Four Bonnaroo medical staffers suffer carbon monoxide poisoning

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At a major event like Bonnaroo Festival, the safety of the attendees is usually the top priority of the medical staff. The paramedic team, who already had their hands full with 37 hospitalizations and one death at this year’s festival, were forced to look after their own, as four paramedics were hospitalized for exposure to carbon monoxide.

Due to a blocked exhaust pipe of a generator, the Bonnaroo staff’s recreational vehicle began to fill with toxic carbon monoxide gas. Fortunately, one of the paramedics awoke on Monday and was able to find help. Three members of the medical team were airlifted to a hospital while the other was taken to a nearby facility. The names and conditions of the paramedics remain unknown.

H/T: Billboard

Photo credit: Clean Vibes, LLC

BREAKING: Male festival-goer found dead at Bonnaroo

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Multiple news sources are reporting that one person has died at Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tennessee. It’s the first death to occur at the four-day festival in three years.

The attendee’s body was discovered in the festival camping grounds between the hours of 10 and 11 a.m. June 8, according to local authorities. Lucky Knott, a spokesperson for the Coffee County Sheriff’s Office, said the only known detail of the deceased person’s identity is that he was male. The cause of death is still unknown, although foul play has not suspected, and an autopsy has been planned to determine the cause.

The investigation is still active and ongoing. DA will update this post as more news becomes available.

H/T: WKRN

Bonnaroo announces free laundry service and vintage clothing swap

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One can’t expect to attend Bonnaroo and not get a little dirty. It’s a 4-day extravaganza in the outskirts of Manchester, Tennessee, where the hot June sun is only a small factor in a dirt-filled, potentially muddy environment…but that’s the fun of it right?

Well, attendees can prepare to have as much fun as they want without the worries of having to wear a soiled t-shirt from day 1, as the festival has announced a free laundry service and vintage clothing swap. The new addition — called the LaundROO Lounge — will be a 3,600 square-foot area in Centeroo where festival-goers can drop off dirty clothes and have them washed, dried, and folded for free.

Powered by LG Electronics, the site will also feature 2,500 pieces of vintage clothing (sourced from NY-based clothing shop, What Goes Around Comes Around), which attendees can choose from to trade for what they’re already wearing. The traded clothes will be washed and displayed for others to check out and potentially swap. Any unclaimed clothing will be donated to United Way of the Greater Clarksville Region.

Bonnaroo 2018 kicks off June 7 and features performances by Eminem, Alison Wonderland, Virtual Self, Bassnectar, The Killers, and more. Visit the official website for more info.

H/T: Tennessean

Photo Credit: Bonnaroo

Beat drops & hook ups: new survey identifies the most ‘promiscuous’ music festivals

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A new survey conducted by Tickpick sought to evaluate the hookup culture of the festival scene, and as the findings indicate, it’s thriving.

Tickpick collected self-reported information from 1,050 people from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk about their sexual activity at music festivals. The statistics revealed 50.2% of festival goers to be open to a “weekend fling,” meaning that the odds of finding a temporary rave bae in the crowd are very likely to be in the favor of those seeking one. 33.6% of attendees reported having sex at a music festival.

Photo Credit: Tickpick

Camping festivals Electric Forest, Bonnaroo, and Burning Man ranked as the top three most popular music festivals for sex, with 30.2%, 27.3%, and 25.2% of ticket holders experiencing a sexual encounter at each event, respectively.

Photo Credit: Tickpick

Tickpick’s data determined Burning Man and Electric Forest to be the top two music festivals for oral sex, with 28.2% of Burning Man attendees engaging in oral activity, and 20.9% of Electric Forest attendees following suit. Electric Daisy Carnival came in third at 18.7%. 46.4% of festival goers stated that they’d had oral sex with someone they’d just met at one of the listed festivals.

Photo Credit: Tickpick

A daring 3.8% of survey participants said that they’d had sex in a festival dance tent. Surprisingly enough, a dance tent was the area that saw the least sex: port-a-potties saw comparatively more action, with 9.4% of attendees getting it on by the toilets. 15.3% reported doing so in a crowd, while 7.2% got hot and heavy backstage. The two most popular locations for festival sex were the tent, and the car.

As the survey identified, “face down a** up that’s the way we like to f*ck” isn’t just a favorite song to shout among festival crowds: doggy style turned out to be the most popular position of festival hookups, with 43.9% citing doggy style as their preferred festival position.

