in business”, Chance makes his way as this years youngest entry on Fortune’s 40 Under 40 list. Amongst endorsements with large-scale brands like Nike and Apple, and immense success from Coloring Book, 2017 has thus far played out to be the best year of his career yet, and just the start of his mark on the music industry.

H/T: Billboard

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Louis The Child release Chance The Rapper remix and fall tour dates

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Growing from Chicago-native bedroom producers to worldwide sensations, Freddy Kennett and Robby Hauldren have taken 2017 by storm. From traveling nationwide on their fall tour to releasing their debut EP, Love Is Alive, the duo, better known as Louis The Child, have worked tirelessly to not only make their mark in the dance music industry but keep a smile on their fans faces.

Now announcing their latest project, Louis The Child will be embarking on their nationwide “Last To Leave” fall tour across North America. Bringing along a diverse medley of friends including Ashe, Prince Fox and Louis Futon as openers, their fall tour extends into mid-December where they will close out their last show in Los Angeles.

Treating fans to an endless slew of remixes on their Soundcloud, the duo has released their latest production, a remix of Chance The Rapper‘s “All Night”. Taking the originally additive pre-gaming anthem and adding their unprecedented touch to it, the boys have magically spun this release into an insta-pleaser. Experimenting with eclectic synths in combination with boosted percussion assemblages, the boys have once again hit the nail on the head with this release. Playing out this long-awaited remix in a variety of their live sets this summer, fans are finally able to listen to the full version on Soundcloud.

 

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Hip-hop’s ultimate sweetie Chance the Rapper is hosting a free surprise concert in Chicago today

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Chance the Rapper is officially music’s gift that keeps on giving.

His compassion for his hometown of Chicago is genuinely heart-warming. After announcing that he’ll be hosting a free concert, today August 12, deemed #BBBash, Chance then proceeded to share in an on-camera interview with ABC 7 Chicago he would be handing out free tickets beforehand.

“ I wanted to make sure I can identify all those teachers that support our youth and build our children up, all those fathers that are out here with their families, the cornerstones of their houses, bringing their families out—I wanted to make sure I can identify y’all so my people can get you some free tickets,” Chance told the camera.

The free show is set to follow Chicago’s annual Bud Billiken parade set to culminate with a picnic at Washington Park —one of the city’s oldest and largest celebrations amongst African-Americans in the country— of which Chance will be the grand marshal. He previously took to Twitter to ask Chicago public school teachers attending the parade to wear red in an effort to locate them to pass out free tickets to the show and celebrate their hard work and earnest dedication.

On top of it all, Chance has also announced his non-profit organization SocialWorks will be giving away 30,000 “stuffed” backpacks to children during the parade.

H/T: Pitchfork

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Towkio shares official music video for Lido-assisted ‘Drift’ [Watch]

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Chicago is currently experiencing a golden moment in the city’s already legendary hip-hop history, largely behind the work of young up-and-coming figures like Chance The Rapper, Vic Mensa, and Towkio, among others. Preston Oshita, better known as Towkio, is staking his claim in the current hip-hop space with his dexterous lyrical hopscotching and adventurous flow, and he’s no stranger to working with some of electronic music’s brightest forward-thinkers. Past collaborators include Kaytranada, Mr. Carmack, as well as Lido, who produced the rapper’s latest single “Drift.”

On the production end, “Drift” finds Lido on a screeching joy ride, putting together a hypnotic rap beat broken up by infectious half time breaks and off-kilter clinks and kicks. The track marks Towkio’s major label debut, recorded at Rick Rubin’s legendary Shangri La studio in Malibu. Towkio’s latest also comes complete with a high-octane new music video that fits the track’s name perfectly. “Drift”takes on a DIY-inspired filming style, catching the rhymer everywhere from pyramids in Mexico, to the middle of a drifting car’s tightly wound figure eight. Pulling out all the stops with fast cars, bikes, and even hot air balloons, Towkio who also assisted Todd Burr in directing the new video, delivers a one-two punch on “Drift.”

