Premiere: BoxPlot gears up for enthralling Liquicity EP with ‘Voicemail Poems’ [Q&A]

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Premiere: BoxPlot gears up for enthralling Liquicity EP with ‘Voicemail Poems’ [Q&A]Boplot

Introspective drum ‘n’ bass finds its voice in talented producers like BoxPlot. The Boston-based producer first caught the attention of the dnb world back in 2015 and has been making a name for himself via his unique brand of dreamy beats ever since.

His newest piece of work, an EP called Alice, arrives on Liquicity Records on Sept. 6. Hear its opening track, “Voicemail Poems,” and learn more about the work that went into the EP below.


Tell us a little bit about the making of this EP.

The initial idea came from my tune “My Non-Existent Friend, Alice,” but not from the tune itself. It came from the people in the YouTube comments sorta wondering “who is this person” or “why is she non existent.” That got me wondering if I should build this story further into an EP, and so I did. The making of Alice was a pretty grueling and extensive—1.5 years or so—but it was definitely fun. I’m very meticulous when it comes to writing songs because I nitpick on literally every detail and I absolutely want to make sure that it’s 100 percent the direction I want to go in. As for production techniques, I’ve finally gotten to utilize my Eurorack synth that I’ve been on and off building for a year or so. I’ve sorta designed it to where it’s basically made to be an ambient-lofi drone machine, and it does wonders when it comes to making atmospheres.

What can listeners expect from this EP?

I’d definitely consider this to be like a mini concept album if anything, but still very familiar to my Tramontane EP. I really wanted to hone in on the emotions of lust and loss and sorta play around with them. You can sorta view the timeline of these two imaginary characters and see how things evolve over the course of the four tracks. I periodically listen to the entirety of the EP end to end and I still get chills from it.

What does this EP mean to you?

While making the EP, I didn’t really think it had some sort of emotional connection to my actual self. I more or less just thought I was just writing a story just for the sake of writing a story. But after these past few months have gone by, I’ve come to realize that this body of work was actually me subconsciously telling myself how I felt over the past year. It kind of is surreal to think how when writing things you can be writing something that has no meaning or anything behind it, but in actuality it does and you don’t know it yet. 

What are your hopes for drum ‘n’ bass in the United States?

I’m optimistic about it, but I’m realistically in the middle. I’m noticing there’s now tons of hype coming from a good majority of the big EDM guys talking about how drum ‘n’ bass is so sick and are asking for tunes from people, but it’s one of those things where I sorta need to see it to believe it. Now I’m not talking about the talent here in the U.S. The talent I’m seeing from the States is actually rather insane to be honest. A great example of this is a guy named Winslow. His tunes are absolute stompers and he makes really quality YouTube videos that I tend to watch periodically and enjoy greatly. Anyway, back to the original point: it’s the promoters that are based here that I’m iffy about. For example, if you don’t originate from the UK, you aren’t getting booked. It’s as simple as that. Flite I know for a fact is working his butt off to make sure to change that, and it’s working. It’s just that these promoters aren’t willing to pick up these homebrew artists at all, or they are at times but they are getting paid in pennies. It’s a slow process yes, but that’s what it is going to have to be; a waiting game.

What’s in store for the remainder of 2019?

I do have some collaborations with some artists that I’ve always wanted to work with, but I won’t name drop them because I do want to keep things secret. I do have plans to also make a non drum ‘n’ bass EP for once since the good majority of music I actually listen to isn’t really drum and bass. Finally, I also have another EP lined up, but this time it’s for my side project, Tetracase. Nothing is completely set in stone for that one, but it’s probably going to receive the majority of my attention for the remainder of the year.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 100: The Ultimate Drum ‘n’ Bass Playlist

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 100: The Ultimate Drum ‘n’ Bass PlaylistDeters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.


There’s just something about drum ‘n’ bass that’s always spoken to my soul. I remember hearing my first Pendulum song a decade ago and thinking “what on earth is this, and where can I get more?”

The genre began making its way into the electronic music sphere in the early 1990s, right around the time I was born. Its rapid breakbeats took over London and Bristol, ramping up the jungle and rave scene to 160-180 BPM. While still more widespread in the UK to this day, the genre has slowly trickled into the United States EDM scene. We still have a long way to go before drum ‘n’ bass artists are regularly installed as main stage performers at major US festivals, but there’s so much to discover and embrace in the US drum ‘n’ bass scene (I see you, Flite and Boxplot). There’s also an endless stream of quality dnb being churned out overseas, with imprints like RAM Records, Hospital Records, and Liquicity Records as strong as ever in their supporters and fan base.