Photo Credit: Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Coachella

H/T: Tickpick

Report: The most commonly used drugs at music festivals

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Over the years, drug and alcohol’s relationship with electronic dance music has heightened its foothold in worldwide festival culture. Music festivals themselves undeniably afford a collective culture of intoxication — a palpable permeation of substance use and abuse that one can sniff out regardless of whether they choose to partake or not. Considering substance abuse’s assimilation, one may find themselves wondering just how deeply drugs and alcohol are intertwined with the modern festival landscape. Is substance abuse worse than it seems, and how is the industry taking responsibility for its needed conversations about these substances and their abuse?

In an effort to gain a better understanding of the how the industry is working through its deeply embedded substance use and abuse, it’s helpful to first try and understand the roles different substances play at festivals. To do so, TickPick — an ever-growing ticketing marketplace — surveyed 1,000 attendees of well-known music festivals about their own intoxicating experiences. Their participants ranged in age from 18 to 74, with a mean of 32.4. In the end, their results revealed not only the common types of drugs at festivals and which events are associated with which substances, but a general synopsis as to what the landscape of American consumption looks like in 2018 and beyond.

Overall substance use at festivals

More than three-quarters of participants reported consuming alcohol while attending a festival, which is roughly double the percentage of participants who had consumed any other substance and almost more than twice the rate of those who consumed marijuana.

Though more than a third of respondents reported smoking marijuana at a festival, a smaller, yet still significant portion of people reported using harder drugs. Thirteen percent of respondents reported using MDMA in some form, with hallucinogens’ use clocking just below at roughly eight percent apiece.

Substances use per ticket type

There remains some debate about the optimal festival experience: dance it up with the raucous crowd, or keep things refined with VIP privileges? Whichever route one takes, TickPick’s data suggests a slightly boozier vibe outside the VIP area. Generally, it suggests that a larger portion of general admission attendees consume alcohol, which may come to a surprise to those in VIP, with the complimentary alcohol some of the VIP experiences entail.

On the other side of the spectrum, the data found that VIP attendees generally were more likely to do a range of drugs than those in general admission. Between marijuana, MDMA, cocaine, and hallucinogens, VIP pass-holders were substantially more willing to indulge than the average festival-goer. A possible explanation for this trend is financial limitations. As VIP experiences can cost upwards of thousands of dollars, one can imagine these individuals can succumb to the use of any substance at their disposal.

Greatest substance prevalence per festival

Though alcohol was the leading substance at all festivals, TickPick’s data brings about some interesting findings on other substances. One might expect Coachella would have the highest rate of marijuana-smoking in the cannabis-friendly state of California, but the data aligns quite well with the bans of the substance on the grounds, despite the state’s recent legalization of weed for recreational use. EDC and Ultra each had high rates of MDMA and cocaine consumption, and ultimately, Burning Man had some of the highest rates of overall drug use around. Perhaps this significant rate of consumption can be pinned on the festival’s “gift economy,” where food, supplies, and even drugs are shared openly as a means of “payment.”

Top festivals for each substance

Ultimately, the final data lends itself to some idea of each respective festival’s consumption demographic. SXSW, for instance, led in rates of alcohol consumption. While cocaine use was the highest amongst Ultra attendees, a finding that may result from a mix of EDM culture and the festival’s deep historical roots for the drug and a recent resurgence in Miami’s cocaine trafficking.

While geographical differences may explain some findings, it is a bit difficult to understand why Alabama’s Hangout Music Festival led others in DMT use, as just one example. EDC was another consumption leader across the different categories, also ranking in the top three for a number of substances. This point ties into the festival’s battle with health and safety concerns with drug use in the past, including more than 1,000 attendees needing medical treatment in 2017. Though there are issues and ambiguity within the self-reported data like TickPick used for this study— including,  but not limited to, selective memory, telescoping, attribution, and exaggeration — these results do shine a light on the landscape of American substance use, nonetheless. Here’s to hoping some of these findings diminish the blind eye to EDM’s drug abuse, increases awareness, and implements further safety precautions down the line.

Via: TickPick 
Featured Image: Courtesy of Goldenvoice

Live Nation details Festival Passport expansion for 2018-2019 season

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Last year, Live Nation successfully launched its Festival Passport program, granting 1,000 lucky fans across the world access to over 90 of the company’s festivals at just one flat fee. The ticketing and events behemoth has announced the return of its one-of-a-kind access pass for the upcoming season, now with a major expansion in territory and new VIP option.