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Listen to Frankie Knuckles’ last recorded mix to celebrate late house legend’s birthday

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In April 2014, electronic music lost one of its most impactful founding fathers when Frankie Nicholls died at the age of 59. As Frankie Knuckles, Nicholls was one of house music’s most influential progenitors. Deemed “The Godfather of House,” Frankie Knuckles served as the musical figurehead of the genre’s seminal venue, Chicago’s fabled Warehouse.

Legendary in both life and death, Nicholls is deservedly one of dance music’s most decorated figures. Nicholls’ contributions to house’s formation earned him, among many other honors, a Grammy and a spot in the Dance Music Hall of Fame. In 2004, then-Illinois Senator Barack Obama famously played a role in helping to rename the Chicago street where the Warehouse once reigned “Frankie Knuckles Way.” Chicago still recognizes Obama’s decree that August 24 be known as “Frankie Knuckles Day” evermore.

Today, January 18, 2017, would have been Nicholls’ 62nd birthday. In honor of the late legend’s birthday, we encourage readers to listen to Frankie Knuckles’ final recorded mix. Performed at Winter Music Conference in Miami on March 22, 2014, Nicholls’ two-hour set serves as a stunning reminder of how much influence the Chicagoan pioneer had on the music which pervades club culture in the modern day.

Happy birthday, Frankie.

H/T: Mixmag

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Chicago to finally recognize DJing as an art form

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After being antagonized by the Cook County government for not booking “live cultural performances,” small venues in Chicago have received a reassuring piece of news: DJ performances will finally be considered a “recognized art form,” under the same umbrella as live concerts. This means that venues which exclusively put on electronic or hip-hop shows will not have to pay the additional three percent amusement tax that the city was attempting to levy by classifying DJ sets separately from live music.

Cities are the cultural hubs of the modern world, where art tends to evolve the quickest. To charge additional taxes on small venues that put on electronic shows — in the birthplace of house music no less — would be to stifle innovation.

Joe Shanahan, the owner behind popular Chicago venues like Metro and Smart Bar, commented on the new amendment: “This agreement confirms that government officials should not be the arbiters of what constitutes art while affording small venue owners a sense of certainty as they continue to present musical talent to Chicagoans and the many visitors who flock to our venues based on our city’s international reputation as a music capital.”

The amendment to the Amusement Tax is set to be heard on Wednesday, October 26, 2016.

The news follows a similar situation in Berlin, which recently declared techno — and more specifically, Berghain’s world-renowned techno parties — as “high culture.”

H/T: Mixmag

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Listen to Skrillex’s headlining set from Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring Day Festival

 

Listen to Skrillex’s headlining set from Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring Day Festival

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As far as independent artists go, Chance The Rapper is making some game-changing moves right now. He is challenging the record industry’s status quo while simultaneously producing some of the most top-notch hip-hop out there. His latest feat includes throwing his own festival, Magnificent Coloring Day, for a hometown crowd in Chicago, bringing a thick cast of support for the show, and locking down an exclusive live stream on TIDAL. Chance even bought tickets for his own festival back from scalpers and redistributed them to his fans. The young Acid Rap proponent is unlike many other artists producing music right now, and Skrillex, one of his earliest major collaborators and supporters, was there to help the rapper cap off the biggest night of his still-budding career.

Holding down closing duties after Chance’s slot on Saturday night, Skrillex took to the decks to deliver a special headlining set from U.S. Cellular Field on Chicago’s south side. The set opened with Chance coming out to perform a raucous rendition of his summer smash “No Problem,” live to kick off Skrillex’s high-octane DJ performance. The set comes with all the staple bass weapons Skrillex has in his arsenal, then topped off with a heavy dose of hip-hop throughout. New unreleased music with Snails, tracks from Vic Mensa, Schoolboy Q, 4B, Zomboy and more all make their way into Skrillex’s set, capping off a special evening at Magnificent Coloring Day with one of his most memorable outings of the year.

Stream the full set below:

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