I regularly tell people that have never really gotten into drum ‘n’ bass to just try. It’s a diverse and ever-evolving genre, full of sub-genres and offshoots. I guarantee you’ll find something you like in some format. Dig through the 100-song playlist I’ve compiled to celebrate 100 installments of this series to see if there’s something there for you!

Thank you, drum ‘n’ bass, for your tireless energy, emotive vocals, and the ability you always have to yank me out of a bad mood and reignite my love for electronic music in today’s day and age. Here’s to you, and the brilliant artists who create you.

NMF Roundup: Mat Zo gets fired up with ‘Motivate,’ Lost Frequencies remixes Martin Garrix + more

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NMF Roundup: Mat Zo gets fired up with ‘Motivate,’ Lost Frequencies remixes Martin Garrix + moreMat Zo 3

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Mat Zo has unleashed a brand new Mad Zoo compilation into the world, complete with a new original from the head honcho himself: “Motivate.” Lost Frequencies puts his spin on Martin Garrix, Macklemore, and Fall Out Boy’s “Summer Days,” and Whipped Cream and LICK team up for “The Greatest.” Cedric Gervais joins forces with MJ Cole and Freya Ridings on “Waking Up,” and MK takes on Mark Ronson and Camila Cabello’s “Find U Again.” BIJOU flexes his hefty house chops on “Floetry,” and Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, David Guetta, Daddy Yankee, Afro Bros, and Natti Natasha deliver a mega-collab called “Instagram.” Foxen remixes Gill Chang and glasscat on “One For You,” and Leandro Da Silva has released a take on Oliver Heldens, Devin and Nile Rodgers’ “Summer Lover.” Sick Individuals, Justin Prime, and Bymia team up for “Not Alone,” and Frank Walker delivers his cut of Kygo and Chelsea Cutler’s “Not Ok.” Don Diablo has remixed Zara Larsson’s “All the Time,” and MOTi and Riggi & Piros collaborate on “Habibi.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: Rukes

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 84

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 84Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


Liquicity‘s Reflections – Part One is nothing short of stacked. The eight-track compilation is full of emerging and veteran talent, featuring remixes by Flite, Polygon, L Plus, and a Dualistic & NCT rework by one of my favorites, BoxPlot. The Massachusetts producer has taken this Liquicity classic, first released in late 2014, and given it a wholehearted, energy-filled refresher. He builds slowly but dives face-first into the drop at the minute mark, taking listeners on a whirlwind drum & bass journey.

Though he’s still young, ford. has made huge strides on ODESZA‘s Foreign Family Collective. The Utah producer follows up his 2018 album, (The) Evening, with an enticing remix of labelmate Kasbo‘s “Places We Don’t Know.” ford.’s take is a dreamy, contemplative one, slowing down the pace to focus on intermittent piano melodies and instrumentals. The remix tucks in neatly with ODESZA’s body of work, as ford. takes listeners outside and brings the crisp and calming sounds of nature to their doorstep.

Mielo‘s Anywhere But Here EP makes its full debut on March 29, composed of four tracks that showcase his storytelling capabilities. He glides through a smooth and soulful introduction onward to the previously released “ILY” and “Scar,” ending at the EP’s title track. With the help of vocalist Tori Letzler, he’s created a track that’s wistful and melancholic but still maintains the energy brought to the EP in its previous tracks. Its piano- and vocal-laden outro makes for the perfect send-off for the body of work.

Last summer, Russian producer Sound Quelle took to Silk Music to release his Ethereal “mini album,” kicking off the collection with an intro mix of “Ethereal” with Brandon Mignacca. In the months since then, other producers have been hard at work on their own versions of the progressive house track, culminating in a remix package that features takes by Referna and David Broaders. The set also includes a “chillout mix” of the original track, composed by Sound Quelle himself. This moving take on “Ethereal” gives listeners a chance to sink deeply into the songs lyrics and instrumentals.

In a sea of producers churning out the same repeated electronic sounds, artists like former hero stand out. The UK producer’s style is difficult to define or put in a box—and that’s a good thing. His newest release, a piece called “erase you,” manages to be both peaceful and energetic, leading the listeners in with an understated introduction. He ramps up into a creative drop, pounding out out a swift beat that quickly fades back into a subtle soundscape.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 65

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Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 65Deters Beat Lab@0.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA managing editor Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.

Listen in playlist format here.