2,500 GA passes will be sold at $999 with just 100 VIP passes priced at $5,000. Though the GA price includes a $200 increase from last year, purchasers will now have over 100 of Live Nation’s unique festivals to choose from.

Both GA and VIP passes will be granted access to any of over 100 participating festivals worldwide, including Austin City Limits, Bonnaroo, Electric Daisy Carnival, Governors Ball, Sasquatch!, and Lollapaloozas in Germany, France, and the US.  New additions to the roster include Australia’s Sydney City Limits, China’s Creamfields, UAE’s RedFestDXB, Poland’s Impact Festival, and the UK’s Edinburgh Summer Sessions.

This year, in an effort to avoid scalpers and ensure that Live Nation is only accommodating fans’ needs, purchasers will have to pre-register through Ticketmaster’s Verified Fan platform with their full legal names and photo ID. Registration is open now through April 12 at 11:00 PM ET/10:00 PM CT, with sign up here. Tickets are on-sale beginning April 17 at 8:00 am EDT, but be aware, Festival Passports sold out in under 24 hours last year, so purchasers must act quickly when the time comes.

Bonnaroo announces ‘The Other’ lineup

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bonnaroo sunset red bull

Bonnaroo announced stage programming for The Other ahead of the festival’s 2018 edition. The newly added dance tent likely formed as Bonnaroo’s answer to Coachella‘s storied Sahara Tent. Last year, Bonnaroo debuted the new stage concept — which replaced the festival’s beloved Kalliope Stage — and featured a diverse range of EDM acts such as Claude Vonstroke, G Jones and Getter, to name only a few. The addition was welcomed by attendees and The Other appeared to be one of the most frequented attractions throughout the four day weekend.

Now, the festival has released this year’s lineup for ‘The Other.’ Featuring acts like Kaskade, Virtual Self, Alison Wonderland, What So Not, Big Wild and Shiba San, the festival is taking a forthright step into the electronic programming that’s become so popular at festival’s nationwide. It appears such programming has paid off, too, as the Tennessean reported last year the festival’s attendance had rebounded following a dull turnout in 2016.

Photo Credit: Billboard

What So Not announces 30+ date ‘Beautiful Things’ world tour

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2018 was projected to be a big year for What So Not with the anticipated arrival of his long-awaited full-length album debut. Now, as the ball gets rolling for the Aussie standout this year, What So Not is officially starting to deliver with the announcement of his upcoming Beautiful Things World Tour, slated to hit a handful of major international festivals as well as more than 30 stops around the globe.

The “Be Okay Again” producer is expected to hit Ultra, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza‘s South American circuit, covering ground from Mumbai to Miami, Brooklyn to Berlin. The tour will include What So Not’s newly launched custom touring rig, featuring a massive chrome horse and chariot setup. The news of the Beautiful Things World Tour comes on the cusp of leaked, unconfirmed details about What So Not’s highly anticipated upcoming LP — rumored to be called Not All The Beautiful Things and said to include contributions from Skrillex, Rome Fortune, Toto, and more. Hopefully by the time What So Not hits the road later this month, we’ll know for sure.

Purchase tickets to the Beautiful Things Tour here.

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How Superfly’s inaugural Lost Lake Festival put Phoenix on the map as the next big festival spot in the U.S.

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How Superfly’s inaugural Lost Lake Festival put Phoenix on the map as the next big festival spot in the U.S.

This fall, Superfly Presents, the masterminds behind North American festival giants Outside Lands and Bonnaroo set their scopes on a new, emerging entertainment market that they were banking on being the next big festival-hosting city in the United States: Phoenix, Arizona. While most picture Phoenix with a skewed vision of the “wild west,” Superfly was planting its flag in a burgeoning hub of vibrant art, food, local music, and tourism marketability as the home for their newest concept, Lost Lake Festival. The result was not only another overwhelmingly successful event for the organizers, but in turn, positioned Phoenix to strongly attract additional large scale events in coming years to coincide with the city’s exciting, growing social scene. If Phoenix wasn’t on the festival map before, Lost Lake unquestionably changed that notion. The inaugural Lost Lake didn’t just bring in an enticing lineup and top-tier liquor sponsors, the event was a masterfully curated three-day experience, from logistics to programming, that used the host city’s aesthetic as an intrinsic factor in the festival’s appeal.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