I first heard i_o‘s “Low” in the early months of 2018 when he sprinkled the track in a mau5trap mix. Its thumping bass and sultry vocals immediately caught my attention, and in the months since, I’ve replayed that snippet of the mix more times than I’d care to mention. This is i_o in his finest form: churning out preposterously filthy beats with a catchy vocal loop that lures the listener from the get-go. “Low” makes up the first half of his latest EP, which is out now on mau5trap.

So much respect for American drum & bass producers who are pushing the scene here in the States! One of my current favorites is BoxPlot, a Boston-based artist who’s been building a following through releases like “Sunroad” with Flite (who’s also American!) on Liquicity. His latest is a rework of Mint Royale’s 2002 “Blue Song.” BoxPlot has modernized the track and brought it swiftly into 2018, switching up the pace considerably by adding a truly intimidating drum & bass backbone to the song.

Following his “Mirage” release in July, Monstercat mastermind Rogue has returned to deliver “Badlands.” This track is a breath of fresh air in a genre where there’s often little variety in sound: future bass. Badlands is beautifully complex, lush with airy melodies and an overall ferociousness that’s apparent from the first few seconds. This intense atmosphere makes it perfect the compilation its a part of: the latest Monstercat x Rocket League compilation.

After building anticipation through singles like “Just Life” and “Behind Those Clothes,” Jaguar Dreams have at last unveiled their debut self-titled EP. The seven-track collection of songs leads the listener on a somewhat nostalgic journey, dwindling down with the last song, “Tapts.” This one’s a bit darker than its predecessors but is equally beautiful. “This first EP is a collection of songs that came about somewhat effortlessly in a shack in the middle of the jungle using basic instruments,” they tell their listeners in the EP’s description. “We produced and arranged everything back in our studio in NYC and the collection became a true culmination of our collective pasts embodied in a new shape that felt right.”

While I can’t understand a word of this song, its beauty is so utterly apparent. “Hislerim” manages to build a bridge between what many would consider a “heater” and a more melodic, ethereal piece. It ebbs and flows from bass-filled choruses to verses of gorgeous vocals backed by minimalist instrumental elements. This song has it all: twinkling piano melodies, heavenly vocals, a hefty dose of bass — and still comes together in a neatly packaged, comprehensive way. Good music truly transcends language barriers.

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory Vol. 39

This post was originally published on this site

Dexter’s Beat Laboratory is a weekly collection of songs from DA music editor and staff writer Robyn Dexter. With a taste that can only be described as eclectic — to say nothing of a name that lends itself to punnery — DA is happy to present a selection of tracks personally curated by Dexter for your listening pleasure.


Just a month after the release of “Satisfied” on his Science EP, Robotaki has tapped the talents of Machinedrum for a dynamic remix. “When my team and I were thinking of artists to hit up for remixes, we wanted to have a collection of remixes that would truly change the way the original tracks felt and sounded,” Robotaki says of the remix. “Travis’ creative, eclectic and hard-hitting take on ‘Satisfied’ is everything I could’ve hoped for.”


It makes my heart happy that people are still remixing Oliver Heldens and Becky Hill‘s beloved “Gecko (Overdrive).” It’s been nearly five years since its release, and it remains one of my favorites. The song been reworked into a drum & bass masterpiece (thank you, Matrix & Futurebound), spun into a progressive gem (thank you, Lost Kings), and now has been funk-ified into nu disco by Flamingos. With a laid-back, synth-filled vibe, Flamingos revamp this classic with a retro feel.


With each new Rocket League collaborative album, Monstercat continues to impress. Volume three features the latest from Bad Computer: a tantalizing house track with vocals from Skyelle. “Silhouette” marks the producer’s third release with the Canadian label. With captivating instrumentals and beautifully emotive vocals from Skyelle, this one is an alluring addition to Bad Computer’s arsenal of well-crafted tunes.


Bass music plunges to the depths of hell in WAVEDASH and QUEST‘s new track, “Devil Music.” Sprinkled with eerie vocals from fknsyd, this creepy collaboration is crammed with aggressive bass and compelling sound design.  The in-your-face atmosphere of “Devil Music” is invigorating and menacing, making it a breath of fresh air in the saturated bass music market.


There are few things I love more than a drum & bass song that’s equal parts passion-packed and energetic. Flite and Boxplot’s latest, “Sunroad,” is part of Liquicity‘s Galaxy of Dreams 3 compilation, which came out at the end of April. It’s a clear standout on the LP, bursting with life and gorgeous melodies.