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Stellar inaugural lineup

Led by top-notch headliners that included Chance The Rapper, The Killers, and Major Lazer, Lost Lake delivered a well-rounded blend of talent that paired top electronic acts like Odesza and Big Gigantic with satisfying, multi-generational tastes of hip-hop from Lil Yachty to Ludacris. Folk rockettes HAIM performed one of the highlight sets of the weekend, along with a raucous showcase from Run The Jewels and a lesson in R&B excellence from The Roots. The lineup curation was designed to span the spectrum, from Huey Lewis and the News to A Tribe Called Red with so many genre-hopping performances in between. What’s more, local Phoenicians and Phoenix-bred acts like Playboy Manbaby, Kongos, and Bogan Via shared the stage with nationally touring acts including Tritonal, Danny Brown, and Crystal Castles, celebrating the city’s animated music and arts scenes, hopefully encouraging other large-scale festivals across the country to adopt similar programming practices.

Image: Quinsey Sablan

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Big on local programming

Beyond a phenomenal three-day lineup, Lost Lake applied heavy emphasis to balancing the inherent corporate sponsorships that come with a large-scale music event with locally sourced arts, attractions, and businesses tucked into their FOUND Marketplace. Lost Lake also incorporated interactive art installations across the festival grounds at Steele Indian School Park located in central downtown Phoenix. From pyrotechnic lilypads floating across the venue’s serene lake to paintings created by some of Phoenix’s top muralists sprinkled throughout the grounds, Lost Lake was a sight to behold. When fans weren’t busy enjoying life-sized LED playground equipment and backyard games, attendees could peruse local bar and restaurant options that lined the event’s concession areas, pushing Phoenix’s developing culinary culture to the masses.  Lost Lake honed in on the city’s local charm with complementary programming that immediately established Phoenix’s character as a major element to the new festival brand’s identity.

Image: Jeff Kravitz

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Perfect location, aced logisitics

Most large-scale festival events struggle with logistics planning, even beyond their infancy. None are immune to all production issues, however Lost Lake’s inaugural run proved to be incredibly calculated and organized, even as it ran directly anchored in the heart of Phoenix’s downtown district. No training wheels necessary. Public transit access ran without a hitch, and on-the-ground festival operations were aced. Attendees were well-informed and considerately directed by festival staff, and local infrastructure was more than adequately prepared to accommodate Superfly’s Arizona debut. On-site logistics were matched by a pristine venue, and Arizona’s mid-80’s autumn season proved to be a perfectly pleasant festival backdrop. Other events that have tried to stake their claim in Phoenix have suffered from incredibly poor planning, unsavory venue selections, and even worse weather, though Lost Lake managed to navigate Phoenix’s stereotypical “drawbacks” with near perfection. Trash and recycling receptacles dotted every free space at the festival, again encouraging similarly scaled events to take similar measures not only for the attendance experience, but also out of respect for the city and the venue alike. The result made a profound difference.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

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Keep your eyes on Phoenix

Superfly Presents has already established itself as one of the top names in the business, putting on some of the most sought-after events of the year in North America. Expanding their vision to include a largely untapped market in Phoenix proved to be a significantly successful move, and likely put Phoenix on the map in a major way. And while other dance-centric festival events have sprung up in Phoenix in recent years, like Goldrush Festival, Mad Decent Block Parties, and Decadence offshoots, Lost Lake brought an entirely different vibe to Phoenix that included a heavy appreciation for the city’s narrative and identity, and likely lit the beacon for other major cross-genre multi-day events to begin flocking to the Southwest too.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

Listen to Rezz’s full set from Bonnaroo 2017

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There’s a reason Rezz was our breakout artist of the year in 2016, and this year, she’s continuing to roll, playing some of the biggest festivals in North America tackling Ultra Music Festival in March, and now Bonnaroo. Rezz, real name Isabelle Rezazadeh, delivered a set that conceptualized all the elements that her fans undoubtedly resonate with, mainly heavy-handed bass music, tempered by a generous dose of experimental techno, riddim, and a variety of other bass genres.

The “Paranoid” producer has been steadily building a fervent fanbase since her emergence, though her catalyzing breakthrough officially came with her mau5trap co-signed EP, 2016’s Something Wrong Here. Now Rezz is well on her way to dance music superstardom, and her Bonnaroo set will stand as an early highlight in Rezazadeh’s still unfolding career.

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